Number of records in editorial history: 441554 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 18:44
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box containing little Snuff. He used a pinch and said - I have just one more pinch" All knew he had more in the other pocket. The Poet "Farrel the Rake" got the whisper.
After some time "Farrel the Rake" stood up. All looked at him in surprise. He opened his mouth and composed a very sarcastic and bitter poem about the meanness of Mac Sweeney - he also cursed MacSweeney and the curse was that he "may have all the rats from some other district (mentioned) until his death". An old local Seanacaidhe says that a plague of Rats then visited MacSweeney's house and remained there until he died. That on the day of the funeral they followed him to the grave. The old local Seanacaidhe HAS the poem but refused to give it through fear that Mac Sweeney's grandson who lived near may hear it:-
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 18:36
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Power to banish Rats.
People in this district are very superstitious about Rats. They say that the Poets mentioned (see back leaf of this) had the power to banish rats.
Local tradition also says that they were "gifted" had the Filíocht o Dhúthcais. That they often came together. That rivalry existed among them. That they composed poems dispraising one another - That they "could not read or write". The people esteemed them very much and many feared to incur their displeasure.

SCÉAL
The Man with two boxes of Snuff
"A man named Mac Sweeney (His Grandson still lives in this district) was supposed to be very mean. At that time (about 100 years ago approx) it was quite a common custom for middle aged men to keep snuff. This man Mac Sweeney always carried two boxes in his pocket. One was almost 1/2 filled with Snuff the other contained one or two pinches.
When Mac Sweeney went Scoríocting - He used the box containing the small quantity so as to avoid being generous.
One night he happened to visit a house where one of the Poets, Farrel the Rake was amongst the Visitors. After some time Mac Sweeney (meanly) produced the
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 18:20
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Not much is known about Poets in this district (Maughanaclea and Coosane) except that the following poets lived in Coosane a townland 2 miles east of this school. The following are their names:-
"Farrel the Rake"
Dan Mac Carthy
Owen O Sullivan (lived alos in Kealkil)
Jerry O'Sullivan (lived also in Kealkil)
The local poet Jerry O'Sullivan (Related to O'Sullivan Beare) composed a Poem called:- Slán le Carraigh na Caolcoilleac / Good Bye to Kealkil Rock - There is really a large Rock in Kealkil Village called quite commonly "the Rock". He also composed a song called "the White Horse" - Nobody in this school district has the words - but I imagine the song may be sent in, in THE CAPPARBOY N.S. RECORDS of Béaloideas.
The words of Slán le Carraigh na Caolcoilleac are contained under the heading Amráin - further out in the book.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 18:06
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Tea in olden times:-
Tea was not then made like it now is. A large pot of water was boiled. Then about 1/4 pound of tea was thrown in - People drank several cups of it at the time (of course it was coloured)
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 18:03
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A Football match was played in a field owned now by E. O. Sullivan Coosane, about 48 years ago. Over 100 men assembled in that field on a certain Sunday. They came from all the Townlands within a radius of 10 miles.
Then the "Men from the East picked out 17 men and played the men from the West who also picked out 17 men. No side won.
The foot ball used was much larger than the one now in use.

Hurling was scarcely played even in the school district though a man named William MacSweeney who lived in Maughanaclea used to make Hurleys for players from Kealkil. Thes hurleys were unlike the lighter hurleys now in use. The handle
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 18:03
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rejected
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of the hurleys was short and the Boss was almost square shaped and was very wide. They were unsuited for ground playing.

N.B. Strange to say the young men or boys in this school district never play football or hurley; whilst it is an annual custom (especially in Summer) for country lads in neighbouring townlands to 'make up' for a ball; and play for amusement with spirit on Sunday evenings - using coats as Goal posts.
Important:- In a certain town land (Kealkil) up to a about 5 years ago - it was nice to hear the sound of the Football on Sunday evenings - the shouts of twenty or thirty young men - the laughter of the school boys - in fields situated near the Village.
A Dance Hall sprung up - and the lure of the Dance banished all thoughts of Football which is not heard since.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 17:55
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The local landlord that was in our district was O Conour Dun. The familys had been settled in the district about thirty years. The were looked upon as good landlords. The planting had been carried out in the district. The land was divided into farms under their guidance. The farms was sub-divided on members of familys on marriage.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 17:54
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rejected
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A Football match was played in a field owned now by E. O. Sullivan Coosane, about 48 years ago. Over 100 men assembled in that field on a certain Sunday. They came from all the Townlands within a radius of 10 miles.
Then the "Men from the East picked out 17 men and played the men from the West who also picked out 17 men. No side won.
The foot ball used was much larger than the one now in use.

Hurling was scarcely played even in the school district though a man named William MacSweeney who lived in Maughanaclea used to make Hurleys for players from Kealkill. Thes hurleys were unlike the lighter hurleys now in use. The handle
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 17:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Co Tipperary when he came to a river at the Ragg the horse pulled in for a drink of water. The horse shyed and jumped into the river and the man was drown'd but there was no lives lost rescuing him only the one. The river was deep and there was no wall along by the road and there was no warning of disaster before hand. There was a house burning in Ross. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary, and their was a reak of hay burned in Rathcarden. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 17:53
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Ned Ryan Gurthnahala was drown'd in Monroe. Nat Tierney was his name. And Con Delaney was drown'd in Drombane going home from the cremery with a gennet & car. Stephen Manning was drown'd in Liss. Jim Ryan's house of Cullohill was burned with a lighting candle in the middle of the night. Andrew Bourke's hay was burned by accident.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 17:49
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rejected
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The local landlord that was for our district was John Flannery. The families had settled in the district about thirty years. He was a good landlord. There were no evictions or plantings carried out in the district. They bought the land . The land was deived into farms. The farms were sub-deived among members of families. There were tighs collected in the district in former times.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 17:41
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New Year's day is another great festival. On the eve of the new year the bells are chimed, to ring out the old year. In many places bands march to play out the old year.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 17:32
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St Patrick
The townland Carrickatobair gets its name from the fact that there is a holy well in it. This well is dedicated to St Patrick and at the beginning of the last century the station was still frequented. Local people maintain that there were three walls and sure enough three wells can be seen at the carraig, but they being open to cattle, there is now more mud than water in them. Each well has a little hawthorn bush growing beside it. East of Carrick there is a round hill and between the two there is a deep valley some 20 wards in with at the bottom. Tradition has it that St Patrick jumped across the valley on horseback and that as the horse landed on the side of a rock he shed an iron. A track not unlike a horseshoe can be seen in the face of the rock, and the remains of a rusty nail is still sticking out of a small hole (?). The tracks of the two other holes with rust trickling from them can be seen. Forty years ago there were the nails to be seen in the rock.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 16:38
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Tá go leór liosanna i gceanntar na sgoile. Tá ceann aca, Tugtar gClasnasidhe ortha. Tá ceann eile i dTumárd, ceann eile i dTumaduane, agus ceann eile i gCillabhóthair. Tá eolas maith agam ar gach ceann aca. Tá crot cruinn ortha. Tá sean-clais timcheall na leasa. Tá an ceann atá i gClasnasidhe ar chúl mo thighe. Tá féar ag fás ins an gclais sin indiú. Deirtear go raibh uisge annsin ins an t-sean- aimsir.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 16:33
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cat fiadhain ar ais. Chuadar abhaile annsin. I gceann cúpla lá fuaireadar bás. Deirtear gur mharbhuigh na sidheóga iad. Bhí taoiseach an cheanntair ina chomhnuidhe ins an leas fadó. Bhí treinse timcheall na leasa. Bhí an treinse lán d'uisge an t-am sin. Choinnigh an treinse uisge an sluagh sidhe amach ó'n gcaisleán.
Níor threabh duine lios ariamh mar bheadh faitchíos ortha roimh na sidheógaibh. Treabh fear lios uair amháin. Bhí crann ag fás ins an leas. Thocail sé suas í. Do lean na sidheoga é. Bhí air a theacht ar ais agus an cré a shocrughadh timcheall na sgeiche arís.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 16:26
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gclais sin fadó. Tá sé suidhte ar árdán tailimh. Tá sé níos áirde ná na páirceanna eile. Tá sgeachacha ag fás timcheall na leasa. Níl sgeachacha ag fás istigh i lár na leasa. Tá sean-pholl ins an leas Tá sé beagnach dúnta anois. Níor fhág aon duine lámh air ariamh mar bheadh faitchíos ortha roimh na sidheógaibh. Comhnuigheann coiníní ins an leas. Ní bhacann na daoine leo, mar deirtear nach bhfuil sé ceart. Ní mharbhuigheann nó ní itheann na daoine iad, mar bhead faitchíos ortha.
D'innis m'athair go leor sgéalta dom faoi'n leas ata i dTumárd. Seo ceann aca. Bhí beirt fhear amuigh ag fiadhach fado. Bhí lios Tumárd ar a mbealach. Bhí sé go mall san oidhche nuair bhíodar ag teacht abhaile. Bhi an oidhche an-dorcha. Nuair tháinigeadar comhfada leis an lios chonnaiceadar solas. Nuair chuadar go dtí an áit a raibh sé bhí sé imthighte. Bhí cat fiadhain annsin. Bhí a shúilí agus a ruball tré lasadh. Bhí faitchíos ortha roimhe. Ritheadar abhaile. Rith an cat in ndiaidh. I gceann tamaill tháinigeadar go sruthán. Léimeadar trasna an sruthán. Bhí fhios aca nac féidir le spioradh ar bith dul thar uisge san oidhche. Bhí áthas ortha annsin mar d'fhill an
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 15:53
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Tá go leór liosanna i gceanntair na sgoile. Tá ceann aca i dTumárd, ceann eile i gClasnasidhe, ceann eile i dTumaduane, agus an ceann eile i gCillabhothair.
Tá eolas agam ar an lios atá i dTumhárd, mar níl sé i bhfad ó mo theach. Tá cuma cruinn air. Tá sean clais timcheall na leasa. Tá féar ag fás ann. Deirtear go raibh uisge insan
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 15:52
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rejected
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Tá go leór liosanna i gceanntair na sgoile. Tá ceann aca i dTumárd, ceann eile i gClasnasidhe, ceann eile i dTumaduane, agus an ceann eile i gCillabhothair.
Tá eolas agam ar an lios atá i dTumhárd, mar níl sé i bhfad ó mo theach. Tá cuma cruinn air. Tá sean clair timcheall na leasa. Tá féar ag fás ann. Deirtear go raibh uisge insan
BR
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 15:50
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This was and is of the most enjoyable child-feasts of the year. It is a feast particularly for the children and young people.
The children enjoy themselves diving for apples and money in a tub of water. The tub is placed on the floor and an apple or coin is thrown into the water. The child must take the apple or coin from the bottom of the tub by the mouth unaided by the hands in order to secure possession of it. It is not permissible to try to catch an apple on the surface of the water in the mouth it must be forced down to the bottom and caught there.
Nuts are much in use at this feast also. They are used for their edible qualities but also many games or tricks are played with them. Two chestnuts placed over the fire on a stove or range will indicate the future of a boy and girl as to their prospects of marrying each other. If the chestnuts leap towards each other they will be married, if away from each other they will not be married. Grains of wheat serve the same purpose.
Lead melted and poured through the eye of a widowers key will indicate a persons future for the following year. If the lead assumes the form of a coach this indicates a wedding, if a coffin; death [?].
Children enjoy the game of the three vessels
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 15:47
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rejected
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é.
Ní réabadh aon duine lios. Threab fear llios uair amháin. I lár na h-oidhche tháinig ná sidheóga. Bhí air an cré a shocrughadh síos arís. D'innis sé an sgéal so dom faoi'n leas atá i gClasnasidhe.
Bhí fear ag dul chun an aonaigh. Bhí an aonach i nDunmhór. Chonnaic sé na sidheóga ins an leas. Bhíodar ag marcuigheacht ar capallibh bána. Bhí solus aisteach aca. Bhíodar ag casadh amhráín. Sheas sé. Rith siad in a dhiaidh. Bhí abha in aice leis. Léim sé thar an uisghe. Níor tháinigeadar níos fuide.
Ní bhainfeadh aon duine crann ins an lios, mar comhnuigheann na sidheóga annsin. Bhain fear crann ins an leas uair amháin. Bhí mí-ádh air ar feadh na bliadna. Ní comhruigheann an leipreachán ins an leas.
BR
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 15:44
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stocking from round her head and walk her three times round the floor.
Mashed potatoes or champ was the almost universal supper on Hallow Eve and when the supper was partaken of a dish of the champ with spoons was left on the table for the souls of dead relatives who were coming back to re-visit the house on that night; the only time in the year they were priveleged to return. Everything in the kitchen was neat & tidy to have a fitting welcome for them on their return.
The ashes from the turf fire was carefully smoothed out on the hearth. A footprint in the ashes in the morning facing inwards would indicate that there was to be an addition to the family during the year. If the footprint faced outwards some one would die before the twelve month.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 15:37
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rejected
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anois. Deirtear go raibh uisge annsin uair amháin. Árdan tailimh is eadh é. Tá sgeachaca ag fás ins an leas. Tá sean-poll i lár na leasa. Tá sé beagnach dúnta. Nior fhág aon duine láimh air ariamh mar bheadh faitchíos ortha roimh na sideógaibh. Comhnuigheann na coiníní ins an bpoll sin. Ni mharbhuigheann na daoine iad. D'innis m'athair go leor sgéalta dom faoin leas atá i gCluinagcat. Seo ceann aca. Oidhche amháin chuaidh fear ag imirt cartaí. Bhí sé ag teacht abhaile i lár na h-oidhche. Nuair a tháinig sé comhfada leis an leas chonnaic sé muc dubh agus a súilí tré lasadh. Sheas sé amach roimhe Ní leigfeadh sé dó dul abhaile. Rinne se a dhicheall cúpla uair act theip air. Bhí air dul arais arís. D'innis sé an sgéal dóibh. Cuir bean a' tighe a beirt mhac leis. Thug sí uisge coissichthe dó. Chuadar go dtí an leas. Chonnaic an fear an mhuc arís act ní fhaca na buachaillí é. Bhí sruthán in aice na leasa. Léimeadar thar an uisge. Nior lean an muc iad mar ní féidir le spiorad ar bith dul thar uisge san oidhche. Cúpla seachtmainí ina dhiaidh sin fuair an fear seo bás. Deirtear gur sguab na sideóga leo
BR
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 15:28
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future spouse of the person who put the cabbage over the door. The accuracy of this method of divining the future was well established locally more than 50 years ago when a young man, Peter Marron, Umerafree walked into a house in Ardragh owned by a young girl Brigid Keelan, on the morning after Hallow Eve. He noticed a cabbage over the door as he entered. He reached up for the cabbage. "This is here long enough" said he, as he threw it out. "Perhaps it wont be wanted any longer, will you marry me?" She did the same week and made this Hallow Eve custom a great favourite among the girls for miles around for years after.
Peter Marron & his wife died only recently.
If a girl on Hollow Eve night went out to the barn, which must have two door, and commenced riddling oats between the two doors' (which must be open) in the name of the devil, her future husband would enter at one door, take the riddle for a short time in his hands, and then go out at the other door.
The "street" was also swept in the name of the devil and the future husband would take the brush out of the girls' hands.
If a girl got an apple from a boy without asking it and cut it into fourteen pieces and put it into her night stocking and tie it round her head, in the middle of the night her future husband would come and take the
BR
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 15:01
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very much. Three vessels are placed on a table and are re-arranged [?] position frequently. One vessel contains clean water, another dirty water and the third is empty.
One of the players is blindfolded and goes to the table on which the vessels are. If he puts his hand on the vessel containing the clean water he will be married to a young girl, if he puts his hand on the vessel containing the dirty water he will be married to a widow and if he puts his hand on the empty vessel he will never be married.
Grown up boys and girls had various way on this night of ascertaining their future matrimonial prospects. It was a common custom to go out on this night and cut yarrow and to put it in ones stocking and place it under the pillow. Whoever you were to be married to would appear to you in your dreams that night. You could not talk during all the time from you left the house until after you slept or the journey to from place where yarrow grew would have to be made with your eyes shut. Of course it would be necessary that you knew beforehand where the yarrow grew.
Boys & girls went out to some field of cabbage and stole one. This was placed over the door and the first person entering the house in the morning would be the
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 14:58
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by the people of their gallant country, succeeded in laying pipes to these springs, and it is now considered to be the healthiest supply in the world, and from these reservoirs water is supplied to the oldest and newest towns in Ireland.
Those Aherlow confines were until recent years the scenes of two real armies, the most deadly enemies of the age, and yet not a shot was fired or a sword drawn.
The Popis mass is not yet over, as the Orange ascendency of the present day terms it, but the Irish, notwithstanding the state of affairs, are Kneeling in prayer and thanks - giving with heads bowed to the Tabernacle, their venerable Soggarth with uplifted hands and eyes to heaven invoking the Omnipotent God for a safe guidance and deliverance of his Christian people.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 14:53
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There is an art in the sharpening of a scythe. Your blade must be dry and that is why you will see men rubbing the scythe blade with grass before they whet it.
Then also your rubber must be quite dry, and on this account it is a good thing to lay it on your coat and keep it there during all your day's mowing. The scythe you stand upright, with the blade pointing away from you and you put your left hand firmly on the back of the blade grasping it then you pass the rubber first
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 14:50
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brother or anyone else but set off out to the wilderness.
He was roving up and down through the wood when he came on the loveliest apple tree that ever you left your eyes on. He took one of the apples and with the first bite he took off he turned into an ass. Well, the poor fellow was worse than ever he was.
All he could do was stray away up and down the woods. After a while he came to a spring well and went for a drink. As soon as he took the first mouth ful of water he was back again in his own shape. He went back to the town where his brother lived
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 14:40
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There are places in the district, and it is said that people have been buried there. There is a place in Fantane, Borrisoleigh, Co. Tipperary, and it is said that people had been buried there in former time. It is also believed that there was a monastery there long ago. Human bones have been found there. It is also said that there was people was in the district of Killamoyne in the Parish of Borrisoleigh. There is no one buried there now. One day there was a man plough in Killamoyne and he ploughed up bone's.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 14:37
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There is an old grave yard in the district of Killamoyne, Parish Borrisoleigh and Co. Tipperary, and the people in my district do not remember to see anyone being buried in it is not known of any tradition connected with that grave yard.
BR
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 14:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This was and is of the most enjoyable child-feasts of the year. It is a feast particularly for the children and young people.
The children enjoy themselves diving for apples and money in a tub of water. The tub is placed on the floor and an apple or coin is thrown into the water. The child must take the apple or coin from the bottom of the tub by the mouth unaided by the hands in order to secure possession of it. It is not permissible to try to catch an apple on the surface of the water in the mouth it must be forced down to the bottom and caught there.
Nuts are much in use at this feast also. They are used for their edible qualities but also many games or tricks are played with them. Two chestnuts place over the fire on a stove or range will indicate the future of a boy and girl as to their prospects of marrying each other. If the chestnuts leap towards each other they will be married, if away from each other they will not be married. Grains of wheat serve the same purpose.
Lead melted and poured through the eye of a widowers key will indicate a persons future for the following year. If the lead assumes the form of a coach this indicates a wedding, if a coffin; death [?].
Children enjoy the game of the three vessels
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 14:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sé d'imtheocadh sé as a lámha agus nar fhéad chuig phúnt bhéith cruinnighthe aige. Dubhairt Dia cuile phighinn a fuair tú greim air d'imthig sé as do lámha agus tháinigh sé chugam-sa agus cuir me i dtaisce duit é agus tá do cuig phúnt lé tabhairth dúit. Cuaidh an fear go dtí an teach a raibh an cuig phúnt í dtáisce ag Dia agus connaich sé a ainm sgriobtha ar bheart agus bhí cuig phúnt taobh istig ann.
Connaic an sean fhear go leor airgheadh agus go leor oir agus thug sé lán a glaice leis acth nuair a bhí sé ag dul amach an doras tháinig ceo agus deatach roimhe agus chait se filleadh agus é a fhagailt san aith a raibh sé agus d'imthigh sé leis ar a bhealach agus níor ól sé aon deór ó connaich sé canp airgeadh agus cuinnigh sé dhá mbeadhan méid sin aige nach n-ólfadh sé go gcruinnuigeadh sé go leor airgeadh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 14:13
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awaiting decision
Paidreaca
Go mbeannuighthe duit a Peadar geal
Go mbeannuighthe duit féin cá codailís aréir mar a codal mac Dé.
Cá codluigheadh anocht mar a codal na bocht.
Cá coduigheadh oidhche ambárach mar a codal Naomh Pádruig.
Cá codluigheadh is oidhche mainitir i bairithis.
Céadta rómhat atá na n-Aingeal.
Céadta na dhiadh atá na n-Aispaig.
Tug Máire dhosa chun a gailt a dith amach agus annsan go dorus fairiteas.
Táir a Bhrigde is trom do láimh.
Tháinig na brat le gé láim bhinn boga Dia.
Dith sí sceac ó anocht go bliain anocht agus anocht amháin le Dia.
Máire Ní Réaghla.
Cromán Iochtar.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 14:10
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rejected
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Bhí sean fhear ann fado agus bhí sé bocht dar leis. Lá amaín bhí tuairim is dhá phúnt aige. In áit biadh agus eadach a cheannacht dó féin cuaidh sé agus d'ól sé cuile phíginn de. Bhí a bhean lé buille leis agus dubhairt sé leithí go bhféadfadh sé a dhul agus a raibh rudh a dhéanamh agus ise an rudh ceadhna a dhéanamh dhá ngogrógadh sí é. Annsin dubhairt sé go gcuiruigeadh sé cúig phúnt i dtaisce acht anois cé chuirfheadh i dtaisce dhó é.
Bhí se tridh na chéille ní cuirfheadh a bhean í dtaisce dho é é mar bhéadh fios aicí go n-ólfhadh sé uiligh é agus ní cuirfeadh sé féin í dtaisce dó é mar nuair bhead punt cruinnighthe aige d''ólfadh sé é. Dubairt sé an te a cuirfheadh í dtaisce dhó é agus nach dtúibhradh do é nuair a d'iarreocaidh sé air é go mbhéadh cúig phúnt aige gurbh shin é an duine a thiubradh se dhó é.
Oidhche amháin bhí sé amuigh agus casadh Dia dhó agus dubhairt Dia leis go gcuirfheadh sé í dtaisce an t-airgeadh a cruinneocadh sé agus nach dtúibhradh sé píginn do go mbeadh sé uiligh cruinnighthe. Bhí an sean fhear an- t-sasta agus cuile phíginn a d'fagadh se no sgillingh d'imteocaidh se as a lámha agus ní raibh fhios aige cá raibh sé imighthe. Ní raibh sé i bhfadh go raibh cuig phuint caillte aige agus tháinigh Dia cuige agus dubhairt sé leis go raibh an cuig phúnt aige lé faghail agus dubairth an sean fhear nach raibh cuigh phunt cuirtha í dtaisce aige mar cuile phiginn a d'fágadh
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the olden times people were mostly dependent on herbs and home made cures. A plant called the "Cos Dubh" was supposed to cure fever when it was brewed like tea, and then the water in which it was boiled, drank.
In cases of boils and swellings a plant called the "Traon-Lubh" was used to either break or reduce the sore.
This plant grows on the bank of a stream, and should be gathered before twelve noon, and then boiled and applied as a poultice. The "Water-Cress" is supposed to be a great blood purifier used as a salad or a tea. Wild sage when pressed out in water is supposed to be a cure for backache. A tiny little plant with a brilliant little flower called "Eyebright" is supposed to clear and cure the eyes. Dandelion tea is good for the liver, and is supposed to be used in making Stout. It is said that if a goose blew on a boil it would cure. Donkey's mild was an old and favourite cure for Whooping
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In Michael Donovan's field in the town land of Gurranes is a place known as "Tadgs." It seems that there was a house there long ago and a man named Tadg lived in it and his name still survives. The remains of the house are still to be seen.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About six year's
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ned Ryan Gurthnahala was drown'd in Monroe. Nat[?] Tierney was his name. And Con Delaney was drown'd in Drombane going home from the cremery with a gennet & car. Stephen Manning was drown'd in Liss. Jim Ryan's house of Cullohill was burned with a lighting candle in the middle of the night. Andrew Bourke's hay was burned by accident.
Pupils Name: William Bourke. Cullohill. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipp.
Got From. Patrick Bourke. Cullohill. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Thomas Kingston has many old irish names on his fields, such as, The Seana Mhuillinn. There was a mill where there in ancient times. Páircín na Garann is surrounded by a fence on which many small trees grow. Páirc An TSeipil was supposed to contain a Chapel long ago. Páirc Na Bolugaí. Cnuic Buidhe, is a small
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Pairc Na Luinge Deasy's field Pairc na Mouly Pairc na gcoinin Pairc Na Leasa Pairc Líatáin Pairc ioctar and Cnoc an Sgéil are names of fields on Dan o Mahony's farm.
Deasy's field derived its name from an old man who lived there long ago and it was his ancestors who put this name on it. Pairc na Luinge is situated near James White's bog. Kehillys have a field and it is known as the mountain field. In 1923 the thunder bolt fell there and it was from this it got its name.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Co Tipperary when he came to a river at the Ragg the horse pulled in for a drink of water. The horse shyed and jumped into the river and the man was drown'd but there was no lives lost rescuing him only the one. The river was deep and there was no wall along by the road and there was no warning of disaster before hand. There was a house burning in Ross. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary, and their was a reak of hay burned in Rathcarden. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary.
Pupil's Name: Patrick Stapleton. Gurteendawn. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipp
Got From. John Stapleton. Gurteendawn. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We have a field in our land called the "Long Field. It got this name as the field is very large. We have also a field called "Pairc na Carraige. There is a very steep hill in the field and from that it got its name. In our land there is a field called "the Graff". In olden times they used graff the field with a grioffán that is they took the grass off it, and ever since it has been known as the Graff. We have a field called "Pairc na Pucaí" as there is a fort near it. Another field in our land is known as Bateman's Field as people by the of Bateman lived there long ago. We, too, have a field called "Pairc na Scoile". There was a hedge school there long ago. The first National School round this district was built there some time afterwards, and that is how it got its name. Fields known as - "The Laca, Pairc na Ualaig, and Pairc na Stealla are in our land.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One evening there was a man coming home from Thurles, named John Ryan, Gurtnahalla, Borrisoleigh,
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mannings in Castlehill their house was burned.
Pupil Name. Brigid Kennedy. Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh
Got From. William Delaney. Cronovone. Borrisoleigh.
65 yrs
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are two big rocks in Simon Deasy's land which the priests used for altars in the Penal times. There are holes in the rocks in which the candles were placed when saying Mass. The priests had a very hard time in those days because if the soldiers caught them saying Mass they would kill them.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Harnets house in Curnaboola was burned also at the year 1922.
Pupil Name. Brigid Kennedy. Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh
Got From. John Fitz. Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipp
40 yrs.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
William Ryan Carrigeen got drowned in a river he was dead before anyone came to rescue him.
Pupil Name. Brigid Kennedy. Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh
Got From. John Fitz. Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipp
40 yrs.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Kirwans house in Curraleigh theur house was burned by the Blackatan time about the year 1920.
Pupil Name: Brigid Kennedy. Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh Co Tipp
Got From: Michael Kennedy. Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh.
58 yrs
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there were several lime kilns in every district. There was one near Peter Fehilys in Carron and one in Coxestown. First the kiln was built of stones in the shape of a chimney. Then the limestone
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
William Ryan Carrigeen got drowned in a river he was dead before anyone came to rescue him.
Pupil Name. Brigid Kennedy. Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh
Got From. John Fitz. Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipp
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
William Ryan Carrigeen got drowned in a river he was dead before anyone came to rescue him.
Pupil Name. Brigid Kennedy. Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh
Got From. John Fitz. Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh Co Tipp
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
James Ryan Gurtnahala got drowned in a river and when the people came to him, he was dead.
Pupils name. Brigid Kennedy. Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary.
Got from. John Fitz[?] Ballyduff. Borrisoleigh. Thurles. Co Tipp
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A few hundred yards away to the east of "Leach an Dóighte" is a slate quarry. Re opened recently having been idle for over one hundred years. Formerly the slate from this Quarry was shipped from Leap Quay to Cork, and the boat had a return cargo of unburnt lime this lime was burnt on the quay, and sold to the local farmers. At that period and for many years afterwards nine sand [?] were employed there dredging sand this was also bought by the farmers. At present only two are working.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
be doing anything with horses he would say "Go on horses in the name of the three best The Father the Son and Holy Ghost.
10. Tom Broderick of Ballymacward, Woodlawn, County Galway went to Mass one day and the priest was saying the prayers after Mass. Tom looked in the door and said "Blather". Ever since that if anyone is talking nonsense in this district the people say "Blather said Broderick when he lost Mass".
11. Tom McDonough of Killuane, Gurteen, Woodlawn, County Galway went to Forde's shop to get groceries and the shop-keeper asked him "What do you want". "The same compliment as always" said he "Well I have only one loaf" said she. "Two'll do" said Tom. "But I have only one said the shop-keeper again, "Two'll do" said Tom again. They kept at that for a long time. The people around use that still.
12. No one gets his learning for nothing.
13. Hills are green far away.
14. A windy day is not the day for scallops.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man drow'nd in a boghole he was crossing it in the night and he was got after in it his name was Laurance Ryan townsland of Carrigeen, Parish of Borrisoleigh, Co Tipperary
Pupil's name. Mary Clohesy. Killamoyne. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary.
Got From. Thomas Clohesy. Killamoyne. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I
Idir Cuanor 's Léim atá stuaire na gcraobh
Stuaire an rusc uaithne b'feárr tuairsg clú 's méin
Nára buan a bheidh sa tsaol gan nuachtar gan spréig
An té lua tú faoin thúairm, is ná tabharfá fuascailt orm féin.
II
'Sle rátha táimse am luighe 's is bán bocht é mo ghnaoi
Ní fógh ante é mo shláinte 's is gnáthach mé síos.
Le grádh geal don mhnaoi do sháruig mo chroidhe
Mo shlán chúgat-sa a bháin chnis go dtráchtfaid-sa on chill.
III
Do chím chúgam aníos an smóilín tríd an gcoill
Tá sí ró naibhreach 's tá buala ag á croidhe
Mo chuaichín bhreágh bhínn d'fhuaigheadar sinn.
Ná gluaiseóchaimís le chéile go raghaimís sa chill
IV
A uain ghil mo chléibhe nú a gcualaís an scéal
Gur fé uaigneas a fuarthas me ar uair bheag an lae
Mura dtígir anois liom 's mé [?] ón gcúmha
Imtheochaid an gheilt ar fuid gleannta nú beaid go fannlag san [?]
V
Thíos cois na trágha iseadh cómhnuigheann mo ghrádh
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
information to the soldieries and they were flung into the lock it is not known what their name's were.
Pupils Name. Chrissie Younge. Curraleigh. Borrisoleigh Co Tipperary
Got From. Patrick Younge. Curraleigh. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man & woman drown'd in a wild lock in the bog of Comer townsland of Comer, Parish of Templederry. They had a ass and car and they were going round the country and they were caught and trun[?] in.
Pupils Name. Mary Clohesy. Killamoyne. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary
Got From. Thomas Clohesy. Killamoyne. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mallackey that lived in the lane "Every day washin' and no day clane".
5. If people are admiring anything and they do not mean what they are saying they would say this 'Twould charm the heart of a wheel-barrow".
6. If people have not plenty of everything in the house and if people did not get as much much money as they expected they would say "Half a loaf is better than no bread".
7. There was a man ploughing with two horses one day and when he was coming out at the end of the field he said to the horses "Out straight together one after tho'ther". This saying is said by nearly all the farmers round.
8. "Who goes there? Carman from Gort a'Charnáin". This saying was used by an old woman 87 years of age who lived in this district about twenty years ago. It is thought that Gort a'Carnáin was a place where the people got Indian meal during the time of the Famine.
9. There lived a man long ago and when he would
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
information to the soldieries and they were flung into the lock it is not known what their name's were.
Pupils Name. Chrissie Younge. Curraleigh. Borrisoleigh Co Tipperary
Got From. Patrick ounge. Curraleigh. Borrisoleigh. Co Tipperary.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man living in the townslands of Cullohill and in the parish of Borrisoleigh his name was John Ryan he was drown crossing a river in the night going home from a house and he was got after. Another man was drown in a bog hole in the night he fell into it in a bog in Cummer Judy in in the parish of Upperchurch he was got in it and a bottle of whiskey was got in his pocket and the priest would not pray for him on a Sunday at mass because it is said he was drunk. There was a house burned in Ross and in the parish of Borrisoleigh there was a house burned in it belonged to William Harnett. And there was a house burned in the parish of Borrisoleigh and in the townsland of Curraleigh a houses was burned by the Blackantan's, and while it was burning they went off it belonged to Thomas Kirwan. There was a man drownd in the river Clodia about thirty years ago in the River Clodia near Greenane creamery he was crossing the river going home from the creamery and the river was flooded, and himself and the horse and car was drownd his name was John Ryan Greenane, Parish Borrisoleigh, Co Tipperary. Their was a man and woman drownd in Cummer Judy bog in the wild lock, they used to be giving
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 13:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Proverbs.
1. There was a little woman named Nellie Curley and she was not able to speak the English language well. When the children would not have eaten all they got and they asking more she would say "Eat what is in your noggin and you will get more while ago". That is said in this district all the time.
2. If there is any boastful person in this district and the people do not believe him when he tells them about all he is going to do they say "You'll do actions at the fair of the porridge".
3. There was an old woman 87 years of age living in this district about twenty years ago. She was ordered a little whiskey by the doctor because she had a weak heart. She always thought the whiskey was not strong enough but she would not complain except to say when she had tasted it "More water ars an Sasanach agus é leath-bháische.
4. There is a saying about people who are always cleaning up and has nothing tidy "Katty
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 12:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
William Harnett Ross Cottage, Borriseoleigh, Co. Tipperary his house was burned about the year 1924. Michael Fogarty house of Gurtnacranna was burned in 1921[?]. About forty years ago they were typhoid fever in Killamoyne, Cullohill, Cronovone, Curraleigh, Edward Ryan Gurtnahalla was drowned at the bridge of Monroe coming from Thurles about 1907[?].
Pupil; Maureen Devitt, Killamoyne, Borrisoleigh, Co. Tipp.
From whom got; Denis Younge, Rusheen, Upperchurch, Co. Tipp.
46 yrs.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 12:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A man still living in Ardfield named Spillane was blind from his birth. When he was a little boy his mother brought him to the Tomb of Father John Power and spent a long time in prayer there. She then took him to the Cathedral where there were few if any seats then. However she procured some thing for him and putting on it the middle of the floor, whilst she went round the Stations of the Cross. At the fifth station the little boy walked toward her and questioned her as to why she was looking at that thing (station). He wanted her to tell him something about it. He was able to see for the first time. From that day forth his sight grew stronger, and never since had he any reason for complaint about his eyes
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 12:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago men used to light big fires on top of a hill on St. John's night. This night a few men went to light a fire. They had the fire lighting and one of the men went to near it. And the blaze of the fire lit him and burned him alive. The rest of them were saved. His name was John Ryan Gurteenabarna.
Pupils name; Mary Younge, Killamoyne, Borrisoleigh, Co. Tipp.
Whom got from; Mrs Corbett, Killamoyne, Borrisoleigh, Co. Tipp.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 12:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As I was going to St. Ives,
I met a man with seven wives.
Each wife had seven cats,
Each cat had seven kittens,
Kits, cats, men and wives
How many went to St Ives?
Answer:
One went to St Ives, he only met the others.
A room with four corners, has a cat in each corner, three cats before each cat and a cat on every cats tail. How many cats were there altogether?
Answer:
Four cats, each sitting on its own tail.
Hanna - ha - bell - news, spell that in four letter and I will give you a pair of
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 12:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Extracts from a Note Book supplied by James McCaffrey of Skeagh, Bailieboro whose grandfather John Caffery owned the book and made notes in it.
Acconts Between John Cafry and Neal Caffry for Spring 1842
one shilling from Nanny Clark 0 - 1 - 0
for a pullet 0 - 1 - 0
One pound for rent £1 - 0 - 0
(...) 10 - 6
---------------------------
£1 - 12 - 6
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Another Page.
A preventative against the CHINCOUGH. Take One Cut of Bread of a loaf, naming the person that it is inrended for let the person ... on it put a cloth round it and let the person sleep one night on it. give to him to eat and it will prove Effectual.
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Another Page.
The great TURN OUT OF THE CATHOLCIKS OF THE MANNOR OF SKEA was on the 24th and 25th of March 1829 nine.
The night of THE GREAT WIND was on Sunday the 6th of January 1839
James Duffey of Philidelphia, N...199 Gran Street
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lios Beannain:- Tá baint ag ainm na h-aite seo le Naomh Beinín - an naomh go bhfuil a ainm aic "Cill Beanín."
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The old people do not know of any monuments been any place only in churchyards. There is a lot of stones in a field belonging to Patrick Shanahan, Cornabula, Parish of Borrisoleigh, Co. of Tipperary. And on some of them there is different markings or more of them hollows.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The old people do not know of any monuments been any place only in churchyards. There is a lot of stones in a field belonging to Patrick Shanahan, Cornabula, Parish of Borrisoleigh, Co. of Tipperary. And on some of them there is different markings on more of them hollows.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
said that there is a standing stone in Rusheen in the parish of Borrisoleigh, Co. Tipperary. Some say it marks the place where some chief or prince was buried. There is also stone's in Curnabool in the parish of Borrisoleigh, Co. Tipperary. There are some marks on them but you could not understand them. It is also said there is a stone in Fantane in the parish of Borrisoleigh, Co. Tipperary. It is said there is will filly's track's on it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
dá ríríbh gach fear ar a dhícheall ag buaileadh agus ag sábháil, agus dar na Hocksties cé bhuaidhfeadh an chéad sgór ach an Spailpín féín.
Fuair sé an dara sgór an triomhadh sgór agus gach sgór a frith go dtí go raibh an dá fhuireann na choinne-sin ceithre sgóir déág ar fad. Anois bhí naoinuibhar ar fichid i gcoinne an Spailpín agus cad a thuit amach anois ach fuair sé an cúigmhadh scór déag. Do rinne se an-obair ar fad. Do mhol an captaen agus na fir eile é go mór. Chrothadar lámh leis agus isteach leo sna sceachaibh as a dtáinig siad.
Bhí siad buaidhte anois agus níor bhain siad leis an ngort cruitneachtain feasta. Bhí an t-an aithbhéis ar an maighistir de bhárr a rinne an Spailpín ní nach iongantach agus is mó lá a chaitheadar ibhfochair a chéile agus is mo oidhche gheimhridh a chuireadar síos ar an oidhche iongantach úd abhí ag an Spailpín.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a stone at the back of my school it is in Paddy Shanahan's land in Curnaboola.
There are many standing stones in my district. It is
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a stone at the back of my school it is in Paddy Shanahan's land in Curnaboola.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are stones in the townsland of Curnaboola and there is peculiar marks on them and there is hollows on stones in the same land also.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
other stones in the land. It was said that there is a stone in the townsland of Balinahow and it was sharp like a tombstone but it is not there now. There is also a stone in the townsland of Castlehill and there is peculiar markings on it and it is standing up straight in the field and it seen there to the present day.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is stones in the townsland of Curnaboola and there is peculiar marking on them and also hollow's
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sé air an cluiche a ghlaodhadh. D'fhreagair an spailpín é agus adubhairt ní'l aithne agam ar aoinne annso agus ní tig liom an chluiche do ghlaodhadh de bhárr san ach glaoidh beirt agaibh-se féin an chluiche agus beidh mise sásta le pé áit in a cuirfear mé.
Glaoidhfead féin agus tusa an chluiche mar sin ars an captaen. Duine is na duine ag gach taobh go dtí go raibh a fhuireann toghta aca araon. Nuair a bhí san déanta acu do léig an captaen na riaglacha ós árd. Bé ceann dos na righlacaibh ná an t-é a bhuaidfeadh an chéad sgór thabharfadh sé fear don fhuireann eile óna fuireann feín - ag laghdú a fhuirinn féin agus ag méadú an fhuirinn abhí na choinne.
Do línigh an dá fhuireann suas chun tosnúghadh agus thosnuigh an chluiche
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
rules or rites that the milk could be got back.
Blinking of cows or horses is wrought by certain persons slighting or thinking ill or little of their neighbour's stock. The animals affected would become paralized or silly.
Certain forms of cures were wrought, such as cutting a piece of the person's clothing that was supposed to have committed the deed, and burning it under the animal's nose. Another cure was to compel the person to say "God bless the beast" - as it was said that the devil had to depart before a higher Name.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is said that when the Cromwellians were about to take possession of Borris Castle that the Burkes hid all their gold in room deep in the Castle. They killed six of their servants who were sworn to mind the treasure dead or alive which probably lies there to this day.
The Burkes were also good soldiers and fighters. One of the Pallas family was with Sarsfield at Ballynetty and when the convoy was captured each soldier got as much gold as he could raise in one hand. Burke took off his boot and filled it with the gold. He parted company with the main army and came back by Inch-a-valla where he hid the gold and had such a swift horse that he was able to rejoin the party before they reached Limerick. When Burke came for the gold he could not find it and it is said that the treasure lies there to this day.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is said that when the Cromwellians were about to take possession of Boeris Castle that the Burkes hid all their gold in room deep in the Castle. They killed six of their servants who were sworn to mind the treasure dead or alive which probably lies there to this day.
The Burkes were also good soldiers and fighters. One of the Pallas family was with Sarsfield at Ballynetty and when the convoy was captured each soldier got as much gold as he could raise in one hand. Burke took off his boot and filled it with the gold. He parted company with the main army and came back by Inch-a-valla where he hid the gold and had such a swift horse that he was able to rejoin the party before they reached Limerick. When Burke came for the gold he could not find it and it is said that the treasure lies there to this day.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:36
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rejected
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mar do sháruigh siad i méid i ndeagh-chuma agus i ndeagh-mhéin ar bhfacha sé féin riamh ná aoinne eile ach an oiread, ach amháin an fear deireannach agus bhí seisean leamh go leór. Sean fear críonna caithte gan neart gan luath abeadh é.
Bhí camán is sliotar na láimh ag an gcéád fear a tháinig amach. Bé sin an captaen féin agus bhí camán ag chuile fear eile acu.
Do labhair an fear a bhí i bhfolach leis an bhfear deirinneac,
"Cá bhfui túsa ag imtheacht i gcomhluadar na bhfear mbreághtha súd" ar seisean leis. "Bféidir go dtabharfá do chamán dom-sa agus imreóchad-sa id áit."
Dar na Hoxtí tabharfad mo chamán duit agus fáilte arsa an sean-fhear. Nuair a chonnaic an captaen an stroingséar agus an camán aige ghlaoidh sé amach a ainm agus d'iarr
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:36
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Times ago some people could take away their neighbour's milk. On a new May morning before the sun would rise some old women would go around dragging a straw rope after them singing "come all the butter to me". Afterwards the people around would have no butter on their milk.
Occasionally people's cows would lose all their milk very suddenly. It was only by certain
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:33
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awaiting decision
Drawing of a Map.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:32
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awaiting decision
went dry and Culan well supplied the needs of all the people, for raddus of 2 miles,
In our own farm there are two very large ponds, One a very deep one where wild duck swim and hatch their young and the heron or more familiar name the crane give a good part of its time.
In another field there is a spring where the water used burst up and one wet winter it overflowed and filled a large hollow nearly now creating two ponds of water which are very useful for cattle. We have a meadow called moon-veg and in Irish it would be móín-beag. In lower Carnahallia there are a few fields called Kilworm,
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:32
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The present main road from Stranorlar to Glenties passing on the south side of the River Finn is a comparatively new road. The new road in a good many places follows the line of the old road. The old road would appear to have gone more by the hills, some of it is still used, but other tracks are plain to be seen as, for example the part which passes through Glenmore estate, and comes out again on Meenagrave hill and continues until it joins the present Altnapaste road. Where there was once a prosperous village which carried on a weaving industry.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:30
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Adjacent to my Fathers old home is a large sloping field known to the local people as Cúla field this name was derived from Ceál which mean's a Church and a burial place in this field. Up to 30 years ago some of the grass could be traced, also some of the stones that composed the church could be seen scattered about. In the middle of the field there is a beautiful spring well beside which grows a very large Lime tree, as late as 20 years ago old people in locality used to come to this Well to pray and drink the water. Tradition have it that the present tree beside the well only grew in place of the original one which decayed owing to emigrants taking peicies of the branches with them to Safeguard them on their voyage. Up to the present day people in the locality, Who dying look for the water from this were to drink, This well althow being a great neight More than a 100 ft above the was never known to go dry, About 60 years ago when the people were making their own butter all the wells for miles around
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:29
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a dhéanamh do agus leath a thabhairt dá bhean féin agus an leath eile a coimeád. Tháinig sé abhaile agus níor díol as an mbád ná as an dtig agus ní roinn sé an t-airgead. Bhí an fear eile ag imtheacht leis leis. Aon oidhche amháin chúaidh sé isteach i dtig agus loirg loistín na hoidhche. Dúbhradar go bhfaigheadh dá gcodlóchadh sé sa tseómra súas. Dúbhairt sé go ndéanfhadh agus fáilte. Chúaidh sé a codhladh agus i lár na hoidhche chualaidh sé an trampáill. Núair a d'éirigh sé ar maidin bhí iongantasar fhear an tíghe núair ná raibh sé marbh. Dúbhairt fear an tíghe go bhfaigheadh sé a phádh go maith dá gcodlóchadh sé oidhche eile aca. Dúbhairt sé go ndeanfhadh . Chúadar a codladh agus i lár na hoidhche chúalaidh sé an trampáil. Ar maidin núair a d'éirig fear
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:28
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D'innis sé a sceal don spailpín agus thuig an spailpín brígh na cainnt agus gurab iad na daoine maithe abhí á dhéanamh.
Tabhair dhom suipéár maith ars an spailpín agus braoinín tae na dhiaidh agus raghaidh misé a faire anocht. Fuair sé béile gan locht adeirim leat agus indiaidh siar air fuair sé braoinín té d'uisge beatha agus súid chun siubhal leis fé dhéin na páirce chun an fhaire do choiméad do féin. Bhí san go maith agus ní raibh go h-olc.
Bhí roinnt maith crann ag fás in aice na páirce agus chuaidh sé isteach ionnta sa i bhfolach.
Timcheall uair a mheadhon-oidche cad do chíodh sé agus sluagh mór iománaidhe ag teacht amach ar na crannaibh. Do leath a shúile ar an spailpín nuair do chonnaich sé iad
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:27
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How the ground is prepared.
First the ground is ploughed, then it is harrowed and cultivated, then the drills are opened, then the manure is put out and spread, the potatoes are dropped and the drills are closed.
Are wooden ploughs still used?
They are not used, metal ploughs and iron ploughs are used.
Were spades made in this district.
They were brought from other countries but now they are made in Eire.
Write an account of the seed potato.
Pick the best potato and cut it into two equal parts, then drop them in the drill and 7 or 8 inches apart. Then cover the drills.
Do the neighbours help one another with the potatoes?
In some parts they do but in others they do not.
Care of potatoes while growing.
First hoe the potatoes, then gather the weeds off them, and run them up, with a plough. Then saddle-harrow them, and spray them.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:24
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Tá caisleán mor suidse in aice mo tigesé. Caisleán Taidig boict an ainm ais ar.
Fado ní raib aon caisléan ann act bí tig beag ann. ? bí fear boct in a comnuide ann.
? bí taidbream sige ar fead trí oidceannta. ceap sé go raib sé ar ? Ionnoain. ? ceap sé go raib mála mor ar an noroicead.
Ar an triomad lá ?
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:22
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Bhí fear ann fad ó agus fad ó bhí, agus bhí sé ar loirg oibre. Tháinig sé cómh fada le fear sa chomharsanacht so agus d'iarr sé air é do híreál. Bhí gort mór cruithneachtan ag an bhfear so abhí réidh chuna bhainte agus gach maidin nuair a éirigheadh sé bhíodh an chruithneacht díreach mar a bheadh táin beithioch ag damhas air ar feadh na h-oidhche ar fad.
D'fiafruigh sé den spailpín goidé an saghas oibre a thig leis a dhéanamh. "Chuile saghas feirmeóireachta" ars an fear oibre leis. Tá go maith mar sin ars an feirmeóir. Tá gort cruithenachtain amuigh annsan agam agus bíonn sé ar lár gach maidin nuair a éirighim as mo leaba agus níl a fhios agam cén diabhal atá á dhéanamh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:21
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VI Then run there up again. Spray them after that.
VII
Digging Potatoes
Some potatoes are dug in July and some in August. When they are dug, they are put into pits made with a spade and shaped out before the potatoes are put in.
VIII How are potatoe pits made.
The pits are made with a spade, and the potatoes are left in them until the beginning of the next year.
IX Names of Potatoes/
Kerr's Pinks, Dates, Banners, Suttons, Apiclure's, Arran Victors, Irish Queens and Champions.
X How to make potato bread.
First the potatoes are boiled, then they are peeled, and brusied out, and cut into small squares, Then they are put into a frying pan. After that they are eatable.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:17
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stadadar go gcúadar go pálás an Rí. Chnagadar ar an ndoras agus oscluigheadh dóibh. Dúradar go raibh gnó aca don Rí. Ar deire tháinig an Rí amach cúcha. D'fiaruig sé dóibh cad é an ghnó a bhí aca dhó. Dúradar go gcúaladar go raibh a ingean ana bhreóidhthe. Ar deire chuadar isteach agus thóg duine aca a bhuidéal as a phóca. Bhí ingean an Rí sínte siar sa leabaidh agus í ag fághail bháis. Chuir sé spíneóg don uisce uirthí agus d'éirigh sí aniar. Chuir sé an tarna spineóg uirri agus chroth sí í féin. Chuir sé an trímhadh spineóg uirthi agus d'éirigh sí na seasamh. Thug an Rí mórán airgid do agus shín sé go dtí an bhfear eile é agus d'úbhairt leis díol as an mbád agus as an tig na d'fhanadar agus an méid a bheadh fágtha dhá leath
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:15
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The man who lived at the Burnside after John Leeper was Johnny Arnold (commonly Arnott). The fairies used to play tricks on him. At night he would hear them calling "Get up Johnny Arnott, there is a harrow between the cows in the byre". And sure enough when he would go out he would find the harrow.
In old John Leeper's time he and his sister were out milking. When they came in they saw two little women sitting at the fireside counting money. They disappeared up the Chimney and left all the gold behind them.
This same chimney (or brace) fell and killed Johnny Arnott.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:10
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Old John Leeper, of the Burnside was out raking one night. His nephew, Willie the Rover, left him to the foot of his own lane. They said "Good-night". When John was nearly at his own door he heard voices saying "Saddle a horse for me" John shouted "Saddle one for me too". No soon had he said this then he was whipped off his feet and he found himself on horseback.
When he came to himself he found himself at the other side of Stranorlar. He set out for home, On the way he met some carts going to Strabane with flax and he hid himself behind the ditch till they had passed.
It is said that an old witch lived in the Gorey. Every night she came down and turned the rocks in the corn fields into cattle and they ate the corn.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:10
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agus nuair a bhí a dhóthain ithte aige chuaidh sé síos go tóin a locha arís. Do chonnaic mórán daoine é agus bhí eagla ortha roimhe. Bhí cuma péist air agus deirtear go raibh a dhá shúil chomh mór le mearaibh.
Sin í an fáth go dtugtar "Croc an Íl" ar an gcroch so.
Máire de Barra, Both-Fearna
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:05
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Tá Loch Druim an Iúbhair suidhte timcheall leath mhíle ón scoil seo ar an dtaoibh anoir andeas. Tá páuirc in aice a locha san ar a dtugtar Croch an Íl go dtí an lá indiú.
Lá amháin sa tsean-aimsear thosnuigh piast mór ag á thomadh féin istigh sa loch agus deirtear go raibh sí cómh mór gur sgéith an t-uisce amach agus chludaigh sé a lán talaimh ná raibh fé uisgsce go dtí sin.
Nuair a bhí roinnt maith talmhan clúduighthe ag an bpéist deirtear gur tháinig sé aníos annsan ar a' dtalamh tirm agus do dhein sé a lán díoghbhala. Thosnuig sé ag marbhughadh beithioch ar a dhícheall
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 10:02
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Buyers sometimes come round to the houses, and buy the animals. But it is the most common to take them to the fair. In some places there is a field where the fair is held, Everybody who sells an animals gives luck's penny, and they give it according to the size of the animal. When the bargain is completed they mark the animal with a coloured kind of paint, sometimes they use mud off the street, and they put an X on the back of the animal.
There is a special fair for pigs, but there is no special fair for horses or cattle or any other animals.
In this part the people don't pay toll on a fair day, or market day.
They just put the animal into a yard and pay money before they take it out again.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 09:57
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There is one graveyard in this parish, it is called Kilteevogue graveyard. The Roman Catholics are buried in it, but the Protestants of the parish are now buried in Stranorlar graveyard. It is practically square.
There is the ruins of an old church in it. People are buried inside the walls of the ruin. There are some very small trees growing in it. The graveyard slopes eastward. There are some old tombs in it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 09:57
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Hallow-een is on October 31st. Everyone gathers boxfuls of nuts then. They put two nuts on a shovel one for a boy and one for a girl. They put the shovel on the red coals and watch the nuts. If they come together they will be married if they separate they will part.
A young girl takes a ball of wool to the lime kiln on that night and throws it down in the eye of the kiln. Then she winds it back again and her future husband will catch the end of it and come up to her.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 09:55
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The bread that the people used long ago was made from oat meal, and some of it was made from potatoes.
Potatoe bread was made from potatoes.
First of all the potatoes were boiled, then they were peeled and bruized out and mixed with flour. Then they were cut into squares and cooked.
Boxty was made from potatoes.
First the potatoes were boiled and peeled and bruized out. Then some raw potatoes are put into a cloth. First of all they are peeled and grated. Then both are mixed together and cooked in a hot oven.
The Hand quern was used long ago.
It was a large stone mill, used for grinding grain. There was a hole in the stone it was used for holding the grain. Then another stone was placed over the grain and then the grain was crushed.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 09:50
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Diseases...................Cures
Whooping Cough ....Take mare's milk. Jump over a donkey three times. Make a cake and take three pieces of it, every morning.
Evil.... The seventh son can cure for evil.
Mumps... The person that has the mumps gets some other one to lead them across a "merch" burn with a rope and horse's winkers.
Warts. .... Rub them with gizard of a fowl. Rub it with a snail and hang the snail up on a bush
Jaundice.....Take a white of an egg three mornings and a glass of water.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 09:47
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II Shesken Mór
III Grissels grazing
D Rocks
I Standing stone
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 09:46
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Gaipe Thomáis
Now
Dead - Man's brae.
Jamie's field
Island; because it is almost surrounded by water.
Holly garden
Forth
Rowan tree.
Burn side, Because it is situated beside a Burn.
Kiln-field; Because there is a kiln in it
Barn-field; Because it is behind a barn .
Lees
White Park
Meadow Park
Bridge Park; because it is beside a bridge
Long ground; because is is a long piece of ground.
Hills
Alt Mór
Black sod
Cnoc Crow
Marshes
Poulart.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 09:41
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(1) When you hear the 'big bumb clock'
(b) When the midges are biting.
(c) When the swallows are flying high.
(d) When there is a redness at the bottom of the sky & it goes up higher into the sky.
(e) Clear water.
(f) A Mist on the River
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 09:38
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(a) Dog eating grass
(b) When the swallows are flying low
(c)When the hills are black and looking near.
(d) Dogs sleepy.
(e) A Spring rising out of the ground
(f) Stones getting damp.
(g) "Puss on the hearth with velvet paws
Wiping her whisker jaws."
(h) The dust rising off the road.
(i) A rainbow in the morning.
(j) The wind blowing from the East
(K) Cat washing its face.
(l) A Mist on the Mountains
(m) When the crickets are flying
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 02:03
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Long ago there was an old man named Balt O'Callaghan living in Ballinbranagh (Oade á Opearmac). He had a good deal of gold. He got out and he put the gold into a little pot and he buried it in a little field at the back of his house as he did not want to leave the money to anyone. This little field was named the 'Little Haggard'.
It happened that about a month later he got better but when he went to look for his little pot of gold he could not find it. And from that day to this it is supposed to be hidden there. whoever on a dewy morning discovers a patch of land in this land without any dew will find underneath, if he digs, the little pot of gold, as tradition has it, that no dew falls on ground where there is gold underneath.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 02:00
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Long ago there was no such thing as Old Age Pensions and most of the old people very poor went out and begged. They stopped in farmer's houses at night and started off begging in the morning.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:59
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Some of these tinkers who are fairly comfortable go to the small towns and stops in them for the hard months of the Winter and principally to Daingean and Athlone. They have always some food with them which they gather from door to door. The alms they accept mostly are bacon, flour, and milk. The women go on foot usually but the men go on the carts or vans which ever they have.
Two families usually travel together. The name best known in the district is Laurence. He sells gallons and basins and all tin implements used in the kitchen. He also mends those things. The family that come most frequently to the district is Nevin. These travelling tribe come on two special occasions to this district. First for the fair of Lanesboro on the 12th February and second for the Tourlough in July or August.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:59
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When it was well washed it was made into bundles. After about a month in the bundles it was beaten with brittles to break the shells – this was called "pounding the flease." It was then hackled. The hackle was a square piece of board with 12 long spikes. It was palled through the flease.
The flase was then ready for the spinning wheel. After it was spun it was sent to the weaver to be woven into cloth.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:59
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The tinker tribes are very numerous in the midland counties. They camp on the road-side, in different places. They are called Tins-smiths or Tinkers. They stay a week, or even longer, in some places - especially if they happen to camp near a good wood or a bog where they can get plenty of firing. At night they sleep in a sort of camp made of canvas or sacking. Some of them travel on living caravans, others come on horse-vans. The women go about from house to house during the day selling tin saucepans and gallons. They collect food on their route such as potatoes, oaten-meal, flour, and dry tea and sugar.
When they are removing, they leave all classes of rubbish behind them, such as, old rags, sacks, boots, and shoes of all descriptions, bits of straw, turf and sticks, tin clippings and odds and ends of vegetables. Even some times a dead carcase might be seen left unburied. The road-men
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:58
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Not many travelling people come to our house because we live in of [sic] the road. The people who come most often are the O'Learys and Lizzie Murphy, and the O'Donnevans and the Joyces.
The men of the O'Learys are all sweeps they go from house to house to look for the job of sweeping chimneys. Lizzie Murphy goes round to houses she goes looking for help. The O'Donnevans are people who go round selling things. The Joyces buy asses and horses and sell them over again.
They do not stay very long when they come. Some of them are not very poor. Some of them make tins and gallons and sell them.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:57
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:57
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Old Crafts
About 90 years ago spinning and weaving linen was a very common industry in this locality. The people used to spin and weave the cloth for their own use. There was a spinning wheel in every house in the locality. They used also spin not alone flax but wool as well.
In the month of April the ground was prepared for the flax and it was then sown. It was well looked after until the month of September. It was ripe about the middle of September. It was then pulled by hand and tied into sheaves and taken to the bog and let steep in the bog water for 12 days or so, to decay the hulls. It was then brought home and laid out in a field for the rain to wash it and the sun to whiten it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:56
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evening to listen to them, the soft Irish brogue, in their voice one couldn't help but think these must be the descendants of the real old Irish that were cast on the highroad, and oppression brought them to this. The Joyces are tinkers also; their habits and customs are like the Powers but they are a rougher class and given to drink and quarrelling. There is a numerous tribe of them. Old Joyce is a rough looking sandy haired man. His sons and sons-in-law the Nevens travel with him. They are wary and row among themselves. They do have some fierce fights in which the women join in. When they have each others heads well
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:56
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Gipsies and Tramps
Tinkers make their living by making tins, gallons and saucepans. The men make them and the women go around from house to house selling them. Some of the women are very bold. When they do not get what they want the give impudence and wish ill-luck.
Tinkerers live in camps on the roadside. These camps are erected in the following way. Scallops are pointed at both ends and bent in the shape of semi-circle and put down in the ground. About six are put in a straight line opposite each other. The canvas is put on the top of the stick.
Gipsies are different from tinkers. Gipsies live in a caravan. They are always dealing in horses and asses. The women have coloured handkerchiefs tied on their heads. They sell all kinds
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:55
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The first article on the "Anglican Succession" is of the FIRST order of merit - O si sic Omnia.
The THIRD arcitle on Shakespeare has also sufficient merit-
The FOURTH article on the "French Revolution" is admirable - I detect the delightful pen of "Mores Catholici" -
The FIFTH article is my sons - I say nothing of it -
The SIXTH article on the invisible world is bold but of a mighty useful boldness - I admire it much- The EIGHT article on Belgium is highly valuable -
The NINTH on Ireland is excellent -
The TENTH on Geraldine - is also commendable.
The two articles I condemn as the one -Abominable and insulting - and the other atrociously insulting - are the SECOND article - that one Equality and Equalization - and the SEVENTH article on "Modern Orators"
Now as to the French Article - It has this absurdity - It laments bitterly the destruction or rather the breaking down in mass of society of the French Aristocracy.
Look on the article on Carlyle - that by Mr K. Digby- and you will see that it shows the French Aristocracy to have been the most probligately immoral of the human race and also to have been not only audaciously infidel but actually apostles of infidelity.
See what Editorship this is - One Article deploring the loss of the French Aristocracy - Another
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:53
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When froth is on your tea it's a sign of money.
When the soul of your foot is itchy it's a sign that you will be walking on strange ground.
If the palm of your right hand is itchy it's the sign of a shake-hands.
If the palm of your left hand is itchy it's a sign that you are getting money.
If there is bread through the tea leaves in your cup it's a sign that you will be eating strange bread.
If your nose is itchy it's a sign that you will be fighting.
If your ears are hot it's a sign that there is somebody talking about you.
If your left eye is itchy it's a sign that you will be crying.
If sparks come out of the fire it's a sign of money.
If there are moths flying around the lamp it's the sign of a letter.
If there is a long tea leaf floating on your tea it's the sign of a visitor, and if it's hard it's a man, and
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:53
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Ground Ivy washed and boiled with spring water cures pain in back.
The roots of daisies washed and pounded with Ivy leaves, powdered chalk, and boiled with new milk and fresh lard make an ointment which heals and draws any cut.,
(16) "Watercress" is a cure for a weak heart; it should be eaten fasting - raw - with salt.
(17) "Jacob's ladder" boiled on new milk cures weak kidneys.
(18) "Celery eaten" raw cures rheumatics. Raw leeks also a cure for rheumatics, As food: Young turnip-tops are nice ad tender; they can be eaten boiled with bacon, and are wholesome and digestible
Raw vegetables are very wholesome.
(19) "Lettuce" is a tonic and contains iron.
(20) Verwine is the name of a great herb which would cure any disease, but hardly anybody knows this herb or how to use it. Certain would were said while plucking it.
"Verwine of high renown
On Mount Calvary first was found
It cures the sick and heals the wounded
In the name of Jesus I'll pluck it from the ground"
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:50
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The neighbouring hills of Goldenfields and the fox-covert of Ballykeeffe keep company with you on the road to Grange and for some miles after.
Then comes Grange, a small village consisting of about a dozen houses, amongst them being the national School, the post office and the Police Barrack.
There is a small church at the top of the neighbouring hill, which is very hansome with its little towerets and beside it appears a rath. This rath is known as Churchill Rath.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:50
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people have been visiting this district all through the century. Some of them have to depend solely on the help they recieve from the people. More of them sell small articles, which are eagerly bought from them, such as wooden topped tables, straw mats gaudily coloured, and even sometimes umbrellas are sold by them.
Old women usually sell balls of camphor, at two a penny. Some of them carry baskets of pretty things such as mirrors, combs, brushes, hair-slides, toasting-forks, candle-sticks, and brooches.
These travelling folks obtain their supplies in the large towns, such as Dublin, Limerick, Kilkenny and Waterford.
There is always a great welcome for these wayfarers, in the neighbouring homesteads.
Some of them, usually old men, accept lodgings in a barn or loft. A cosy "shake down" is made for them of hay, or bags of straw. A few sacks are given to them for covering.
Sometimes, one of them will ask the "bean-a-tighe" to make a sup of tea, the tea being supplied by themselves. They usually have their own bread, also.
Some of them will accept any alms, such as eggs, butter, milk, potatoes, meat, or any kind of clothes. But more of them will accept nothing but money.
Most of these travellers travel on foot, but others
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:49
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opposite side of the road, called the Metalman Farm. On this farm there was a statue of King Charles 1st. and this statue was there until 1936, when the present owners of this forty acres sold it to Major Loftus.
Danesfort House was a beautiful mansion over-looking the main road and approached by a wide Avenue which was surrounded on both sides by lime trees. The Wemyss carried out a great farming business, kept many farm hands and employed a large household staff.
After the departure of the Wemyss' family, this mansion was supposed to be haunted and there was bright light said to be seen often by several people. This light used to appear in one of the uppermost Windows near mid night. A distant relative of my own saw it on several occasions and he saw the headless coach also which, was supposed to pass at regular intervals through the demesne at Mid night also. In In the old Churchyard, there was a Catholic Chapel, and this Chapel was thrown down by Cromwell in at about 250 years ago.
Then the people around built an Auxiliary
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:48
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There is a very old, holy well in the townland of Sheestown. It is called "Saint Fiacra's Well and is but a short distance from the river Nore.
There are a number of trees and bushes a few yards from the well and also a cairn of stones. Of recent date a Cross has been erected at the spot. A protecting wall surrounds the well.
An annual Pattern is held there, on the last Sunday of July each year. The Rosary is recited and water from the well is distributed to the congregation by Catholic Boy Scouts.
An old tradition says that the well was used by St. Fiacra when he lived as a hermit in the vicinity.
A short distance away there are imprints on a wall and locally, these are thought to be "the imprints of St. Fiacra's toes". The wall is near the river and, as the ground in
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:47
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clearance from Brownsford. The ruins of the houses occupied before the Famine Years have disappeared. Probably neighbouring farmers made use of them, or they may have been used for making roads, as stones of old houses are being used at the present time. In the whole townland of Brownsford only one horse was grazing after Famine Period.
Blight: During the famine years ie. The Great Famine 1846 and 47 whole districts and town-lands were left vacant. Afterwards any person giving the rent to the landlord could occupy the land left vacant.;
Blight: One of those years: The Blight came in one night: the next morning all the stalks were lying on the ground, and in three days the potato-crop was completely destroyed. Potatoes decayed in the ground; some were never dug.
People shifted about - moved to better farms - but the landlord could put them out any time he wished, even though they had the rent paid. Parnell got a bill passed which made the tenant the owner so long as he paid the rent: and the tenant got power to sell the land if unable to live in it.
Famine: Old people used to tell that the people have strange appetites (see page 110) or big appetites during
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:46
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He has a house there and his parents are living there He works for his keep. He is a middle aged man and he wears very torn clothes. The way he go round is walking.
Mick and John Delaney are old men. They mend and make all small articles of tin. Jim Delaney died last year. He was a great man for telling stories.
Before and after a fair they go out into the country. They are sure to tell you all the good news from your relations. They are sure to bring news of a marriage or birth.
Billy Ryan came from Castlecomer. After every story he'd tell you he'd say "Int that very good Mam"
These people are coming for a long now. Nearly all of them have a little house in some part of the country. Some travellers ask for bread, others a penny or meat, butter milk, tea, sugar or clothes. They are welcome every where. Very few of them ask for a nights lodging some of them carry small tents with them.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:46
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been traveling for the past twenty-five years back and forth. They stay for at least three nights in town.
They stay in a farmers house and they cook their own meals on an oil stove. They leave their horses in a barn and sleep in a bedroom which the farmer has all prepared for them.
All those travelers are very welcome because they put a bit of light in the town when they come. We all joyfully look forward to the month of August. Some of them often visit the town on a fair day to buy horses.
Long ago when they visited the town they built a bonfire on"Tom Dorens Hill" and the people of the district gathered round them
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:45
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Castles.
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Another man, who used to visit Freshford, but who did not sell any goods was known to the people by the name of Burke. He used to go around shouting "to shop early and avoid the rush". He always used to travel on foot and generally spent the night in a barn- or outhouse.
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Other travellers who used to visit this district before fair-days were Daly's from Dublin. They used to go around the country selling linoleum and mats.
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Michael Fagin used to go around this district long ago selling thread, pins, polish, combs, laces and many other small articles. His wife went about with him always and the people called her "Mary Ann". Their means of travelling was an ass and car. James Keogh used to around selling clothes, needles and all such things. He used to travel in a Spring-car and pony. A woman by the name of Ann the Navy" used to go around this district selling brooms or as they were called long ago "besoms". Her husband
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:45
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a. a. time at Cool-na-Brusklaun, Castlecomer. He repaired medals scapulars etc. and repaired rosary beads. He was a very saintly old man. He died about 26 years ago. Another travelling man who frequently visited this district was known by the nick-name "Fatty Halloran". He was a big stout man and was very odd and eccentric. He never travelled without his wheel-barrow in which he carried his bedclothes. He also carried a bag of his own hair which he collected each time he got his hair cut. He took only one meal in the day and at that he was reputed to be able to consume 27 potatoes which he took from his pockets and toasted at the fire, a plate and a half of oaten meal stirabout, a loaf, two eggs, and two large mugs of tea.
Tom Suppl and Willis Wagg were two brothers and their mother was Peg Wagg. Another traveller was known as Sailor Lalor. He would do almost anything for a pint of beer. During the whole year round in frost or snow he travelled barefooted. Another traveller who frequented visited this parish was known as "Yellow Magg". She was a big strong limbed woman with a coarse looking face which was very yellow, and from which she got her name. She remained at certain houses for weeks at a time. She was a very clean and tidy old woman and spent her time knitting stockings. She was a good woman but had a very wicked temper when roused.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:43
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get. The method of working of tinkers is well organised. The parish of Conahy has always been noted for its hospitality to travelling folk, especially to some of the old men who are well known to the parish. Most of these travelling folk were welcome to a night's lodging including supper and breakfast. On some occasions particularly in bad weather they remained over a few days amusing the benefactors by story-telling – some of them tall yarns. As they travelled extensively they had a good knowledge of conditions prevailing in different parts of the country. Some of them made their living by selling small articles such as delph, pins, needles, studs, bootlaces, combs, ornaments and hairpins, but unfortunately the market of the latter has almost disappeared due to the coming of more modern fasions. It is very seldom nowadays that travelling folk receive lodging from farmers. With the approach of night they usually make for the towns and villages where they pay for their lodgings,
They do not carry potatoes or meal as they did in former times as they prefer money to any other alms they might be offered. You would not see as many travelling folk on the road now as you would some years ago. The Doyles, the Donovans and the Delaneys are the principal tribes who travel around here.
A poor traveling man named Frank the Pedlar was well known in Conahy district. He often spent days at
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:42
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said to be very sacred because there are gold chalices, and Mass vessels and priests bones still buried there.
At the back of the present church in Kells there is a great big high moat situated. Long ago there was a castle built there and it is in this castle that the Kings of Ossory is said to have lived.
It is said that their is a passage under the ground going from the castle to the seven monasteries. In the year 1396 there was a great big battle at Kells between Roger Mortimer and Mc Murrough. Mortimer was beaten and in the end he was killed. Two miles from Kells there is a place situated which is called Cill-Rí. This place is noted for its high steeple. A King named King Callan is buried there. There is a well in Cill-Ri called Saint Bridget’s well. The water from this well cannot be boiled. Beside this well there is a great big stone. This stone was used by Saint Bridget while praying and the marks of her knees are still to be seen on this stone.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:41
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or a fair.
There are also men who travel by themselves. They live on charity alone. They travel in many places, and some of them bring news from place to place.
The principal travellers who visit this district, are the McInerneys, Dalys and Delaneys. There are a good many others too. Some make tables. They make them from sticks and a board for the top. They cover them with tarpaulin. Some are thin-smiths and they make buckets, gallons pint tins and candle-sticks. There are travellers who exchange their goods for wool or horsehair or feathers. They never give their value.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:40
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Kenny's Well or St Canices Well is on the outskirts of the City a few hundred yards south west of the black Abbey. it has been accounted a holy well probably from the time of St Canice's well. The well is situated at the base of a hill with a steap incline. Over it is an arched building, furnished on the inside with stone benches. A stream of water flows from it into the braegach river. Those who suffering from any infirmity come here to implore the intercession of St Kenny having drunk of the healthgiving holy water of the holy well and invoked the name of God have been very frequently restored to perfect health. it was built in the 17th century to protect the well.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:39
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wild and preferred tramping the roads to working on the farm at home. He has to money out of the home place but he drinks every penny, and is going from door to door in a miserable condition begging a copper, and something to eat. He is now over seventy years.
Jack Fitzpatrick from the County Wexford commonly known as Jack the Whistler" because he was almost always whistling as he went along was a big farmer's son. He fell out with the people at home, and had to get a quarterly allowance out of the farm. He too drank every penny, and begged his bread from door to door. He travelled almost every county in Ireland, and he died about two years ago.
These travellers always travel on foot. They ask for a copper, and if the meals happen to be going on in the farmer's kitchen they partake of it. They also ask for potatoes, eggs, tea sugar and milk, and they usually ask for these after getting the penny. They sleep in a house in High St. Graig and pay 6d for the night's lodging.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:39
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Travelling people often visit our homes the same people have been doing so for many years. Some of the people are very poor, while others have a good way of living. They sell brooches and other small articles. Some of them obtain their goods in the Monster House and others buy them at Woolworths.
These travellers are generally welcome. When they come to the house they remain for a night and they sleep in the barn. The people of the house supply them with food.
Some of those people travel on foot others go around in caravans. The best known of them are the Delaneys and the Donovans. They usually come on Fair Days.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:38
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A great number of travellers come to my house - the Delaneys the Donovans, the Conners, Yellow Mag, Phil Mack and Martin Hanlon. The Delaneys go around in an ass and car. They sell cups and saucers and quart tins and laces and hair slides. They live in a cottage near Freshford. The Donovans come around about every month. They sell the same things. The people around give them potatoes or cabbage or bread. They sleep in a tent near a sheltery ditch. The Conners come and go. They sleep in an old lodge near my house. They do not sell anything. The people give them milk and other things. Yellow Mag passes along by my house sometimes. She is an old woman. Phil Mack brings his own food. He brings tea and sugar and bread and butter and the neighbours make the tea for him. Martin Hanlon also go around he gets his dinner in the houses around. He sleeps in an old loft of Bowdens.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:37
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they had been.
If a man came he was put to sleep in 'the sleep-house' - where the work-men slept, if a woman a bed was put down for her in the kitchen. Alone, they generally came, and they remained one night, as a rule and then went on, on their usual rounds, and returned after some months.
One old man called Danny Morley still comes. He sleeps in the barns, on straw and covers himself with the blankets or old coats they given him.
He gets food and clothing and money from the farmers and in return dances and sings and relates news around the fire-side at night.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:37
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Nearly in every district travelling people go around selling goods. Some of them are rich enough and more of them are very poor. There were a great many people going round long ago. There was a poor man going round and everyone he met, he made faces at them. I dont know his name, but Frozen was his nick-name. There are many people going round this district at present. Paddy Edward often comes around this district. He has a case and keeps all his little articles in it. Paddy Edward stops at Nicholas Dowlings and at Andy Dunne's. Billie Ryan often comes around this district also and he stays at Dorans for a long time. Dinny Morley also comes around this district. Billie Ryan has a melodien and he plays the one tune all the time. The Delaneys are the best known in the district. They generally travel in bands. Paddy mends cans, and pots and he sells quart tins and he also makes tin cans. Jack is always selling and buying asses and ponies. All these people come around before the fair day and
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:36
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For their night's sleep or several nights' sleep anything from a floor to a little of straw will suffice. Money food or clothing is always a welcome alms.
Sometimes they travel on foot sometimes in carts. They seldom travel alone. On rare occasions in this district a bearded middle-aged man of the troubadour type with a donkey, a pack and a mellifluous flate is to be seen. But music hath charms and the value of a penny diminishes near the value of a tune.
The Macarthys the Delaneys the Dorans and the Hoggs are all well known. They come at no particular time and
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:36
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During the day the women folk go from door to door selling tables and chairs which are made by the men folk while others devote their time to fortune telling. These formerly came from foreign countries and are known by their brown colour, the beautiful jewellery they wear and also by their clothes.
The mendicants travel on foot and earn their living by begging. In the country they are never let away hungry and are often given a comfortable bed in barn of loft.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:36
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called "Home Rule".
Another man called Murphy, comes around, every week. He carries a bags on his back in which he carries many old things belonging to himself. He sleeps in the ditches every night. The alms he accepts mostly is money.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:35
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Garlick is a small plant like an union. It is used for dogs taking hystericks and for worms in cows tails. It is sliced and put through food for dogs. It is cut up and mixed with soot and salt. Then a cut is put in the cows tail and the garlick is put in to it.
Nettles are pulled before seeding in the month of May. They are used to purify the blood.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:35
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house. People make beds for them in their barns. People like to see them coming because they tell a lot of old stories. They mostly come about Christmas. The people put names on some of these old people, such as the "camphor man". He got that name because he sells camphor. The names of the well known of these old people are as follows- Davy Holden, Micky Lynch, and Pat Cullen. Pat has no toes as his father cut them off with a spade when he was a young boy. A man, and woman visit the parish of The Rower. It is not known what their right names are, but they are called "Soot and Salt". Some families go around also. The two best known are Dorans, and Flyngs. Often old travellers died in barns all over the parish. It is the custom for travellers to carry a bag each.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:34
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The travelling folk call at our house and sell tins and plates and studs and carpets. They mostly come in bands. They are not poor. They never travel on foot as they all have asses and cars. The principal ones are the OReillys the O Donavans and the Delaneys. The people do not like to see them coming. They uasually come in the winter. They stay in old disused house in fields. They light a fire in it and sing songs. They always ask for rags and horse hair and old bottles. In the night when everyone is in bed they steal hens ducks and geese from the people of the locality.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:34
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Travelling folk are common round this district. They usually come in bands but sometimes they come to a townsland and stay a few days in it. They some times separate and go to different parts of the country. When night comes on them they make a tent by the side of the road but sometimes they get lodging in a nearby house. The names of some of them that come round this district are Johnny and Mary Hennessy, Billie Ryan, Joe Darcy, Paddy Conway and Tom Doyle. Any of those do not sell anything. Another well known band of them that visit this district are the Bolands and another band named Nolan are often to be seen round this district. They usually bring a band of asses with them. Some of the traveling folk sell small articles. Those are called pedlers.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:34
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Long ago beggars went around from place to place with donkeys and horses. They lived on what the farmers and other people gave them such as flour oatenmeal, potatoes, vegetables sometimes a piece of bacon. They exchanged their donkeys and horses at times for articles of clothing and for food. They sometimes brought their alms to the towns and sold the potatoes and other things got from the farmers. Gipsies travelled around like the tinkers and made mats and hats and made artifical flowers. Flowers were sometimes made out of turnips, carved beautifully and then coloured red, yellow etc. Journey men tailors, masons, and stone dressers for mills etc. travelled from place to place and from village to village staying where they got work and after that moving on to the next place. Ballad singers made their way from village to village singing their "Come all ye's" often accompanied by their wives and children. Fiddlers did the same and were often hired for a dance or some such occasion.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:33
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in no particular way. The only fact that unchangeable regarding such wayfarers is that they do come.
They are rich in news and gossip. The tales they relate are not always characterised by truth. Very often the audience they attract is great but the believers are few. When especially they are being entertained by a family they wax eloquent that family's various vicissitudes and past glories are always able to be recalled. Such flattery and badinage are always at their service.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:33
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A good many travelling people call at my home. Some of them are very poor and depend on on the charity of the people. Others are not poor and they sell small articles at a gain. They sell very useful things such as reels of thread, candle sticks which the men make, cups and saucers, mugs and plates, pictures and picture frames, brooches and necklaces, egg cups and large gallons which the men make.
The women usually sell the articles which they carry in large baskets. They also sell flowers which the women make from paper. They are very welcome when they have useful things to sell and are not too dear. They buy their supplies at the Monster House, Kilkenny or at Woolworths.
Nowadays nearly all the travellers have caravans. The poor have cars and in the night they sleep in small tents. These tents are merely sticks stuck down securely in the ground with canvas overhead. They are usually given a penny when they come to the door. They then ask for bread or tea or sugar. It is given to them. When they get two or three things they leave, but there are others who are not satisfied and they have to be sent away.
Two or three families usually travel together. They camp and then go round in twos and threes looking for charity or selling articles. They usually come before a races
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:32
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Travelling people go round the country as they are not welcome in the cities. There are some who are well-known, and have been going round for many years.
The Delaneys who come to our house sell carpets, china, tins, laces, and holy objects. They are fairly well to-do. Nearly everyone buys something from them. They sleep in a caravan. The Dalys are another band of travelling folk. They put up on the Spa road. Their father is seventy years, and their mother is dead. They sell horses and are very rich.
Their people used to have names on the beggar-men that used to go round long ago.
One man used to go around and sell matches, and put burnt ones under and a row of good ones on top, he was called "Tom the Fool". Another man used to come from Wexford. He used to gather potatoes, and sell them every every Tuesday. For the nights he used to sleep in the barn. He was
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:31
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a man of low stature and he wore black clothes. He came every three months and he stayed for a week. He sold soft goods such as remnants of cotton; ties, shirts, collars, overalls, and many other things. He travelled in an ass and cart. He was a good Catholic, and he told funny stories of his travels.
Travelling Folk (Cont'd)
My father was telling about an man who used to come to our house in Rosboultra when he was a boy. They had a nickname on him (called) "Tom the Dancer". They did not know his real name. He was a great dancer, and used to dance for the people every night. He would come every year about the first of May, and stay for about five days. He slept on a bed of straw in the barn. He was a peculiar old man and wore a long coat and a tall hat. He was of small statute, and very strongly built. He used to bring in the calves every evening, and blow the fire.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:31
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About fifty years ago an old woman named Peggie Swift, lived in a two storeyed house in Kilkennny town. She let some of the rooms. Every Monday she gathered the money from her tenants, and paid the rent. She worked for the rest of the week.
Her chief work was making "bums" (bombs) [Those are round balls, made from a mixture of culm and yellow clay, dried, and used as fuel]. She used to come to my house on the first Tuesday of every month to make "bums" and to do other work also.
She started from the town at seven o'clock in the morning, and she used to reach my house at nine o'clock. She got her breakfast when she arrived, and then she started her work.
When there used be children in the house Peggie Swift always brought a stick of "Peggie's Leg". In those days nearly al the women used to smoke pipes. When Peggie used to have her work done she used to come into the kitchen and light her pipe at the fire, and stay smoking and smoking until she'd have all the tobacco smoked. At night she slept in the kitchen with
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:30
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One day whilest St Patrick was on Slieve Mis he found a piece of gold. Not knowing what it was he asked a Gipsy what it was. The Gypsy coveted the gold and he said that it was only a piece of tin. Patrick did not trust the Gipsy so he went to a blacksmith. The blacksmith told him what it was so he blessed the blacksmith gave him the gold and departed. Ever since then gipies have had to live a hard life.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:29
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papers were printed they used to bring the news from town to town. Then when the papers were printed those people used to buy one and read it at the cross roads of every district in Summer time and in the forge in the Winter time. All classes of people used gather to hear the news.
The hawkers frequent this district also. They have donkeys and cars. They bring chairs, tables, lino, mats, rugs, and picture to sell. They mostly make those themselves. They sell them in backward places. Those have to pay a liecence of five shillings.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:28
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There are many different kinds of travelling folk the tinkers sleep out in a camp and in the day they go from place to place and house to house. The most plentyfull family of those travellers is the Delaneys, they lodge on the road sides. There is one old man among them, he is loved by everrybody when he comes and sit down by the fire you would like to be listening to him telling stories about ghosts and fairies and all that he met he could tell you about your friends and all who died and all who are sick. They come at a certain time of the year at the races in Blackbog. When they come they are welcomed by the people of the house they generly stay one night. All those people that come around are very poor they come looking for alms they only take money.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:26
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cure rubs the patient’s hand seven times in succession making the sign of the cross each time.
Rheumatism: - Pull some fainlach which can be found growing on the sea shore and boil in water for about twenty minutes. Remove from fire and strain. Rub the affected limb with the liquid three times a day for about a week. By this time the pain should have gone.
Pluresy: - A near relation of the sufferer bleeds him (or her) at the wrist. When sufficient blood appears to have been drawn off the wrist must be bandaged carefully.
Toothache: - Heat some common salt and put it in a small bag. Hold the warm bag to the tooth for about a quarter of an hour.
”Sprain”:- Hold the sprained part under fast flowing cold water from a tap. Washing the sprained limb in forge water is also a cure.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:26
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was without a house or home and had to tramp the roads just as the poor scholar often had to do before him. While tramping about from place to place seeking work and a bite to eat he came one day to a fine big house. Hoping to get some food he approached the door and knocked. It was immediatily opened to the poor man’s astonishment by a priest. The priest recognised the old man as the one who many years before gave him the price of the book and was sorry to see that he was so poor as to have to beg for his bread. He asked the old man if he knew who he was. “I don’t know you.” “Well said the priest”, so you have forgotten the poor scholar to whom you once gave the price of a book; but come in for I am very glad to see you again.” The poor man entered the house and was treated to a fine dinner by the kind priest. After dinner the priest asked him where he intended to stay for the night. I have no certain place to stay any night now your
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:25
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Long ago a man named Jones hid a pot of gold in a moat in a field beside a house now occupied by Mrs Cafferty in Streeda. There is supposed to be a serpent watching the pot of gold and that he would kill anyone who might succeed in finding it. In order to succeed in getting this gold the seeker must come riding on a white horse and must ride directly to the spot where the gold is hidden. Having found the pot he must take off the lid and throw it across the moat to the opposite side. Then he must ride quickly and cross the first meiren water. The
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:25
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An old woman told me this story. She said it is quite true. It happened about sixty years ago. This is how she told it. "One night meself and two or three of my friends were sitting on the wall outside of our house. Suddenly I saw men with every colour of lights coming very near. When we saw them we knew they were fairies. One group of fairies were standing on dunán and were passing lights across to a group of fairies who were standing on dún na luachra and the latter were singing across to a group of fairies who were standing on dún na lócan. They were singing "ní bheidh clúdach le fágháil ar son tigh amhain i naice na cnuic seo."
On the next night it happend that there came an awful gale and swept the roof off the houses near those moats. Dunán (mentioned above} Is the moat in Breaghwy it is in Thomas Leydons land.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:24
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serpent will follow him on this ride and if catches up with him before he has crossed the water he will kill him. If the finder of the gold succeeds in crossing the water the serpent will fall dead and he can go back to the moat and get the gold.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:23
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“This is the story about James Moor. One night he was coming from ramblin about twelve oclock. As he was not far from Ahamlish graveyard he sthuped to tie his shoe. When he lifted his head
what do you think did he see coming but three men carrying a coffin, when they saw James the said they were all right as they had James to help them carry it. James said “all right, as he thought he had only o carry it as far as Ashamlish graveyard. When they came
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 01:22
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as far as the graveyard they said they could not bury him there, they went on until the came to Drumcliff and they went in there and they were toul that they couldn’t bury him there. So they went on until they came to Sligo cemetry and asked could they bury him there. They were soon toul they could not. So they went on then south, as far as they couldnt tell themselves. Anyhow they buried him.
The three men went away. James did not know where they went to. James faced back, he did not know where he was until he came as far as Thomas Connollys on the line. He called for a half wan. As he was drinking it the sergent of the place came in and was lookin at him. When that half wan was drank he called for another and drank it. The sergent was there all the time and as James was goin out he asked him “Are you James Moor”, “I am of curse” says James. “You are the man who is on the ‘Hue and Cry’ this six months” “I thought I was only away since last night” said James.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 00:12
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are shaped square with a cross with a ring round it on the top. The name of the person buried and the date are inscribed on the most up-to-date tombstones.
senior member (history)
2020-10-31 00:08
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There are two used churchyards in the Parish of Cappamore. They are situated in the townlands of Towerhill and Ballinanure. There is a ruined church or abbey in Towerhill churchyard. The vaults of the Lloyd family are in Towerhill graveyard. There is one churchyard in the parish of Doon. It is situated at the top of the village. All are still in use. There are a few trees growing in them. There are some very old tombs in the graveyard. Nearly all the graves have tombstones erected over them. The tombstones are made of cement. Some of them are made of wood. Some of the Local Families still used distant graveyards for burying their dead relations.
Some of the tombstones are ornamented. Those
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 23:57
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he would have a good meal but when his wife tried her pocket for the doctor she was enraged, but the giant was furious and the two of them started quarrelling violently. His wife brought a knife from under her apron and stuck the giant with it, but he struck her with a cane and knocked her unconscious. He himself died from poison he got in his wound, during the quarrel and they both died in a few days.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 23:16
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The man followed determined to catch the hare.
When he entered the house although it was very early in the morning, the woman of the house was (up) sitting in the kitchen with a pool of fresh blood under her chair.
When the man saw this he returned home convinced that the woman was the "hare" he had shot a few minutes before.
Written by Paddy Malone, who got this story from his father Joseph Malone aged 40
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 23:15
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this – long ago a man who lived in Fahalunaghto about three miles from here was out on a May night watching his cattle.
This man carried a gun.,
Nothing unusual happened until about day-break.
He saw a hare running about his cows
They were all lying down peaseably in a corner of the field and rousing them all up, he watched for a while and at length decided to shoot this hare.
He fired – breaking one of its legs.
The hare now limped along on three legs.
The man decided to follow and capture this hare.
He followed it some distance across the field, when to his amazament the hare headed for a neighbouring house and entered it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 23:11
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May Eve Customs 11-5-38
It is a customs on May eve in all rural Ireland to hang the May bush outside the door. It is also a custom with certain people to stay up all night watching the cows and tillage land, & watching the faries, because it is said that on May night the butter and potatoes used to be taken by witchcraft.
Some people practise this custom to the present day
It is said that those people (those) that practise witchcraft on such occasions used assume the shape of animals.
A story is told in support of
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 23:03
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Most harmful weeds growing at home - Dark leaves. Nettles. Groundsel. Crowfoot, Coltsfoot. Chicken weed, "Buachallanns", Dandelions. Rushes. Thistles. Moss.
Thistles require good land. Story told of blind man who went with his son to "walk" a farm they were contemplating the buying of. Told son to tie the horse to a thistle or Geosadan. Son said there was not any such weed in field. "Come away then" said he. Land poor.
Wet land grows rushes.
(2) Geosadáin is a poisenous weed to animals. There is a cure for other diseases.
(3) Rushes. Generaly grow on wet lands and are useful for thatching hay-stacks
(4) Dandelions. is a useful feed for young Turkeys and for young pigs.
(5) Dog leaves are one great harm to land, and are useful when you get a sting of a nettle.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 23:00
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Jack show your light. This game is played outside at night. A number of children play it. One has a flashlight. He goes away to hide with some company and the rest go to look for him. When they cannot find him they shout "Jack show your light." The he flashes the light just for a moment and off they searching for him again. When he is caught he must give up the lamp and he and his party then go searching for other party
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:57
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If you were going anywhere and to forget something and to turn back for it, it is unlucky. If there are pigeons about your house and for them to leave it it is unlucky.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:53
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"One good turn deserves another". "An apple a day keeps the doctor away". "A wise man says little". "You cant throw a stone in a green-house". "A fool and his money are easy departed". "A penny wise, a pound foolish". "Charity begins at home". "A watched kettle never boils".
Other sayings are "Once bitten twice shy".
"Well begun is half done".
"Better late than never".
"As good out of the world as out of the fashon".
"There is a slippery stone at a strangers door".
"A crust of bread and liberty".
"The longest way round is the shortest way home".
"When the old cock crows the young one learns".
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:52
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2. Very long ago there was a ghost seen near the mill race at Ballymakenny. it was a tall girl dressed in black. Some evenings she used to come and walk the road along with people. She would walk a long distance on the road and then suddenly disappear. Many people saw this ghost.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:52
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1. Long ago there was a woman killed at Fieldstown cross. Her ghost was seen at the place where she was killed. One night two men were coming at the cross very late in the night. One of them saw a woman sitting on the side of the road where that woman was killed and the other man could not see her and then she disappeared.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:51
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3. One night two men were coming home from work. They were coming across a field and they had to cross a stile. The first man got across the stile but the second man could not. He asked the other man to help him over the stile. A man put down his hand to lift him up. When he got up he saw the other man half ways over the field. When he caught the other man he asked him did he lift him over the stile and he said no. it was a ghost that lifted him up.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:50
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:49
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Drumbaragh is derived from the Irish word "Drumbhearra" - which means the '"Shaved Ridge". The road which runs through Drumbaragh, was the old stage-coach road.
Near the school was a large bare hill. The road was cut right through this hill or ridge and this cutting is shown by the high banks on each side of the road
Our school is situated on the Kells-Oldcastle road about three miles from the town of Kells.
The Curra Mor
At the back of our house in Kells, is a large field called the Curra Mor - (Cómhthrom Mór). It is a large, flat, field with no high ground on it. It is lowlying and is used as a grazing field.
Another field near us and at the back of the "Christian Brother's School" is a field called the 'Bottoms".
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:47
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Burns and Scalds
1. The bark of witch elm boiled to a jelly and applied
Thorn
1. A slice of fat bacon applied to where thorn is.
Dogs Bite
1. A few hairs from the dog's coat and rub them to the bite.
Yellow Jaundice
1. A docker root boiled in milk and portion drunk.
Pain in the arm
1. An eel skin tied around the arm
Stye in eye
1. Ten gooseberry thorns pointed at the sty, throwing the last over the right shoulder for ten successive mornings.
Ring Worm and Sore Mouth
There are two people in Loyd who have the cure of Ring Worm and Sore Mouth. When they are curing the sore mouth they have to blow their
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:46
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Draw Wounds
1. Rough side of cabbage or ivy leaf will draw wounds, and smooth side heals it.
Mumps
1. Put ass in front of pigsty. Walk under ass into sty and rub mumps to pig.
Burst
1. Unsalted butter, white of egg and green herbs mixed
Warts
Cut potatoes in two. Put a hole in each half and put salt in the hole. Rub salt on every morning.
Mumps
1. Bring person into pigsty and march him round three times saying 'Ugat the pig. Take the Leicne'.
Ear Ache
1. To cure earache, roast a raisin, and when it is real hot, press it in hard into the ear and leave it overnight
Rheumatism
1. Carry chestnut in the pocket.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:45
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There is an old man who goes travelling around this townland. He is called Harry Hickey. He goes around selling laces and broaches and pins and needles. He has a basket on his arm.
He walks round the big mountains and all around the southern countries and home again. He walks about twenty miles a day. He is married and has a house in Gibstown.
Rooney
There is also another traveller. He is called Rooney. He mends buckets. He is at all fairs and is a horse dealer. He buys horses and sells them. There are very few people travelling around now. All we see is Gipsies and they come round every often. There is a great family of Gipsies. They are called Dunville. They travel mostly in Meath and Westmeath.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:42
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More houses were in the district in former times but a lot of new houses were built there for the past few years. Not many ruins can be seen of the old houses. A great number of people emigrated to a America, but as the emigration to America was stopped they are now emigrating to England. The townland is mentioned in a song called the "Maid of Rooska hill". It was made for a fair maiden who was home in a holiday from America. I'll quote the song in another page.
The land is hilly and boggy. The road is zig zag for vehicles to go up and down. There is a big hill above at the top called Turn hill. years ago a big giant threw a huge stone from the top down to the demesne in NewCastle West a distance of over three miles. That stone can be seen today with the print of the giant's five fingers in it. There are no woods in it but there are lots of streams. One small river flows through the district. No stories connected with them.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:38
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Gloon when may great-grand-father was dying. It happened to be late on in the night, when they had to go for a priest to Glenamaddy. The Priest didn't want to come so late at night. The messenger answered "If you come I will leave you home again". He came and anointed the sick man. The messenger volunteered to convey the priest back home again. About half way between the sick-man's house and the church there was a stream of water running across the road. When both arrived at the stream the priest said "Stand back you and don't step on the stream". The priest told him then never to convey a priest home again after he had anointed a sick person. To night you will get great mawling on your way home. There was a lot of sandpits on his way through the fields he had to cross. Before he came to the first sandpit, he was taken off his feet and flung to the ground. When he came to the pit he thought he saw a lot of youngsters hurling and playing all kinds of games. He got great mawling there and the same
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:38
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happened at each sandpit. He could hear the laugh and fun and they seemed to enjoy the mawling he was getting. There was a double ditch which he had to cross before he reached home and he was taken and flung over it but yet he was unhurt. Even to this day people do not like to convey a priest home after he has anointed a person at night.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:37
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In this place there were three different kinds of candes made; mould candles, dip candles and rush candles. Mould candles; - The tallow was melted and poured into the mould. Apiece of cotton was put in the centre for a wich. It was kept in the centre by means of a match placed across the top of the mould. When cold it was turned out. We have a mould in school that was used by my Great-grand-father; Edmond McGrath. Dip candles - In the dip candles the cotton was dipped in melted tallow and allowed to try a little then dipped again till thick enough. As it thickened at the ends they were constantly changing till it was the same thickness at each end. Rush candles - They got soft thick rushes growing near the river and stripped off all of the skin except the piece down the back. This was steeped in melted tallow: These were called "Sluts". Wax candles. My grand uncle John McGrath had a lot of bees and from the bees-wax he made wax candles. He baled down all the honey combs in the winter, the pure wax went to the bottom and the dross came to the top. He strained away all dross and melted the wax again. This he used in the same way
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:34
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"Don't count our chickens before they are hatched"
"A persons mouth often broke his nose"
"Everyone has his own story"
"A rainbow in the morning is shepherds warning. A rainbow in the night is shepherds delight"
He's a poor priest who hasn't a clerk.
It does not matter if your born in a duckyard if you're hatched from a swan egg.
The world wold not a racehorse from ass.
You can't make a silk purse from a sow's ear.
A person who fails to get what he is often striving after is often glad to accept something inferior: When all else fails, welcome haws".
When a person shows no sign of gratitude for a good turn as if it passed completely from his memory people say, "Eaten bread is soon forgotten".
A person is sent upon some dangerous mission as when the persons he is going to are his deadly enemies, this is "Sending the goose on a message to the fox's den".
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:33
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Tonn na bFidil
The sea surrounded by rocks near Mutton Island is shaped like the bottom of a violin and that is how it got it's name
Cuir na nDruid
There is a sheltered cave in Mutton Island which is "Cúir na nDruid." It got its name from the starlings that used take shelter in the cave.
Cuan na long.
There is a harbour near Mutton Island which is called "Cuan na long." It is called that name because of the ships that used come in there long ago.
Carraig na Rón.
There is a rock outside Quilty that is calle d"Carraig na Rón" on account of the seals that used sleep and rest on the rock.
Sruthán Brigid d'Arcy.
There is a little river between Quilty and Seafield called "Sruthán Brigid d'Arcy" because there was an old woman called Brigid d'Arcy living near it. It is the boundary between Quilty and Seafield.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:31
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Birds of a feather flock together.
Fine feathers makes fine birds.
Spare the rod and spoil the child.
Like father like son.
When the cat is out the mouse can dance.
Never put off till to morrow what you can to to day.
Make hay while the sin shines.
Wilful waste makes woeful want.
The first sickness is better then a relapse.
Grumbling makes the loaf no larger.
All is not gold that glitter.
You cannot put an old head on young sholders.
After a storm there comes a calm.
When boys have money they're men.
When their money is spent they're back to boys again.
Children or fools should not handle edged tools.
A leaking barrel is soon empty.
First be just then you may be generous.
Trust not the man who promises with an oath.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:27
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Tonn na bFidil
The sea surrounded by rocks near Mutton Island is shaped like the bottom of a violin and that is how it got it's name
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:27
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A cure for a bleeding nose is to tie a piece of string round your "lúidín".
Fairyflax cures kidney disease and stoppage of water. It is boiled at first and the juice that's made from it cure those diseases.
A cure for sore eyes it so wash them with cold tea.
A cure for a chin cough is to boil a plant called a "Luvatreac" and to drink the juice.
The best cure for the "Measles" is to stay in the open air as much as possible and to do some exercise.
A cure for rheumatism is to boil a cup of salt-water and rub it in.
A cure for a boil is to mix soap and sugar together an put them up to it.
A cure for a hiccough in a person is to give them a fright or a surprise.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:25
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Most harmful weeds growing at home - Dark leaves. Nettles. Groundsel. Crowfoot, Coltsfoot. Chicken weed, "Buachallanns", Dandelions. Rushes. Thistles. Moss.
Thistles require good land. Story told of blind man who went with his son to "walk" a farm they were contemplating the buying of. Told son to tie the horse to a thistle or Geosadan. Son said there was not any such weed in field. "Come away then" said he. Land poor.
Wet land grows rushes.
(2) Geosadáin [?] is a poisenous weed to animals. There is a cure for other diseases.
(3) Rushes. Generaly grow on wet lands and are useful for thatching hay-stacks
(4) Dandelions. is a useful feed for young Turkeys and for young pigs.
(5) Dog leaves are one great harm to land, and are useful when you get a sting of a nettle.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:24
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makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
The early bird catches the worm.
'Tis too late to close the stable door when the horse has gone.
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
The neighbours porridge is sweet.
All together like Brown's cows.
Look before you leap.
A stitch in time saves nine.
The proof of the pudding lies in the eating.
Many hands make light work.
Pride goes before a fall.
A miss is as good as a mile.
People who live in glass houses should not throw stones
If the cap fits you wear it.
Deep water runs smooth.
The younger the chicken the better the picking.
Every dog has his day.
Health is better than richness.
The wren thought he was a great bird when he threw the snail over the dicth.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:22
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The following weeds are obnoxcions in any field or garden. Chicken weed, Robin Run the hedge. Bouchalauns rag weeds and varrious others.
In some cases of sickness herbs are very advantagons for instance pikewort is a great cure for tiles while watercress and mustard-cress are great for the blood house-leeks are a cure for Kidney trouble. There are a great many others but in these up to date times are not so much used as its all chemicals and drugs. In former times the herbs were extensively used for cures.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:21
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The tillage of potatoes is a very interesting job and is only an enjoyment in the find day weather in Spring when a peck of March dust is worth a kings ransom. There are man varieties of potatoes. Namely British Queen, Black Bulls, Duke of York, Land Leaguers, garden fillers Golden wonders, Flounders. All these being an early variety. For the main crops Champion Irish Queen Aran Banner, Kerr's Pinks, Farmyard manure with a little bog stuff on rich soil will produce a good crop at home we can get a grand quality out of bawn ridges and sow a half acre each year.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:20
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If you want to know me come and live with me.
Too many cooks spoil the broth.
The nearer to the bone the better the pick.
Eating and grumbling like a hen hatching.
The longest way round is the shortest way home.
Short and sweet like a donkey's gallop.
Sense taught is better than Sense bought.
We know the worth of water when the well is dry.
Do unto others as you would wish them do unto you.
A good character is better than a great fortune.
For the want of a nail the shoe was lost, for want of a shoe the horse was lost, for want of a horse the rider was lost and for want of a rider the battle was lost all for the want of a little horse shoe nail.
Early to bed and early to rise
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:20
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Grown by people generally. Grow enough to supply home needs. The average farmer puts down about an acre.
Ridges first year. Drills subsequent years.
Ground manured.
All plough work. Very little spade work nowadays. Even out with plough or potato digger. "[?]" at digging. Variety generally sown.
Kerr Pinks, Champions, Langleys, Lapworthy, Golden Wonder, Epicures, Duke of York.
Starch made from potatoes.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:15
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The landlord of Glanworth was the Roberts. The teller does not remember how long they had claim or how they got it, but they lived in Midleton Park Cobh. Leases gave that adderss and every member of the family was mentioned in the lease. The family vault is in Glanworth where they were all buried.
Emily Aldworth was landlord of Dunmalion Cubbage having come there from Kanturk.
General Barry was landlord of Ballyclough. It was he, a Yeoman, had removed from the Dominican Abbey to the Protestant Church nearby, a beautiful stone framed window. On going over the bridge and turning on his horse to view the work of his hands, he was struck blind, while others say he started some muscles and his head remained turned back.
Lucas was landlord of Dunmahon They were all loyal subjects to the Crown and were very harsh on the people. Evictions were carried out every other day
Twelve families were thrown out in Manning by Lord Donoghmore and
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:13
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called luck (he spits on it and puts it in his pocket.)
When a bargain has been made, the parties show their agreement by striking hands.
Cattle are marked by clipping hair on the side. Sheep are marked on the back with red raddle.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:12
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The local fairs are held in Midleton on every second Monday of the month.
Fairs are not held in the country,
Buyers very often transact business at farmers' houses in these days.
Fairs were held formerly in Carrigtwohill, Cloyne, and Lisgoold, but no buyers attended as Carrigtwohill, Cloyne and Lisgoold were too far from the railways. Later on lorrys came into progress and fairs are carried on again in Cloyne.
There are no local traditions of fairs on hills or in the neighbourhood of cemeteries or castles, forts.
The pig fair in Midleton is held on the street but there is a special fair place for the other animals.
When going into the fair place toll is paid to a collector at the gate. A penny toll is paid for each sheep and two pence a head for cattle but when taking in a horse and crib four pence must be paid. When a cow is sold the buyer gives the person from whom he bought her the money and he gives the buyer a half-crown. It is
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:11
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Once there was a landlord in Ballybane and he had a bailiff named Kelly. Once when the landlord was absent, Kelly evicted all the tenants. The landlord was displeased because the bailiff had no justified reason to evict them out of Cloonascarbery. He heard the cries of the people
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:11
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It was prophesied when Newbridge chapel was to be built that the stones would be removed three times and it happened so. It was first to be built in Tohergar. The foundation was laid and the concrete was raised three feet above the ground. It was removed again to a place half way between Newbridge and Closatoher and a tree has sprung up in the very spot in the middle of the field. The stones were again removed to Newbridge. There was a market house in Newbridge and the masons put an to it and converted it into a chapel. The market house windows are still to be seen in the inner wall.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:10
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In the old chapel in Tohergar there was a friar. He resided there also. Occasionally he was haunted by a ghost but he could not touch the priest while he wore the stole. One night he was away from home and he used always wear the stole but on this occasion he forgot it and when he was going home it is believed that he was stricken dead by the ghost for he was found dead in the morning. He is buried outside the old chapel and the ruins of it are still to be seen.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:08
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People who are born between certain hours of the night have a cure for "Craosgalar." Another cure is when a boy that has never seen his father blows hi breadth into the child's mouth that has "Craosgalar it will cure. The boy has to do this for three mornings in succession.
If you dip a wart in water which is lodged on a hollowed rock, the wart will cure.
The seventh son of a family has a cure on his finger for any kind of a sore. If he rubs this cure to the sore, the sore will cure. A seventh son has also a cure for a pin in the back - by walking over the person's back.
If you lick an "Arcluacra three times you will have a cure for a burn.
If you lick a "Leac-a-luacra" you will have a cure for a burn.
The people long ago had a cure for a bleeding sore by chewing pure green grass and rub it on the sore. Another cure is to rub a cobweb to it and it will stop the blood.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 22:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
woman who had teeth as long as the teeth of a harrow and she told these men that there were crocks of gold hidden there and she adviced them to continue their journey. "I am guarding that gold for hundreds of years," said the old woman.
They turned back again to continue digging for the gold when a bull appeared and they got frightened and ran for their lives. This treasure was hidden by the Danes in olden times and there was a witch guarding because that time it was all by witchcraft.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Several "travelling people" travel around yet, but they are not so familiar as they were long ago. These people sell several things such as laces, needles, polish, studs, combs, etc. All the people of the country buy from them. The people keep them for the night, and when morning comes they go to some other houses. Some of these "travelling people have food with them but others don't. The most of these people travel on foot, but some of them have donkeys, and ponies. It is mostly for the fair days these people come.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is one fort in Gurteenroe, and it is said that fairies used to lived in it long ago. It is said also that when a priest was going to mass one morning on horse, and when he was crossing a river near the fort he fell in, and was drowned. Some say there is a hole from the river into the fort.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Travelling folk still call to my home. The people who come now, have been coming to my home for two or three years. They seem to be very poor. Some of them sell small articles, and others beg for money or clothes. I don't know where they get the articles which they sell. Some of them go about in caravans, and others walking, and more in horses and cars. They mostly come on the sports days, and on the horse races day.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
fever, and they were buried in the cill in the southern end of Skehanore which is called the Reen. In another place in the townland there was a street of twelve houses, and twelve families lived there, and the most of them died of famine and fever, and they were buried in the Cill uncoffined, and several bodies were put in one grave.
Scarely had the people seed-potatoes for 1848.
They cut the eyes out of the potatoes, and sowed them broad-cast like grain, and they produced a wonderful crop of potatoes.
The people ate turnips, and sea-weed, and shell-fish, and boiled nettles.
There are several ruins of houses which were them
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ní raibh lich ar na h-urláir san t-sean aimsir, acht urláir dobh buidhe.
In aiche na teine a bíod an leaba i gcómhnuidhe.

Mo Atair d'innis an sgeal seo dom
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá dá reilig ins an áit seo ceann i "gCill Mumhain" agus ceann eile i "Tuath Cleith". Ar talamh léibéalta atá na reiligí sin.
Tá tomba mór ins reilig i dTuath Cleith. Is le muinntir Mac na Mara an tombha sin acht níor cuaraibh aoinne acha ann mar cuadhar anonn go Sasanna.
Ins gach reilig tá fothrach teampall acht níl fhios ag aoinne beó chaithfhinn ar leighibh Aifrinn ionnta. Tá na reiligís in carnógacha.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are several forts in this district. There are three forts in Cooragurteen about two miles from the town.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Travelling people still visit my house. The same people have been doing so for about seven years. They sell small articles such as studs, brooches, and tiepins. When they come they stay for the night sometimes. They sleep in some out house. Sometimes they have food with them. Some of them are very poor. The most of them travel in bands. They come around during horse-races, and fair-days. When they come they tell stories about other parts of the country.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Blianta ó shoin deirtear gur tháinig Naomh Darra amach ó Árainn ar eitealáin. Tháinig sé go "Ucht Darra", san áit in ar tháinig sé bhí tobhar. Do chrom sé ar a ghlúnaibh ar chloich a bhí in aiche an tobair chun a phaidreacha a rádh agus tá rínn a ghlúnaibh ar an gcloich sin fós.
Dubhairt sé cúpla paidreacha ós chionn an tobair agus tá leigheas teinneas fiachla ar an tobar ó shoin.
Do chuir sé séipéal beag in "Ucht Darra" agus tá fothrach an séipéal ann fós.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fridays are counted unlucky for visiting sick people. In this district people think they would not have a good crop of potatoes unless they would start sowing after St Patrick's Day, and finish on Good Friday. Some people say that it is unlucky to remove from on house to another on Good Friday, and on Easter Sundays.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays are thought unlucky days, and the rest are thought lucky days.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(-)
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
rucks builds their nest with sticks, and hair, and fur in the inside of the nest. The Lark builds its nest with hay and hair.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tógadh caisleán Baile-na-Leachain sa bhliain 1517. Sé Leachain Ó Conchubhair a tógadh é.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sé an fáth gur tháinig sé go dtí an áit seo ná, d'eirigh troid idir é féin agus naomh a bhí in Árainn.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Martin Aithens interest advice
Martin Aithens interest advice
Martin Aithens interest advice
extraordinarily Association Athens
extraordinarily Association Athens
extraordinarily Association Athens
competition
competition
competition
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Martin Aithens interest advice
Martin Aithens interest advice
Martin Aithens interest advice
extraordinarily Association Athens
extraordinarily Association Athens
extraordinarily Association Athens
competiton
competition
competiton
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Through his influence O'Dwyer got into the police force and from that he raised himself to his present position.
Martin Sheridan had an enormous influence in America, was extraordinarily popular. He died rather young of Pneumonia (actually he died of influenza). His funeral was as large as any up to then in New York. In 1932 the Mayo Men's Association of New York presented what was known as the "Sheridan Trophy" for competition between the New York and Mayo teams. Martin Sheridan is represented as throwing the discus. The statue itself is of solid silver. The New York Team won it but it was presented to the Mayo Team to take home to Bohola, Mayo, Martin's native parish. This trophy which is a valuable work of art can be seen in O'Dwyers of Lismirrane Bohola. The inscription on it is as follows.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tipperary also gave an exhibition with the hammer. At the Olympic Games held in London America. Aitkens Martin proved himself the all round World's Champion beating all comers. The pole he used in pole vaulting can still be seen in Mr. Clarke's shop Bohola where it is greatly treasured and an object of great pride to the people of the locality.
In the year 1932 when the Mayo Gaelic Football Team toured America as Connacht Champions the present Judge William O'Dwyer, a contemporary of Sheridan's and a native of Bohola also, sponsored the tour.
The Judge attributes his success to the interest, and advice given by the kindhearted Martin who took him completely under his wing.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago people used to have cures for certain ailments. It is said that if a person licked the tail of a lizard he would have the cure for a burn on his tongue.
There is a cure for a tooth-ache; if a person rubbed his tongue to the jawbone of a porcupine he would have the cure on his tongue.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Martin Sheridan the second youngest of a family of five brothers was born in Bohola in the year 1881. He had four brothers Patrick, Dick, Andy and Joe. The latter according to local knowledge, was a greater athlete than Moran, who in the years 1906-7-8 was all round world's Champion.
When young he emigrated to New York where he joined the police force after-wards because became Detective. About 1906 he visited his native home and while in Mayo the writer saw saw him give an exhibition in hurdle racing pole vaulting throwing the weights and discus in Ballina. On that day at a big sports meeting that famous athlete Tom Kiely from
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 21:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
long until he heard a voice saying "Keep out of my way or I will kill you" Tom nearly died with fright when he heard the voice and could not see anyone. It was not long until he saw a man in white standing beside him on the path.
He brought Tom into the fort and left him there by himself. It was not long until Tom died and he is seen every night in the fort dancing and playing.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
black spots.
The Seagull lays its eggs in a hole in a rock, and they are of a bluish colour.
The Wren and the Wagtail make their nests in holes in fences or in furze, of moss and hair.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the young cuckoo comes out it throws out the young rivogs. The Swallow builds its nest under the eaves of houses, or in barns. It makes its nest of sticks and wads of hay.
The Corncrake makes its nest in meadows of grass.
The Robin, and the Sparrow, make their nests in trees, or in fences, of moss and sticks. The Robin lays four or five eggs which are of a speckled brown colour.
The Rook and the Magpie make their nests on the tops of high trees, of grass and sticks.
The Thrush and the Blackbird make their nests in fences or in trees, of mud and sticks. The Blackbird lays four or five eggs, which are of a blue colour.
The Thrush's eggs are speckled brown in colour.
The Lark makes its nest in a hay-field, of grass and hair. The Lark's eggs are grey with
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There once lived in Barragolda on the top of the hill, a man named Tom Kelly.
His father and his mother died when he was about twenty years old and he was left in the house alone.
There was not one night in the week that he would not go out visiting to the neighbors in the village. On his way home from his nightly visit at about two o'clock in the morning he saw a gate in the field hung up but he could not see any posts to hold it up.
It was not
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
inside the fence he heard the the boy saying some thing and going back to the fort again.
My father was sorry he did not speak to the boy. All the neighbours said it was some boy out of the village who died some time ago and wanted a mass said for him to go to heaven.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Thomas was very much afraid until he reached his house.
When he went home he went to bed but he could not sleep.
All the night he was thinking of the ghost.
He told all the people that he would not come that way at night again if he got Ireland for nothing.
He was surprised when the ghost knew him and he did not know the ghost.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
nó rudaí ann na bionn gáth aca sa tig. Fadó nuair ná raibh aon coróiní ag na daoine piocaidís deich cloca beaga agus caithidís ar an gcásán mór timceall an tobair íad, nuair a bídís ag dul timceall.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
strange black mare in the field and she could not see her own gray one. My father went out then and saw the it was our own mare that had been in a boghole the night before.
While he was out a wee man came in. He was told to sit down and he sat on a chair and his legs were so short that they were dangling and very far off the ground. Grandmother gave him tea, bread and butter. He said the butter was good but she had not it all. He said only for him they would have lost their mare the night before.
There was a wee spade at the boghole and small sods dug and placed as a pad for the mare to get out of the hole. The wee man thanked her for the tea and went out and disappeared.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Is cuimhin liom sean-athair linn a fheiscint ag fás annso. Do réir sin ba dheas an barra é. In iomaire leathana a cuirtí é. Nuair a bhíodh sé aibidh bhíodh bláth breag gorm air. Do scractí ansann é, deintí a srathú ar an umaire ar nós an choirce do baintí leis an gcorán. D'fhágaidís ar an laighe sin é ar feadh seachtaine go dtí go mbeadh sé tirm go maith. Do ceangailidís na truisleán annsan é. Na dhiadh san do cuiridís ar bhogadh i bpoll doimhin uisge é ar feadh tréimhse. Do thógaidís ansann é agus leathaidís amach ar pháirc arís é ar tíormú. Buailtí ansann le tuairgíní é. Deintí táitíní de annsan. Do bhailigheadh an fear gur leis é meitheal ban. Thagaidís, a tlú féin ag gach mnaoi acu agus chíoraidís an líon. Bhí sé ollamh annsan le sníomh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí lá saoíre aiteamhal againn Dé Ceadaoín seo caithte. Patrún iseadh bhí ins an paroíste seo sé sin féasta in onóir do Mocuda Naomhtha. Is inaice tobar an beannaca i gcnuc leitrim iseadh bhí an comluadar, mar deir na daoíne go raibh bainnc mór ag Mocuda leis an dtobar san. Is i gCiarraíghe do rugadh Mocuda naomhtha in áit in aice an Máing agus tar-éis blíadhanta fada do cuir sé mainistir mór ar bun i Lios Mór. Táirle uair nuair a bhí Mocuda ag gábháil tríd an paroíste seo gur caith sé tamaill in aice tobar an beannaca. Deirtear gur dhein sé both ann dó féin cé nach bfuil aon ríghean de anois ann. Deirtear leis gur cuir sé leighis éigin ins an dtobair. Mar sin an cúighmeadh lá fichid de Mí na Bealtaine gac blíadhan cifeá dreamna daoine ag gluaiseacht leó fé dhéin tobar an bheannaca
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
where they finished working.
The river runs through a bog and there was no flag there when they were leaving. They said to one another that they would break it up. Just then a small red-haired man appeared and said "Leave well enough alone" and then disappeared. The men did not interfere with the stone.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Brideswell . St Bridget's Well - situated in Lisanoram Farm - about 1 mile north of Hillstreet. A Pilgrimage still made between August 15th and September 8th.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
More than fifty years ago there was an old man named Andrew Plunkett a neighbour of mine he was going from card-play about twelve o' clock one night and he heard a strange noise as if chains were rattling. He was not a cowardly man still he was afraid.
My grandmother was up very early next morning and went out to see if the cattle were alright.
She came in and said there was a
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are two forges in this parish. The smiths are Ned Owens and Berney Dignan Ned Owen is the first of his family, but Breney Dignan's grandfather was a blacksmith. The forge in Hillstreet is about forty yards from a cross-roads, the other forge is just beside a cross-roads.
The forge in Hillstreet is one storey high. It is roofed with iron, the door is just like a shop door. There is one fireplace. The bellows is worked by the hand with a shaft. It was made in Éirinn. The smith uses an anvil, a sledge, a hammer, a rasp, a pincers, and a knife.
The smith shoes horses and asses. He does not make farm implements but he mends them if they are broken, but he makes gates. The blacksmiths are very strong and hardy.
Long ago people who were prevented by their parents from getting married went to the blacksmith to perform the ceremony across the anvil. The pair joined hands across the anvil. The blacksmith struck the anvil. They said the words. Then the
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nuair tháinig an gorta fuair na daoine bás ar thaoibh an bhóthair. Is amhlaidh a theip ar na prátaí. Nuair bhí na daoine ag fágailt báis fuair siad galar tógalach. Chuala mé go raibh fear ag dul ó a thig féin go dtí an óspuidéal agus luighe sé síos idir dá chlaide, agus fuair sé bás.
Sé thig Mhadágáin 'na bhíodh an t-óspuidéal an uair úd, agus roimhe sin bhí Árrus na bPóilíní san dtigh céadna, nuair fuair na daoine bás tógadh go dtí lísín atá ag Muinntir Úí Duilleáin, agus do dheintí poll ann agus cuirtí na daoine marbh isteach ann, cuirtí aol isteach leó.
Bhí níos mó daoine san áit seo fadó ná mar atá anois; tá sean-fothraig le feiscint anois mar d'imthigh na daoine as na tigthe go dtí a Meiriocá. Sé an biadh abí acú an uair úd ná turnipí agus an féar glas féin. Níor chuir an Riagaltas aon cabhair dóibh.
Máire Nich Aoid, An Riasch,
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This like many another district had its poets and rhymers down through the years. The oldest was a man named Conroy who lived where a namesake kinsman now lives at the junction of three roads near Drinane. This writer was not very well educated but had a good grasp of local subjects and wrote a lot of love-songs probably at the request of other people. He also wrote a number of songs recording evictions and the shooting of landlords and their helpers. Little is now known of this writer beyond the tradition and a few snatches of his ballads. It is not known when he was born or when he died.
Two brothers named Peter and Thomas Duignan, Corbally were good poets and flourished during during the years 1880 - 1912. Their verses partook of religious and national feelings and were well written. One of these Peter died in America and the other died
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Neill Barróid, Baile Úi h-Eidhin, Caisleán Nuadh Thiar
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 20:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí Scoil Scairte i Sean Mhuillean fadó. Bhí an scoil seo suidte ibferim Mhuinntir Úí h-Ifearnáin agus bhí sí ibparóiste Árdacadh. Istig idtig abhí an scoil ar siubhal. Bhí cóir scríobtha aca leis cailc agus slinn. Múintí béarla áireamh agus sgríobhnóireacht insan scoil - labartaí béarla ann leis - ní raib fochal Gaedhilge le cloisint.
Bhí leabar béarla aca "Reading made Easy". Seán O Faoláin ab'ainm don magistir agus tugtaí maigistir taistil air. Bhí a thigh féin aige. Ní bhíodh sé ag gábhailt timcheall ar aon chor. Bhí an fear céadna imbun na scoile seo igcomnuidhe. Bhíodh an scoil ar siubhal ar feadh an lae. Thug na scoláirí pinginn leó gac maidin Dé Luain agus thabharaidís don maighistir é. Chuaidh mo shean athair féin go dtí an scoil sin.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 19:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí fear i mBáile-Thaobh-Ruasghadh dar'bh ainm Aodh Ó Saidhail agus bhí sé na shuibhailteoir mhaith. D'fág sé an bhaile lá amhain ag an deic ochlog agus shiubhail sé go Litir-Ceanain agus thug sé ceadmachan mune leis ar a dhruim.
Shiubhail sé arais sa bháile agus bhí sé sá bháile i n-ám leis an t-Suipear a dheanamh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 19:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí fear na comhnuidhe ar an Rinne-Bhuidhe d'arbh Ainm, Tomas Mach Giolla Cearra, agus Snámh sé o Port-na-Luinge go Mull-Mór agus thiochad leis dhuil síos go tóin na fairrge agus sé pighne a thógháil anios, agus rinne se sin fiche uair. Snámh sé trasna na Maoile Ruaidhe agus rinne sé an rud ceadna.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 19:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
dó, chonnaic sé teach breagh mór, leag sé sios an cliabhán agus a mhathair ann, chuaidh isteach, agus d'fiarr sé obair. Bhí faitchios ar muinntir an tighe é a dhiultughadh, agus dubhradh leis go bhfuigheadh sé obair. I dtosach tugadh béile do agus d'a mhathair freisin.
Nuair a bhí an béile caithte aca dubhradh le Gioll go raibh gamhain amuigh i bpáirc agus go gcaithfeadh sé é a tabhairt isteach. Nuair a chuaidh sé amach ceard a bheadh sa bpáirc acht tarbh fiadhan, agus chomh túisge is a chonnaic sé Gioll rinne sé air. Rinne Gioll ar an tarbh freisin, rug sé air, d'iomchur sé isteach é, agus d'fág ag doras an tighe é. Cheap muinntear an tighe go mharbhochadh an tarbh Gioll acht ní mar sin a bhí an sgéul. Chuimnigheadar annsin ar áit a raibh piast mór neimmhneach. Bí poll ag an bpéist istigh fá crann mór árd. Thugadar tuagh do Gioll agus dúbhradh leis an crann a leagaint. Chuaidh sé amach agus tosuigh se ag gearradh an chrainn. Tháinig an phiast amach as a poll, acht nuair a chonnaic sí Gioll, bhí faithchios chomh mór sin uirthi, is gur leag Gioll an crann, chuir sé ar a druim é agus thiomáin sé í go socar reidh isteach chun an tighe. Nuair a chonnaic muinntir an tighe, Gioll agus an phiast , agus an crann ar a druim, ag tigheacht, biodar ag tuitim le sgrannradh. Fuaradar mála óir, thugadar do Gioll é, agus d'iarradar air dhul abhaile airís. Tháingi sé féin agus a mháthair abhaile, agus bhí saoghal breagh suaimhneach aca in a gCaisleán i gCill-Sgeachach uaidh sin amach.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 19:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Seán dé Faoite, aois 13, as Cill-Sgeachach, Turloch Mór, a fuair an sgéul seo ó na athair, Seán de Faoite.

Tá fothracha sean-chaisleán i gCill-Sgeachach agus creideann muinntir na h-áite go raibh fathach in a chomhnuidhe ann fadó. Tá daoine ar inntin fós, gurb é "Gioll-Sgiath" an t-ainm atá ar an mbaile agus gurbh o'n bhfathach a fuair sé an t-ainm.
Pé sgéul é, nuair a bhí Gioll-Sgiath in a ghasúr bheag, bhí an ghrádh ag a mháthair do, mar ní raibh aici acht aon mhac amháin agus ní raibh san gcaislean acht an bheirt aca. Bí rud amhain ag chur imnidhe uirthí, bhí an-ghoile ag Gioll, agus bhí croidhe a mháthar beagnach brisde ag iarriadh a sháthach a coingbeál leis, acht nior chlis sí air. D'fás sé suas go raibh sé ina a fhear óg, agus bhí sé chomh mór, chomh árd agus chomh laidir sin go raibh faithchios ar 'chuile duine roimhe.
Lá amháin dubhairt a mháthair leis go gcaithfheadh sé tosnú ag obair chun a bheartha a shaorúghadh. Ceard a ndearna sé? Rinne sé cliabhán mór, chuir sé a mháthair sios ann, d'árduigh sé ar a druim é, agus rinne sé a bhealach go Baile-Átha Cliath.
Ag sroichint na cathrach sin
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 19:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
O an bean a b'[?]uilig aca nach dí a tug mé grádh.
1111
Is a stóirín dílis ealuigh liom is nior [? ] anall do laimh,
is siubhal is téirig go h-Eocaill liom ag baint an coirce buidhe
O ní racaidh me go h-Éocaill leat, nó in áit ar bith faoi an saoghail.
Nuair a cuaidh me cheana go h-Eocaill leat
is beag a cheap tú díom
O d'fagh tu ag silt na ndeora mé is mo baby le mo thaobh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 19:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
O Suibhal is teirigh [?] go h-Eocaill liom ag baint an foghmair bhuidhe,
Ní racaidh mise go -Eocaill leat nó in áit ar bith faoi'n saoghail,
Nuair a chuaidh me cheanna go
h-Eocaill is beag a ceapadh díom
Gur fhág tú ag silt na ndeoraí me is mo baby le mo thaobh.
11
O bhí dhá leicna geal uirthi comh geal le gliobóg liath,
Ní ba gile ná an ceannabháin atá ag fas i meascg na gcreath, [?]
Acht bainfidh mé an caol slat díoth a sníomhfás as an bpáirc,
Agus cuirfidh mé ar mó h-Éili é go duthrachthach
faoi na lár.
111
I gcaoi gur cruaidh an ceangal is go mbíonn se ar a lár,
Ta triúr bean ar an mbaile seo is tá siad {?] aca liom féin
Ta ba go leor ag cuid aca is airgead ár deír
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 18:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí fear ann aon uair amhain a raibh trí bá aige. Bhí trí laoig ag na trí ba agus faoi ceann tamaill cailleadh ceann de ba. Ní moran bainne le faghail ag an laoig a cailleadh matair agus bhí an da laoig eile ag fagail i bfadh nios mo na é. Nuair a bhí na laoigheannta ag fas sean bhí an laoigh a cailleadh a mháthair í bfadh nios fearr na iad. Bhí an iongad ag an bfear annsin agus oidhche amhain a bhí sé amuig connaich sé an bhó agus an laoig ag duil uirthi lean sé annsin í agus fuair sé greim rioball uirthí acht thug sí an rioball uaidh agus dimtig sí. Bhí sé amuig an dara oidhche agus do connaich sé ag duil uirthi ar an mbó do lean sé an bhó acht d'imthig sí uaidh . Do bhí sé amuigh an treas oidhche arist agus do chás sé a laimh i-na agus do tarraing sí é acht coinnig sé a greim agus do tug sí go tulacaí na garinan é. Bhí go leor sideoga annsin agus d'iarr sé luach na mbó ortha acht nior tugadar doibh é agus tugadar do ar buarach a bhíodh ar an mba. Chuaid se abhaile annsin agus an buarach aige agus níor thainig an bhó chuige ní bu mo. Faoi ceann bliadna i-na diaidh sin fuair an fear bás. Mar gheall ar go go b'fuair se an buarach ó na sideoga.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 18:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
cross is rightly fixed
Elect him as your Councillor
And with a hand devine
Then God will bless your actions of
eighteen ninty nine.
This song was made by,
Patsy Ryan, R.I.P.
Kilanear,
Newcestown.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 18:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Who for Tory establishment
Of wickedness and fraud
They sold their nationality
Their Country and their God.
IV.
And while the red blood of our fathers'
Gushes forth within our veins
We will prove to these shownín J.P.s
That we've got the ways and means
Of securing in our Council
Men of a righteous strain
And hand and hand we'll make our land
A nation once again.
V.
So be ready in your thousands
Upon the polling day
From Kenneigh's national round tower
To the Castle of Kilcrea
And cast you voter for Ireland's son
Your cause he won't deny
He'll stand, not run like others done,
Undaunted Jeremiah.
VI.
Electors all be cautious on April the 6th[?]
Be sure that after O'Mahony's name your
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 17:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I.
Attend you gallant Irishmen,
And listen for a while,
Till I'll tell to you the changes,
That are made in Erin's Isle.
The Election of new Councillors
To represent us in our cause
And to amend the state of Ireland
And to rectify her laws.
II.
I ask you to assemble
In earnest, not for sport
To elect a true born patriot
For the division of Warren's Court
The man that I refer to
Is a man of ancient fame
He's a famous sixty-seven man
And O'Mahony is his name.
III.
So away with shownínism
And government J. P.s
Who would dare allow our Council
To be packed with stuff like these?
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 17:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The priest told him to pay for them and he did.
Since he paid for the pints the boy never came near him.
2. Long ago when my father was small he was coming from Enniskean about ten o'clock in the night.
As he was coming on to the west of Palace Anne Bridge he saw a big tall man with a white whisker and he walked along the road beside him.
My father got afraid and he ran and the man ran with him till he came to the bridge and there he disappeared.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 17:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1. Long ago there were two boys in Bandon and they were great pals.
They used walk every where together.
One of the boys died and the other was very lonely after him.
He used walk out the same road as he used when his pal was alive.
This night as he was walking out the road, the boy that died appeared on the road and walked away long side of his friend.
Either of them did not speak.
When they were coming back near the town the boy disappeared again.
The other boy went immediately and told the priest about it.
The priest told him to go out again the following night and ask the "ghost" what he wanted.
He went out as the priest told him and the boy appeared again the same way and he asked him what did he want.
The "ghost" told him to go into the public house and pay for the two pints which were due and then he disappeared.
The other boy went to the priest again and told him what he wanted.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 17:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and very soon afterwards his family were converted and himself asked to be received into the Church on his death-bed.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 17:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Kingstons of Drimoleague were very bigoted Protestants. About 150 years ago a young man of the Kingstons set out from home on horseback towards someplace where he was to be made a clergyman. At one part of the journey there was a crossroads and one of these roads lead to a Monastery. When he reached the cross he allowed the horse to go unguided. The horse went towards the monastery and the young man became a priest.
After some time he returned home though his father disowned him. He arrived on a Friday. The father had meat for his dinner and he asked his son why he wasn't eating the meat. The son answered that the dog would not eat meat on a Friday. The father scoffed at this statement and called the dog. He selected a choice piece & gave it to him. The dog sniffed at it and refused to eat it. The father was dumbfounded
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 17:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
declared to be insane. he was committed to a lunatic Asylum where he died many years later. The bodies of the dead sailors were buried at Passage.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 17:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
He told them that the crew had planned his murder. He promised them each rewards when the vessel should reach Cobh if they would stand by him. Then one member of the crew was called to the cabin and bound and thrown into the hold. The other members of the crew were thrown into the hold in the same manner. One day the skipper visited the hold and found one of the prisoners free. He remedied the situation by killing the prisoner. Then he conceived the idea that the apprentices were also in conspiracy against him. These he also found and consigned to the hold. He then proceeded to kill two other members of the crew by means of a hatchet. The other member of the crew feigned death. The skipper gave the two apprentices terrible injuries. Next-day a ship lone in sight and came towards the "Mary Russel". Her captain hailed the skipper of the tragic vessel and inquired of the whereabouts of the crew. The skipper reported that he had killed them all as they had organized a mutiny on board. Then the other captain boarded the "Mary Russel" and proceeding to the hold released the two apprentices and the one member of the crew who was still alive. They told their story The "Mary Russel" was then towed into Cork Habour The skipper was put on his trial but was
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The schooner "Mary Russel" sailed from Cork Harbour in the year 1826. Her skipper was one Captain Stewart. He was reputed to be a kind and capable captain. There were six oarsmen on board four sailors and two apprentices. On the homeward voyage the skipper became insane. He thought that he was the victim of a cowardly plot. The idea got into his head that the four sailors were about to murder him. He decided to spy on the crew. The four sailors were Irishmen from Cobh or the immediate vicinity. They frequently conversed in Irish which was their native tongue. On one of these occasions he happened to overhear a conversation, which he never understood He was thoroughly convinced that his crew had made a conspiracy to murder him. The following day he procured all the weapons he could find. Then he summoned the two appointees to him in his cabin
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
storm rise so suddenly on the sea after the young man (whom he knew she disliked) had gone out in his boat he suspected it was her doing. So he went at once to the house and when he saw the tub of water foaming in the middle of the floor he went up to it and dipped his fingers in it and cut the sign of the cross in the water which at once calmed down as did the sea at the same moment. So the young man returned home safe. but was warned by the old sailor not to go to sea any more at least until the old hag died.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fort in Kilcummin on the land where my mother lived. It is called Cloc-er-na. It is not an ordinary sort of fort but comprises two walls a few yards a part around which grow very ancient bushes which intertwine overhead so as to form a sort of house. One end is completely closed up with bushes but there is an entrance on the other side. Small lights may be seen in great numbers entering and leaving this fort. My mother often counted as many as 30 or 40 at a time, as it is only one field from her house. She also heard old people of the district saying they often heard sounds of great merriment in that direction what the could make out on a moonlight night as horse races on the level field in which it is.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
cartaí. Do thuit ceann des na cartaí agus do crom an cailín síos cun é do togaint agus cad a connaic sí fe'n mbord acht crúb bó ar an fear a bhí sí dhá pósadh. Do thuit sí le neart scannradh agus nuair a connaic an t-atair i do chuaidh sé fé bhun an sagart. Nuair a tháinig an sagart dubhairt sé gurb é an diabhail a bhí ann mar bhí asplanncana ag teacht amach ón a suilibh agus bhí sé ag croit le h-eagla ins an cúinne. Do tosnuig sé ag paidiréacht agus ag croith uise beannuighthe mór timcheall an seomra agus splanncana agus deatach in a diad. Taréis cúpla lá ina dhiadh sin fuair an cailín bás agus bhí brón mór ar an t-athair in a dhiadh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
that same evening they had to seek for shelter and the generosity of the nearest cottage or farm house. The late Bishop of Meath Dr. Gaughram was motoring near to Athboy that day when he had to abandon his car and seek shelter in the nearest house which was at Lisclogher cross roads. Several teachers also children had to remain in their respective schools that night after the storm as travelling was impossible. The Teacher and a few children of Killough school were trapped in the school where they remained for the night.
The snow drifts were over the ditches completely covered hedges, gales and some small houses. The snow remained on the roads for some weeks, gangs of men united and cleared some roads leading to the towns and villages. Some localities and houses were completely isolated and suffered much from want of provisions.
Farmers suffered great hardships trying to get in touch with their flocks numbers of which were lost. Provisions got scarce in country places. As all bread vans and means of transport, delivery of letters
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I sat on my hunkers and looked through my winkers and saw the dead burying the live? the red coals in cenders.
What is full and yet holds more?
A pot of potatoes.
How would you make 91 less than ten by adding something to it? put it nine and a half.
A round tub without any bottom in it for blood, flesh and bones to go into.
a ring
Round the house and round the house and yet never gets into the house.
I washed my hands in water that never was rain and dried them in a towel that never was woven or spun.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The blue bunnty builds her nest in an old house. She builds it with hair She picks the insets off the trees.
The gold finch builds her nest in a ditch. She is one of the favourite birds. The linnet builds her nest in hedge with moss. She is not seen very often. The pigon builds her nest in a tree and builds it with sticks. She eats the currants.
The seagull is white bird with a black head. She builds her nest on a lake on a island her eggs are white with brown spots on them. They sit on them for three weeks.
The thrush is a brown bird with a speckled breast. She builds her nest up in a white thorn bush she makes her nest of moss, white grass and feathers. She lays four eggs and sits on them for two weeks
The willie wag tail is grey and white.
She builds her nest in a wall and makes
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In February 1932 a big snow storm enveloped the whole of Ireland. The storm came soon and sudden one morning beginning in a mist which did not predict any unusual situation and gradually grew stronger until the air became one mass of blinding snow flakes. The wind grew stronger apparently circling or blowing with unusual noise and blustering confusion.
The storm continued from about 10 O clock in the norning until about 5 O clock in the afternoon, terrific and blinding gusts smothered the traveller and completely impaired the vision and made a journey impossible on foot by car, train or any means of travelling.
Numbers of travellers, business people farmers who had gone out on business that morning were trapped. They had to seek shelter in the nearest house, busses, motor cars it had to be abandoned on the roadside and although numbers of people suffered from exposure and of home comforts the number of casualties were few. Scarcely any person who had left home that morning were able to return
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The birds that are to be found mostly around this district are : - the wren, sparrow, robin, goldfinch, bullfinch, chaffinch, blue bunty, swallow, stare, thrush, blackbird, cuckoo, magpie, rook, and the jackdaw.
The wren in a tiny brown bird but it is the king of all birds. Once all the birds agreed to meet to decide who should be king. They were to fly up and see who should go the highest, and whoever should, he should be king. They started off and one by one they dropped till only the eagle with the wren hidden in his tail unknown to him were.
The eagle shouted "I am king" "O no you're not" the wren said who had come out and had flown a little piece above the eagle. The birds had to agree and they were all jealous at the wren the smallest becoming king.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The horse churn is not used as frequently now as of old. It was a huge iron construction with chains fastened to it which were fastened to the horses harness and the horse went round in a ring and so did the churn.
During the churning some water is usually put in, hot water is put in to raise the cream to a certain temperature or it will not churn. And cold is put in to change the temperature and to gather the butter.
Churning was first discoved when the children of Israel were crossing the desert and they brought milk with them in bottles and when they looked at it they had butter and buttermilk in the bottles.
Buttermilk when scalded is a good
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
plough. The potatoes are stored in separate pits. The big potatoes are put into one pit and the small into a pit for themselves. It is usually the children of the house who picks the potatoes. Before putting them into a pit they must make a hole down in the ground and in there they put them. When they put them in they cover them with rushes and outside the rushes they put clay. The potatoes sown in this district are Epicures, Dates, Kerr's Pink, Champions, Banners, Golden Wonder. Kerr's Pink is the easiest and best potato grown in the district. Long ago people made starch out of potatoes.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Potato Crop
Potatoes are grown on every farm. There are about two acres of potatoes sown every year on every farm in this district. The farmers prepared the ground. The ground is never manured before being ploughed. Potatoes are sown in ridges and drills. In making drills they plough it first and then they harrow it. When that is done they open the drills with a double mould board and they spread the manure. Then they spread the slits and when that is done they close the drills. They make the ridges with a spade. Wooden ploughs were in use long ago. None of them are left now. The spades are bought in shops. The woman of the house cuts the slits.
The people of the district help each other in sowing the potatoes. They help each other in spreading manure and slits. In a month's time after sowing them they begin to come up and then he moulds them to keep down weeds and so that he can manure them. When the stalks grow up they begin to blossom, but unless they are sprayed at this time they will get blight. He sprays about three times. In the month of October he digs them with a spade or
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Story
7.12.38
There lived in the Parish of Bohola about a hundred years ago a boy named John Howley.
He wished to have a gun and a fiddle. One day when he was passing an old fort he met a fairy who gave him his two wishes.
When he was going home he saw a calf in a field and he shot him. The next day he was brought to court. The judge asked him why he killed the calf and he said he wanted to see if he had a good shot.
When the judge condemmed him he asked to be let play a tune on his fiddle. The judge gave him permission and he started to play.
All the people in the court started to dance.
He kept on playing till their feet were tired. Then they said they
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Care of the Feet
The people long ago began to wear boots at the age of sixteen. There is no account of any person who did not wear boots. Children at present go barefoot in summer. The water used for washing feet is thrown out. The people say if you threw out the water after washing your feet and if anyone of the house was out he or she would go astray. If you did not throw out the water after washing your feet you would be dreaming all night. The people used to put a coal of fire in the water before they threw it out.
Boots are repaired by Joe Egan of Kinreask, Ballymacward, Woodlawn, County Galway. There is no boot of shoe maker in this district. Clogs were worn long ago and sometimes now. Leather was not made in this district long ago.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The day of the funeral Patrick recovered from his sleep.
A fairy that he knew told him a way by which to get out of the fort.
Then he set out across the fields for home. When he was gone about half a mile he met the people coming home from the funeral.
When they saw him they thought he had risen from the grave and they ran as fast as they could across the fields. When his mother saw him she fainted. When she recovered he told her his story and she told it to the neighbours.
Writer Enda Kelly
Carragowna
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
put sugar on it. It was only given to infants and children. Pot cakes were pots of gruel and an oaten caked put into it. When it was boiled they ate the cake and drank the gruel out of mugs. Meat was eaten very seldom and it was salt meat. Fish was never eaten. The people did not eat later than six o'clock. They got tea and flour at Christmas and Easter. Tea came in use about seventy years ago. Mugs were used before cups came in use.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 16:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Fairy Story
7.12.1938
Once upon a time when my grandfather was a boy there lived in the town land of Carracastle a boy named Patrick Murtagh and his mother.
One night when he was coming home from a dance he met a crowd of fairies near and old fort.
They brought him in to the fort and to his surprise he saw there many people whom he had known before they died. In about half an hour two more fairies whom he had not seen before came and gave him a glass of wine. When he took the wine he went to sleep.
While he was asleep the fairies sent a boy to Patrick's house.
When he reached the house he was sick. Patrick's mother thought he was her own son and she put him to bed.
The next day he died.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Food in Olden Times
They had three meals a day long ago and some people had one. They were called an céadfrainn on dinnéir and the roisín. They were eaten in the morning, midday and evening. They used to eat their breakfast before going to work.
For the céadfrainn they ate potatoes and drank milk and sometimes they ate potato cakes. For the dínnéir they ate potatoes and bacon which they bought at threepence a pound. For the roisín they ate crowdy pot cakes and boxty and potatoes. They ate potatoes at every meal. They drank milk at every meal but chiefly buttermilk. The table was in the centre of the floor. The bread they ate was boxty crowdy, potato cakes, flumaire and pot cakes.
Boxty was grated potatoes raw with milk. Crowdy was a mixture of oaten meal and water. They ate it raw. They made potato cakes out of potatoes and flour and salt. They rolled it out and they they would bake it. Flumaire was fresh oaten meal steeped in water for three or four days until it got sour and they they would
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the weaver to be woven into cloth. Then it would be sent to the tuckmills and thickened. When it was brought home it was washed until the clear water dropped from it. Then it was given to the tailor and he made it into clothes. In these days the tailor would have to come to each house in which he sometimes would have to remain a week. The tailor made all the boy's and men's clothes.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:57
approved
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awaiting decision
Thomas was very much afraid until he reached his house.
When he went home he went to bed but he could not sleep.
All the night he was thinking of the ghost.
He told all the people that he would not come that way at night again if he got Ireland for nothing.
He was surprised when the ghost knew him and he did not know the ghost.
Storyteller - Patrick McGowan
Writer - Johnie Commons
Carragolda
Bohola.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Story 5.12.38
There once lived in Carragolda a man names Thomas Ruane.
He used to go on his visit to his cousins who lived about two miles away. One night on his way home at the hill near the graveyard he heard a noise.
He looked about to see a man by his side. He turned to go to his cousins, but some power drew him straight on his journey for home. He looked to see the man again, but this time, there was nothing left but his bones.
The ghost walked by his side until he reached the stage then he looked in to his face and said "My walk is finished with you tonight Thomas"
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Old Crafts
Weaving and dyeing.
Long ago weaving and dyeing were very common in this district. Thomas Davis and Tom Barlow were the chief weavers around here.
Every farmer sheared his sheep and the wool was dyed. If grey freize was needed black, blue and white dye were put on. This wool would be carded and when there would be a certain amount carded a heavy weight was left on it.
After some time the three colours would be mixed together. Then the wool was carded, greased and made into small rolls. This was spun on a spinning wheel by the women. The black frieze only wanted two colours of dyes which were black and white.
When the wool was spun it would be sent to
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
belonging to the Wests, one to the Leeches, one to the Mays, and one to Father Cawley. Nearly all the people emigrated to England and America. The land in the townland is not good land. It can be compared with the townland of Knockanillaun.
There are two wells in the townland. The old people say the well we get the water from is called Tobar na gCaora. They say it is the best well in the province, because it is coming form the pure solid rock. There is another well in the district. It is in the field of Mr. Anthony Harrison Greensaun, Ballina, Co. Mayo. No matter what calf went into the field they used always drink water out of the well. The spring water was abused. But the well dried up and broke out in the land on the other side of the river.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
old woman had disappeared.
He then said to himself, "She and her mother must have been fairies and that he could not see them"
He went home and told his father and mother.
They said to Tom that the same old woman used to be seen there when they were young a long time ago.
Writer: John Commons
Carragolda
Bohola
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A Story
2.12.38
There once lived in Carragolda a rich old man named Tom Howley.
One moonlight night on his way home from a dance, he saw an old woman wearing a red shawl and a pipe in her mouth sitting on a fence by the roadside.
He asked the woman why was she out so late alone. There she said to Tom "I shall not be long here because my mother is coming for me" Tom waited, and stayed there for about an hour but failed to see anyone.
Then he said to himself that he would speak to her again before he would go home.
He looked in the direction of the old woman, but to his great surprise, the
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:50
approved
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awaiting decision
room. They could not see anybody.
About a half an hour after they heard the door opening they heard noise in the room.
Two of them went to the room door and were afraid to go any further. They said they saw Thomas's father talking to another man.
This used to happen every night until Thomas could not live in that house any longer. He built a new house and he used to see the ghost outside the old house.
He got a Mass said for his father. He never saw the ghost after that.
John Mc Donnell
Toughnane
Bohola
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the end of it. The bobbins of straw are put on the top of the house. The rest of the straw is spread evenly on the sides of the roof. there are sticks, about twelve inches long stuck here and there to keep the thatch in its place. The straw that is used in thatch is wheaten straw, rye and oaten straw. All the houses are built of mortar and stone.
My townland got its name, Ballymanagh, on account of it being middle way between Ballina and Crossmolina. In this townland there is only two old people, Mr. T. Brogan and Mr. J. Clarke both of Ballymanagh. They can tell stories about the place.
Houses were more numerous then than now. There are only ten houses in my townland where there were fourteen. In front of my home there were four houses, one
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:46
approved
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awaiting decision
A Story
15-7-38
About forty years ago there lived in the village of Treenduff a man named Thomas Jenning.
He lived alone the greater part of his life. Every night a crowd of boys used to come to his house.
One day Thomas got news that his father was dead in England. That night all the boys came in and found Thomas very downhearted.
They asked him why he was so downhearted. He told them the story and they all mourned with him for the death of his father.
At twelve o clock they heard someone opening the door and going up to the
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:44
approved
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awaiting decision
O'Horas, one of Foys and one of Flynns. In the time of out ancestors it was a family of Flynns that owned all the land from the parish of Backs down to the Ballysokerry Bridge. Clarke is the next most common name in the townland. All the houses in the townland are thatched with the exception of two. This is how the thatch is prepared. Whatever kind of straw is used in thatching the grain is threshed off it with a flail. The flail is made of two pieces of sticks, a little thicker than the handle of a twig. One of the sticks is called a handstaff or "cupran", and the other "boulsteain". The "culpan", and "boulsteain" are tied together with a piece of bag called a pucán. When the straw is threshed it is made into "bobbins". Whoever is "drawing" the straw takes every handful of straw and put a kind of knot on
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
My father is a farmer. He has about fifty acres of land. Some of it is situated in the townland of Ballymansgh in the parish of Ardagh, in the Barony of Tirawley, mid-way between Ballina and Crossmolina in the County of Mayo. In the townland of Ballymanagh I live. This townland is situated on the western side of Ballina, and on the eastern side of Crossmolina. There are ten families in my townland, and about fifty seven people in all.
In my home district the names of the people are not very uncommon. The names of the people are as follows. Two families of Clarkes, one of Harrisons, one of Gibbons, one of Brogans, one of Hallerons, one of Scots, one of
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:34
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rejected
awaiting decision
the other man rolled it up.
Sheets, towels and tablecloths were made from it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:33
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awaiting decision
it was tied up in sheaves again. It was brought home and stacked for a while. They made "pooteer" to dry it.
This was a good frame intercrossed with sticks. The sheavers of flax were put on the "pooteer" and left till they were well dried. It was taken down and a number of people with beetles broke it.
When it was broken it was sent to the scutcher. They had scutching stocks and handles made from wood by carpenters.
After the first scutching it was "hackled". Spikes of iron were put in wood and they pegged the flax on the spikes and drew it to get the tow out. Then it was spun on a spinning wheel.
Next it was sent to the weaver who had a loom. This was four posts like a bed. A man stood at the head and according as the weaver wove it
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:32
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awaiting decision
hunger. The stirabout was down boiling. They took up a saucepan of it boiling and gave it to him.
Then they put him to bed and he was boxing the wall with his knuckles and never left a bit of skin on them. He would say "Come here! Look at the death on the wall".
At that time the people would go out to the field and dig up the potatoes and take the eyes out of them to set for the next year, and ate the potatoes. At that time the tinkers used to go about looking for charitys. They would get no charity only white turnips. When they would go home they would boil them and give them to the children with a grain of salt.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:28
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rejected
awaiting decision
ithe agus ag ól, ag ceol agus ag damhsa. Do bhiodh chuile short idir biadh agus deoch le ceannacht ann, píobairí agus ceolteoraí as gach árd ag piobaireacht agus ag seinm ceoil ann, bacaigh agus lucht iarachta na déirce cruinnighthe ann. Bionn daoine ag tabhairt thuras ann fós acht ní bhíonn acht cúpla cead ann, agus ní fhanann siad ar bharr an chnuic acht tamall beag.
Má bhionns duine nó paisde tinn agus má fhághann sé biseach, gealltar turas go Tobar Bearnáin, ar a shon. Teightear thart timcheall an tobair seacht n-uaire ar glúnaibh no cúig uaire deag ar siubhal, agus ar feadh an ama sin abruigheann siad an Paidrín Páirteach ó thús deireadh. Ceannuightear cupán den uisge agus óltar é, agus tugtar buidéal de abhaile. Tá leigheas ann do go leor thinnis, agus aichidí, agus galair.
Tá fear beo san bparáiste seo a leighiseadh ann. Bí sé caoch agus é in a ogánach. Chaith se an oidhche roimh Lá Bearnáin ag an dtobar agus ar maidon, d'iompuigh sé thoir, agus chonnaice sé an ghrian ag eirigh. Chaith sé gach Lá Bearnáin o shoin ag an dtobar.
Ní raibh an tobar gan uisge le cuimhneamh an duine is sine san áit. Creidtear nach feidir an t-uisge atá ann a fhiuchadh, acht tá faitchios ar na daoine iarracht a thabhairt chun é sin a dheanamh.
Tá go leor paidrín agus buinn beannuighthe, agus rudai mar sin, a dfhág daoine a thug turas, crochta ar an mballa atá thart timcheall an tobair.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:27
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rejected
awaiting decision
About ninety or ninety two years ago there was a severe famine in Ireland. It was in the year 1845 and 1846. It lasted for two years. Some of the crops failed. The crop that mostly failed was the potato crop. The food the people ate was nettles and roots of trees.
They used to lie down on the side of a ditch eating weeds and grass.
The poor people would give you a weaving machine for a jug of Indian meal. There was a woman that time who got a weaving machine for a jug of Indian meal. Her name was Mrs. Sweeney. She lived in Bally Croy.
The people used [to] boil the nettles and weeds with salt and mixed it with Indian meal. Thousands of poor people died with the hunger on the road side.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:22
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rejected
awaiting decision
mé stábla duit, le h-agaid an chapaill beag sio. Tá go maith arsan an fear tá mé an buideach duit chun é sin do faghail. Tainig sé isteac agus do cuair do fear an capaill ins an stábla dó.
Bhí feasta mór acha an oidhche agus bhí na gaoltaib go léir ann, agus i rith an t-am sin go léir bhí grádh aici ar an bfear seo. Bhí sé deanach nuair a chuaidh na gaoltaibh abaile agus nuair a bhí siad imtighthe cuaid siad a codhladh. Ar maidin nuair a d'éirig an fear tug siad a breicfasta do agus a codhladh. Ar maidin nuair a d'eirig an fear tug siad a breicfasta do agus nuair a bhí sé ag imteacht dubhairt siad leis teacht arais arís agus dubhairt sé go tiocfaid sé. Míosa in a diad sin táinig sé arís agus bhí fáilte mór roimhe. Stad sé ar fead seachtmhain agus do dein an t-athair cleamnas idir an beirt agus bhí siad sasta.
Bí an cleamnas go léir déanta agus bíodar an pósaidh an mí sin. Bhí sé ag imteacht agus ag teacht agus an oidhce deireannac a tháinig bhí fleadh mór aca agus bhí an tig lán de dhaoine. Bhí siad ag rinnce agus ag deanamh grinn go raibh sé in am cun dul abhaile. Nuair a d'imtig na daoine do tosnuig an beirt ag imirt
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:20
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rejected
awaiting decision
There is a field not very far from the townland of Bunaneraghtish. I do not know for sure is it in the townland of Bunaneraghtish or in the townland of Greensun.
The field belongs to Anthony Harrison. There is an old sandpit in the field, and it is said there are three children buried in it, and that they have money with them.
When any one is out hunting at night after twelve o'clock and are near the sandpit, a ghost will follow them.
One night Anthony Harrison was out hunting and he had a dog with him. When he came near the sandpit, the dog jumped at him and brought the collar and tie off his neck. He hit the dog a kick and fainted him. Then he ran home as fast as he could and there was a man after him.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:18
approved
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awaiting decision
Old Crafts
The growing of flax.
Linen is made from flax and the flax is grown in this country particularly in the north of Ireland. It is a well known fact that the linen made in Belfast is the best in the world.
Flax is not grown in this district at the present time but nearly a century ago it was grown plentifully. At that time people wore all linen underclothing used bed linen and table cloths.
They prepared the ground the same as for corn and sowed the flax broadcast. When it was ripe in Harvest it was pulled from the roots and tied up in stooks, and lift there for some time.
It was brought to the bog and bogged in water. It was left there till it worked. It was taken up spread to dry and bleached. When bleached
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:15
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awaiting decision
There was a pot of gold discovered in my townland a good while ago. It is not known the mens names who got it, but they were from Sligo. It was hidden in Gillvarry's fort and the track of the gold could be seen afterwards and candle-grease all around it, where they were taking it up.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:13
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awaiting decision
of the land was all run-dale and was called Ballynabull, which was owned by the Knox's of Rappa Castle.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:11
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awaiting decision
About fifty years ago there was a prize of five pounds offered to the man in Co. Sligo who would score the most land in a day. The place appointed for the competition was a large field near the village of Carney, Drumcliffe, Co. Sligo. Nearly every townland in the county was represented at the match. Some of the men scored over twenty perches and a few went as high as twenty-five. In the evening when the work done by each man was measured it was found that one man had scored thirty-two perches and he got the prize. The winners name was John O’Connor who lived in Breaghwy. He was about sixty years of age at the time her performed this feat. He won many prizes afterwards for scoring.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:10
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awaiting decision
There is supposed to be a pot of gold buried under the floor of a stable owned by a man named Paddy Harrison. He lives in the townland of Ballymanagh. it is in the corner of the floor.
Anyone that goes into the house, and walks over the place where the gold
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:09
approved
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awaiting decision
No attempts have been ever made to get the treausre. The treasure consists of some gold.
I never heard of any gold or such treasure to be found in our district.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:07
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rejected
awaiting decision
Below Ballycastle, in the County of Mayo there is a kind of an island called Downpatrick-Head. There is about a half an acre of land in this island. There is a piece of land on top of a big stone that is going up straight and hanging out over-head. There is a treasure hidden in this piece of land. I do not know who placed the treasure there, or why. It is too difficult to climb it, as it is too straight up.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 15:04
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rejected
awaiting decision
There is a field called Knockagawna, on the lands of Rappa Castle, Knockamillaun, Ballina, Co. Mayo, Ireland.
The field is near the Rappa grave-yard, and is also near the Rappa road.
About twenty years ago a woman named Mrs. Rooney dreamed that there was gold hid in this field. It is said to be under a white thorn bush on the right hand side of the gap which goes into the field from the Rappa road.
It is also said it is guarded by a serpent, and it is also said that there is a life to be lost, and that it is a black cat. The treasure is said to consist of bars of gold, hidden in a gold pot. The field is owned by Mrs. O'Hora, of Clonkee, Knockanillaun, Ballina, Co. Mayo.
There was gold got on the other side of the road near Knockagawna in Joseph Egans field in the townland of Rathball in the Parish of Ballysokeery, in the Barony of Tyrawley, in the county of Mayo.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:58
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awaiting decision
In the year 1798 the French landed in Killala.
They passed through this locality on a road now owned by Mr. Anthony Flynn.
This road was the Carriage Drive at that time.
That was the only road at the time that was leading to Ballina or any other town. This road is not as much used now as there is a good road leading from the Ballina-Crossmolina road to Rappa and other townlands. It is supposed they came up through a road in the townland of Rappa now owned by Mrs. John O'Hara, Cloonkee, Rathnamaugh, Crossmolina.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:41
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awaiting decision
chat eile isteach agus thosnuigheadar ag cainnt. Dúbhairt an cat mór go raibh ingean rí Shasanna an-bhreóidhte agus go mbeadh ana chuid airgid ag an té a leighisfheadh í. "Nach fuiris san do leigheas" arsa an cat eile. Bheadh sí leighiste acht trí dheoch don uisce atá annsúd thall d'ól. Ar maidin núair a dhuisigh an bheirt fhear bhí na cait imthighthe agus an teine múchta. Chúadar go dtí an dtobar agus líonadar dhá bhuidéal don uisce. D'imthigheadar leo go Cóbh. Chuadar isteach i dtigh agus loirgeadar lóistín na hoidhche. Ar maidin d'itheadar an bricfeasta agus d'imthigheadar leó go dti an gcaladh. Bhí an tárthach díreach ag gluaiseacht amach. Dubhradar le captaon an bháid iad a chaitheamh sall. Dúbhairt sé go ndéanfadh.Chúadar isteach agus tugadh go Sasanna iad. Níor
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:38
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awaiting decision
The three castle head is on your right as you enter Danmanus Bay from the Atlantic ocean and the Sheep's Head is on the left. This song is sung locally by the people around the headland.
Come all you lads of liberty and listen to my song
I'll sing you a few verses to pass the time along
Concerning that historic spot which you have seen or near
Of lofty peaks and the craggy creeks of
Bold Three Castle Head
Now to be sung in truth its praises I'm really at a loss
And to paint its beauteous pictures my pen it will surpass
Where natures beaties charms, they are all gone or dead
And whose beauty will fade when these compared with
The Bold Three Castle Head.
And crowning all its beauty there on that ground-stone
The relics of our ancient times he home of armed band
Hemmed in between those mountains like lovers shady bowers
Stands the relics of old ancient times three strong and lofty towers.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:29
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awaiting decision
A burn: - Get a live Bárnach from the sea and place it over the burn for about six hours. By that time it will be cured.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:29
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awaiting decision
Knockeen - Learys.
Sean - be halld; Páirc Fn, Bán Árd Rí a wán; Cruacod a Lán; bánn Folla; Párc Gurbh; The Till Wee; Igas an Lesian; The stone Field; The Augh field The Golf field, Pairc na h-cosa; Aeroplanefield scraghan. Bán buidhe; Páiric;
Clash:- Paircin na Gobhann
Páircín an bgol. Barry's
an noo lensa
Páircín Árd
Tursh Field.
Knockaheen Hallahans. farm
Pairhc na Strog; Gleann natobair. Kill Field; (Kiln thre long ago). Roé Fladh, Rockybáin; Paírc na Golcsoí;
Knockaheem Whelans;
Páirc an Doll; Rocky bán;
Kill Field; Jackey Acre;
Dooneen - Tattans : Páirc Difreann. The Ring Field;
Balleyvatta: McCarthys: Seán a Milla; Pell na gCarraige; {Gallai Gadaí} = Sagairg.}
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:28
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awaiting decision
Bhí beirt thiar i nDún Chaoin fadó. Aon oidhche amháin chuadar ag iasgach. Ní raibh aca taréis na hoidhche acht dhá dheargán. Bhí a gclann sa bhaile agus ní raibh aon nídh lé nithe aca. Núair a thánadar abhaile fúaireadar blúire beag aráin agus dhá bhuidéal uisce. D'imthigheadar leo thar Tráighlí ó thúaidh. Chonnacadar tigín beag lín(???) thúas le hais an chnoic. Chuadar isteach, ní raibh aoinne istig rompa. Ní raibh aon teine aca ach oiread. I lár na hoidhche tháinig cat isteach agus tharraing a eirbeall tríd an lúath. Las an lúath súas agus bhí teine bhreágh ann anois. Leig an bheirt fhear ortha go rabhadar na gcodhladh. Tamall na dhiaidh sin tháinig dhá
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:27
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awaiting decision
cure rubs the patient’s hand seven times in succession making the sign of the cross each time.
Rheumatism: - Pull some fainlach which can be found growing on the sea shore and boil in water for about twenty minutes. Remove from fire and strain. Rub the affected limb with the liquid three times a day for about a week. By this time the pain should have gone.
Pluresy [sic]: - A near relation of the sufferer bleeds him (or her) at the wrist. When sufficient blood appears to have been drawn off the wrist must be bandaged carefully.
Toothache: - Heat some common salt and put it in a small bag. Hold the warm bag to the tooth for about a quarter of an hour.
”Sprain”:- Hold the sprained part under fast flowing cold water from a tap. Washing the sprained limb in forge water is also a cure.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:19
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awaiting decision
Cough: - Get some flax-seed, candy, liquorice and lemon. Mix all together in water. Strain the mixture and boil for about an hour. Strain again and allow to cool. Drink a wine glass of the liquid a couple of times a day and the cough will soon be cured.
Warts: - There is a herb called dárach found growing in cabbage. Squeeze the juice from this herb and rub it to the warts two or three times each day. In a few days they will have disappeared.
Mumps: - Put the donkey’s bridle on the person who has the mumps and drive them three times in and out to the horse’s stable.
Whooping cough: - Warm some donkey’s milk and drink.
Ring Worm: - The seventh son or seventh daughter in a family can cure this disease. The sufferer of this disease must go to the one who has the cure. The person having the
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:18
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awaiting decision
Michael Knawles remembers a famous mower for Limerick by the name of Jimmy Dryer. He could mow 2 acres in a day. He would have 1/4 acre cut before breakfast. + he used get 1/6 an acre for work.
The Day's work was from sun rise to Dark.
A Cock gave the time in the morning.
The made Candles by pouring fat in a candle mould + a wollen thread as a wick.
He remember stealing turnips to have them for breakfast with porridge.
Going to work turnips + meal were armed for the driver.
Food when mowing spuds + quart of milk.
They worked for about 4/- a week
The Proud Man wrote the peoples
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:11
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awaiting decision
People used timber ploughs drawn by bullocks.
They had no threshing engines they had to flail their corn
Every house had a settle in the kitchen which could be made into a bed by night.
People had to skim all their milk long ago + churn in a barrel by shaking up + down.
They had no clocks + used sun-dials for telling the time.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
be telling that story. This is only one of the many incidents by which people believe that there are things in the fort.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:11
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awaiting decision
Consumption: - Get two herbs -one called Mountain seige and the other óir Hound. Boil both together for about half an hour. When boiled strain and allow to cool and give to patient to drink. Repeat two or three times a day using fresh herbs every time a drink is given.
The herbs mentioned above are to be found growing at the foot of Benbulben Mountain and along the Grange river.
The “Rose”: - The person who has this disease must go to their next door neighbour and beg a big slice of butter from them “for God’s sake”. When the butter is given it must be brought by the person who gets it to the woman who makes the cure. This woman will breathe on it for a considerable length of time while repeating certain prayers. She then breaks the butter into ten pieces and gives them to the person seeking the cure, telling them to go home and run the nine pieces to the sore and to throw the tenth piece across their left shoulder. After this the disease disappears.
(Mrs Oates of Gortarowey, Drumcliffe, Co. Sligo makes the cure)
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:11
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rejected
awaiting decision
Timchealls míle go leith thoir dtuaid o'n sgoil seo tá cnoc mór árd. Cnoc-Ruadh a tugtar air. Tugtar an t-ainm sin mar geall ar an dath atá air, mar tá fraoch ag fás ar a thaobhanna. Tá carn cloch ar a bhárr agus le h-ais an chairn seo tá tobar beag beannauighthe. Tobar Naoimh Bearnáin a tugtar air. Tá balla beag thart timcheall an tobar.
Seo sgéal an thobair.

Deirtear go raibh Naom Bearnáin ag iasgaireacht le slat agus doruigh lá in áit eicint. Thuit an slat as a lámaibh isteach san uisge. Sguaib an t-uisge leis é. Tamaill in a dhiaidh sin bhí mánach as Mainistir Cnuic Mágh ag siubhal do féin ar bhárr Chnuic Ruaidh. Chonnaic sé an slat ag gobadh aníos o'n dtalamh. Tharraing sé aníos é, agus on bpoll beag as a tharraingeadh e, thosuigh an fior-uisge gle geal ag eirigh anios. Tá an tobar ann o shoin agus cuireadh 'Tobar Naomh Bearnán' mar ainm air.
Bionn go leor daoine ag tabhairt turas ag an dtobar Lá 'le Bearnáin gach bliadhan. Suas go dtí scór bliadhain o shoin, do thagadh na sluaighte as ceithre conndathe (Gaillimh, Muigheo, Roscomáin agus Cláir) ann. Do thagaidís an lá roimh Lá Bearnáin agus ní imtheochaidís go dtí an lá in a dhiaidh. Do thugaidís turas i dtosach agus do chaithfidís an t-am annsin ag
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:11
approved
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awaiting decision
would be boiling. One of them struck a tree and changed it into a tree house and the man went off with them. He thought he was a long time gone and when he came back he found he was only gone a few minutes. It is not right to fall in a fort or you would die before the year would be out.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:10
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awaiting decision
When people sheared the sheep they took the wool to the river + washed it. When they had it dry they dyed it any colour they liked. People had their own spinning wheels + wove their own blankets + flannels.
The men wore flannel wrappers + the girls + women flannel petticoats. The suits were made of frieze.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:09
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awaiting decision
About a quarter of a mile from my village there is an old fort. There are a great deal of trees and bushes growing in it. There is an old story told about it as follows. One morning there was a woman taking a walk and just as she was passing by the fort she saw an old man and she said "You are a stranger what is your name and where did you come from, he then answered "No ma'am, I am not a stranger my name is "Iron Sides" I live here at the back, which meant in the fort.
Leading from that fort there is an underground tunnel about eighteen inches deep and one foot wide. It is supposed to be like a chimney. There were bones found in the hole also.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:08
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awaiting decision
When cows looked thin + wasted people said they had worm in the tail. To cure this a long slit was cut in the cow's tail + salt or tobacco juice rubbed in.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:07
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awaiting decision
Long ago these cures were used by the people.
If a child had whooping cough give it the milk that a ferret would take a drink out of.
To rub a dandelion to a wart would cure it. If you get a nettled rub the centre of a dock to it.
If a bee stung you rub earth to it.
The ivy leaf was used for burns or sores. The wild sage was used for a pain in the back or side
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:05
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awaiting decision
Skellig lists were published pairing single girls with elligible men. There were very often most unsuitable + unlikely pairs + often scathing remarks were made of the parties. Sometimes the men + girls were flattered + received compliments. The lists took the form of poetry.
Shrove Tuesday night the boys went out with long ropes + when the girls came along they were caught in the ropes + dragged off to Skellig.
Boys stood at the street corners armed with bags of soot or flour + when bachelors or maidens came along these were thrown at them.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Skellig lists were published pairing single girls with elligible men. There were very often most unsuitable + unlikely pairs + often scathing remarks were made of the parties. Sometimes the men + girls were flattered + received compliments. The lists took the form of poetry.
Shrove Tuesday night the boys went out with long ropes + when the girls came along they were caught in the ropes + dragged off to Skellig.
Boys stood at the street corners armed with bags of soot or flour + when bachelors or maidens came along these were thrown at them.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:04
approved
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awaiting decision
to the house that year.
After the first fire is made in the morning who ever gets up first puts some spring water in a cup and puts some salt to it and takes three sips in the name of the father and of the son and of the holy ghost for to keep healthy for the coming year.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:01
approved
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awaiting decision
It is not lucky to pass through a graveyard without having business there.
A black cat would bring a person luck.
It is not lucky to burn playing cards.
If a person threw a dead best into another person's land it is supposed to take away the misfortune from themselves + give it to the other person.
It is not lucky to kill a robin.
It is unlucky to meet a foxy woman when you go out in the morning
It is unlucky to lie down in a graveyard.
Three lights in a room are supposed to be a sign of death.
It is not right to remove on Monday. Wednesday or Friday.
It is not right to go to a wake alone.
It is not lucky to walk under a ladder.
It is not right to return milk.
It is not lucky to spill salt.
It is unlucky to break a looking glass.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 14:00
approved
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awaiting decision
There is a fort over in Rahins and it is built of a bank of soil. There is a lot of Raths and Forts around this district belonging to the Kings and Queens of long ago. All those Raths and Forts are now filled in from age.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:58
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Q What's the difference between A and B
A You open your mouth to A and close it to B
Q What's always behind the time.
A The back of a clock
Q What's in all day and out all night.
A A door.
Q It's in the rock but not the stone it's in the marrow but not the bone, it's in the church but not the steeple it's in the children but not in the people.
A The letter R
Q When has a man to keep his word
A When no one will take it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:57
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Bateman 2 pupils
Coombes 1 "
Deane 2 "
Helen 4
Synan 2
Wagner 4
11 Classification of pupils according to hair colour
very dark dark fair red
- 4 11 -
Classification of pupils according to eye colour
12
brown blue
1 14
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:55
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Q Why is the King's head on the English stamp.
A Because if it was any other part of the him the people would not lick it.
Q What has three feet and no legs.
A A yard of cloth
Q As I went out one morning I heard some old man balling. He had a flesh moustache and horn mouth and such and old man never was born.
A A cock.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:54
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God increase your store.
The Lord be between us + all harm.
God bless the heavens + the way the story is told.
May you live to wear them. (clothes).
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:54
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Q It's under the fire and it's over the fire and it never touches the fire.
A A cake in the oven.
Q Twenty sick sheep went out a gap twenty more went after that six, seven, five, eleven, three and how many was that.
A Five sheep.
Q A house full and a room full and you would not get a spoonful.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:53
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My grandmother used timber bowls made of hard wood for washing up.
Hen coops were in use - They had two divisions one above the other + were made of bars of timber with an opening in each division for the hens to go in.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:52
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What has the most eyes and cannot see?
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:51
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It opens like a barn door it closes like a trap, you would think of many things before you would of
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:49
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A head like a thimble a tail like a rat you may guess for ever but you will not guess that.
A pipe
Jenny huddle in a puddle a green coat and a white petticoat.
A rush.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:48
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right to walk round the fort at night. There are no stories told about that fort. Some people say there were lights often seen around that fort.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:47
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There is a fort in the townland of Carrowkeel Crossmolina. It is known as the Carrowkeel fort. It is situated in John Kilroys field. It is situated on a high hill. It is of a round shape.
There are little black thorn bushes growing on it also. There are stones on it also. There is a fence round it. There are fairies supposed to live in it.
People never cut bushes off that fort. On account of the fairies no body ever touched it when ploughing or planting crops. There is no entrance hole in the centre of it. People say it is not
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:45
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:45
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:44
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hide in the fairy bush but the man saw him.
The man told him to go home or something would happen him. He went home then and he did not go near that bush after that.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:43
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There is a fort on my father's farm called lios na Marbhra. It is situated on the town land of Carrowkilleen. The fort is of a round shape. There is only one bush growing on it. The people say it is a fairy bush.
Long ago a man went to cut down the bush and when he had half it cut blood came out of it. A few days after the man got sick. The priest a doctor came to the sick man. The doctor said it was a fret he got.
A man dreamt to come to that place at twelve o'clock in the night that there was gold hidden there. In the morning he told the
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:37
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its name from a bottle that was held in that field. Poll na Púcha. It got its name from the púcha hole. It is connected with some of the forts. There is a big passage running to some of the forts. It is beside the river Deel. It is said that there are a lot of forts built on it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:35
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that it got its name from all the roots and ditches that were in it. There is another field called Lúibin. It is a soft marshy place. It is a field that whins and coarse grass grows on. Thee are a lot of little ditches corners and angles in it. There are little ditches and rocks of stones also in it. It got its name from all the corners and all the angles that are in it.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:33
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There is a fort in my district. It is called Rathbane. It means the white fort. It is a big fort. There is a round ring on the top of the fort. It is lower in the middle than it is on the ring. There are little banks of earth around the fort. That fort is on John Lynn's land.
Páirc Mór is the name of the field on my fathers land. Páirc Mór means the big field. There are two ditches in that field. There is another field called Páircín Bán.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:24
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This James Moor is still alive, he is living down at Cliffoney.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:22
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as far as the graveyard they said they could not bury him there, they went on until the [sic] came to Drumcliff and they went in there and they were toul [sic] that they couldn’t bury him there. So they went on until they came to Sligo cemetry [sic] and asked could they bury him there. They were soon toul they could not. So they went on then south, as far as they couldnt tell themselves. Anyhow they buried him.
The three men went away. James did not know where they went to. James faced back, he did not know where he was until he came as far as Thomas Connollys on the line. He called for a half wan [sic]. As he was drinking it the sergent [sic] of the place came in and was lookin at him. When that half wan was drank he called for another and drank it. The sergent was there all the time and as James was goin out he asked him “Are you James Moor”, “I am of curse [sic]” says James. “You are the man who is on the ‘Hue and Cry’ this six months” “I thought I was only away since last night” said James.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:21
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:15
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2 Principals 41 Managers.
1.Master Wilson 1. Rev Egar.
2. Miss Menary 2. Rev Devlin.
3. Miss Wilson. 3 Rev. Haddock.
4. Miss Henley. 4. Rev Homan.
5. Miss Lowry. 5 Rev. McQuaide.
6. Mrs Guy. 6. Rev Burnette
7. Master Scott. 7. Rev Jones.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:13
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Family (i) Bans (Pattons)
(ii) Butts (Pattons)
(iii) Nods (Pattons)
(iv) Whappys (?0 (McCreedys)7
(v) Poseys (McCreedys)
(vi) Bishops (McMenamins)
(vii) Noahs (McCreedys)
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:09
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Q A kitchen ful a roomful and you could'nt lift a spoonful
Ans Smoke
Q What three letters in the aplhabet would scare a thief
Ans I.C.U.
Q What has teeth but cannot eat?
Ans A comb.
Q As I was going up Derry street I met my uncle Sam I cut of his head and drank his blood and left his body standing.
Ans A bottle of wine.
Q I have a wee horse with an iron throt the harder he gallops he swallows the rope.
Ans A spinning wheel
Q As round as an apple as deep as a cup and al the men in Ireland could'nt pull it up.
Ans A spring well.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:07
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“This is the story about James Moor. One night he was coming from ramblin [sic] about twelve oclock. As he was not far from Ahamlish graveyard he sthuped [sic] to tie his shoe. When he lifted his head
what do you think did he see coming but three men carrying a coffin, when they saw James the [sic] said they were all right as they had James to help them carry it. James said “all right, as he thought he had only o carry it as far as Ahamlish graveyard. When they came
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:05
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Question What has two hands but cannot wash its face?
Ans The clock.
Q What goes round the house and round the house and lays an egg in every corner
Ans Hailstones
Q What stands on one leg and has its heart in its head
Ans A cabbage
Q Riddle me, riddle me what is that over my head and under my hat.
Ans The hair of my head.
Q What goes round the house and round with my father's coat on it?
Ans A sheep.
Q Twenty white sheep on a red hill here they go there they go now they stand still.
Ans The teeth in your gums.
Q Which is the easier to spell geese or goose?
Ans Geese because you can spell
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:01
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until it would be safe to come out.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 13:00
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awaiting decision
There is a field in Streedagh which once belonged to Paddy Bruen but it is now owned by James Rooney of Aughagad. There is a lot of huge stones in the field. There is one very big stone in the field. This stone is about four tons in weight and can never be moved. In olden times the Priests used to celebrate Mass on the stone. The priests was not allowed to say Mass in their own Churches. The name of the field is Cruck a Braugha. There is a Cave about ten yards away from the stone. In case the enemy were seen coming the priests used to hide in the Cave
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:53
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reverence” said the man. In that case” said the priest “sit down there and you may remain here with me as long as you live.” The old man did so and lived happily with the priest for the remainder of his life.
The track of the house in which the poor scholar once lived is still to be seen in a field belonging to Martin O’Connor of Breaghwy. The priest is buried in Ahamlish Churchyard in this parish. The stone over his grave bears a Latin inscription, the English translation of which is: - Here lies the grave of Father Brian Harte – died on the 17th June 1702.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:47
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was without a house or home and had to tramp the roads just as the poor scholar often had to do before him. While tramping about from place to place seeking work and a bite to eat he came one day to a fine big house. Hoping to get some food he approached the door and knocked. It was immediatily [sic] opened to the poor man’s astonishment by a priest. The priest recognised the old man as the one who many years before gave him the price of the book and was sorry to see that he was so poor as to have to beg for his bread. He asked the old man if he knew who he was. “I don’t know you.” “Well said the priest”, so you have forgotten the poor scholar to whom you once gave the price of a book; but come in for I am very glad to see you again.” The poor man entered the house and was treated to a fine dinner by the kind priest. After dinner the priest asked him where he intended to stay for the night. I have no certain place to stay any night now your
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:41
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raised with all the people that are buried there.
An pairc bheag. The small field. There is a fort on it. There are trees growing round the fort. The scailp. It means the clift. There are pieces of land going in and out on it.
The river Deel is flowing under the hill. The sraith. It means very boggy land.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:39
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was young he was called by his neighbours the “Poor Scholar”. He used to attend an old “hedge school” in the district. After school he used to work for his board and lodgings in a farmers house.
One day he told his master that he was leaving him. The master asked him if he was sick. “I am not sick,” said the boy, but I am going away to school and I shall be grateful if you will give me the price of a book.” “I will said” his master” if you will tell me what God is doing.” I will said the boy. He is making wheels.” “What is the meaning of that” said the master. “Well” said the boy, “those who are up to-day will be down to-morrow and those who are down to-day will be up to-morrow.” The man was satisfied with this explanation and gave the boy the price of the book. The boy then left and went away to College and was in time ordained a priest.
During the time the boy was in College things went badly with his former master and in a few years he
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:27
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awaiting decision
More than two hundred and fifty years ago a priest named Father Brian Harte lived in Breaghury. When he
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:26
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serpent will follow him on this ride and if [sic] catches up with him before he has crossed the water he will kill him. If the finder of the gold succeeds in crossing the water the serpent will fall dead and he can go back to the moat and get the gold.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:23
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Long ago a man named Jones hid a pot of gold in a moat in a field beside a house now occupied by Mrs Cafferty in Streeda. There is supposed to be a serpent watching the pot of gold and that he would kill anyone who might succeed in finding it. In order to succeed in getting this gold the seeker must come riding on a white horse and must ride directly to the spot where the gold is hidden. Having found the pot he must take off the lid and throw it across the moat to the opposite side. Then he must ride quickly and cross the first meiren [sic] water. The
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:21
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Comharthaí Stoirme
1) Ná faoilleáin ag teacht i dtír o'n bfairrge
2) Na h-eanlaith ag dul a chodladh ar na géagaibh is ísle des na crainntibh
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:19
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A) Comharthaí Báisthighe
1) An geallach nua in a luighe ar a dhruim
2) Fáinne thart timcheall an gheallaighe
3) Na lachain ag glaodhach súl a theigheann siad ina gcodladh.
4) Na crotaigh ag sgreadach san trathnóna
5) Lasógai gorma san teinne
6) An sughadh ag tuituim anuas sa tsimné
7) Na cearca ghá bpiocadh féin
8) Clog dhá bhuaileadh a cloisteál i bhfad i gcéin
9) Na cliogair ag feadaighil go meidhreach agus go h-árd
10) Má thosuigheann an mada ag ithe féir
11) Ná fainleoga ag eiteall go h-íseal
12) Dath donn no dubh ar na frogannaibh
13) Ceo bothair ag imtheacht leis an gaoith

B) AIMSEAR BHREAGH
1) Spéar dearg san iarthar, le dul faoi don gréin
2) Deatach on t-simné ag dul suas go direach
3) Drúcht trom ar maidin
4) Na h-eanlaith agus go h-airithe na fainleoga ag eitilt go h-árd

5) Dath or-bhuidhe ar na frogannaibh
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:16
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Dún na luachra (mentioned above) is the fort in Shrarevagh belonging to the late Brian Curinin.
Dún na lócáin (mentioned above) is the fort belonging to Robert Hood. It is in Drangan.
One of the houses in Breaghwy off which the roof was blown was John Youngs, now belonging to Thomas Leydon. It is not known what house in Shrarevagh the roof was blown off but it is known that the house belonging to Robert Hood was unroofed.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:15
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a needle unknown to yourself. One night the man was coming in from visit and a strange little black man followed him. Both ran fast and the man just reached his own home in time to hear the strange black fellow saying "Only for the needle is stuck on your trousers your wouldn't go home safely". The needle worked the charm and only for the Monaveen tailor he would probably have been killed.
N.B. It is common superstition around here that if a needle is stuck in the clothing of a card-player who is losing, he will win. The needle however must be put on his clothes unknown to him.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:13
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The name of my townland is Kildaree. It is situated in the parish of Crossmolina. It is supposed there was a church built on it for two kings.
Those are some of the names of the fields The King field. It is said that there are three Kings buried there. There are three big stones on the top of each grave.
Cnoc na Marbh. It means the hill of the dead. It is said there a lot of people buried on that hill. It is a very big hill.
There are giants buried on it also. People say that the hill was
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:13
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awaiting decision
a needle unknown to yourself. One night the man was coming in from visit and a strange little black man followed him. Both ran fast and the man just reached his own home in time to hear the strange black fellow saying "Only for the needle is stuck on your trousers your wouldn't go home safely". The needle worked the charm and only for the Monaveen tailor he would probably have been killed.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:11
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awaiting decision
All the fields on my fathers farm are named. One field is called "Crocáin". It got that name because there is a hill in it. Then the people thought that name was suitable.
"Lean na Dubh" is the name of another field.
Cnoc Cruaigh is the name of a field. It got that name because there is a hill in it. It also is a hard or stony hill. It is a hard tilled field.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:10
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An old woman told me this story. She said it is quite true. It happened about sixty years ago. This is how she told it. "One night meself and two or three of my friends were sitting on the wall outside of our house. Suddenly I saw men with every colour of lights coming very near. When we saw them we knew they were fairies. One group of fairies were standing on dunán and were passing lights across to a group of fairies who were standing on dún na luachra and the latter were singing across to a group of fairies who were standing on dún na lócan. They were singing "ní bheidh clúdach le fágháil ar son tigh amhain i naice na cnuic seo."
On the next night it happend [sic] that there came an awful gale and swept the roof off the houses near those moats. Dunán (mentioned above} Is the moat in Breaghwy it is in Thomas Leydons land.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:09
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awaiting decision
There was a tailor in Monaveen who made a trousers for a man in Woodlawn and left a needle stuck somewhere in the trousers unknown to the man, because it is lucky to carry
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:09
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awaiting decision
The fields on my father's farm have names. The first field is called An Paírc Mór. It got that names because it is a big field. The next field is called Cnocáin na gCloch. It is called that name because there is a hill with a lot of stones in it.
The next field is called the Fáil Mór. It is called that name because there is a hedge around the field. It is called Cnocáin Dara because there is an oak tree growing on a hill in it. The next field
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:05
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there and the people say any person that goes near that bush some thing will happen them.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:05
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awaiting decision
talamh. Chuaidh daoine isteach ann cúpla uair, acht bhí sé ró-dhorcha agus b'eigin dóibh teacht ar ais. Shíleadar a mbealach a dheanamh le coinle acht ní rabhadar in ann na coinle a coineál ar lasadh. Tá carn cloch fós ar bharr Chnuic na Cathrach, tá staighre cloch ag dul suas bárr an chairn seo freisin. Creidtear gurbh iad Muinntir Thuatha Dé Dánainn a tóg an 'Cathair' seo, (1,000 B.C.) 'Sé an ceann is fearr i gConndae na Gaillimhe é. 'Se Cnoc na Cathrach an cnoc is aoirde san gCeanntar seo freisin, agus is feidir a fheiceál fiche míle uaidh, agus is feidir an cnoc a fheiceál ó áit sé mhíle taobh thíar de Gaillimh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:04
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awaiting decision
usually go through a town they never went before for a drive. When the bride would be to get married the people would come the night before and take her away with them.
When the bride and bridegroom come out of the church the people throw rice after them.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:03
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times and the people rode on horse back and the first horse man that arrived at the wedding house would get a bottle of whiskey.
In the night the boys and girls of the village gather to a neighbours house and dress there. They put on old cloths and straw hats. They select a captain before they reach the wedding house. The other people have to obey the captain. Sometimes they have a sergeant.
When the straw boys come in to the wedding house they ask for the bride, and bridegroom. People say it is not right to do all those customs. The straw boys dance, and sing in the wedding house.
They
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 12:00
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There are a lot of local customs connected with marriage. All the old customs are dying out. It is a custom to throw an old shoe after the bridegroom the morning he would get married.
Long ago the people said if the wedding was held in the brides home her mother would never visit her. Some people say it is not right to get married in Lent.
Long a go the drag was called a "Dragging Home". There were no motor cars in those
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:59
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awaiting decision
bainbh. Tugann muid fataí agus mín bhuidhe agus bainne dóibh seó. "Furais, Furais," agus "Deoc, Deoc" a deireanns muid le na mucaibh, nuair a bíonns deoc, no biadh réidh dóibh.
Tá capall amhain againn sa mbaile. "Rose" a tugtar mar ainm air. Treabheann sé an talamh san Earrach, agus foirseann sé freisin. Coirce agus féir a thuganns muid mar biadh dó.
Tá gabhar ag corr feilméar san gceanntar séo, acht níl aon ceann againne. Deirtear to n-itheann gabar na luibheanna nimhneach a bíonns ag fás sa bhféarach, agus ní tagann tinneas na galar ar bith ar gabhar. Is ainmhidhte an bhradach é.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:58
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Saint John's night falls on the twenty fourth of June. There is usually good sport on that night. The young boys and girls build a fire.
They build it on top of a hill or at crossroads. They build it in honour of Saint John. The boys and girls of the village come to the fire. They say prayers around the fire.
They build it with turf and straw and sticks. They put a bone in the fire. When they are going home each of them brings a coal. They dance and they sing around the fire. When they light the
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:58
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awaiting decision
a bone hey ho the dairy o the dog wants a bone.
The bone is left alone the bone is left alone hey ho the dairy o the bone is left alone.
The actions are performed to each of theese lines : -
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:57
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one for the witch one for the maid and one for the mother. The mother names the players Monday, Tuesday, and so on then she will say to the maid to have whatever [da?] dinner the end of the row is ready for her when she comes back. The witch will come to the maid for a shirt for her grandfather or something esle, immediatly the maid goes to get it the witch brings away the dinner which the maid was preparing. When the mother comes back she names the people and finds she is one short. She asks the maid where is it and the maid says "in the pot" the mother goes to look and does not find it and she asks again "it is up the chimney" the maid answers, the mother goes to look "it is not she says "O mam the witch took her" then the maid gets a spanking. They continue till all the days are gone
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:56
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whins they rise them up in the air and shout.
Saint John's night is a great night for fun and sport. They say it is not right without bringing a coal out of fire. They throw the coal in a field. Everyone builds a fire in their own land. They say it is not right without doing so.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:55
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they divide the money. The small boys and girls buy sweets with money. The bigger boys buy cigarettes. That day is kept in honour of Saint Bridget. People put crosses on the roofs of the house.
Where ever there are old people they put a cross on their roof. St Bridget night is the night of fun and sport for young boys and girls.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:53
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day he was caught in the furze.
Up with the kettle and down with the pan give me some money to bury the wren.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:53
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awaiting decision
The games I play at school are Tig.
Hounds and hares, Witch, Shopkeeper, Mother goes to market, Trades, Nuts and May, down inthe carpets, colours, birds and fishes, lame dog, football, the farmer wants a wife.
Tig is played by a group of children one being the catcher. There are dens made and the other children run from one den to the other while the catcher tries to catch them.
Hounds and hares is played almost the same way. Two players are appointed for hounds and the rest are hares. The hares have dens and when one of the hares are caught by a hound he has to hold him if he is able till the other hound comes and tigs him then there are three catchers. For witch a row of players are placed along the wall and three are chosen
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:52
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awaiting decision
Má fheictear dhá chearc ag troid, is comhartha é go bhfuil stroinséara ag teacht chun an tígh.
Fiche cúig lachain atá againn sa mbaile. Bíonn síád ar fud na páirceanaíbh gach lá. Tugann muid isteach íád san oídhce. Ní fhágann mórán le n-ithe ach beile amháin ar maidin. Do bheirteann síád uibheacha breághtha móra gorma. Glaoidhtear na lachain le "faoíth, faoít, faoít,"
Ceithre géana déag atá againn sa mbaile. Bíonn síád amuigh ins na pairceannaibh gach lá acht cuireann muid isteach sa mbothán san oidhce íad, mar tá go leór sionnaígh thart san áit seo. Tá sé ráidhte go bhfuil níos mó ná caogadh sionnaígh thíos i mBéal-Atha Glúinín.
"Beadaighe beadaíghe" a deireann muid núair a bhíonns bíadh réidh againn dhóib. Is maith leó poiríní fhúar, fataí bruithte coirce agus cabáiste.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:52
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awaiting decision
St. Stephen's day falls on the twenty sixth of December. It is a great day for the young boys and girls. On that day the young boys and girls go out from house to house collecting money.
They put on old clothes and they cover their faces with false faces. The get a piece of a table cloth and they cut the place of the eyes, the nose, and the mouth in it. Then they put strings in it for tying it on their faces. Then they go from house to house playing a fiddle and singing songs. When they go into a house
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:51
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rejected
awaiting decision
na gcuid páiste beaga a choinneál suimhneach agus leis an pis a phiceád.
Nuair a bhíodh na fir a dul 'un aonaigh nó na mhargaidh bíodh gráinín mine leobhtha i na bpóca go n-íosfaidh siad ar an chasan go dtiocfadh siad na bhaile.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:49
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awaiting decision
good sign. When there is a ring round the moon there is rain near at hand.
When you can hear sound of a train at night it is a sign of frost.
When the clouds are moving that is a bad sign.
When the seagulls around there is storm on the sea.
When the wind is in the south east there will be storm.
When the wind is whistling it is rain the is coming.
When the mountains appear dark and near we will have rain.
When the river is roaring in certain places it is a sign of rain.
When we hear the sea roaring it is a sign of bad weather.
When the swallow flies high it is sign of weather.
When we see a dog smelling the air it
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:49
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awaiting decision
they will cross the ocean first. If it is on the other plate they are said to die first.
They also make a cake. They put a ring, a button, a nut, a thimble. People say the person that gets the ring will be the first to be married.
On that night young boys go out to some ones garden and take cabbage. Then they break the cabbage on the road. People also eat a lot of nuts that night.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:47
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awaiting decision
until the two parties have agreed. Every animal is marked when it is sold. Some buyers mark their cattle with a coloured mark on the hip or on the back. Others clip some of the hair off the animals hip. Others put on mud on the animal. When an animal is sold the rope or halter is usually given to the buyer. There is no special fair held for sheep, bonhams or horses. The sheep bonhams and horses are sold on the cattle fair day. The sheep and bonhams are sold on the streets. The horses are sold around the fair green gate.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:46
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awaiting decision
My house is situated in the townland, of Bawnmore, in the parish of Kanturk and in the barony of Duhallow. There are twenty six dwelling houses in Bawnore, and of these, six are thatched, four covered with corrugated iron, and the remainder are slated.
The townland is a very large one and it is divided into two parts. Bawnmore North and Bawnmore South. There is an area of 443 acres of Bawnmore North and Bawnmore South has an area of 729 acres. There is a population of 122 in the whole of the townland and of these eight persons over 70 years.
It is not known how the townland got its name. Bawnmore means "big bawn, or big field," and there are a lot of of big fields in the townland.
The greater part of the land is dry and stony. There were two big woods in
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:45
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awaiting decision
Fairs are held locally in Crossmolina. The fairs are held on the fair greens. There are two fair greens beside the town of Crossmolina. There is one of the fair greens called the old fair green. There are twelve fairs held in Crossmolina. There are two fairs held on one fair green and there are ten fairs held on the other fair green.
Sometimes the buyers go out the country buying cattle and pigs. The fairs are never held on the streets in Crossmolina. There is luck money given when an animal is sold. When two people are making a bargain they keep dividing the difference of money that is between them
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:45
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awaiting decision
Luigh an ghorta-mhór go trom ar Fhánaid ó'n bhliadhain 1845 go dtí an bhliadhain 1847.
Tháinig meath ar ne préataí. Chá rabh bhiadh ar bith ag na daoine le h-ithe ach turnapaí fuara, cáil, féar agus ach'an seórt eile a h-ithe le iad fheir a chóinneáil beo. Chan fhuair an dhuine fá'n áit seo bás.
Bhí corrach i mBaile- Uí- Tighearnan ag déanamh brócain Indian do daoine bochta nach rabh an greim le h-ithe aca. Ach'an mháidin rachadh a gcuid athara le gúgan fá choinne an bhrócain fá choinne a gcuid pháiste. Gheobhadh siad a gcuid féin ag an corrach. Nuair a bhíodh an corrach foladh rachadh na fir isteach ann ag sgríobhadh na sgríobhadóige.
San am seo fosta bhí cuibhrinn turnapaí ag fear agus cruinnigh a saoghal go bhfuair siad cuid aca le iad féin a choinneál beo. Fosta, rachadh siad agus gheobhadh siad búcaid creafóige agus caithfidh sa chluidhigh é. Chuireadh siad phis fríd an chreafóg le
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:42
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in the townland long ago. One of these was situated in Bawnmore South and its name was "Cranagh" but all the trees were cut down, and the timber was used for ceilings, and other purposes in the local houses. The ground in that place is now covered with furze bushes. The other wood was situated in the eastern part of Bawnmore. It was covering all the valley between the houses of Benjamin OConnor and Jeremiah E OConnor. It was known as "Lacanagalig" wood. But this wood was all cut away and in its place today are to be seen nice square green fields.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:42
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for them to disperse.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:41
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were let wander around. Often times the people had to go out in the lake on horseback or on a cart after them. There usually were nine or ten tents selling drink on the fair green, eight or nine of these tents were from Crossmolina and one from Castlebar. Each tent owner had a certain place on the fair green for his tent. The front of these tents, facing the road were open and the back and sides built of stones and sods. At first they had to pay no licence but then there was a rule made they had to pay four shillings. There was one tent for supplying dinners to the people that they came long distances. Along the lake there was
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:40
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of the farm and their names are Maggie and Prince, Prince is Maggie's foal. He is a five year old and very wicked. Maggie is the oldest horse in this district, she is thirty years old and she has been with us since she was a year old. My grandma's father owned her mother so she is one of the family.
We have about seventy sheep altogether they are two different kinds, mountain hornies and white sheep or as the mountain people say "polly" sheep.
We have three dogs also, two collies and a Labradorr Retriever. One of the collies is only a pup and the other is seven years old. The pups name is Jumbo and the old dog's name is Ceaser. The Labradorr's name
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:40
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awaiting decision
Tá cearca, eiróga, sicíní, lachain, géana, gaislíní, francaigh, againn sa mbaile. Tá ceithre scóir cearca againn. Tugann muid coirce agus fataí agus min bhuidhe mar bíadh dhóibh. San Earrach núair a bhíonns na cearcha ag gur cuireann mo mháthar ál síos faoí circ. Nuair a bhíonns síad trí seachtmhaine thíos tagann na sicíní amach. Bíonn síad ann lag ar dtús. Chun glaodhach ar an cearcaibh deirtear "tioc," "tioc," agus "dis," "dis," a deirtear le na sicíní.
Ní maith le na daoinibh an coileach a cloisteál ag glaodhach go mall sa trathnóna nó go lúath san oidhche; creidtear gur fógra an bháis é. Ní maith an comhartha ar chor ar bith cearc a chloisteál ag glaodhach mar coilleach. Is comhartha mhi-adhaidh an-mhóir é mar deirtear i mbéarla:-
"A whistle from a woman,
Or a crow from a hen,
Would awaken the devil,
Out of his den."
Má bhíonns cearc ag tarraing toinlín tuigh in a dhiaidh, deirtear go bhfuil sí ag iomchur conra duine eicínt agus gur comhartha é go bhfuil an bás in ndan do duine sa gcómharsanacht.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:39
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There are four graveyards in the parish in use. Kilmacow, Kilcorcan, Kilroe, and Kanturk. Kilmacow is in the Townland of Bwnmore, and Kilcoran is in Rossline, while Kilroe is near Kanturk. There are trees growing in all the graveyards.
There is a tomb in Kilmacow. It is surrounded by an iron railing and Sankey was buried there long ago. There are a number of very old head stones in Kilmacow, there is a headstone in Kilmacow and it is one hundred and fifty years old, and others are up to a hundred years old.
Unbaptised children are buried near the walls of the churchyard. "When a person is buried in Kilmacow two are sure to follow," it is an old saying. When a person dies the Kilmacow "drum" goes out to meet him, and lights are seen there also. It is a very ancient churchyard.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:37
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suit or some other dark colour. A few years ago flax was grown in my district but it was sent to Ballina to the flax mills that were there at the time and sold in them. There are a lot more tailors in my district now than there were a few years ago.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:36
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There is a unused graveyard in Ard Na Cille" or Knockilla near my house.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:36
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a pen out of it for the Blessed Virgin. The implements that are used in work are the bellows, anvil, vice, sledge hammer, pincers, nails, knife, iron, trough of water and a rasp. The blacksmith shoes wheels of carts out in the open air. He shoes wheels of carts beside a river or lake or some place where he can get water.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:33
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put holly in the stall house on Christmas night to bring luck on the cattle because our Lord was born in a stable. The customs connected with milking are:- (1) to wash your hands after milking each cow (2) to milk the cow fast and not to be stopping now and then, because the cow might toughen (3) to milk them out clear.
When goats come running home wit their heads down it is supposed to be a sign of bad weather. When a sheep falls on her back she can never rise. When she is caught in a corner she never screams. When people were settling the eggs for the hatching in olden times they put an old horse shoe or any other iron under the nest "for fear of thunder." It would keep it from destroying the eggs. When the geese lay eggs they are put into bran to keep them fresh. The old custom was to prepare the nest, get the eggs and get a sally and burn a little of it in the fire. Then the woman of the house would make the Sign of the cross on the eggs. The same sally was kept until St. Patricks day to make the sign of the cross
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:33
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made boots.
Clogs were worn by a good many in this district at one time and during the German War a clog maker lived where Pat McHugh lives at present in Erris Street, Crossmolina, and he made clogs from wood. He got the wood in Castle Hill woods.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:31
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In former days a great many of the country people did not wear any boots. School children in former days never wore a shoe to school and it was only when they were able to earn the price of boots that they could get them.
School children now go barefooted in Summer for pleasure and very few grown up people would walk without boots. There was a woman who lived in Crossmolina. Her name was Anne Colman. She used to go barefooted in Summer and Winter. There is a man in Enaghbeg, Crossmolina
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:29
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Then they are left on a butterboard. When this is done the plug is pulled out of the side of the churn in order to take out the buttermilk. Then the churn is washed with boiling water. The buttermilk is used in making bread.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:28
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Tá lios beag i bpáirc Máirtin O'Colmáin. Tá crann beag istigh san lios. Agus tá claidhe thart timcheall na liosa. Biodh paiste curthá ann fadó. Bhiodh sidheoga ann fadó. Tá go leór pollaí ann. Tá sgeachai thart timcheall leis an claide. Tá clocaí móra istigh san lios. Tá cnocaí beaga istig san lios seo. Níl aon teach in-aice leis an lios seo. Tá cásan beag ag dul isteach go dtí an lios. Is cuma cearnogach atá uirthí. Is feidir an lios atá tios i gCnocán a fheiceál ón lios seo.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:28
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awaiting decision
The farm and domestic animals at home are:- hens, chickens, ducks, geese, goslings, turkeys, dogs, cats, pigs, bonhams, goats, donkeys, horses, sheep. We have names for all the cows such as:- Neckchain, Blackie, Timberleg, Starry, Whitestocking, Dandy, Pet, Onehorn, Thief, Drum.
When driving the cows I say "How, How," and if I had a dog with me I would say "turn them up, Lass" or whatever the dog's name would be. When driving the calves I say "suc up". The cow's house is built with stone and has a paved floor. The roofing is of galvnised iron and the doors are also glavanised. It is called the stall. The cows are tied by means of "stalls." The stalls are made of timber. There is one stake left loose and when it is being stalled there is a lever on top to step over the stake to close it in.
There are various forms of tyings such as, tying by the neck with a chain or tying by the horn with a rope. A great number of people
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:27
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delays them a few days after the time they are due for coming out. The eggs that there are no birds in are called blanks or gluggers.
When hens are dying on a person they take the dead hand and throw them into a neighbours field so that the disease will leave their hens. Those are some of the costoms about hens.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:25
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and girls playing.
Every morning you would see boys and girls flogging their tops. Some of them usually have no tops. They make whips out of ropes. Some of them make whips out of meal bag strings. They put the top spinning then and they whip it with the whip.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:24
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the Moy,
From your own native parish, historic Knockmore,
Now an exile you roam on a far distant land's shore,
And the friends whom you ask for are living there still,
And the big grazing farms the people now till
You took a man's part in the fight that was made.
All over the country from Lackin to Straide,
Where rest Michael Davitt, brave, valiant and true
Who fought, toiled and suffered, dear Ireland for you.
II
The boys oft awaited your word of command
And our battle-cry singing back-back to the land
I hope, as you say, you'll return next year
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:24
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awaiting decision
Gleann na bhFiadhails
Tá lios i bpáirc Seán Ó Treasaigh i gCrocán. Tá sgeachaí thart timcheall uirthi. Creideann na daoine gur chuireadh págánaigh ann fadó. Lios a tugtar uirthí. Tá sí i radharc ceann eile. Cruinn atá mar deanamh uirthí. Creideann na daoine go bfuil sídeóga inntí. Rinneadh í ar dtús núair a bhí muinntir Thuatha de Danann sa tír seo. Ní fheictear rud ar bith ann anois. Úaireannta teigheann caoraigh isteach ann agus má bhíonns daoine ag dhul an bealach san oidhche bíonn
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:22
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awaiting decision
Tá lios i bpáirc Seán Ó Treasaigh i gCrocán. Tá sgeachaí thart timcheall uirthi. Creideann na daoine gur chuireadh págánaigh ann fadó. Lios a tugtar uirthí. Tá sí i radharc ceann eile. Cruinn atá mar deanamh uirthí. Creideann na daoine go bfuil sídeóga inntí. Rinneadh í ar dtús núair a bhí muinntir Thuatha de Danann sa tír seo. Ní fheictear rud ar bith ann anois. Úaireannta teigheann caoraigh isteach ann agus má bhíonns daoine ag dhul an bealach san oidhche bíonn
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:20
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The usual farm animals are cows calves, horses, donkeys, pigs and goats, and sheep. Some of our cows in the farm are named White-Stocking, Bawney, Strawberry, Starry, Daisy, Cully, Cuby, Dandy, and Rosie. When the cows are going out or coming in we say "How! How!" and to the calves we say "Suck! Suck!"
The cowhouse is covered with slate. It is called the stall. Some of the cows are tied with a chain or rope and more of them are in stalls. The tyings are not home made ones
Palm is hung in the stall to bring luck on the animals every year. Some people hang it in the stall so that the cows would milk well for the year, and in order they would not get any sickness. Long ago the people
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:18
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síad lán cinnte gur sídeógaí a bhíonns ann. Creideann na daoine atá in-aice leis an lios go bhfuil sean daoine sídheógach inntí.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:17
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remained up on May Eve night for fear "pishogues" would be set on the cows.
The goats are called thus "Betty! Betty!" or "Ginney! Ginney!" The pig's call is "Hurish! Hurish!" and the sheep's "Baw! Baw!" The hens are called "Tuck! Tuck!," the ducks "Finn! Fin!," and the geese call is "Baddy! Baddy," When the eggs are put down to be hatched there is a cross put on them with soot. There are two reasons for this : first, the eggs will produce good birds : second, it will be known if any other hen lays in this nest.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:17
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A real Irish welcome's awaiting you here,
We'll call in to Brogan's, they still hold the bar,
Across from the Island to there is not far,
Then straight away to Cloughan's we'll go by the lake,
Where a view of the scenes of your youth you can take,
A drop of the real stuff I'll try to procure,
And we'll toast if to the health of the Bards of Old Moore.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:17
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Tá lios ar thaobh an bhóthair, ar do láimh deis is tú ag dul ó dheas go Baile-Atha-an-Riogh. Is i ngabhaltas Phaidin Uí Choinnín ata sí. Tá an lios le h-ais Chnuic na gCarraig agus tá Cnoc na Cathrach timchealls dhá céad slat síar. Cathair Mór a tugtar ar an áit seo. Tá an lios nios aoirde na an talamh atá thart timcheall. Deanamh cruinn ata uirthi.
Go dtí le goirid bhí balla thart timceal na liosa agus bhí fothracha sean caisleáin istigh in a lár. Anuraidh nuair a bhí Chomhairle Conndae na Gaillimhe ag deanamh bóthair idir Baile Átha an Riogh agus Tuaim, chuir siad na clocha as an mballa a bhí thart timceall na liosa agus iad seo a bhí sa gcaisleán amuigh ar an mbothar, agus briseadh iad chun an bothar sin a deanamh. Níl balla ná fothracha an sean-chaisleáin le feiceál anois. Istigh i lár na h-áite in a raibh an caisleán, tá staighre cloch ag dul síos fé'n talamh, agus tá casán ag dul o'n áit seo fe'n talamh go dtí mullach Cnuic na Cathrach. Tá an lios dá céad slat ó Cnoc na Cathrach agus is feidir dul an fad sin fé'n
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:15
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I
Many thanks for you letter and wishes sincere,
I am glad you were pleased with my rebus last year,
On Moore's brilliant pages that famed book of song,
Depicting the scenes by the Deel and Lough Conn,
These places you travelled when but a mere boy,
From Cloughane to Cloone, from the Deel to
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:13
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turf. He was surprised to see a huge black dog trotting along the road from Bawnmore to Lismire. SO he had to give up his work and leave the dog to his own business. Some time ago point to point races were held not far from here, over a course. On the day of the races there were three men killed and the three horses were also killed. This incident is quite true as the writier was told this story by a man (now dead) who remembered the occurrence well. One of the deceased men was a jockey, another man was killed in a faction fight; and the third was a police-man who tried to quell the row.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:12
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IV
For years they have toiled in the land of the stranger,
Their hearts always set on their own native home,
And longed for the day when again they'd return
And oft cursed the tyrant who forced them to roam.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:10
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years ago there were two men coming home from a fair in Ballina with cattle. When they drew near the fort they stopped and let the cattle feed along the roadside and the men sat down on the green to rest themselves. One of the men was Patrick Hegarty of Askereagh, Crossmolina. They were not very long sitting down until they say the hunt coming out of the fort and it crossed the road and up through Cloonawillian farm, also of Crossmolina.
After a while the dogs started yelping as if they were after a hare.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:10
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In the olden days often strange looking animals were seen: such as bulls guarding hidden treasure.
A story is told of a party of men who once tried to unearth hidden treasure. They went on with their work until they came to a large stone, and when this was removed they found a heap of dried leaves. They were surprised by a fierce looking bull while examining the leaves and he terrified the men so much that they took to their heels and ran away. At another time while a man was cutting grass with a scythe a huge black cat seized the blade of the scythe with his teeth and held it despite of all the men's efforts to release it. So he had to abandon his scythe and leave the place. The cat was supposed to be guarding hidden treasure. At another time a man was working late at night storing
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:07
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There is a fort in my district of Ballinobaun, Crossmalina, Co. Mayo known as the Rathbane fort. It is in John Lynn's field. The forts are in view of one another. This fort is rectangular in shape. The centre part of the fort is about two feet higher than the rest of it. There is a descent at the back of it like a stairs. There are two noises in it. There is a fairy bush on the south side. Nobody ever say it to bud or to put out any
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:06
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that mermaids were often seen near the sea shore, and sailors say they are like human beings.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:06
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Leipreachans are also known as Cluarans. A Leipreachan is about one foot in height. They say that the Leipreachans are dressed in green jackets and red caps. They live under mushrooms, and up the heathery mountains. Their usual occupation is shoemaking.
It is said that long ago a girl was going to a well and she saw a leipreachan. He was mending a tiny shoe and she asked him to give her his gold. He said to her "Look down at the floor," and immediately she did so, the fai Leipreachan disappeared. Ben Finn of Lismire saw a leipreachan in Kilmacow and as he looked around the Leipreachans went away.
The Leipreachans are thought to be friendly people. It is said
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:05
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The people give her lodgings though they are not as kind to her as to Hugh Keogh.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:04
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any ailment such as headache, ringworm, Rose and such has to wait for one of those days no matter how bad the ailment might be. The twenty eighth day of December is known as "la na leanbh" or the "Cross Day" of the year.
The last three days of March and the first three days of April are known as the days of the old cow. March is supposed to come in like a lamb and go out like a lion. Those three days are usually very rough.
Most people like to sow potatoes on Good Friday as they expect to have a good crop that year. Some people say of February is good that the Summer will be wet.
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 11:01
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In this district farmers like to start work on Tuesday or Friday as no other days are thought lucky. They usually start building on Tuesday or Friday. People usually change from one house to another on one of those days.
Saturday is said to be the unluckiest day of all days as it is said that any one that starts work on that day will soon be finished. Charms are usually made on Monday, Thursday, and Monday. A person suffering from
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 10:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2020-10-30 10:58
approved