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senior member (history)
2021-10-28 14:56
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A Story
There is a big tree on a side of hill facing the North, in the Barony of Glenquin in the parish of Killeedy, in the County of Limerick. This three is called the big tree. It is said that on one Christmas night, as a man went for messages to a nearby shop he saw a beautiful young lady, having a bucket feeding a flock of ducks. On he returning he heard beautiful music and people dancing. It is also that on the last side of the tree a number of priests vestements
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 14:47
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to go and make the match. The most of the people generally get married during cheershrove or during the month of June. then the married people used to have a feast for two days. Some of them would go to Limerick for a week or a fortnight. Some of the strawboys wears green and more of them would be dressed in red.
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 13:12
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senior member (history)
2021-10-28 13:12
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In this district there are three tailors, - Mr. Harte in Grenagh, Mr. Cremin in Beeing, and Mr. Dennehy in Dromahane. These tailors work at their homes.
When people want clothes to be made they supply their own cloth, as these tailors do not stock cloth. Clothes are not spun in the district now, but they were some time ago. Cloth is spun in Blarney Mill. People wear clothes made of such cloth. The types of cloth are; tweed and serge
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 13:09
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Linen and flannel are the types of cloth used. There are no accounts of shirts made from flax grown locally. Blankets and bed-spreads are still in the district which were made from the flax which was grown in the district nineteen years ago.
Socks and stockings are made in the homes while sitting round the fire during the long winter nights. The thread is not spun in the homes but it is got from Blarney Mill. The people long ago used their own spinning wheels for spinning their own thread. There are no spinning wheels in the distinct now.
Special types of cloth are worn the wedding day. White clothes are worn by the nearest relative. Black clothes are worn by the relatives the day of a person's death.
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 13:04
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There is one tailor in this district. Mr. Patrick Harte is his name. He lives in Quarry Hall, Grenagh. This man works at his home. He does not travel from house to house. When the people want any thing to be made they go to his house. This tailor stocks cloth. Sometimes the people bring their own cloth.
Cloth is spun and woven in Blarney Mill. The local peope wear this cloth The types of cloth that are made in the factory are - tweed and serge.
There is an old saying connected with tailoring "Don't forget to put a not in the end of your thread". The gear or implements the tailor uses are a scissors, a thimble, a needle, thread a measuring tape, a lap board, an iron presser and sewing machine.
Shirts are made in the homes
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 12:57
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lords etc. down through the ages.
Gladstone was responsible for getting the land divided. He was member of Parliament in the British House of Commons.
We have an incident worthy of note in the County which I daresay every person in Clare has heard viz "The Bodyke Evictions" There were cattle taken for rent from a few farmers in the neighborhood and put into the pound - guarded by the policemen. Rev. Fr. Mc. Namara was then P.P. there. He caused the gates of the pound to be opened and the cattle were removed without the policemen seeing them this event took place about a 100 years ago.
Tithes were collected in this locality. In some cases money was collected in other cases stock and crops.
There was a song compiled about the evictions.
Wait till the Landlords go Paddy,
Wait till the Landlords go,
Hold fast the sod and trust in God
And wait till the Landlords go.
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 12:53
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The landlord of Quin Gardens was the Earl of Limerick. He had an office in Limerick where his tenants paid him the rent until the Land Commission got the land in 1912.
Edward Singleton of Quinville had tenants in and Rhineen.
Brady Browne was landlord of the Newgrove estate. The Studderts were his last agents, and before that Charles Perry was his agent. He was shot because he was a bad agent. He threatened to evict his tenants and also to raise the rent.
Col. O'Callaghan of Maryfort evicted his tenants tenants Bodyke, because they refused, to pay the high rent. After a while they got a reduction in their rent and got compensation for the damage that was done to their houses.
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 12:50
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Colonel O' Callaghan was landlord of our parish. He was regarded as a tyrant by the people and it was he who was landlord at the time of the noted "Bodyke evictions". These evictions happened in June 1881. Several people were evicted from their homes and all of them joined the "Plan of Campaign". I heard it said that when the sheriff was coming the people used to throw out a swarm of bees or boiling water. Mrs. Pat Fahy formerly Mack of Coolreagh (now living in Scariff) roasted the sheriff with stirabout when he was going to evict the family. This family and O'Hallorans were two of the families evicted. Dick Studdert was Colonel O'Callaghan's agent for collecting the rent. He was at the Scariff fair and an old woman threw a sugan around his neck. A Song was composed about him:-
On the ninth of December, it being a fair day,
We boycotted Dick Studdert, I'm sorry to say,
With sticks and with stones, we walloped him away.
So three cheers for the boys of old Erin.
He ran to John Hickies being one of his creed,
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 12:39
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every available article of furniture against their doors so that there would be no chance of breaking them in. From the top stories boiling gruel and water was thrown on the soldiers who were trying to break the doors with battering-rams.
In some of the houses they were repulsed but in others the poor tenants were evicted. Some of the tenants went to other countries and there either got a position or perished of hunger and want.
Some of the people who remained at home built lean to sheds against walls and ditches and here lived in the most abject state of misery and poverty. The good parish priest of the place, Father - stood faithfully by his people and did all in his power to ease their sufferings by pleading and remonstrating with the Landlord but his work was of little avail.
The news of this terrible deed was noised abroad and the name Colonel O'Callaghan became a by-word amongst the people for cruelty.
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 12:36
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In the year 1887 Landlordism had reached its worst in this country. About this time the little town of Bodyke became famous in history for its fierce and steadfast resistance of a harsh Landlord.
The name of the Landlord was Mr. John O'Callaghan but he was locally known as Colonel Jack. He was a very cruel man and he charged very high rent. The people being poor were very often unable to pay these rents and then at the landlord's orders they were thrown out of their houses and belongings very often to starve and die by the roadside.
The poor people could stand this no longer so they decided to pay no more rent and then began the famous Bodyke evictions. The landlord sent guards, soldiers and bailiffs to evict the tenants but when they arrived they found the doors and windows locked and barricaded.
The people had placed
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 12:31
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The Bodyke Evictions were in the year eighteen eighty four. The landlord at that time was Colonel O'Callaghan and the sheriff was Mr. Croker. The cause of the Bodyke Evictions was that the tenants were not able to pay the rent to the landlord. So he and his sheriff and a crowd of policeman went to evict them. A crowd of policeman used to stand about eighty yards away from the house and form a ring around the house to stop the public from coming near the house, while the landlord and his sheriff and a few bailiffs attacked the house. The people in the houses held out very strongly against them. My father told me that the landlords did the most cruel things to the people, when they were evicting them. He told me he saw a cripple being taken out and left in the side of the road. He also said he saw a little girl running through a bog with a goat lest the goat would be taken from them as it was the only means they had of having milk. When the men failed to get the people out of their houses they attacked the walls and the doors with the "Battering Ram" and put holes in the walls, but men and
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 12:21
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rógaire - peata - cochall - alp - smailc
smuilc - bior - stráiméad - gadaidé
"T'anam o'n Riach" - grásta Dé cúghainn
Cabhair Dé chúghainn - smuta - "táisc nú tuairisc"
Gárlach - útamáil - scriosamhnach
fámaire - fiadhaire feadha - slaghdán
bolta - súiste - sonuchar - dúlaigheach - pr -al - canal (?)
píobán - braon - duíg - dúil - cóithsire
scannradh - scannróir - scruggal - sméaróid
tráinín - mo léir! - mo ghoin! - cailp
fláitheach (chickweed) - slánlus
meachain dobhac pr. "meachain dá abha"
fuachtáin - méidhiscrí - caith siar é
púscadh - ceárduighe - cábóg
"míle maide" - glugar - aiteann
aiteann gaedhealach - cros abha - ínnse
ciseán - cláirín nú clebhí, nú clabhra
droll - croch - corcán - scilléid
cloigeann - meigioll - bolg - gúirléidí
cadhrán - brus - spairt - fionna mhóin
tóin a bhogadh - sceach - cuileann - beithe
ciotóg - crúincín - taílliúr - gabha
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 12:03
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Bed at night and the initial left by the snail on the plate is supposed to be that of future husband or wife.
8. Get an apple and cut the whole peel round and round without breaking it. Then put it over your right shoulder and say this little verse:- “Saint Simon, Saint Jude Upon thee I intrude By this paring I hold to discover this day the first letters of my own true lover.” Then let it fall down and some letter will form. It is supposed to be the initial of your future husband.
9. Three Bowls. Get three bowls. Put salt in one, clay in another and a ring in the third. Then close your eyes and let someone change the bowls about. Then walk over and put your hand into one of them. If you put your hand into the salt you will cross the water before the year is out. If you put your hand on the clay you will be dead before the year is out. If you put your hand on the ring you will be married
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 11:58
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as do thógadar ceó draoídeachta
le díomas os ar gcionn.
Is mó baile beag aoibhinn margaidh
agus cáthairín aoibhinn ceóil
go bhfuil cúirt aiges na Sasanaigh
mar bhárr ar ár ngnó
is mó ainir mhilis mhúinte
agus leanbh fireann fionn geal
agus óigfhear eadrom lúthmhair
san úir uainn ar feóig (marbh)
cé gur deachar púirt as draoiche (ag cur amach)
ná clannibh búird do dhibirt
'nár mbaile dúthcais dílis
a bhí ag ár sinnsear riamh rómhain
Cá bhfuil anois bhúr mhaoinig
no an fíor a bhfuilid beo
go dtacaidí in ár dtímpall
cun cabhrú linn san gleo
do tháinig óceann Connacht orainn
céad as míle laogh
oiread (?) eile ó leagain orrain
a mhairim glan sa bhfaobhair
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 11:40
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Rí Connraí go dtí an áit seo cun Aifrionn d'fhéisteacht. Marbhuigheadh bean Connraí annsa - na Danair a mharbh í istig san teampaill maidin Domhnaig, peaca fíor nú bréag an sgeal, ach "Teampaill na Fanaide" a thugaimid ar an áit ó shion.
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 11:38
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Sgeilín "An Droch Shaoghal"
Deirtear go raibh tíghearna talmhan na cómhnaidhe sa cheanntar seo fadó. Fear mór cúiseach do beadh é agus níor thaithn leis núair ná raibh na daoiní ag díol na cíosa agus seo mar dúbhairt sé leo, agus é ag bagart an maide dóibhe:-
"Níl bucach ná fear mála
Ón Tooreén go bailín fúar
As san go Cathair Dómhnail
Nú go bun Iochtar Cúa
Mun a dtiochfadh i gceann na ráithe
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 11:31
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Cuireann siad suas é an oidhche roimh an aonach agus bíonn sé anáirde ar fead trí lá. Tógann siad anuas é an oidhche tar éis an aonaigh agus bíonn siad ag rinnce le h-áthas agus bíonn céol agus rinnce acu. Nuair bhíonn na h-ainmidhthe díolta acu marcálann siad iad. Uaireannta géarann siad a gcuid gruaige agus cuireann siad marc dubh ortha.
Fuaireas an méid eolais seo ó:- Donnaca Ó Shéaghdha, Gortbhuidhe
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 11:24
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Ainm agus seoladh do'n té a thug an méid eolais thúas dom i nGaedhilg:- Bean Uí Chonchubhair, Cuileannach
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 11:23
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The Elder is a beautiful shrub, grown from seeds or cuttings. There are ornamental varieties of the plant also and people in towns and cities grow it in their gardens and its leaves are of various colours such as green, and white and gold and variegated elder. It has a beautiful scent and a wine called elderberry wine is made from its berries. Boys peel the pith out of the bark and they use the bark to make pop guns out of it and they also make pea shooters out of it. Gardeners put elder twigs in between cabbage plants to prevent the cabbage butterfly laying here eggs on them. The butterfly knows that if she lays her eggs in the cabbage the young ones when they come out will eat the elder as well as the cabbage and it will kill them. The wood is of no use.
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 11:16
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Cnoc Meadonac - middle Hill. Evidently the Hills here were named around from Both Cárthaigh or Teamhair as it is at present known where the McCarthys - Kings of Munster lived before going on to Cashel. The district around is called Sliab Luacrac. There is Conoc na nCat, Cnoc na Muclac, Gleann na (?). Here is one of the largest forts in the district and in next field is a large Gullán with finger prints on it. There is no sign of Ogam. The field is called the Cill field.
At present there are 7 families, population 31, that is 16 males and 15 females. Three houses are thatched and 4 slated. Most of townland is very good land, with a few spots of cut away bog.
At one time a girl Sighlín na Siafra lived in Knockmanagh. She went to school in Boherbue and on the way had to pass by the fort in Keelnahulla; being a very lovely little girl, and of grand dispositions, the fairies in the fort got a liking for her and enticed her to spend the days with them instead of going to school. They warned her not to tell her mother. She did however after some time tell her mother, who washed her in some mixture. Next time the fairies would not look at her but told her they would get her on her first baby. On this account she never married, and was ever after known as Sighlín na Siafraí.
Keelnahulla the next townland is so called because there was a praying stone in the Cill there in O'Connor's land. There is also a Cillín for unbaptised children in O'Sullivan's land. Here along Brogeen are remains of many mud houses.
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 10:45
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In olden times the people about this place never wore any shoes. In summer time they never wore anything on their feet. In winter time they always put skins around their feet.
In summer time the the children round about this always went barefooted and they always go barefooted yet.
There are few people in this parish make boots. The women never get boots made boots made but the men who are working in the field always get boots made. There are two men in St. Johnston and two in Carrigans. Willie Bell and Hugh O'Donnell in St Johnston. Bob. Jackson and Thomas Wilkin in Carrigans.
In olden times the people always wore clogs in winter and in summer time they went barefooted. Long ago the shoemakers were very
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 10:38
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There is only one forge in each of these forges. Here are some of the tools which a smith uses and things he keeps in the forge:- bellows, anvil, bench, hammers, chisel, iron, a drill, pincers, nippers, sledges and plyers.
Robery Robb shoes horses, fixes ploughs, puts shoeing on cart wheels, makes iron girdles for putting over the fire, fixes tongs and so on.
When Robb's father was living they hadn't a very good forge. After his death all the farmers collected money and put him up a new forge.
Every winter's night after darkness falls, three little red lights are to be seen in Robb's forge. If anyone enters the forge the lights disappear, and when they come out and look in at the window the lights are to be seen dancing on the anvil. They appear at about nine or ten o'clock. Many people have seen them
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 10:30
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St Baithin is the patron saint of this parish. The native place of St Baithin is Taughboyne.
St Baithin had a church in Taughboyne. The ruins are still standing. This was the only church the Catholic had in olden times. The Protestants took the church from the Catholics but they got it again.
St Baithin lived about the fifth century. It is siad he had a monastery near Derry but there is no trace of it now. There is a well in Taughboyne called St Baithin's well.
St Baithin was buried in Taughboyne. he was buried where the graveyard now is. Some people say that he worked a miracle.
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 10:23
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were: Wednesday is the feast of SS. Peter and Paul and Mass will be here at Eleven o'clock. Confession will be heard on Thursday evening for the first Friday of the month. On Friday Paddy McCallin and Biddy McGilliam will be married in this Church and if any body has any objections to make, make then at once. The Pope's collection will be taken up here on next Sunday. There was a small parcel found outside the Church and if anyone claims it in the Sacristy they will get it.
The servant went out to the church and this is what he said:
Ladies and Gentlemen, Fr Doyle is sick but that's no sin. Wednesday is the feast of Paddy McCallin and Biddy McGilliam. Thursday is the first Friday of the month. On Friday SS Peter and Paul will be married in this Church and if any body has any objections to make they will find it in small parcel in the Sacristy. The Pope will be here to take up his collection on next Sunday.
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 10:16
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kid did nothing on me." She called on the stick to beat the dog. Says the stick: "I'll not, for the dog did nothing on me." She called on the fire to burn the stick. Says the fire: "I'll not, for the stick did nothing on me". She called in the water to drown the fire. Says the water "I'll not, for the fire did nothing on me." She called on the bull to drink the water. Says the bull: "I'll not, for the water did nothing on me." She called on the butcher to kill the bull: Says the butcher "I'll not, for the bull did nothing on me." She called on the rope to hang the butcher. Says the rope: "I'll not, for the butcher did nothing on me." She called on the rat to eat the rope. Says the rat: "I'll not, for the rope did nothing on me."She called on the cat to kill the rat. Says the cat: "I'll not, till I get some milk." She called on the cow to give her some milk. Says the cow: "I'll not, till I get some mash." "You'll soon get that," says the wee woman. When the cow got the mash she gave some milk. When the cat got the milk she ran at the rat; the rat ran at the rope: the rope ran at the butcher: the butcher ran at the bull, the bull ran at the water: the water ran at the fire: the fire
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 10:06
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We came to see Jenny Joe is played in the following way. One girl stands with her back to the wall and another hides behind her. Then a row with one in the middle called a mother come up to her singing. "We came to see Jenny-Joe, Jenny-Joe Jenny-Joe if she is in". The one at the wall answers "She's upstairs washing clothes, washing-clothes, washing-clothes. She's upstairs washing clothes, washing clothes can't see her to-day. Then the row go away again singing "Farewell young ladies and gentlemen too. We came to see Genny-Joe etc. This time the one at the wall answers: She's up stairs ironing clothes iron clothes can't see her to-day. Then the row go away again singing. Farewell young, ladies young ladies young ladies. Farewell young ladies and gentlemen too. We came to see Gemmy-Joe etc. The
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 09:57
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Brown Knowe. A field belonging to Andrew Stuart.
Bridge Park. A field along Cappry burn belonging to Pat Doherty.
The Hand Ball Alley. A place on Dooish hill.
The Dam Park. A field belonging to McCools.
Cnoch Bán. A field with a big brae in it. It belongs to Pat McCool.
The Shanney A field belonging to Mr. Donaldson.
The Moss and Alts A field belonging to the McCools
The Rocky Knowes A field belonging to Mr. Donaldson with a lot of Rocks in it.
Castleban A field belonging to Charles Herron of Kiltyferrigal.
Glen Doris A field belonging to the castle in Drumboe.
William Hill and Burnet Two fields also belonging to the Castle
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 09:35
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Sean na Sagart and Bingham Sean na Sagart used to kill priests, he used to keep their heads and give them to a man named Bingham who was living near bastlebar. He was a long time gathering priest's heads so at last he had the roofs of live barns full with heads. When he was a year or so at this work God put a plague of lice on him. He body was covered over with lice so at last he could not have clothes on him. Then he got a leather suit made and when this suit was made he put it on him as he thought this would banish the lice. When he put this on him he was as bad as ever. So at last he was so
senior member (history)
2021-10-28 09:34
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Once upon a time there were two young men, brothers, both under twenty years of age. They were fond of playing cards much to their father's dislike. He had to do most of the farm work, because the boys went off gambling every night, to the gambling house, which was about four or five miles away from their home.
The neighbours often gave them good advice to give up cards and help their poor old father who was failing in health. He went in one morning to their bedroom where they were lazily sleeping after their night out. He warned them that something evil would happen [to] them, if they continued the late hours. The boys simply laughed at the poor old man.
Soon after their father's warning, they were coming home late as usual. They stopped to light their pipes on the road side and one said to the other "Isn't it a grand night?" but the other did not answer. He was gazing open mouthed at something coming down from the sky. The other brother looked and behold a table came before them. Then to their horror a hand placed two chairs, each side of the
anonymous contributor
2021-10-28 07:00
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[page number:] 167
Card Playing
Once upon a time there were two young men, brothers, both under twenty years of age. They were fond of playing cards much to their father's dislike. He had to do most of the farm work, because the boys went off gambling every night, to the gambling house, which was about four or five miles away from their home.
The neighbours often gave them good advice to give up cards and help their poor old father who was failing in health. He went in one morning to their bedroom where they were lazily sleeping after their night out. He warned them that something evil would happen [to] them, if they continued the late hours. The boys simply laughed at the poor old man.
Soon after their father's warning, they were coming home late as usual. They stopped to light their pipes on the road side and one said to the other "Isn't it a grand night?" but the other did not answer. He was gazing open mouthed at something coming down from the sky. The other brother looked and behold a table came before them. Then to their horror a hand placed two chairs, each side of the
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 23:27
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Walse and Eoin Ruad O'Sullivan. Edward Walse taught in Millstreet. He was born in Derry.
Eoin Ruad O'Sullivan was a native of Knocknagree, he wrote in both English, and Irish. It is not known how they got the gift of poetry. He was a Spailpin and there is a poem written down by Eoin Ruad O'Sullivan. The name of it is (An Spailpin Fanach) describing a Spailpin. He was a tradesman by trade. Edward Walse wrote many poems Mairgeadh Ní Ceallaigh, and Castls McAuffife (?) and other beautiful poems.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 23:22
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I live in the townland of Gurteraugh and the parish of Boherbue, and the barony of Duhallow and in the Co of Cork.
There are seven families and seven houses in Gurteraugh, which comprise fifty in number in seven houses. There are thatched and slated houses in the townland about equal halves in number
It derives its name for in former days twas know as the fields of the briers, and so that is how it go its name
There are very few old persons in my townland of the age of seventy. I know one person her name is Mrs Shine, Gurteraugh, Boherbue. Co Cork, she can tell English stories but no Irish one.
Houses were very numerous long ago, and some of the ruins can be seen where they were built.
My father told me that they were a few houses at the back of Droumararigle School which is the school I attend.
I know and saw the walls of an
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 23:21
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I live in the townland of Gurteraugh and the parish of Boherbue, and the barony of Duhallow and in the Co of Cork.
There are seven families and seven houses in Gurteraugh, which comprise fifty in number in seven houses. There are thatched and slated houses in the townland about equal halves in number
It derives its name for in former days twas know as the fields of the briers, and so that is how it go its name
There are very few old persons in my townland of the age of seventy. I know one person her name is Mrs Shine, Gurteraugh, Boherbue. Co Cork, she can tell English stories but no Irish one.
Houses were very numerous long ago, and some of the ruins can be seen where they were built.
My father told me that they were a few houses at the back of Droumararigle School which is the school I attend.
I know and saw the walls of an old (?)
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 23:19
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old ruin in my district.
It is in our land in one of our fields. I saw the ruin, and the name of the person that lived there was called Margaret Murphy, in the field where it was we call it now "Ro (?) Mac" field.
There is no woods planted in my district, but my eyesight can see the Island Wood which the birds play a great part in its scenery there with their musical voices.
The river I know best is the Brogeen, which means little river or small river, the source of it is said at Reyallian which is to the west of my place, and then it is a tributary of the Black Water.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 22:56
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which is called for years "Pollgrady." There is a big hole in the field.
In Mr Dunlea's farm in the townland of Bridgetown, in the barony of Fermoy, Co. Cork his fields are called - "The Grove, "The Lawn," "The Abbey Field," "The Inch," "The Railway Field."
In the "Lawn Field," there stood a great gentleman's house long ago. There is a field which is called the "Abbey Field," because outside the eastern ditch there are the remains of an Abbey. There is a field called the "Railway Field," because the railway is running up to the ditch of that field.
Across the river, where the river Awbeg flows into the Blackwater, there is a spring well and there is a tree overhanging it. It is called "Bun Abhann."
Told by Mr Patrick Dulohery, Main St.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 22:43
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Winniwards A brae near McBride's crossing Brae gates in Cappry.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 22:42
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Buailidh Árd. A field on (my father's farm) in which there is a big rock.
Árd An Bhrich. A height on Aughavoy mountain on which there are a lot of bushes growing. The people say that there was a badger on it long ago.
Garfaidhe Bán. A place on the top of the hill. The people say a white hare was killed there.
Lilly Lough. A little lake on the top of the Aughavoy hill. It is a very small and there is an island in the middle of it which is covered with water lillies.
Carraig An Roc. It is a rock on Corraine mountain which is covered with heather and there is a holly bush growing on the top of it.
The goose's Foot. It is cut out on a rock on the top of Dooish hill.
Cat's Cradle. A place with wire round it to keep cattle from going up to it because they would fall down again.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 22:28
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4. The farm at present occupied by the late Daniel Quigley's widow and family stand on high ground which slopes abruptly down to the Finn valley behind the house. Immediately behind the house is a sloping garden now planted with fir-trees. The late owner's mother had lost an eye and the following is the story told locally in explanation.
When she did her washing - clothes, potatoes and so on - she used to carry the water afterwards into this garden and throw it down the slope. She used two tubs - a large one for doing the washing and a small one for carrying the water to the garden to throw it out of the way.
One say she heard a voice as she was going to pour out the water asking her not to throw it there. She paid no heed but went on with her old practice, till one evening as she emptied the tub she pricked her eye on some sort of twig and was blind in that eye for the remainder of her life. Both her tubs, the large and the small, "were in smithers the next morning."
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 22:18
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é seo agus is ann a deinti an mhóin do chrúacha gach bhlían nuair a tógtar é ón bportach agus "páirc na crúaiche" a tugaimíd air igcómhnuidhe.

PÁIRC CONNRAÍ
Páirc mhóir bhog é seo agus seana fotharach na lár áit a raibh cathair Rí Connraí. Tá rían na fotharach ann fós agus tá falla mhór árd deanta do cloch is carraig tímpeall an caiseil. (?) Tá cúpla golán mór na sheasamh tímcheall air (Ogham Stones) agus tá lios faoí thalamh ann. Bíonn ana ceól ag na "daoine maithe" san fotharach seo - "Páirch Connraí"

GÁIRDÍN GLÚINÍ
Gáirdín beag ar cúl an tíge é seo. Deirtí linn gur fear do muintir Glúiní abhí na cómhnaidhe annsa fadó, fadó agus bé sin fé ndear ainm na páirce.

TEAMPAILL na FANAIDE
Thúas san cnoich atá an áit seo. Faoí (?) thalamh atá an seana teampaill agus raghadh
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 22:17
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 22:13
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Tá tobar beannuigte i mbaile a cruaic ins an roilig agus tá iash beag dearg ann agus deirteas duine ar bit a feicfead an iasg sin go racaid se flatas deireac
Ta tobar beannuig eile nEireas agus caitead tú soubhal yart ar cloca géina oct nuaire sin é ann
puinneas ata ar na daoine a rastas go dtí an tobir beannuigte sin i gcomnuide duine a ratas ann ar an ocaid sin
anonymous contributor
2021-10-27 22:11
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Sean na Sagart and Bingham Sean na Sagart used to kill priests, he used to keep their heads and give them to a man named Bingham who was living near bastlebar. He was a long time gathering priest's heads so at last he had the roofs of live barns full with heads. When he was a year or so at this work god puli a plaguer of lice on him. He body was covered over with licer so at last he could not have clothes on him.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 22:08
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seo lá crostá ná blian atá acá deir siad rud ar bith a Cuirtein ar aone ceiste nar locfad se cor ar bít
Seo ceann eile atá aca Nil se ceart obair ar bith a deanam lá Nolac se an fá duine ar bith abaire an lá bainig sin nil cuire ar bit acá ag Diá deir siad nac bfuil se ceart
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 22:07
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Is mór an áis dos na feirmeoírí agus des na ceannuighteóirí na h-aontaigthe sin do bheith ann anois, mar fadó do bhí sé ar na ceannauigtheóirí dul ar fud na tuatha go dtí gach tigh feirme cun na h-ainmhidhe do cheannach. Anois bíonn páirc fé leith i bhfúrmhór na mbailte i gcóir na h-aontaighthe agus is éigin don lucht díolta a stoch do thaisbeáint agus don lucht ceannuidhthe é d'fheiscint.
Anois bíonn sé air na feirmeóirí "páidhe a tabhairt ag geata an aonaigh le h-aghaidh gach beithidhigh mar atá, trí pingine ar mhuch, agus sé pingine ar bhuin. Bíonn na h-aontaighthe i ndeire na bliadhna ar na h-aontaigíbh is mó mar bhíonn na ferimeóirí ag sgarúint le na stoc a bhíonn aca roimh an gheimhreadh. Fadó bhí aonach an patrúin i gCíll Gobhnait. Anois bíonn aonach mór i gCíll-Orglan i mí an Mheithimh. Aonach an Phuich a tugtar mar ainm air. Bíonn pocán gabhair ináirde ar áit áird i lár na sráide ar feadh trí lá an aonaigh. Cuirtear ináirde é an oidhce roimh an aonach agus tógtar anúas é taréis an tríomadh láe. Bíonn aontaighthe fé leith i gcóir capall agus banbhaí.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 22:05
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obair ar bith a deanam ar an donact deir siad nac bfuil se ceart rud ar bith á gearrie amac Diá Luain.
Deir siad nac bfuil se ceart rud ar bith a tobairt amac nuair tá duine ag deanam maisguire.
Deir siad nac bfuil se ceart ag duine ar bith posad ar Dia Ceidin no ar Dá Luain m fior e
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 22:00
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Tá cuid mait ainmneacá ar na paircne seo Ainm amain gearrie Neidie seo ceann eile gairrie na luaitre.
agus gairrie mor se an fá a bfuil siad gliotá ná h ainmeacá sin bi feir sá ait á bi gliota na hainmeaca sin.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 21:58
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Bhí go léor gaisge ann fado, bha mait an fhear é Deirmuid O Reata, Bhí sé iongantach mait ag deanam gac rud, biongant ac anfhear é deirmuid O reata ag rit gac shear a racad ag rit, bhuailead sé amac iad uilig agus mar geall ar sin Ní racadh moran fhir ag rit leis, cor ar bit mar ní raibh aon mait doibh dul ag rith leis.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 21:57
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Bhí fear mait in Bhaile A Cruac fada, deire na daoine nac raib fios acu moran faoi act go raibh se in a so ac mór ard laidir breág, Tainic siad an uaidh agus deir siad go raibh cloc mór as cíonn an uaid agus go leor sgriobad ar an cloc seó é cuid den sgriobad a beidir leó a deanain amac Dunn Mac a Diarrse Bhí mios mo sgriobad na sinn ar an cloc act sín é an beíd a beidir
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 21:54
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'San am ceadna mhair flaith arab' ainm dó Caomh in-iarthar Duthaighe Ealla. Is minic a théigheadh an fear seo ar cúaird go Caisleán Cor go mór mór nuair a bhíodh (-) ar siubhal. Bhíodh an buadh ag Caomh de gnáth ins na cleasaibh lútha agus ar a shon 'san bhí fabhar ag an Draoi agus go mór mór ag Aoibhil agus Cliodhna leis. Shíl an Draoi cleamhnas a dheanamh idir an bhfear óg seo agus duine d'á inghean mar annsan bheadh an duthaig go léir fé'n a smacht. Acht b'é rud a thuit amach ná go raibh an bheirt ingrádh leis. Bhí an scéal 'na phraisigh annsin. Acht is le h-Aoibhil abhí Caomh ingrádh agus ní fada go raibh lámh agus focal eatorra. Bhí Cliodhna le buile is le báine mar gheall air seo agus i racht feirge chuaidh sí go bean feasa abhí ar aithne aici. D'imir an sean-chailleach a cuid draoidheachta ar Aoibhill agus ní fada go dtáinig deallramh leicneach, tanaidhe ar a gnúis agus a ceannacha agus bhí saghas eitinne 'á marbhú i leabaidh a chéile. D'éag sí sa deire agus cuireadh tórramh uirthi agus cúpla lá n'a dhiaidh sin cuireadh í i bprócláis in aice leis an gcaisleán. I gcuim na h-oidhche tháinig Clidoha agus an bhean feasa agus rugadar corp Aoibhil leó go dtí pluais abhí ingar do'n chaisleán. B'é rud a bhí taréis tuitim amach ná gur thug Cliodhna deoch suain a thabhairt d'á drifiúr agus nach raibh uirthi acht deallramh an bháis. Nuair a tháinig Aoibhill chúici féin cuireadh in iúl di go gcaithfheadh sí fanamhaint 'san bpluais i gclódh cait bháin go deo na Díleann. Deirtear 'sa cómharsanacht go bhfuil sí ann fós i gclódh cait agus go gcuirfear deire leis an draoidheacht má
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 21:54
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Bhí go léor gaisge ann fado, bha mait an shear é deirmuid O Reata, Bhí sé iongantach mait ag deanam gac rud, biongant ac anfhear é deirmuid O reata ag rit gac shear a racad ag rit, bhuailead sé amac iad uilig agus mar geall ar sin Ní racadh moran fhir ag rit leis, cor ar bit mar ní raibh aon mait doibh dul ag rith leis.
anonymous contributor
2021-10-27 21:50
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168
in the middle called the fool.Then they change and the fool stands in the middle watching her chance.If she gets the corner the one put out is the fool.We play limping Tom in the Summer.We all join together then one of us go into the middle and another go around the ring.The one in the middle says"who goes round my stony wall"and the one outside says no one but poor limping Tom will you take any of my chicks no only this little one.Then we all run and one follows us another saves us.We also play little silly saucer in Summer we all join together and we sing a verse.
Little silly saucer
Sitting on the water,
Turn to the east,turn to the west
Turn to the girl you love best.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 21:42
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Dá mhead tinneas fiacla ar dhuine agus sliogán agus frog do chur leis an bhfiacail bhainfeadh sin an pian as.
Má bhíonn calán ar bun coise duine agus seilmidhe do chur leis deirtear go mbainfeadh sí iad ó dhuine.
Má bhíonn fairiniu ar duine agus dá dtagadh sé ar chloich agus uisge ann
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 21:38
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D'innis m'athair na leigheasanna seo dhom.
Mac nach bhfeicfeadh a athair bíonn leigheas béil tinn aige.
An 7adh mac nó an 7adh inghean bíonn leigheas naoscóide achu.
Leigheas do'n triuch dubhán alla a chur i mála mbeag agus é a chrochadh thart timceall an mhuinéil.
Bainne a thabhair do fheréad agus an méid a bhéadh fágtha aige é a thabhairt don'n duine atá an triuch air.
anonymous contributor
2021-10-27 21:30
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time to the very minute. Some people had sticks in the ground and they used to call it a sundial.Sometimes they used to have tea at Christmas.
Sometime around 1844 the tea became common. When the tea came there were no cups and they had to drink out of noggins.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 21:26
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53 An tí a chuireann san Earrach baineann sí na bhFoghmar.
54. Is trom an t-ualach an leisge.
55. Má's gearr ó indiu go dtí indi is giorra bhíos an leun ag teacht.
56 Jack of all trades and master of none.
57. Don't change your clout until May is out.
58. The left hand side is the safest ride.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 21:23
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59. Good characters make good citizens
60. Fortune favours efforts well begun
61. Honest labour beareth a lovely face.
62. Industry is the greatest of conquerors.
63. Judge nothing by appearance alone.
64. Keep alive the spark of conscience.
65. Manners should adorn one's conduct.
66. Character is higher than intellect.
67. Níl Satharn 'sa bhliain na spalpann an ghrian.
68. Aifreann an Domhnaig na spalpann uait.
69. Is maith an cáirde la fada an tsamhraidh.
70. Muna mbeidh se tirim, is fliuch is fearr é.
anonymous contributor
2021-10-27 21:21
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Aughagower Forty Years Ago
About thirty or forty years ago Aughagower was not the same as it is now.
Where Stantons are living now the Geratys lived at that time. They had a thatched house but Stantons got it slated. It was a public house (also) in Geraty's time also.
Where Scotts are living now the Johnstons were living then. They had a slated house and they had the post office also.
At that time Fr. Flatley Parish Priest lived where Fr. O'Toole is living now and before his time lived Cannon Flatley. A man called Henry was living
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 21:19
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45. A patch upon a patch is better than a hole; but too many patches make too great a show.
46. Saturday's wash for Sunday's dash.
47. Téigheann an bainne sa Gheimhreadh go h-atharca na mbó.
48. Is annamh gort gan diasa fiadhain tuigead cách brígh mo scéal. Is annamh beirt ar a mbhíonn rath ná tagann meath ar chuid dá gclainn.
49 You could not knock blood out of a turnip
50. A half a loaf is better than no bread.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 21:15
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51 Is maith an capall ná fáigheann barrathuisle.
52 'Tisn't so many gowns but so many pounds
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 21:10
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Bhí baintreach bocht ann fadó agus ní raibh aici ach aon mach amháin. Bhí sé ana leisgheamham . Sínte sa chúinne a bhíodh sé furmhór a shaoghail agus a mháthair ag soláthar blúire éigin bíd dho. Aon lá amháin tháinig atrú air, dúbhairt sé lé na mháthair go raghadh sé in aimsir agus chuaidh.
An chead lá oibre a dhein sé dhá máigistir ní bhfuair sé mar phágh ach chat. Nuair a bhí sé ag imteacht abhaile thug a máighisthir paca dho chun an cat a cur isteac ann. Ach nuair a bhí sé ag imtheacht abhaile dhearmúdh sé an paca agus chaith se an cat a thúbhairt na dhá láimh . Bhí an cat á sgrabha no go raibh a dhá láimh cómh tinn sin gur a eigean a dhfhead sé é túbhairt leis.
Nuair a bhí sé aige baile chonnaic a mháthair a dhá láimh agus dúbhairt sí leis ca na thaobh már cheangail se cosa an chait. Bhí san go mhaith is ní raibh go h-olc. D'imthig se leis an
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 21:01
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A Dhonnachada is léan liom an sgéul seo le h-innsint
Gur d'iompuighis ód gaolta is lucht a béarla gur luighis leó.
Thugtar bíobla an an éithig agus an t-séanmhas do lioa
Agus gan aon bríg don mnaoí bhánla
is gurb í máthair geal Críost í.
II
Chuimnig is mactnuig ar bheatha na Naomh
Nác bhfuil ag an gconairt ach d ingte agus claon
Nách bhfuil ins an tsaoghail seo ach claontas mí-áthmhar
Agus gan aon chúnntas ag éinne ó indé go dtí ambáireach
III
Dort do chuid fola ar an gcrosaire cruaidh
A géaga dá ceangal gan taise gan truagh
Creid - se go bhfágghann gan fághaltas a tsaoghail seo
'S gan aon chúnntas ag éinne ó indé go dtí amáireach
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 20:53
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VIII
Má tagann aon gaoth ar fostar
Cuirfead é as CeannTrágha
Más é toil a Máigistir Easboig
É aistriú as malairt áite.
IX
Beidh tú annsan go h-aindeis
'S ní thuillfidh sé puinn paig dhuit
Cas a bheidh annsan dá bharr agat
Ní leanbh é ná páiste.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 20:50
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V
Nuair a imthigeócaidh an bhríg ód sheanduine
Sé an Poor house mór do stáit-se
Nuair a eirigeóir suas ar maidin
Cuir do dá shiúnamail mhóra breaca
Chun na Flaithis geal anáirde
Ag lorg cabair ar an maigdean bheannuight
Dul chun péin ins an páis leat
Agus do peacaí troma á maitheam duit
A dheinis leis an Saucepan.
VI
Brígid Ní Cinnéide mar measaim-se
Tá's tú anois go sásta
Go bfuil Mr Lake an scaifre
Dá cheangal léi anois láithreach
VII
Beidh cabhair aici ó'n maigdean bheannuight
Caradeas Rí na nGrást Geal
Nuair nár pós sí an crúnca sean-duine
Go mbaistear air an Saucepan
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 20:45
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A Shiobhan Uí Leiginn m'attuirse
Mo mallacht sa go bráth ort.
Do dhóigis do scaifléar beannuigthe
'S stracais d' aibíd áluinn
II
Do dhíoilais do ciall 's t-anam
'S do séanais Ríog na nGrást Geal
Mar gheall ar seact sgillinge sa t-seachtmhain
Do phósais Paddy Sausepan.
III
Féicead sa arís go h-aindeis tú
Agus ní bheidh muga agat na saucepan
Ag siubhal ar fuaid na mbailte amach
'S ar do dhrom sead bheidh do mhála
IV
Ní bhfaigidh tú prátaí, mhin ná bainne uaim
Ná aon níd le chuir id Saucepan
Ach luarálaig siad le maide tu
'S madraí an baile á sáth leat
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 20:31
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and settled down to wait. They were not long there when they heard the sound of the hunting horn and a hare dashed by followed by a batch of hound. The next thing was a great company of horsemen, redcoated and women and who was leading but the gentleman who disturbed the hair in the garden.
Away across the country went the chase and the two men waited for no more.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 20:30
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The Dead Hunt" is spoken of having been seen or heard at the witching hours, but this story which is true, happened some 40 or 50 years ago in this parish
Two men set out at the midnight hour to steal apples out of a walled in garden Green Mount. They scaled a fifteen foot wall and set to work. Very shortly the opening of a wicket gate disturbed them and they crouched in hiding in the tall potatoe stalks. Soon a man dressed in hunting kit came striding down the walk lashing at each side of him with a whip. More dead than alive the men saw him retrace his steps so they waited for no more but quickly got over the wall again. How ever they did not give up the idea of taking the apples so they decided to cross the river and cover themselves up in the cocks of hay, (it was hay time) and come back at cock crow and have their bags filled. No sooner said than done, they got into the hayfield
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 20:28
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an sagart an rud céadna, agus dubhairt an fear arís gur mharbhuigh sé an tríomhadh fear, "O tá an diabhail ort," ars an sagart. "Má tá sé orm ní bheidh sé orm i bhfad", ars an fear agus leis sin do chaith sé an sagart isteach san abhainn agus bháitheadh é.
Annsin chuaidh an fear abhaile go n-áthasach ag innsint do gach duine nach raibh diabhail ann anois ar chor ar bith mar cheap sé gurbh é an diabhail a bháith sé.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 20:27
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Sgéal Greannmhar
Bhí fear ann fadó agus amadán a bhí ann. Chuaidh sé go Sasana agus bhí sé ag obair i gcóir feilméara. Leig sé air féin nach raibh sé indon airgeadh a cómhaireadh. Bhiodh an feilméar ag innsint dó go minic go raibh na Gaedil an-sanntach. Chuaidh an sgéal ceart go leor go dtí gur tháinig tráthnóna Dé Sathairn an t-am ba gnáthach leis an ngasúr a phaigh d'fághail.
Tháinig an feilméar chuige agus trí píosaí airgid aige. Bhí piosa dá sgilling is leath-choroin is leath-sobhran buidhe aige. Bhí cead ag an ngasúr ceann ar bith acu seo a thógail.
Dubhairt sé nach mbeadh sé chomh sanntach le na buachaillí eil[e]
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 20:26
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Two men paid the extreme penalty of the law = execution - for her murder. One was a gentleman lover and the other his boatman. The remains of the former lie in Crecora Churchyard, within the precinct of some ruins. This gentleman belonged to a family who held high influence in those far off days. Consequently, his body must have been allowed to his friends for his private internment. Thoumpeen na Webbina lies in the farm of Mr Ned Lane. Where the "Colleen Bawn" used to visit was close to the little stream near Pat Keating's house.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 20:24
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is little trace of any other structure or grave around it. Local people say that there are indications of the remains of an enclosing wall. If this existed as a protection to the vault its ambit would be small. Whether other families were interred there must remain a mystery.
It is a peculiarly strange spot for a lonely vault, as it now appears, and elevation and solitude must be in the mind of the deceased owner when he selected this site as a final resting place.
As weird and requestered its position is there were a few men who were not afraid to avail of the shelter of this vault at at night. One was an outcast, and the other was a poor half witted beggarman. People and times have changed since then, and it is a pity that there is not greater respect and protection for these ancient graves.
This landmark lies about 500 yards from the place where Ellen Hanly (The Colleen Bawn) Lived with her uncle temporarily.
It was there Captain Scanlan met his bride. The unhappy ending of both has been immortalised, in the dramatic story of the "Colleen Bawn" by Gerald Griffin.
The principal characters in this play have assumed names, but the author founded his story on the romantic touch attached to the life of the "Colleen Bawn"
She lies in Burrane churchyard, in West Clare, quite close to the banks of the River Shannon whither her body was washed up by the tide.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 20:15
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awaiting decision
an sagart an rud céadna, agus dubhairt an fear arís gur mharbhuigh sé an tríomhadh fear, "O tá an diabhail ort," ars an sagart. "Má tá sé orm ní bheidh sé orm i bhfad", ars an fear agus leis sin do chaith sé an sagart isteach san abhainn agus bháitheadh é.
Annsin chuaidh an fear abhaile go n-áthasach ag innsint do gach duine nach raibh diabhail ann anois ar chor ar bith mar cheap sé gurbh é an diabhail a bháith sé.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 20:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sgéal Greannmhar
Bhí sagart ann uair amháin. An t-Athair Ó Ceallaigh a bhí mar ainm air. Bhí sé in a chómhnuide i leath Leath Árdan Baile Beag atá cúpla míle ó bhun Neiphin.
Uair amháin bhí sé ag dul ar aistear fada. Ar an abha seo bhí abha le treasnú aige agus ní raibh sé indon í a treasnú. Bhí fear ag obair i bPáirc a bhí in aice na h-aibhne agus tháinig sé le cuidiú leis. Céard a rinne sé acht an sagar[t] a chur ar a dhruim agus nuair a bhí sé ag treasnú na h-aibhne thoisigh sé ag cainnt fa na Peacaidh a rinne sé ar feadh 'na bliadna.
Dubhairt sé gur mharbhuigh sé fear agus dubhairt an sagart gur mór an peacadh é sin. Dubairt sé gur mharbhuigh sé ceann eile agus dubhairt
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
atá ann anois. Cuireadh craiceann caorach ins na fuínneóg. Bhí balla beag i gach aon teach, agus beadh taistear os a cionn. Bhí “laft” i gach aon teach chomhair a bheith agus bhéadh leabhaid acu ann san oidhche. Fanann bán cuid eile “cib dubh” Bíodh coinnle déanta de gúis i talló acu. Seáság an t-aimn a bhí ar leabhaidh na cisteannaigh. “Grat” déanta de cóchan a bhíodh mar doras acu
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bocsa beag a bhíodh aca do lampa agus ola istoigh ann. Bhéadh poll beag cruinn ar an bhocsa agus giota éadach shíos ann. Bhéadh coineál feaga aca a ndeánfadh siad fhéin. Bhainfheadh siad an taobh amuigh de’n fheaga agus thomadh siad an chuid eile de i ngeir no rud éigin. Nuair a bhéadh siad cruaidh bheádh solas an maith ortha.
Bhíodh na toighthe iongantach fada agus bhéadh an doras i lár an toighe agus bheádh na ba ceangailte taobh thíos de’n doras.
Bocsa beag a bhíodh mar lampa acu agus ola istoigh ann. Bhéadh poll beag cruinn ar an bocsa agus giota éadach shíos ann. Bhéadh coineál feaga aca a déanfhaidh siad iad fhéin.
Bainfidh siad an taobh amach de’n feaga agus thomadh siad san (uisge) geir é. Nuair a bhéadh siad cruaidh bhéadh solas an mhaith ortha.
Bhíodh na toighthe iongantach fada agus bhéadh an doras i lár an toighe agus bhéadh na ba ceangailte taobh thíos de’n doras.
Ní rabh siad cosamhal leis na toighthe
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tighthe na sean-Aimsire
Bhíodh cochán mar toighe ar na toighthe ag n-a sean daoine. Bhíodh an chuid is mo de na toighthe comgarach d’a chéile agus iad giota maith ó’n bhealach mhór.
Bhíodh leabaidh sa chóirneál a chois na teineadh fa chuid a ba mo de na toighthe agus bhéadh balla beag ag cois n-a leabtha leis an fhuacht a chongbhailt ar shiubhal, no sé an duine a ba shine sa teach a ba ghnáthach luighe ann.
Sa chuid is mo de n-a toighthe bhéadh an teine sa bhinn. Ní bhéadh simléar ar bith ann acht poll thuas ar bharr an toighe leis an tóit a leigint amach Móin an t-adhbhar teine a bhíodh aca.
Dhá dhoras a bá ghnáthach bhéith ar na toighthe agus bhéadh an comhla deánta de shlata fosta.
Fuinneóg amháin a bhíodh ar na toighthe agus ní bhéadh gloine ar bith ionnta. Bhéadh cochán ionnta san oidhche.
Urlár cré ghorm no leacacha a bhíodh ins na toighthe.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
siad ag an aois. Dubhairt an fear go seisean triocha bliadhan, agus dubhairt Dhómhnaill go rabh seisean dha oiread sin. Dubhairt an bhean annsin go rabh sé (rabh s) ró aosta agus nach glacadh sí é.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Éadaighe:-
Tá beirt tailliúr annseo. Tá áit mhaith acu fa choinne oibruighadh. Domhnaill Ó Tuathaláin an t-ainm atá ar fhear acu. Coinnigheann Domhnaill cuid dé’n eadach é féin. Bheireann chorr dhuine eile isteach an t-éadach. Tá sé ag obair ina theach fhéin. Da gcluinfeadh Domhnaill go bhfuightea culaith déanta in áit áit ar bith eile. Ní dheanfhadh sé an darna culaith duit. Bhí athair Tuathaláin ina thailliúr é fhéin. Bíonn siad ag ceannacht éadach as an t-siopa.
Peadar Ó Laodhóg an t-ainm atá ar an tailliúr eile. Tá sé ina chomhnuidhe ar a Dumhaigh. Tá seisean ag déanamh cultacha fosta. Tá sé iongantach mhaith. Níl Domhnaill Ua Tuathalain comh maith le Peadar Ua Laodog.
Oidhche amháin chuaidh Domhnaill amach le fear eile ag iarraidh bean do fhéin. Dubhairt an fear le Domhnaill ach aon rud a deireadh seisean é a [dhubhlu]?
Chuaidh siad chuig an bhean agus dubhairt an fear go rabh ceithre bó aige. Dubhairt Domhnaill tá dha oiread sin agam. Bhí go maith go dtáinig
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are four forges in the parish of Boherbue, the one I know best is Mr Fitzpatrick which is situated in the townland of Acers.
It is built in the side of the road with a dwelling houses attached on to it. There is always a stream or a well beside the forge to cool irons and other articles.
The implements a smith uses are many, a hammer, a chisel, and other things.
The most of the forges are situated near cross roads but the one I know is not near a cross road, but it is about a quarter of a mile back from it. There is always a large fire in the forge or sometimes two. The roof of it is slate there are no thatched forges, because they would take fire.
He shoes horses, asses, and other things, he repairs ploughs and other machinery. Smiths were taught very skilful and very
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
chuaidh sé isteach ann. D'íarr sé lóistín na h-oidhche agus fúair sé é. Chuaidh sé a chodhladh. Ar maidin núair eirig sé cé cidfead sé istig roimis ach Tadhg Rúadh agus a mhac na fir ceadhna do mhairbh an bhó. Bhíodar ag déanamh cleamhnais le cailín an tíghe sin.
Annsan chuadar amach ag feuchaint ar an dtalmh. Ní raibh aoinne istig ach an bacach agus na mná
Thosnuig sé ag ínnsint an sgéul i dtaobh goid an mhairt dóíbh agus isé an rud a tháinig as ná gur briseadh an cleamhnas i dtaobh an bhacaigh.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Grange Hill near Ballycahane Upper, contains a historical land mark. It is a burial vault of a family named Webb. This family were probably extensive land owners well over a hundred years ago. The oldest person now living does not remember and interment in this vault which was originally closed by having a large flag up to the doorway.
This has been thrown aside for some years, exposing the interior which reveals only some human bones scattered among stones which were a part of the erection in which the coffins lay.
There was a slab over the entrance containing an inscription I heard. This has fallen down and is buried in the debris. The interior space is very limited as only about two coffins would fit in the floor area.
A growth of whitethorn bushes shelters this structure. There
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cuir Cliodhna a lámh ar dhrom Sheáin agus dubhairt sí
"sin é Sean agus nára fada buan é." Níor mhair Seán i bhfad in a dhiaidh san.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Sar a thóg Cliodna Séan léi, bhí fear eile ag rinnce agus fear an dathamhail a bheadh é. Do theastuigh uaithe é. do sgiobadh léi ac nuair cuir sí a lámh in a phóca fuair sí fáinne óir ann. Bhí fios aici annsan go raibh sé pósta agus níor dhein sí a thuille cur isteach air.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí Cliodhna, bainrioghan sidhe na Mumhan, in a comhnuidhe ar charraig ar a dtugtar Carraig Cliodhna. Bhí fear darbh ainm Seán Seamus in a chomhnhuidhe sa comhursonacht. Lá amháin bhí Seán ag rinnce le n-a lán daoine eile ar an bPatrún in "Abha na h-Inse". Tháinig Cliodhna agus thóg sí Seán agus do choimeád sí le lá is 1 bliadhain é. Do leigeadh sí abhaile é anois is arís ámhthach chun a mhuinntir d'fheiscint. Lá dá raibh sé sa bhaile dubhairt fear feasa leis leigint air go raibh sé an-ceanamhail ar Cliodhna mar go marbhóchadh sí é dá mbeadh sé feargach léi. Bhí mermaid an-cliste in a comhnuidhe in iarthar na h-Éireann, agus tháinig sí ad'iarriadh ar Cliodhna Seán Seamus do leigint amach. Ar theacht go Carraig Cliodhna di, arsa sí. "Go mbeannuigidh Críost féin duit. Leig amach Seán Séamus, tá sé lá is bliadhain agat." Arsa Cliodhna. "A rhuidín grána, níl sgáth ón gréin ort féin nó inghean leat. Ní leigfead Seán amach go dtí go bfaighead -
Cuig céad gabhar de gabharaibh maola,
Cúig céad asal gan aon crios céasta,
Cúig céad sovereign de phiosán raolach
Tabhair dom an méid sin nó beidh Seán Féin agam."
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About 45 years ago a human skull was unearthed at Ballygriffin on the farm of Mr. P. Buskin. The late Mr Buskin had removed the stonework of a fence under which was an elevation of earth which he utilized as top dressing for the adjacent field. The skull was dug out of this earth and it must have lain there for a long period as it appeared to be easily broken. I remember to find it on the fence after discovery; even handled it when a young lad. I could not account of it was subsequently consigned to mother earth.
It is mysterious that no other bones were found save this member of a human frame.
It may have been severed from the body of a warrior engaged in deadly combat, or may be a testimony of days of persecution in ancient Eire.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I heard of a man who was seen walking by the side of Tory Hill. He was seen to fall and remain down until relieved and brought to where he got a little to eat. The scarcity of food and unsustaining qualities of the kind procurable was the cause of the weakness.
A drink made by boiling Indian meal to a porridge consistency was customary. This was used with boiled turnips and the people were glad if enough could be found. The bread was of the coarse kind too, rye, oaten, and wheaten as a rarity. There was nothing finer than good oaten meal or Indian meal stirabout but these were not very often within the grasp of the poor people. People went days without food and they were fine types of manhood in those days, many of whom unknown to the world died even by the roadside as well as in lonely resorts.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I heard of an incident that occurred in Black 47 the year of the famine. The scene was the house of Mr Burke Tory Hill Croom, who had the reputation of relieving the wants of of many an unfortunate starving person in those far off days. The potatoe crop had failed and the people were mighty glad if there was a sufficient supply of turnips to be procured. These were not largely grown and to instance this, Mr Burke had recourse to travel to Grange House, the residence of Mr Croker, to obtain his supply.
One day there were some turnips peeled and sliced in a hamper outside Mr Burke's door when a beggar woman with three little boys came seeking alms. The three boys started ravenously eating the raw turnips when Mr Burke (R.I.P) took compassion on them and brought them and their mother into the kitchen where they got plenty to eat
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 19:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Protestant parish Kilpeacon was formed some years previous. During Jame's Reign The 1st Minister was George Allen who is described as the reading Minister. Philip Jenkions was Curate.
Reading Minister.
There being a service shortage of Protestant clergy in Ireland at the time, men of reputable character were given charge of parishes to read services hence the name.
Quinns Cross. From the main road, Patricks Well to Croom there is a boreen leading into Killonahan which was formerly a main road to Cork. Cromwells troops camped on the hillside towards the present Railway Bridge on their way to Limerick. At Killonahan can be seen a fort of much importance a rare one of its kind.
Attyflynn. During Cromwells time was given to Westrops but they were never fully given title till Williams reign.
Patricks Well. Blessed well dedicated to St Patrick, now a [?]
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 18:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Townland
Ballenvilis
Bearnagaishy
Bally na morrough
Cahirpola
Rightful Owner.
Margaret Brian.
Grantee
R. Sweet.

Estate Margaret Brian.
Shanaologh Sir D Burke R Sweet.
Ballinivella Earl Thomond "
Lakarantaun Burke M. Sweet
Graigue J O'Brian G Peacocke
Field of Graigue " "
Dooneen " J Blackwell
Upper Dooneen " R Sweet
Lower Dooneen Nicholas Stritch G Peacocke.
The Catholic parishes of Ballycahane Kilpeacon, Cahervalley Killonahan Clounanna Mungret were then in existence.
Ruins of churches and burial grounds still in existence.
anonymous contributor
2021-10-27 18:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tímceall seasgad bliadhain ó shoin bhí tuille mhór annso i gCúil-Aodha. Sa tSamhradh a bhí sí ann agus níor dhein sí puinn díoghbhála. Do bhí daoine ag peith muca ó Mhaghchromdha go Neidín. Do bheiridís cuid acu i gcrib agus chomáinidhís an cuid eile. Nuair a bhíodh a méid a bhíodh ag siubhal corta chuiridís sa crib iad agus thógaidís amach an cuid eile. Bhi ana spórt ag muinntir na parróiste ag feachaint ar na mucaibh ag snámh sa tuille. Bhí aon chullach mhór amhaín ann agus chuaidh sé síos san ínse. Do rith fear mór 'na dhiaidh agus uisge go crománaibh ar. Cheapadar ná feicfí an cullach a thuille ach snáimh sé thar n-ais arís.
Bhí sneachta mór ann geall leis céad bliadhain ó shoin. Bhí sé morán troighthe ar dhoimhneas. Tháinig sioc anáirde ar agus nhí capaill agus turcaillí ábalta ar shiubhal ar gan dul síos tríd. Sneachta séidain a bheadh é agus bhí gach aon póirse lan agus tháinig sneachta isteach trí pholl na h-eochrach ina lán tighthe. Bí caoire amuigh ar a gcnoc agus nuair a chludaig an sneacht iad dheineadar seómraí dóibh féin fé'n dtalamh
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 18:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A boy named Thomas Riordan lived in Lemonfield about 60 years ago. One night when he was returning from a neighbours wake he saw a lady dressed in black garments standing on a heap of stones by the roadside, and when she moved her robe made a strange rustling noise.
He bade her "good night" but got no answer. When he saluted her the third time he grew terribly frightened. He raced towards home as fast as his legs could carry him with the lady in hot pursuit. When he reached the door the cock crew on the roost and the fairy folk vanished.
He was in bed for three months after, with Rheumatics and he never regained his proper health.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 18:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A short distance from Lemonfield house there is a ruin which is said to be haunted.
One night about 60 years ago a few boys were camping out in Blackbog which lies in the vicinity. About midnight they were awakened by singing and laughter so they agreed to go and see what was happening.
The boys arose and went in the direction of the old ruin for it was from the direction the sound seemed to come. On reaching the ruin however they found that the laughing and singing was coming from a pond among some trees. They hastened to the pond and no sooner had they arrived there than they saw a boat afloat on the water, with four or five ladies in it. The boys soon forgot about the incident and thought it was the Russell ladies from Lemonfield house.
On the next day they inquired about the matter and found out that it was no loving beings they saw.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 18:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
at least a month.
This is how the match is introduced:- The parents of bride inquire as to prospects of prospective grooms as to ages, appearance family, history land and stock.
The bride must not see the bridegroom on the morning of the marriage until she sees him in the church.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 18:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
working on some clothes while the people of the house were in the yard catching an unruly pig. Somebody shouted "tail her" when down jumped the sewer and caught her. Then somebody jestingly answered. "I wouldn't doubt you, Tailor."
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 18:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About 70 years ago it was usual for tailors to go from house to house. They used come to farmer's houses and spend a week or more at each place according to the amount of clothes to be made. Two of the tailors in this locality were, Burns who lived at Kilpeacon, and Madigan at Fitzgerald's shop.
A spinner lived at Ballyregan in the Fort field about 50 years ago and in the same townland there were also weavers named Moroneys. A member of the Moroney family still resides at Ballyregan.
The farmers used to shear the sheep and having combed and cleaned the wool, they used to send it to the spinners where was spun into thread. This process being over the thread used to be sent to the weavers where it was woven and made into frieze. Then it was ready for the tailors to make clothes from it.
Tradition states that an old tailor was seated on his table
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 18:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
explains why the neighbourhood of these raths is avoided by country people after nightfall, even by those who profess disbelief in the fairies or "good people". People will not venture to cut down a shrub or bush within of them as it is considered to bring ill-luck or even prove fatal The forts have often been used as hiding places for treasure of various kinds during the many troubled times when people did not want their valuables to fall into the hands of enemies. A more secure place could not be found than these fairy guarded circles where friend nor foe did not dare to search.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 18:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
These mysterious mounds known as chains or ring forts are very numerous in this locality and as many as 25 have been counted. In the townland of Ballyregan there are 6, Newtown 1, Kilpeacon 2, Shanaclough 1, Ballycahane 1, Ballyveelish 1, Greenmount 3, Bettyville 1, Drumloughan 1, Cloiugh Cloaka 1, Mr Kirby's 1, Toomeys 1, Quiltys 1, Shines 1, Mulqueens 1, Dooneen 1, Fort George 1. They vary in size and in appearance and derive their name from the fact that they are invariably circular in shape and in many instances are surrounded by a rampart of clay.
The origin of these forts or raths is lost in the mists of antiquity and for that reason the question must only remain a conjecture. Tradition has it however that at some remote period they were erected as (centures) centres of defence for the ancient inhabitants against their enemies. It is assumed that they were also utilised as placed for burial of the dead. This
anonymous contributor
2021-10-27 18:02
approved
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awaiting decision
There are six forges in this parish. The names of the men that own them are:-
Frank Marron, Cremartin
Peter Kearly, Clarderry
Peter McBennet, Dunfelemy
Pat McGinn, Gala Clontibret
John Morgan, Doohamlet
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 18:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
'Severe Weather' 22/2/38
In the month of December 1929, there was a terrible storm. It commenced at 4 pm and lasted until midnight. Early in the day the storm was expected as the clouds were moving very quickly and the sky had a vivid colour South West. towards evening the wind rose higher and higher. It stripped houses, tumbled down hay and straw ricks, knocked down several trees in dangerous positions, tore down telegraph wires, tore ditches and bushes were rooted out of their places. Several small boats were wrecked and those living near the sea coast had a terrible experience. The people remained up most of the night. The storm ceased after midnight. In February 1934, there was a terrible thunderstorm. It commenced at six p.m. and lasted until about one o'clock. There was terrible lightning all night and thunderbolt immediately after. The people were terrified and spend the night out of bed. There were a number of cattle killed belonged to a farmer named Mr. Collins of Meelinague. There were also some bushes and ditches torn down. In the year 1855 there was a great snow storm. The night was was fine when the people were going to bed, but when they got up in the morning the country was covered with snow, in some places it rose as high the the eavves of the houses in such a way that people had to make paths with shovels to go for water, turf etc, or to go to outside houses. The cattle had to be kept inside and it was very trying on them to feed them.
James Casey
obtained from Mr. Patrick Casey, Lettergorman, Dunmanway
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 17:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
'Severe Weather' 22/2/38
In the month of December 1929, there was a terrible storm. It commenced at 4 pm and lasted until midnight. Early in the day the storm was expected as the clouds were moving very quickly and the sky had a vivid colour South West. towards evening the wind rose higher and higher. It stripped houses, tumbled down hay and straw ricks, knocked down several trees in dangerous positions, tore down telegraph wires, tore ditches and bushes were rooted out of their places. Several small boats were wrecked and those living near the sea coast had a terrible experience. The people remained up most of the night. The storm ceased after midnight. In February 1934, there was a terrible thunderstorm.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 16:47
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rejected
awaiting decision
62
More die from over eating than hunger.
63
A chain is as strong as its weakest link.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 16:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá sé le feiscint go soiléir go raibh saidhbhreas mór ins an paróiste seo fadó mar tá rudaí luachmhara seanda le fághail annso agus annsúd ins an áit. De réir sgéil tá ciste óir i bhfollach i bpáirch is ioirthear na paróiste.
Deirtear gur na sídeóga a tainig tar-nais agus do cur ann é mar bhí fhios acu go mbeadh gorta sa tír agus na bheadh aon airgead ná aon biadh ag na daoine Geibhtear móran rudaí óir fá ceilt mar núair a tháinig na lochlannaigh go h-Éirinn creacadar mainistreacha agus séipéil agus do thóghadar na rudaí óir beannacadh, amach uatha cun faíní agus órnáidí eile do dheanamh in ionad rudaí Críostíochta agus núair a cifidís an namha ag teacht cucha cuiridís na rudaí i bhfollach in na portaigh agus giebhtear ann iad anois. Cúpla bliadhain ó shoin bhí fear ag deanamh bóthair agus fúair sé thigín beag déanta fe'n dtalamh agus é lan de troscan agus bhí beagán óir.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 16:42
approved
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awaiting decision
mouth of the cave but no farther for the soldier never came apass the mouth of the cave.
Pat tried to run off but found he was stuck to the ground. He did not know what he would do. He remained in that position for two days until a passer-by saw him. He came to him and asked what happened. Pat related his story. The man then went for the priest. When he arrived he said some prayers and sprinkled him with holy water.
Pat was released at that moment and soon after he became all right. After that anybody never went to seek for the treasure ever after.
ordinary member (history)
2021-10-27 16:39
approved
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awaiting decision
thousands, of starvation and fever. When they were dead holes used to be made, and the people used to be thrown in coffinless.
During the time of the great Famine the people were very scarce of food, whatever potatoes grew with them, scabs came on them in pits, and some of them became black, and on that account, they had very little potatoes for the following year.
The Irish people got Relief from the English at that time, but not until a great number of them had died, and when they got food, they used to eat a big meal of it, and could nit digest it and used to die. It was generally all Indian meal they ate.
It was said that a man who was living in [?] had three sons and they died the time of the Great Famine. These young men's father took them one by one on his back, and buried them all in the same grave, without a shroud or coffin in the old cemetery in the farm of Mr. Michael O'Brien Dromore.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 16:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá deall ramh dubh bagartach ar cuid de beannaibh na gCescain Cnoc Daodh ar an dtaobh thiar de Eadragóbhail. Deirtear gur ó Daod Dia na Feirge do h-ainmnigheadh é. Idir Gleann Garbh agus Eadragabháil tá dhá bheann go bhfuil dealbh cnoc bholcánac ortha Gabhail Mór agus Gabhail Beag. Ar an mbothar ón Gleann Gearbh ceapfá go bhfeichfeá an "crater" ar mhullac na Gabhail Móire. Deir daoine gur imeasg na sléibte sin go mór mór ar an aghaidh theas atá an rian is fearr in Éirinn de Ré na Lic Oidhre. Tá aighte na gCarraig go léír sgríobta le linte doimhne agus tá Carraig anuas ar carraig eile comh fluirseach san ann go dtugann gach aoinne dé ndear iad. Tá na barr carraigreacha san cómh neamh-shocair san gur dóig le duine go séidfeadh a anál de drum a chéile iad. Ní bíonn le déanamh ac an lámh do cur ortha cun iad do cur ag corruighe. Níl aon aoirde iongantach ar na sléibte sin i gchompáraid le sléibte Ciarraighe, act istig in a gleannta tá na cúm go fluirseach agus loc ins gach ceann acu agus nuair a bhíonn lá fluich ann is aluinn an radarc iad cumair na sléibte agus a srután sléíbhe ag teacht le fadaidh is gach cumar na cubhar geal bán. Ní foláir no níor deineadh puinn atrú ar deallramh na sléibte sin ó eirigeadar as uct na fairrge act ag a mbun ar taobh na fothana mar a bhfuil comnuidhe ar na daoine is mó atrú atá tagaithe i gcuimnne na sean daoine atá beo fos.
Ar an gcead dul síos ní mar a bhfuil tuigdas na daonrad anois a bhí comhnuidhe ar furmhór na ndaoine
ordinary member (history)
2021-10-27 16:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(1.) What is it the more you take out of it the bigger it grows?
A Hole.
(2.) Brothers and sisters I have non, but that man's father is my father's son? A father and a son.
(3.) As round as a marble, as deep as a cup and all the salt water
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 15:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
snaois de". "Fóill, fóill", arsan garsún.
"Ní chuige sin a tháinig mise agus chun ceart agus cóir a bhaint dhíot". " Cia'cu mbhfeárr leat a bheith a gabhail de sceannaibh ar bhárr carnach a chéile nó iomrascáil chaol, chruadh casda" arsan fathach. "Iomrascáil chaol, chruadh casda, mar a d'foghluam mé i measc na leanbhuidhe uaisle ag a bhaile arsan garsún. Cuaileadar fá céile agus tháinig an spideóg ar an gclaidhe agus a dubhairt leis an garsún " Cuinnig ar ghaisce an bualláinín buidhe". Chuir sé an fathach go dtí a glúine sa talamh den céad cor agus go dtí a bhásta den tarna cor, agus go dtí muineál den tríomhadh cor. Diarr an fathach párdún agus dubhairt leis go dtabharfadh sé dhó cadh caol sonn, srian agus diallait agus ór 'na chuid póchaí, culaighthe airm cliadheamh agus slaitín draoidheactha agus buidéal slán adamne a leigheasfadh an domhan. Fuair sé an claidheamh agus bhuail sé annsa muinéal é. D'éirig a cheann anáirde. Dubhairt an spideóg, " Má luigfidh tú an ceann ar a colann ní marbóchaidh a dtiocfaidh 'sa dtáinig é ". Buail sé an ceann agus do dhein sé dhá leath dhi.
Nuair tháinig sé abhaile ní rabhas ag muintir a tighe go dé an cuinne 'na gcuirfidhe é bhí an oiread meas aca air, bhí an oiread san bainne ag
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 15:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and screaming of a woman at the door shouting "Let me in, let me in." The Scotchman told them to continue & pass no heed. Then she went to the window & back of the house, screaming & shouting all the time & trying to force an entrance She tried to climb up on the roof but failed as the walls were too high. Then she came to the front door still screaming & said "If you let me in I'll give you back all I have taken." The Scotchman asked, "Do you want back all you have lost." "No, " said the Laings, "all we want is what's coming to us." He took the porringer off the fire and said "All right so." Immediately the screaming stopped & the woman made off. He ordered the door to be open and a neighbouring woman, whom they recognized, was seen making away from the house. The churning was completed & they never had such a return of butter as they had that time. After that they had the butter as usual on their churning.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 15:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and screaming of a woman at the door shouting "Let me in, let me in." The Scotchman told them to continue & pass no heed. Then she went to the window & back of the house, screaming & shouting all the time & trying to force an entrance She tried to climb up on the roof but failed as the walls were too high. Then she came to the front door still screaming & said "If you let me in I'll give you back all I have taken." The Scotchman asked, "Do you want back all you have lost." "No, " said the Laings, "all we want is what's coming to us." He took the porringer off the fire and said "All right so." Immediately the screaming stopped & the woman made off. He ordered the door to be open and a neighbouring woman, whom the recognized, was seen making away from the house. The churning was completed & they never had such a return of butter as they had that time. After that they had the butter as usual on their churning.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 15:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
on a board or table. An equal amount of the largest sized potatoes that could be got was washed peeled while raw again washed, and then rubbed against a sheet of perforated tin, and so reduced to a pulp. This process was called "grating" boxty. This pulp was thrown into a calico bag and pressed till all the moisture was squeezed out of it. This dry pulp was next mixed with the boiled mashed potatoes and well kneaded on a table a pinch of salt and a handful of flour were added. Then the boxty was ready for either boiling or baking. If Baked boxty was decided on this mixture was made into flat cakes from a quarter of an inch to half an inch in thickness the size of the Pan in the house, put on the pan and baked over the fire. Several panfuls being baked on each occasion.
If Boiled Boxty was decided on, the the well-kneaded mixture was made into cakes about the size and shape of the present day Bun or toastcake. A large pot of clean spring water was boiling on the fire, and these often as many as twenty were put into the boiling water and left boiling over the fire for an hour.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 15:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One fool makes many but the old fool is worse than any.
True love never runs smooth.
The devil you know is better than the devil you do not know.
He who goes a borrowing goes a sorrowing.
Give a fool enough rope and he'll hang himself.
Blood is thicker than water.
A nod is as good as a wink to a blind horse
No flies enter a shut mouth.
Be just before your generous.
You cannot have your loaf and eat it.
Silence gives consent.
There is no smoke without fire.
The best hurler is on the ditch.
When the old cock crows the young cock learns.
Its a bad wind that blows nobody good.
Two of a trade never agree
'Tis a bad hand that is not worth whistling after.
As the twig is bent so shall it grow.
Spare the rod and spoil the child.
A donkey's love is a kick and a bite.
A bad workman quarrels with his tools.
An empty bag wont stand.
Learning events cast their shadows before
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 15:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
he stopped beating the donkey.
He met a pagan another day and said "I want you to preach to the people". The pagan only smiled and said "Give me your blessing." When he got off his knees he gave St. Patrick all his land and means and began at once to preach.
'Twas at Tara, where he lighted the fire that will never be put out. That he had the most trouble He was most afraid of women and blacksmiths and druids of course. One druid said he had more powers than St. Patrick and before all the people he flew with his chariot and fury horses up and down the air several times. Then St. Patrick made the sign of the Cross and down came flying horses, chariot, the druid and all, with a bang- and stopped there! He was the laughing stock of the people after that for all his magical powers.
At Tara they had a stone called the "peaka" stone on which they crowned the Kings. The
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
that there is a pot of gold under the "tortán" and there is a cat taking care of it. One night a girl dreamt that there was gold under the "tortán". She dreamt of the same thing for three nights. She told her father of it. Then herself and her father went to the "tortán". The girl stood upon the "tortán" and said. "Its under here, "its under here". Her father said that he would dig the "tortán" but alas! he was afraid of the cat. Anyways he began to dig it. When he had it half dug the spade broke and he was unable to dig it.
The "tortán" is still to be seen and many a day I stood in it.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Shíl na daoine go mbeadh siad an saidhbhir go deo nuair a bhí na sgadáin ag teacht isteach.
Thoisigh siad ag troid sa deireadh. Thainic mórán bádaí as árd na ratha agus as Arainn a Iasgaireacht agus níor mhaith le muinntear Traigh - Eanach seo. Thuit siad amach leis na stráinnseóirí agus doirteadh fuil. Ní rabh a dhach le ithe ag na stráinseóirí no ní rabh a dhath le ól aca.
Tháinig siad go dtí tobar agus bhí bean ann. D’iarr siad deoch uirthe agus ní thabhairfeadh sí daobhtha é. Shuidh sí os cionn an tobair agus ní thiocfadh leobhtha é a fhághail. Chuaidh siad arais ag iasgaireacht agus ní thiocfadh leobhtha ceann ar bith a fhágháil.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Iasgáireacht Tráig Eanach.
Thóisigh Iasgaireacht tráigh Eanach sa bhliadhain naoi gcead déag agus an ceathair.
Sagairt darbh ainm “Father Walker” a thug annsin iad. Ní bheadh sgadáin ar bith ann fad o shoin agus chonnaic an sagart an doigh bocht a bhí ar na daoine. Sgairt sé maidín amháin ar sgadáin na fairrge agus thainic siad go Tráigh Eanach comh tuigh leis an fhéir ghlais.
Ní thearn siad mórán airgid ortha an chead bliadhain mar nach uirlisí ar bith aca fá - n-a choinne. D’éirigh go maith leobhtha an darna agus an treas bhliadhain. Bhí stáisiún beag aca leis na sgadáin a chuir ar shiubhal. Chuir Pádraig Ó Canáinn suas siopa amuigh annsin agus tá sé ann go fóill acht ní dheantar usáid ar bith de acht fá choinne rudaí a choinbhailt. “Condy Bheiti” atá ag bhaint usáid as anois.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
aca i n-a sheasamh díreach. Tá an chuid is mo aca sínte treasna ar na h-uaigheannaí.
Tá fánaidh leis an Reilig nua o dheas agus tá sé cearnógach. Tá mórán cruinn ag fás thart air. Cuireadh Caitliceach ins an t-sean Roilig anuraidh. Bhí a chuid daoine a tháinig roimhe curtha annsin fosta.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
An Roilig i Leitir Mhic a Bháird.
Tá dhá roilig ins an ceanntar seo. Ceann aca i Mín a Gabháin agus ceann eile i Magh Damha. Ceann Caitilceach atá i Magh Damha agus ceann Produstunach atá i Mín a Gabháin.
Tá an roilig i Magh Damha chor a bheith líonta le daoine atá curtha ann. Tá blathannaí deasa ag fás ar na h-uaigheannaí ann. Tá ballaí árda thart ar an ceann i Mágh Damha.
Tá teampall gallda togthá sa tsean roilig. Roilig caitliceach a bhí ann, an cead uair, acht na produstunaigh de na Caitlicaigh é. Tá ballogaí an tSean Mainistir le féiceail go fóill fósta. Bhí an tSean Teach Pobail san áit a bhfuil an sgoil seo tóghtha anois. Tá sagart curthá sán roilig gallda.
Deirtear go rabh fathach ag dul thart annseo agus go rabh sé tinn, nuair a fuair sé bás gur chur siad taobh amuigh de ballaí an tsean (teach p) roilig é. Bhí sé ocht troigthe déag ar fad.
Tá ballógaí an tsean Teach Phobail Caitliceach le feiceal ann go fóill. Tá tombaí móra sa Reilig. Ní’l morán
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lucht Siubhal
Eibhlín Ní Chánánn a chuir síos.
Thig lucht siubhal thart gach aon lá ag cruinnuigadh preataí agus rudaí eile.
Na daoine ceadhna a bhíos thart gach aon seachtmhain
Bhí fear ag dul thart agus John Kelly a b’ainm do. As Fear Monach a tháinig sé.
Bíonn earraidhe le díol acu, bíonn blathanna agus sópa agus pictuirí agus rudaí eile acu.
Ceannuigheann na daobhtha uatha, agus nigheann na daoine bocta airgead ortha.
Bíonn failte roimh lucht siubhal agus gcorr teach agus ní maith le daoine eile iad a fheichealt ar chor ar bith.
Na mála a bhíos acu bíonn siad déanta de giota eadaigh
Fanann cuid acu seachtmhain cuid eile cúpla lá.
Bíonn biadh le cuid aca, cuid eile caitear biadh a thabhairt daobhtha
Na daoine a mbíonn paistí leo bíonn siad ag iarraidh báinne
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lucht Siubhal
Eibhlín Ní Chánánn a chuir síos.
Thig lucht siubhal thart gach aon lá ag cruinnuigadh preataí agus rudaí eile.
Na daoine ceadhna a bhíos thart gach aon seachtmhain
Bhí fear ag dul thart agus John Kelly a b’ainm do. As Fear Monach a tháinig sé.
Bíonn earraidhe le díol acu, bíonn blathanna agus sópa agus pictuirí agus rudaí eile acu.
Ceannuigheann na daobhtha uatha, agus nigheann na daoine bocta airgead ortha.
Bíonn failte roimh lucht siubhal agus gcorr teach agus ní maith le daoine eile iad a fheichealt ar chor ar bith.
Na mála a bhíos acu bíonn siad déanta de giota eadaigh
Fanann cuid acu seachtmhain cuid eile cúpla lá.
Bíonn biadh le cuid aca, cuid eile caitear biadh a thabhairt daobhtha
Na daoine a mbíonn paistí leo bíonn siad ag iarraidh báinne
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lucht Siubhail.
Ní bhíonn mórán acu thart sa geimhreadh, nó bíonn sé ro fhuar aca.
Acht nuair a thig an Samhradh bíonn siad ar a gcois arís.
An dream céadhna a bhíos ag dul thart igcomhnuidhe comhair a bheith
Bíonn cuid acu iongantach dolba agus bíonn siad ag iarraidh mórán rudaí.
Tá fear ag dul thart d’arbh ainm Padruig O Baoghall agus bhí sé iongantach maith.
Bhí fear na fideog ag dul tart fosta níl fhios agam caidé an t-ainm a bhí air.
Bíonn “Camphor” agus blathannaigh deasa le cuid acu, da n’íol bíonn paindí le cuid eile acu. D’íolann siad go h-an saor iad. Bíonn málaí saic le cuid acu agus málaí leathar leis an chuid eile.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Dheán siad leabaidh de na rudaí a bhíonn ins na maillaí aca.
Ní leigeann cuid de na daoine isteach iad ar chomhair ar bith, bíonn an lucht siubhail mallachtaí ar n-a daoine seo.
Suidheann cuid aca síos agus seasann cuid eile sa doras agus iarrain siad cé bith rud atá a dhioghbhail ortha. Bíonn siad ag iarraidh loistín bheireann cuid de na daoine loistín daobhtha, agus cuid eile ní thabhairfhann. Innsean siad sgealtaí do na daoine sa teach. Bíonn mála bratógaí leobhtha cuireann siad síos ar an urlar é [?] Luigheann siad air go maidín agus sin an cineal leabaidh a bhíos acu. Nuair a bhíonn siad ag imteacht deireann siad paidireacha beaga
“God put the bad hour past you”
Annsin imthigheann siad.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tig Lucht Siubhail thart ó am go h-am.
Chomhair a bheith na daoine ceadhna a thigeas i dtóladh.
Tigeann “Micí the Cat” agus sgáifte eile thart fosta.
Bíónn cuid aca ag díol blathannaí canaí bheaga agus camphor.
Bíonn malaí leathair le cuid aca agus malaí saic le cuid éile. Bíonn beirt no tríur malaí ag cuid aca agus cuireann siad séan-éadaigh ionnta.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Thig lucht (sil) siubhail go dtí an teach (s’ain) s’againne.
Siad na daoine ceadhna a thigeas i gcomhnuidhe.
Tig fhear darbh ainm “Joe Swiggy” agus “Mc Goldrick”. Tig “Joe” as Co Feamonach agus thig an fear eile as Co Ros Comain.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bíonn bláthannaí ag Mary Mc Groary agus pioctúirí, sopa agus rudaí beaga eile le díól aca.
Gheibheann cuid aca pigineacha agus cuid aca préataí agus bainne.
Codluigheann cuid aca ag taobh na teineadh no ag taoibh cruach an fhéir.
Bionn fáilte rompa i gcuid de n-a toighthe agus ní bhíonn mórán fáilte rompa i dtoighthe eile.
Fannann cuid aca seachtmhain no mí i dteach agus cuid eile cupla bomaite.
Gheibheann cuid aca uibheacha. Ní bhíonn rothar no gluaisteán aca acht ag siubhal d’a gcos.
Ní bhíonn siad ag innse sgealtaí agus ní chruinnigheann na daoine isteach le h-éisteacht leobhtha.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lucht Siubhail.
Thig lucht siubhal thart go minic, chomhair a bheith trí uair sa mí ag cruinniughadh bainne, preataí agus rudaí beaga eile.
Ní h-iad na daoine ceadhna a thigeas i gcomhnuidhe.
Tigeann Micí the Cat agus Josephine Clod. Mary Mc Groary, Jimmy Hegarty. Tháinig MicI the Cat ó’n Sráth Bán, tháinig Josephine Clod ó Béal Átha Seanaigh agus tháinig na daoine eile o Thír Eoghain agus ó Árd Macha.
Bíonn earraí le díol ag cuid aca.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 14:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lucht Siubhail:- Gráinne Ní Chnáimhsighe a chuir síos.
Thig lucht siubhal thart gach aon lá ins an tseachtmhain. Bhíonn na daoine ceadhna thart gach aon mhí nó dá dtigeadh siad gach aon seachtmhain bheadh na daoine tuirseach daobhtha.
Tá fear beag ag gabhail thart agus bíonn sé ag “Dannie Waugh” ins an oidhche agus ba é Joe Waugh an t-ainm a bhí air. Bhí sé díol rasúir agus sópa, agus mórán rudaí eile. Tháinig sé anuas as Ardara.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 13:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
iad agus annsin tiocfaidh sí í mbrionglóidí aca an fear a phósfaidh sí.
8. Gheibhtear tubán nó buicéid uisce uisce agus cuirtear ubhla isteach san uisce agus bíónn an-spóirt ag na daoine ag iarraidh na h-ubhla a fhágailt.
9. Bíonn lá na Mairbh i ndiaidh la Samhna agus deirtear go bé sin an fáth go mbíonn na sídheóga amuigh an oidhche sin.
10. Bíonn bairghean breach ag gach duine oidhche Samhna agus bíonn fáinne ann agus deirtear pé'r bí duine a gheobhas an fáinne gur bé is luaithe a phósfar.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 13:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 13:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 13:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
siubhal bíonn roinnt cailíní agus búachaillí in-aice na teine agus iadh ag cur cnóna isteach san ngríosaigh, agus ainm cailín agus búachaill ar gach ceann acha. Má fhanann an dá chnó in-aice a chéile agus má léimeann siadh amach le chéile deirtear go bpósfar an bheirt úd, ach má léimeann siad óna chéile ní pósfar go deó iad.
Sa tsean-aimsir do théigheadh sgata buachaillí ar fúaid an bhaile oidhche Samhna ó thig go tigh agus a gceannacha go léir dubh i dtreó ná h-aitneocfá iad, agus culaithí de tuighe umpa ag bailiúghadh airgid. Buachaillí tuighe a tugtí ortha san.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 13:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bíonn oidhche mór grinn ag na Gaedhil oidhche Shamhna. Bíonn suipéar mór ins gach tigh an oidhche sin. Deintear báirín breach i gcóir an t-suipéir agus cuirtear a lán rudaí isteach ann mar atá fáinne, lasán, méarachán, raol nó leath-raol. Bíonn gach aoinne ar chipíníb feachaint cadh a gheobhadh sé nó sí agus is mó fonn cúardach ná fonn ithte a bhíonn ortha go mór mór na daoíne óga.
A duine a gheibheann an fáinne, is é sin an duine is lúaithe a phósfar. An té a gheibheann an lasán is é sin is lúaithe a chaillfear. Má’s cailín a gheibheann an méaracán is táiliúir a phósfaidh sí. An duine a gheibheann an t-airgead, beidh sé nó sí saidhbhir go deó.
Taréis an tsuipéir cuirtear tubhán lán d’uisge i lár an úrláir sa chistin, agus cuirtear mórán ubhall isteach ann, agus bíonn gach aoinne ag íarraidh na h-ubhall a thógaint amach as an dtubán le na bhéal gan lámh do chuir ar an dtubán. Uaireanta eile cuirtear dhá phíosaí adhmaid i bhfuirm croise thar a chéile agus cuirtear ubhall agus coinneal ar lasadh ar gach píosa de’n crois, annsan cuirtear an cros ar crochadh ar chrúcha sa chistin agus deintear é casadh go mear agus bíonn a lán spórt ag na daoíne óga.
Le línn an spórt sin a bheith ar
anonymous contributor
2021-10-27 12:25
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awaiting decision
344
were kicking when a woman jumped out of the well. They all ran away except William O Brien .He remained and spoke to her .He asked her would she marry him and come home with him.She said she would but to promise her never to allow any strangers to the house except neighbours alone.The man promised her sincerely.They had two children a boy and a girl.The boy was very much like the father and the girl very much like the mother.
One day there were sports in Inchiquin and William O Brien was headmaster.He invited some strangers never thinking of his promise.While the races were going on she went down to the well with her two children .They jumped into the well and that moment the lake sprung up and drowned the most of the people at the races. This beautiful lake is there yet.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 12:22
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awaiting decision
133
Sites of Churches and
Graveyards.
" The old church in the burial ground near the Railway and situated in Upper Doora was founded by St.Brecan who was a great friend of St Patrick. At this time all this district was a marsh and the only place dry and suitable for a building was where this church now stands.
The Holy well near this church is dedicated to St Odhran who was St. Patrick's Charioteer. The old people used to say that St Brecan was a busy man who travelled up and down through Ireland founding churches and that having founded two or three in Doora he invited St Odhran to come and take charge of the District when he left.The well was visited by people some time in March probably March 6th and held in veneration when Mrs Mc Inerney was a child. It gradually fell into neglect. It is now called "The Blessed Well" but not visited .
The ruins of another church are in Killavella. It must be very ancient .The burial ground which surrounded it is now a mere mound grazed over by cattle and forgotten .In the childhood of the narrator people were buried there and she remembered seeing funerals going in there. She thought this church was also founded by St Brecan. She heard it said that he founded
anonymous contributor
2021-10-27 12:14
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343
from house to house to tell the news and as they went along the band played.
At last she got tired of being living in the land so she said she would go to the sea to be with her companions again. She left one morning and before she left she told all the people and the king to come to the shore that day twelve months to see the cows.
On the appointed day the shores were flocked with people .At evening the waters were very calm .Then there was a rustling heard and the cows came in and set out in different directions,through Ireland. From
those three cows ,the white cows, the black cows,and the red cows are descended.
There is a lake near Corofin called lake Inchiquin and it is a wonderful story that is told of it..Long ago there was a man living in Inchiquin whose name was William O Brien .He was a great football kicker.He was kicking football with his companions .There was a beautiful well in the place near where they were kicking .All the men
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 12:12
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Folklore
About fifty year ago there was an old Churchyard in the Town [?] of Gortshanafa about two miles from Farrangore.
It is said that there was a very large stone in the Churchyard with oghan writing on it.
When building houses, several people took the stone and every body that took it, their was used be knocked down the following morning and the stone gone back to the Churchyard.
In the building of Dicksgrove Lodge a mason named Mr Barry and his son went down to the Churchyard and brought up the stone.
The following day Mr Barry was dressing the stone, when Mr Meredith came into the yard
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 12:06
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Killoran means the Church of St Oran.
Gort na Prátaí is in the neighbourhood of Killoran and got its name as follows: At the time of the Famine a party of holy people lived there. When they planted the potatoes in 1846 the crop was spoiled. They had no potatoes to plant the next year. When the Spring came a crop of potatoes grew up in this particular field.
Ballyleahy means the town of the Leahy's because in former times there were numerous families of the Leahy's living there.
Tullow Mac James. The Normans who lived in the castle of Tullow were at war with an Irish army under a leader called Mac James. It is a tradition that Mac James was victorious and that the district is called after him and is known as Tullow Mac James.
Lisheen means the little fort and is so called on account of all the little forts that are situated in it.
Longorchard is so called on account of the large orchard which was owned by Mr. Power Lalor.
Corrig, in Irish means a rock and is so called because of all the rocks in that place.
The Clucks, spelt Clochs, means rocks and it
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:59
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The cure for sore eyes is to milk a cow into them or to wash them with strong tea.
There was once a man and he had a sore hand and he could get nothing to cure it. One day a priest told him to walk till he came to three trees growing together and in one of the trees he would find a well. He walked till he came to Gatestown, Moylough, Co. Galway. He saw the three trees. He went in and put his hand into the well and he was cured. That happened on Saint Oran's day so that is the reason the well is called Cluan Óran.
The remedy applied to cure a toothache was a frog. They got a live frog and rubbed it of the tooth.
They cured cuts and sores with the vein side of a cabbage leave.
St. Patrick's leaves were used for healing and drawing wounds.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:56
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There is an old building in my village "Lakeview". This is a windmill of long ago, but it is now in ruins.
Long ago corn was grinded in the mill, only on a windy day, because the wind would blow an iron which was on top of the mill. Then the oats would be grinded through the iron. It is just like a round tower now. There are several windows in it.
Long ago there were over eighty men working in the mill. The field in which the mill is situated was called "Gort an Muilleann."
Not very far from the mill there is a little ditch. It is very small, and is called "The Tortán." It is said
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:51
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mar sin. Bé sin fáth an Garraí Garbh a thabhairt air agus cé go bhfuil sé na pháirc réidh cothrom anois tá an sean ainm air ig cómhnuidhe.

GARRÍ DHÓMHNAIL DRÍOGHAN
Tá an garrí seo fé féir anois. Mo sheana athair a thug do Dómhnal Dríoghan é. Bhíodh bothán ag Dómhnal bocht ann, acht níl rían ná túairisg de ann anois. Bhí garra bheag aige leis agus bhíod prátaí curtha ann. Fuair Dómhal bocht bás trí ficead blían ó shoin nú mar sin, ach tá "Garrí Dhómhnal Dríoghan" ar an b'páirc ó sion.

COINNLEACH a' tSEAGAIL
Páirc íseal cruínn é seo. Ins an pháirch seo a cuireadh mo shínnsear an seaghal agus bhíodh bárr mhaith de ann, agus go dtí an lá indhiu tá "Coinnleach a' tSeaghail" mar ainm air.

PÁIRC na CRÚAIDHTE
Páirch trim fánach
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:51
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very fond of blood.
Long ago when ships were crossing the seat they brought a cat or a god with them to give to the merr maid. Sometimes when they went to sea and had nothing to give to her they cast lots and who ever the lot fell on was to be thrown out.
Once a crew was going across and the merr maid came near the ship. They had nothing to give to her so they cast lots.
The lot fell on a very clever man. He knew that the merr maid was very fond of music or singing. So he began to sing and kept singing until they came to land.
Then the merr maid swam away and disappeared. The merr maid could wreck a ship with a wag of her tail.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:48
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Barney got the better of it. He got into bed.
64. I went to the fair and I had browney
I came home and I had browney.
I had a dog called browney
65. My first is in number my second is in measure my third is to mar or to injure ones pleasure. My fourth is a town that is very well known for its fairs and markets in the county Tyrone.
Sixmilecross
66. As bright as an angel. As light as a feather both heavy and dark. When you squeeze me together.
A snow ball
67. Spell a red running rogue in three letters.
fox.
68. Thumby, gitentree, longman, brisby, and wee jack andy.
69. B and O and X in the middle T and and Y come tell me the riddle.
Boxty
70. When is a clock on the stairs unsafe
When it runs down
71. Why are tall people the laziest.
Because they lie the longest
72. What is it that is often put on the table cut, and passed, but not eaten.
A deck of cards
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:42
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A pot of potatoes
54. Why does a rabbit go up the hill.
Because it can't go an under it
55. As round as an apple as plump as a ball and covers the market house steeple and all.
The sun.
56. If a man falls off a house what will he fall against.
His will
57. Down in yon meadow I have a table how many men sits around it
A man mowing
58 Pink : pank : down yon bank ten about four.
A woman milking.
59. What begins at one end of the wood and licks it all over.
A sow licking a trough
60. There was a man of Adams race. He had a certain dwelling place It was neither earth, heaven, hell or any other place for man to dwell in.
Jonas
61. Four and twenty white cows standing in a stall up comes the red bull and licks over them all.
Your tongue licking your teeth.
62. Why is hell like a cobblers shop.
Because it is full of condemed soles.
63. Biddy boxted it and battered it and
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:41
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"Is luachmar an rudh an t-anam" arsa an tállúir, agus é ag rith ó'n ghanndal

Is maith an fear an fonn
Is liath gach othar t'réis a leigheas
Níor dhóigh seana-chaith é féin riamh

Dá mbeadh chuigheann ag an gcat, is minich a fluicheadh sé a bhas

Imthigheann an t-am ar nós na gaoithe
Úaim nó thaoidhe ní fhanann le h-aoine
Tús maith leath-na h-oibre
Is feárr bheith dhíomhaoin ná droch-gnótach
Is olc an cearc na sgríobhann dhí féin
Ní neart go chur le chéile
Ní aon theinteán mar do theinnteán féin
Is feárr uair an cluig ar maidin, ná dá uair úm tráthnóna
Nuair a chruadhuigeann an slat is deachair é sníomh

Is maith leis an gcath an t-iasg, ach ní maith leis a chosa fhluicheadh

Ní h-é lán na ghaoithe lá na sgolbh
Cad a sgríobhann an phúcha do leigheann sé féin é
Is fheárr fhochal sa chúirt, ná púnt sa sparan
Ní gádh do chur le céile
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:37
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and a half-penny more.
A shilling'
44. Why is a school master compared to a clock.
Because he warns before he strikes.
45. I brought twenty-four heads to water and not one of them drunk put one
Twenty-four nails in a horseshoe and none of them but the horse.
46. What goes round the house and round the house and its fathers big coat about it.
A sheep.
47. What goes from house to house and lies out at night.
A pad.
48. What goes round the house and leaves a rag on bush.
The snow
49. Why is a cowardly soldier compared to butter.
Because it runs before the fire
50. I built a bridge from her to Dublin what height is it.
The height of nonsences
51. What grows in the wood and sounds in the town and earns its master many a pound.
A Fiddle
52. What goes away between two woods and comes home between two waters
A man with two wooden buckets of water
53. What is full and holds more
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:37
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that there is a pot of gold under the "tortán" [?] and there is a cat taking care of it. One night a girl dreamt that there was gold the "tortán" [?]. She dreamt of the same thing for three nights. She told her father of it. Then herself and her father went to the "tortán". The girl stood upon the "tortán" and said. "Its under here, "its under here". Her father said that he would dig the "tortán" [?] but alas! he was afraid of the cat. Anyways he began to dig it. When he had it half dug the spade broke and he was unable to dig it.
The "tortán" [?] is still to be seen and many a day I stood in it.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:32
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a car. There was two black men and a white man in the car. the two black men ate the white man. What was the number of the car.
128 (one, two, ate)
36. What goes round the world and round the world and leaves a bit of its tail on every bush.
The mist
37. How many wells would make a river.
One if it was big enough.
38. Forty sheep went through forty mor followed that six, seven, eleven, three and two how many is that.
five.
39. The latest of fruit the greatest of gain the largest of measure and that spells my name.
Hamleton. "Haw" "mill" "ton"
40. As round as an apple as flat as the pan. The half of a woman the whole of a man.
Penny, (Queen Victoria)
41. Half-ways in and half-ways out its just half-ways between it's neither in or out
A door-case.
42. Whats too short and take a piece off it to make it longer.
A grave.
43. A half penny wet and penny half dry four pence half-penny and a half-penny and a half-penny behind four pence half-penny
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:26
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26. Chip, chip cherry all the men in Derry couldnt climb chip chip cherry.
The smoke.
27. Wooly without and wooly within I lifted my leg and put in.
A stocking
28. Black and white and read all over.
A newspaper.
29. A houseful a roomful and you couldnt catch a spoonful.
The smoke.
30. What is it that is as green as grass and not grass and as white as milk and not milk. It has a beard on it like a goat and its tail stands up
An onion.
31 What goes through the water and the two ends of it down.
Bag on a horses back.
32. As I went over yonder hill I saw three pots boiling and no fire under.
Three spring wells.
33. As I sat on my hunkers I looked through my winkers and I saw the dead burying the live.
Raking the fire.
34. What part goes up the hill first.
Her rout.
35. As I was going out the road I met
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:21
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Distance lends enchantment to the view.
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush
Better late than never.
Make hay while the sun shines.
Nature comes out through the eyes of a cat.
Wine to-day, water to-morrow.
A cat could, could look at a king.
The old dog for the hard road and the pup for the puddle.
Foreign cows wear long horns.
No morning sun lasts a whole day.
The Longer you live the more you learn
Do not lose a ship for a half-penny worth of Tea.
What is bred in the marrow breaks out in the Bone.
Live horse and you will get grass.
Better be sure than sorry.
Without education, without manners.
A Toad is a jewel to a duck's eye.
There is often anger in a laugh.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:20
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Seanfhoirgnithe
There is an old building in my village "Lakeview". This is a windmill of long ago, but it is now in ruins.
Long ago corn was grinded in the mill, only on a windy day because the wind was on top of the mill. Then the oats would be grinded through the iron. It is just like a round tower now. There are several windows in it.
Long ago there were over eighty men working in the mill. The field in which the mill is situated was called "Gorc an muilleann" [?].
Not very far from the mill there is a little ditch. It is very small, and is called "The Tortán" [?]. It is said
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:19
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éigin imeasg na nGaedheal agus ní fada gur chas na Sasanaigh ortha agus dheinedar brúscar d'arm na nGaedheal. Taréis an catha agus go ceann i bhfad 'na dhiaidh sin bhí cnámha na bhfear a marbhuigheadh 'san chath le feiscint ingach áit ar fúd an chnuic. Deirtear 'sa chómharsanacht gur thug bean-uasal cárthannach éigin órdú iad do bhreith go dtí an mhainistear i gCill na Mullach agus gur cuireadh fé ghlas annsin i dtreo na beadh daoine a d'iarraidh iad a ghoid. Pé scéal é tá na cnámha le feishcint i gCill na Mullach i láthair na h-uaire agus dar ndóigh is cuimhneacán fiuntach iad chun a chur 'na luighe orainn nach le cainnt agus poilitideacht a baineadh amach saoirse na tíre seo.

BEÁL-OIDEAS I DTAOBH AN CHATHA

CLAIDHEAMH MHIC DOMHNAILL
Bhí claidheamh Mhic Domhnaill 'sa chómharsanacht ar feadh i bhfad. 'Sa Chaisleán i Lohort a bhí sé acht le linn an díth-ármála 1918 do tógadh an claidheamh agus níl tásc ná tuairisc air anois.

BÁS MHIC DÓMHNAILL
De réir lucht staire na comharsanachta marbhuigeadh Mac Domhnaill ag ath ar abhainn bhig atá ar bhun an chnuic. Tugtar "The Chieftain's Ford" ar an áit fé láthair. Bé rud a thuit amach ná go raibh Mac Domhnaill taréis teicheadh ó'n ár agus bhí sé ag bogaint a sgíth cois na h-abhann nuair tháinig Sasanach ar ab'ainm dó Williams taobh thiar de agus sháith sé claidheamh tré'n a dhrom
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:16
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Agus Dia mar ghárda cuirim leat anonn.
Donchadh Dhonncadh ó Súileabháin (21) ó Dhromfheircín, láithreach a thug dom é seo ar an 6adh Márta 1938.
Óna sean athair (go ndeinidh Dia trócaire air) a fuair sé é.
Cheap sé gur Diarmuid na Bolgaighe dhein ar shon mháthair an bhuachalla so airighthe chuaidh ag saigdiúireacht in arm Shasna.
Séamus Gógáin.
Thíos i mbun Áth chomnuig an Mháthair, do mhuintir Sheaghdha
[?] an chainnt so bheith ró-shimplí do Dhiarmudi na Bolgaí
M. OSeaghda O.S.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:15
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Lambe, being in need of money & being well warmed up with whiskey jumped at the offer, and sold his wife to Hanna for a sum of money & Hanna's housekeeper.
Mrs. Lambe was very indignant when she heard what had taken place & refused to go home with Hanna. Hanna, to show that he possessed her according to law took her by the arm & lifted her into his cart & drove away with her.
It is stated that the new arrangement worked out admirably & that the women became acclimatized & lived in greater harmony with their new masters than with the old ones.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:12
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na fir isteach sa chliabhán agus bhíodar na leanbhaí airís. Níor chuir an bhean aon t-suim ionnta.
Nuair a tháinig an fear isteach do innis an bhean an sceal dó. Ní dubhairt an fear aon fhocal, ach do aimsig sé sluasad agus do dhearg sé sa teine é agus dubhairt sé, "Scólfaidh mé sibh-se."
Léimeadar amach as an gcliabhán agus amach an doras leó, agus do rith na leanbhaí isteach agus dubhaireadar, "Is maith an rud nár scólais an bheirt fhear mar scólfaí sin-ne sar a scaoilfí saor sinn."
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:11
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Up to the middle of the 19th century the belief was prevalent that wives could be sold if the bargain was made in a fair town on a fair day.
A transaction of this kind took place in Monaghan about 90 years ago. The parties concerned were Teacy Hanna of Killadonnelly & Pat Lambe of Tattindonagh both townlands about 2 mls from Smithboro. Teacy Hanna was not married but Employed the services of a housekeeper whom he was tired of. He fixed on Pat Lambe's wife (who was a thrifty good-looking woman) as her successor & happening to meet Pat Lambe who was a drunk and in Monaghan fair made a suggestion to Pat that he would buy his wife and assured him that it would be legal
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:06
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Maidin mhoch ar m'éirighe amach,
le feóirín Locha Léin.
Mar a mbíonn an t-slat sa chraobh le'n ais,
Is samhra teas ó'n ngréin.
Ar bhfillead dhom tré bhailtí phuirt,
Is bánta míne réidh.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:04
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Agus Dia mar ghárda cuirim leat anonn.
Donchadh Dhonncadh ó Súileabháin (21) ó Dhromfheircín, láithreach a thug dom é seo ar an 6adh Márta 1938.
Óna sean athair (go ndeinidh Dia trócaire air) a fuair sé é.
Cheap sé gur Diarmuid na Bolgaighe dhein ar shon mháthair an bhuachalla so airighthe chuaidh ag saigdiúireacht in arm Shasna.
Séamus Gógáin.
Thíos i mbun Áth chomnuig an Mháthair, do mhuintir Sheaghdha
[?] an chainnt so bheith ró-shimplí do Dhiarmudi na Bolgaí
M. OSeaghda O.S.
----------------------------
Fuadach leanbh, iarlaisí sluasad na Teine &c
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 11:04
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Number [?] of swallows - I got a young swallow out of barrel used for spraying potatoes - just clinging side - week - I could n't hold in my hands - could not close in box - darent let loose for fear of cat - so I thought of a quiet hen - put swallow under it - 2 hrs after heard cry - swallow getting away from hen
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 10:57
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Bhí beirt leanbhaí ann fadó, agus cúpla ab eadh iad. Aon lá amháin bualadh breóite an bheirt. Bhíodar breóite ar feadh i bhfad, agus sa deire bhíodar na rudaí grána beaga.
Aon lá amháin bhí corcán mór feóla beirbhighte ag mnaoi an tighe, agus chuaidh sí amach ag glaodhach an an bhfear isteach chun a dheinéir. Nuair a bhí sí ag teacht do fheach sí isteach tríd an bhfuineóg agus cad a chonnaic sí ach beirt sean-fhear agus iad ag alpadh na feóla.
D'imthig an bhean isteach, agus léim
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 10:54
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on leading road from Monaghan to Smithboro
Aughnamalla Fort Pat Lamb wished to build house there - crock of water, "Good people if you allow me to build dont spill water to-night. Crock not spilled build - hadnt good luck - drank.
Tom Hamill lives beside asked to put animal into Lamb's - went one night - black object leaped out frightened life out of him - my sister was coming from Carraberro one Evening - a man in grey clothes & grey cat formed before her and disappeared - no gap, no place to go into - she was annoyed.
Robert Thomas St anna was coming along one night and at the forth he fell his cap stand up with the hair of his head and took week I could nt tell what reason.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 10:52
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Weather - Lore
At night if a ring is around the moon rain is sure to follow. If the stars are shining brightly we are sure to have dry weather. When we see the clouds black we are sure to have rain. A rainbow at night is the shepherds delight and a rainbow in the morning is the shepherds warning. When the wind is from the south we will have rain. When the wind is from the north we will have dry weather. It is the south wind that brings most rain to my district. When the swallow flies low we are sure to have rain and when she flies we will have fine weather. When the sky is cloudy we are sure to have rain. When there is fog on the hill we are sure to have rain. When there is dust seen on the roadway we are sure to have dry weather. When the smoke got up straight we are sure to have dry weather. When the sut falls we are sure to have rain.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 10:51
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A bheathódh buachaill mar é 'um shórd.
D'imtheóch uaithe gan fiosa a dtuairisc,
Ná go mbeadh a' buaidhreamh fad a mhaireadh beó.
IV
Sé brígh mo chúrsa go bpósfair cúl fhionn
Is go bhfágfaidh tú me ag sileadh deór
Cé gur gile liom chugham thu a teacht 'an dúthaig
Nó dhá bhfaighin long í lán d'ór.
V
Mo chúmha mo bhuaidhreamh mo léan mo chrudhtan
Nár thárluigheas uair bheag uile ar Chóbh
Sar a leogas féin uaim tú a ghrian-mhic uanaig
Do dhéanfainn buairt nó go raghainn ar bórd.
VI
Bhí an mhuir ag tuarghaint is an tonn ag luascadh
Raghad im bhualad i bh-ocht mo bhrón
Mar tiocfaidh an Franncach suas leat chun resht (arrest) a bhualadh ort
Agus Dia go mbuaidh sé lem bhuachaill óg
VII
Nuair a ghabhaim an t-sráid síos go buadharta cráidhthe
Ag dul ins an áit úd na mbíodh mo rún
Ní bhfaighin fear id áit-se a chrochfadh lámh liom
Nó déarfadh "a mhaithrín how do you do?"
VIII
Anois más fearr leat dul thar sáile
Is an bhean so thál ort bheith go dúbhach
Guidhim na grásta óm chroidhe go h-árd leat
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 10:37
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& bad taste. The Scotchman asked if he could look into the churn. The bean a' tighe said "Certainly." She raised the lid of the churn & when he saw the appearance of the milk he said "Someone is at work surely & when you have the next churning ready - call me in." She said she would. A few days after she had her churning ready again. She sent for the Scotchman & he came. He ordered all doors & windows in the house to be barred & shuttered. When this was done he took a porringer off the wall - put his hand into his pocket & took some three things out of it & put them into the porringer. He then pulled out the red hot coals on the hearth & put the porringer on them. Then he told them to begin the churning & he would attend to the cooking. He put his back to the fire & they started off with the churning. The churning was not long in progress when they heard a sudden gust of wind round the house & next they heard the hammering
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 10:25
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& bad taste. The Scotchman asked if he could look into the churn. The bean a' tighe said "Certainly." She raised the lid of the churn & when he saw the appearance of the milk he said "Someone is at work surely & when you have the next churning ready - call me in." She said she would. A few days after she had her churning ready again. She sent for the Scotchman & he came. He ordered all doors & windows in the house to be barred & shuttered. When this was done he took a porringer off the wall - put his hand into his pocket & took some three things out of it & put them into the porringer. He then pulled out the red hot coals on the hearth & put the porringer on them. Then he told them to begin the churning & he would attend to the cooking. He put his back to the firer & they started off with the churning. The churning was not long in progress when they heard a sudden gust of wind round the house & next they heard the hammering
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 09:56
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Jones of Easkey was landlord of Rathgoonane and several other adjoining townlands. He had a shooting lodge near the house where the present Martin Ferguson lives. Before the Fergusons got this place it was owned by a man named Laing. One day the Laings were making a churning when Jones and his friends arrived to the lodge. There was a young Scotchman in the party & he crossed over the street & into Laing's house where the churning was being made. Seeing what they were at he said "That's the very thing I want, a nice drink of fresh buttermilk." The bean a' tighe said she often had better buttermilk than she could give him this time - that there was some mí-ádh on her milk & butter for the past two or three churnings. The Scotchman asked what was the matter. The woman told him that no matter how long she churned she got no butter, nothing but froth & that the buttermilk had a terrible smell
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 09:54
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fly inland it is a sign of rain. When the ducks and geese are to be heard making a lot of noise it is a sign of rain. When the cat lies near the fire it is a sign of rain. When the sky is very red in the evening it is a sign of fine weather and when it is grey it is a sign of rain. When the distant hills are looking near it is a sign of rain. When there is a lot of dust on the road it is a sign of dry weather. When the spiders creep from their cobwebs and when the ants are to be seen creeping on the road it is a sign of rain. When there is a blue light in the fire and when the soot begins to fall it is a sign of rain.
anonymous contributor
2021-10-27 09:48
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Once upon a time a woman came from America. She bought a farm of land and built a new house. The first night she slept in the house she heard people walking around it and she did not take notice of it. The second night she heard the same so she concluded that the house was haunted and that she would not sleep in it any more.
She offered fifty pounds to anyone who would sleep in it three nights in succession. A courageous man heard this. So he came to the woman and told her he was willing to sleep in the house. He asked for a story book and a sword. She gave them to him. He lit a fire and began to read his story book.
About one oclock he heard footsteps behind him. He looked back and saw a hairy man running to catch hold of him. He took his sword and cut off his head. Then the head began to speak to him. It told him to put it on the body again and that the owner would give him a pot of gold. He took the head and put it on the body and the man became all right again.
He went out to the end of the house and lifted a big flag and took from under it three pots of gold. He kept on himself, gave two to the other man one for himself, and the other for the woman who owned the
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 09:47
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an dtráig agus go bhfuil siad curtha i roilig Fionntrágha. Níor tháinig saor ach an máirnéalach agus a mhach.
Bhí fear 'na chómhnuídhe i gCeann Trágha fadó agus Vanston ab ainm do. Protastúinach dob eadh e. Lá amháin bhí sé ag lorg clárach san Success agus do bádhadh é.
Bhí fear ó Dhúnchaoin ag dul abhaile ó Ceanntrágha oidhche. D'Fág se an tig óil ana dhéanach san oidhche agus bhí a dhóitín ólta aige. Cheap se go raibh an bhóthar ceart aige agus siúbhal sé amach go ceann an Ché agus thuit sé síos agus bádhadh é.
Fuarathas é san áit sin lá ar na bháireach agus ní bheadh fhios aca cá raibh sé muna mbeadh go raibh tarnaí 'na bhróga agus leanadar a rian.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 09:43
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Care of Feet
The children in this district get shoes when they learn to walk. Before this they used not get any shoes until they were twenty years and some old people used not get them at all.
Mary Foy is an old tinkerwoman that goesaround here. She used to wear shoes when she was young but when they got dear she stopped buying them and she goes in her feet now. People used to give her shoes but after a while she stopped taking them.
There is no shoemaker around here now. Tom Durkan, Farnaharpy, Skreen was the last shoemaker around here. He gave up the job about six months ago and no one came in his place since. Terry Mc Cann, Corkhill, Skreen was the shoemaker before him.
There was a woman around her once and she threw out the water that washed feet after twelve o'clock in the night. She went into the house and after a while a knock came to the door. She opened the door and there was an old woman outside and the old woman told her never to throw out water again in the night time or if she would she would die.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 09:36
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Jones of Easkey was landlord of Rathgoonane and several other adjoining townlands. He had a shooting lodge near the house where the present Martin Ferguson lives. Before the Fergusons got this place it was owned by a man named Laing. One day the Laings were making a churning when Jones and his friends arrived to the lodge. There was a young Scotchman in the party & he crossed over the street & into Laing's house where the churning was being made. Seeing what they were at he said "That's the very thing I want, a nice drink of fresh buttermilk." The bean a' tighe said she often had better buttermilk than she could give him this time - that there was some mí-ádh on her milk & butter forv the past two or three churnings. The Scotchman asked what was the matter. The woman told him that no matter how long she churned she got no butter, nothing but froth & that the buttermilk had a terrible smell
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 09:28
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sé aon uair eile. Thughad a corp go baile an Góilín cun é cur ann. Ach nuair a tháinig an corp i ngearracht dp'n nDainghean ndfhéadfhad aon duine dul inaice leis lé blath lubhfha a bhí uaidh.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 09:25
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agus gan focal asta. Nuair a bí deire ráighthe aige tarraig duine dos na sagairt leabhar as a phocha agus chuir sé an stoil ar a mhuinéal. "An fhreaghóchaid me" ar seisean leis an sagart paróiste. "Stad Stadh arsan sagart paróiste na dein rud indiu go mbeir i aithreacas amairch" As an labhair se lé fea an tíghe agus dúbhairt sé an fhreaghócaid me a Sheáin" ar sisean. Deanfad arsa Seán. Do rainng leis an thighearna talmhan a bheirth ar a laéthanta saoire i gCorcaigh fe'n dtráth so.
Ansan thosnaigh an sagart ag léigheamh agus nuair a bhíodh stáir léighthe aige deiread sé Seán "amen" a rádh "amen" óm craoide amac" a deireadh Seán. Go dtí go raibh amen ráidthe aige trí huair
Tá sé ag tabhairt suas fé dtráth seo i dtáth seo arsan sagarth. Bhí an tighear ag chaitheamh a breacfast i gCorcaig fé'n dtráth seo i dtig óstha agus thuit sé isteach fé'n mbórd. Agus níor éirigh
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 09:13
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Tamall de bliadantha ó shoin. Nuair a bhí na tighearnaí talmhan ag iarraidh na daoine bochta ga cuir amach as a gcuid talmhan. Bhí fear na chómhnáid ar an dtaobh shoir de'n nDainghean i dtig aonair agus bhí sé lé cuir amach as a cuid talman ag tighearna a bhí i mbaile an Góilín. An seachtáin sar a raibh sé lé chaitheamh amach as a cuid talmhan, bhí na stasiún aighe. Nuair a bhí an tAifrion raigtc ag na sagairt suigheadhar cun boird cun a breachfasth a ithe.
Crom fear an tig ag caint agus sé bhí á rádh aige na go raibh sé fhéinig le caitheamh amach as a chuid talmhan an tseachtain a bhí chúghain. Agus ná feadair sé cad a deanfadh sé féin is a clann nuair a beidís amuigh. Bhí na sagart ag éisteacht leis i gcomhnaide
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 09:05
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1 Neart Mhuire agus a Mich. Grásta ó'n Spioraid Naomh anuas orainn. Dhá láimh gheal Íosa Crióst idir sinn agus gac aicíd o anocht go bliaiain ó anocht agus anocht leis amháin lé Dia.
An Uair a connaic Críost an chros tháinig crith cos Am agus láimh. D'fhiafhruig na Guidig Do ciacu fiabhras a bhí am no pláig.
D'Freagair Críost agus Dúbhairt na raibh fiabras Am na Pláig. An té a dearfhad na h-uirnaighthe seo taréis lúighe ar a leabaidh do beadh sé saor ó gach aicídh go brát.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 08:59
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2. Bhí buachaill aimsire ann fadó agus an mhaidean amháin cuir a mhághaistir an ceárdcain leis an gcapall é cun cruidhthe a chuir fé. Nuair a chuaidh an buacaill an cheárdcháin, bhí mórán capaill eile ann roimis agus cuireadh cruidhte fé na capall sin roim capall an bhuachalla. Annsin díreach agus gabha cun cruidhthe a cuir fé capaill an buachaill cad a dhein an gabha ac cruidhthe a chuir fé chapall an tsagairt roim capall an bhuachalla. Cuir san fearg ar an mbuacail agus nuair a bhí cruidhthe fé na chapall dúbhairt sé an rann seo leis an ngabha
Mo chráidhteacht agus is breágh an rud an racmas,
Agus is maith iad na sagairt gan dabht,
An cheárdcain nuair a teid le na gcapall
Cuirtear árdú go tapaidh na mbonn.
Ac anois ó táimse im' caonaidhe boct dealbh
Taobh cois falla go fonn mo mhallacht seo ag an gceárdhcain seo ar maidin.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 08:50
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Fé mar d'fág Pádraig ag sliocht mhagaidh an domhain.
3. Bhí fear i mBaile Gamín fadó go raibh ingean aige agus theastuig uaid cleamnas a dheanam di. Aon oidhche amháin ghaibh cúigear fear isteach chuige ag deanamh cleamhnais do buachaill óg a bhí i n-aonfhacht leó. Deinead an cleamnas agus fuair an fear adhbhar mhaith spré dho'n inghean ach nuair a bhí an cúighear ag dul abaile chúimhnig sé ar féin agus glaoid sé ortha. Dúbhairt sé leo go gcaitead sé féin a thuille spré d'fagailt mar geall ar an méid bíd a bhí ithe ag an gcúigear ach ní bheidís sin sásta agus brisead an cleamnas. Anois bhí sean-duine tamall o'n mBaile i áit go nglaodtar Beal Átha an Muilinn ar. Cualaid se sin mar geal ar an gcleamhnas agus dubhairt sé an rann seo.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 08:39
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Is cuimhín liom cuigh dheag agus is cuimhin liom cúigh fhichid
Is cuimhin liom long cuileann do brúghadh is do brisead
Chaitheas mo thearma i mBaile Áta an Mhuilin
Is nfheaca biadh cuigear á dubailt i mBille
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 05:35
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he stopped beating the donkey.
He met a pagan another day and said "I want you to preach to the people". The pagan only smiled and said "Give me your blessing." When he got off his knees he gave St. Patrick all his land and means and began at once to preach.
'Twas at Tara, where he lighted the fire that will never be put out. That he had the most trouble He was most afraid of women and blacksmiths and druids of course. One druid said he had more powers than St. Patrick and before all the people he flew with his chariot and fury horses up and down the air several times. Then St. Patrick made the sign of the Cross and down came flying horses, chariot, the druid and all, with a bang- and stopped there! He was the laughing stock of the people after that for all his magical powers.
At Tara they had a [?] called the "peaka" stone on which they crowned the Kings. The
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 05:31
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When St. Patrick was building Armagh Cathedral he had a great many skilled workers with him, who used to make great progress during the day with the tools St. Patrick himself forged for them. But at night the devil used to come in the form of a bull and pull down much of the work done during the day. The masons were wild and determined that they'd beat the devil - and they did. That Cathedral remained until the present one was built. St. Patrick liked a joke and when his workmen looked for praise he said: "That ye may be fat, merry and ragged with sore fingers and seldom full time." He was a great schemer, was St. Patrick!
He saw a boy beating an ass one day and he ordered him to stop and said: "That was the animal that took Our Lady and her child to Egypt and Jerusalem." "They'd never get there if they had this one" said the boy but
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 05:26
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They tie the ribbon around their head, and it cures it.
On Ash Wednesday blessed ashes is got at the Church and is put on the forehead, and if any ashes weren't got at the Church, the old people would get the ashes from the fire. It was the custom not to eat meat from Ash-Wednesday until Easter Sunday. On Ash Wednesday a flitch of bacon was hung up in the thatch in the kitchen. During Lent the people's dinner consisted of "Praties and point." When the family was eating the dinner they would point up at the bacon in the thatch and pretend to be eating it.
On chalk Sunday all the old bachelors who were not married before shrove were chalked on the back when going into Mass. This custom has now died away.
On Shrove Tuesday pan-cakes are made. It is usually called pan-cake Tuesday. When the pan-cakes are made, each one gets a chance of throwing the pan-cakes up into the air and catch them when coming down in the pan. People are generally married before shrove because it is the last day before Lent.
On St. John's night it is a great custom to light a tar-barrel and place it on top of some old ruin or castle. This custom is still carried out.
Easter Sunday morning there are bets given as to who will eat the most eggs, and everyone tries to beat each other. On Easter Saturday, Easter water is got at the Church and when it is brought in each member of the family blesses himself there
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 05:18
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"Little Tommy Tucker"
Sings for his supper.
What shall he have,
But plain bread and butter,
How shall he cut it
without any knife
How shall he marry without any wife.
"Meeney, Meeney, Miney, Moe,"
Catch a nigger by the toe
If he screeches let him go.
Meeney, Meeney, Miney, Moe.
Two, four, six, eight,
Kitty at the railway gate,
Picking stones on a plate
Here comes the engine
And blows off her nose.
"Ah" says Kitty "thats fair"
"Ah" said the engine "I do not care"
One two, sky blue
All out but you.
"Elsie Mack dressed in black
A Silver button behind her back
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 05:14
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Distance lends enchantment to the view.
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush
Better late than never.
Make hay while the sun shines.
Nature comes out through the eyes of a cat.
Wine to-day, water to-morrow.
A cat could, could look at a king.
The old dog for the hard road and the pup for the puddle.
Foreign cows wear long horns.
No morning sun lasts a whole day.
The Longer you live the more you learn
Do not lose a ship for a half-penny worth of Tea.
What is [?] in the marrow breaks out in the Bone.
Live [?] and you will get grass.
Better be sure than sorry.
Without education, without manners.
A Toad is a jewel to a duck's eye.
There is often anger in a laugh.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 05:09
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One fool makes many but the old fool is [?] than any.
True love never runs smooth.
The devil you know is better than the devil you do not know.
He who goes a bottowing goes a sottowing.
Give a fool enough rope and he'll hang himself.
Blood is thicker than water.
A nod is as good as a wink to a blind horse
No flies enter a shut mouth.
Be just before your generous.
You cannot have your loaf and eat it.
Silence gives consent.
There is no smoke without fire.
The best hurler is on the ditch.
When the old cock crows the young cock learns.
Its a bad wind that blows nobody good.
Two of a trade never agree
'Tis a bad hand that is not worth whistling after.
As the twig is bent so shall it grow.
Spare the rod and spoil the child.
A donkey's love is a kick and a bite.
A bad workman quarrels with his tools.
An empty bag wont stand.
Learning events cast their shadows before
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 05:04
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None so deaf as he that will not hear.
None so blind as he who will not see.
Root but proud.
It's better to be mean than at loss.
Too many cooks spoil the broth.
A burnt child dreads the fire.
Never put off till to-morrow what you can do to-day
Handsome is that handsome does.
A penny wise and a pound foolish.
Many hands make light work.
Look before you leap.
Speech is silver; silence is golden.
All is not gold that glitters.
Two wrongs do not make a right.
Empty vessels make most sound.
A little learning is a dangerous thing.
Money makes the mare go.
Waste not! Want not.
Wilful waste makes woeful want.
Put a beggar on horse-back and he will ride to the devil.
Hell is paved with good intentions
Never venture: never win
It is better to be a good listener than a great talker.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 04:58
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When the winer is in the wit is out.
Never let your right hand know what your left hand does.
A merry evening makes a sad morning.
It is a long lane that has no turning.
She is worth her weight in gold.
Do not say "Good morrow" to the Devil till you meet him.
It is never too late to mend.
If you make your bed you can lie in it.
There is no chain without a weak link.
Aim high and you will be sure to hit the mark
The mills of God grind slowly but surely.
Rome was not built in a day
When you are in Rome you must do as Rome does
A rolling stone gathers no moss:
The eye of a farmer does more work than both his hands.
Imitation is the highest form of flattery.
Honesty is the best policy.
Hunger is good sauce.
A good run is better than a bad stand.
Thats where the shoe pinches.
Evil to him that evil thinketh
That the eye does not see the heart does not grieve for.
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 04:50
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Mind the pennies and the pounds will mind themselves.
Marry in haste and repent at leisure.
It is an ill wind that blows no good.
If the the cap fits: take it.
Fine feathers make fine birds.
It is no use crying over spilt milk.
United we stand; divided we fall.
Every dog has its day and every cat has its night.
Birds of a feather flock together.
It is better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all:
One swallow does not make a summer.
You never miss the water till the well runs dry.
Once bitten twice shy.
To run with the hare and hunt with the hound.
Do not give heed to every Jack Tom and Harry.
Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy wealthy and wise.
Every cloud has a silver lining
When rogues fall out honest people come by their rights.
Honesty is the best policy.
Where ignorance is bliss: his folly to be wiser
senior member (history)
2021-10-27 04:44
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Bully's Acre: This name was given to a triangular field at the back of the present tennis field. The Protestants of Kilmallock turned it into a graveyard and as Catholics were also in need of a burying place the question of consecrating the place arose. The minister was opposed to this as it meant a stipend yearly for him from the Catholics. One renegade Catholic, however, at a meeting of the Town Council, actually voted against the Consecration and the people showed "one for you, Bully". His vote was the deciding one as the votes for and against the consecration were equal in number when Mortell came into the Court.
The Lake Field:
A field in Ceshill Towers bears the name of "the Lake Field' although there's a moat there also. Cromwell's soldiers, they say, drained the Lake for one of the Weldon's. The old people need to say that some day the Lake would rise again and destroy Kilmallock
Mount Coote:
The Estate that bears the name Mount Coote was given by Cromwell to Chisley Coote, a drummer boy belonging to his army. Pointing to a horse Cromwell was supposed to have said "Mount, Coote and take possessions of your land"
anonymous contributor
2021-10-26 22:57
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There were once three girls living in a house and none of them was married. They owned a big farm and there were three shares to be made of it. Mary the oldest said she would never get married and Bessie the second said she wouldn't get married either and Kate the youngest said she wouldn't get married either. So they said they would live on their own share so Bessie went to one of the rooms, Mary stood in the kitchen and the other girl went to another room. They divided all the stock between them so each went doing for herself. They went to a fair and each (she) sold her own and bought a [?] walking stick. When the oldest lady came home she said "I bought the right kind of stick I can pull it in halves. "Well mine is the same" said Bessie so she started to pull her own apart, "Mine is the same" said the other girl so we can put our money in them and no one will know. Where
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:55
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bores holes in the ridges with a bucan, and the children put in the slits. He shovels the mould over the slits, a few times. When the stalks begin to grow they are sprayed three times in the year, for fear of the blight. When they are fit for used about Autumn, they are dug by the farmer, and picked by the children and put in a big heap in the garden and covered by rushes and clay.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:53
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My uncle sows a crop of potatoes every year, he sows about a rood and a half. It is the men of the house that sow them. the first thing that is done before the ploughing, stable manure is spread a week or so, so that it will soak into the soil. If the ploughing is done first and the manure spread then, the manure won't and it will blacken the potatoes.
The ploughing is then done, the first sod is turned to the right, the second sod is turned to the right meeting the first. We continue doing this putting five sods in a ridge until we have the required amount ploughing.
The reason why we put five sods in a ridge is, when the stalks begin to grow if they are apart they won't be catching other and they will grow better.
the potatoes are then cut into slits an eye in each slit. The farmer then
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:53
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on a board or table. An equal amount of the largest sized potatoes that could be got was washed peeled while raw again washed, and then rubbed against a sheet of perforated tin, and so reduced to a pulp. This process was called "grating" boxty. This pulp was thrown into a calico bag and pressed till all the moisture was squeezed out of it. This dry pulp was next mixed with the boiled mashed potatoes and well kneaded on a table a pinch of salt and a handful of flour were added. Then the boxty was ready for either boiling or baking. If Baked boxty was decided on this mixture was made into flat cakes from a quarter of an inch to half an inch in thickness the size of the Pan in the house, put on the pan and baked over the fire. Several panfuls being baked on each occasion.
If Boiled Boxty was decided on, the the well-kneaded mixture was made into cakes about the size and shape of the present day Bun or [?]. A large pot of clean spring water was boiling on the fire, and these often as many as twenty were put into the boiling water and left boiling over the fire for an hour.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:48
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Church permitted its use and at dinner only
Sometimes however the people used veal. Fifty or more years ago if a cow had a bull calf, on being dropped he was taken to the nearest butcher and sold for from Five shillings to seven and sixpence. Then the farmer brought back from the butcher a quarter of veal. More often the former employed a local butcher to "clean up" the calf on his own premises, give a quarter to the butcher for his pay, and distribute the rest among himself and two or three neighbours. These neighbours did likewise with him in turn.
On special occasions the people used a food called Boiled Boxty. This was considered a Dainty. Baked boxty was eaten more frequently. I forgot to mention earlier that men in the country went to work in the morning at latest at seven o'clock in the morning and worked till nine before they ate any food.
Both kinds of Boxty were made in the following way:- First a pot of potatoes was boiled in the ordinary way as we see it done now. These when boiled were carefully peeled and brussed up in a pile
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:43
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this type of table is still to be seen in this part of the country and is known by the name "Falling Table".
The bread most frequently eaten was Oaten bread. It was made in the following way
About two pounds of Oatmeal was put in a dish (wooden) a small pinch of salt was added. Then it was wet sometimes with cold water, other times with lukewarm water and mixed into a moist dough. Then a little dry meal was added, and all made into the shape of a globe or sphere.
This globe or sphere was taken out of the dish and set on a table or on a breadboard and bruised out with the hands into a shape like a coin - say a penny or crown and about one quarter of an inch thick. This cake was allowed to remain about a quarter of an hour on the table and then set on a "bread iron" before a turf fire so near that the heat baked the moisture out of it, but not too near lest it would burn. Every ten minutes or so the cake was turned. This was continued until the cake was quite firm and hard.
Sometimes a little caraway was mixed with the meal and this gave it a nice flavour.
Meat was eaten was eaten every that the
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:42
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remains of Nicholas Mahon who died in 1680 and of his son who died three years later.
The lone graves at Doonard and Corskeagh mark the last resting place of two victims of the famine. They died on the roadside and were buried inside the wall.
In the field on the north side of the Hollow houses lived a mother and her two sons. A mound now marks the site of their cabin home this poor irish mother died of hunger while her two sons became weaker and weaker from starvation. They rolled her corpse in a sheet and carried her, by night, on top a Cliabh to Kiltrustan graveyard where they laid her to rest.
Lying over a wall near the ill fated well of Kildalogue was found the corpse of yet another victim of the famine. The neighbours lighted a large fire in the field close by and "waked
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:39
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rejected
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for Indian meal which now was fed to the starving Irish nation, while their wheat crop was send to England to make flour for the tyrants. This Indian meal was with a herb called Brioscán the only food to be obtained by the starving peasantry. It may be remarked that the above named herb grew in exceptionally large quantities throughout those dreaded years. Major Mahon was then living in the Bawn and did his best to alleviate the suffering of his tenants for whom he was truly sorry.
One evening when returning from Roscommon, he was waylaid and shot dead; no reason for the dastardly crime was ever discovered. Two men Hasty and Cummins were charged with the murder, convicted and executed outside Roscommon Gaol. The murdered major was laid to rest in the vault known today as the 'Major's grave" not far from the black bridge. This vault is built with what may be the ruins of an old church. Here too lie the
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:38
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rejected
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About a mile outside this town on the road to Templemore there is a holy well.
It is said that the water from this well will cure sore eyes. You must bathe your eyes with the water three times before you are cured.
A few years ago this owner of the feild tried to change the course of the stream that flows from the well but the well went dry and when he let the stream back on its old course it started to flow again.
Anyone who is cured must put some money or a medal in the well. Rags maybe seen on the hawthorn over the well and coins and medals are laying at the bottom of the water.
William Kyan
Main Street
Borrisoleigh
January 9,1938
Told by Mrs.Kearney
(Aged 50 years)
Lower Street
Borrisoleigh
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:38
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In olden times that is say sixty or seventy years ago the people of this neighbourhood ate three meals a day: that is breakfast dinner and supper.
The breakfast was taken about nine oclock in the morning and consisted of oaten stirabout and "mixed milk" Mixed milk consisted of a mixture of buttermilk and sweet or new milk half and half of each.
The dinner was at one or two o'clock in the afternoon and consisted of Potatoes, bacon and cabbage or turnips except on Fridays when eggs were used and the Supper was taken at eight o'clock in the evening or night and consisted of oat stirabout and mixed milk again.
Some time between dinner and supper a small portion of oat bread was eaten with butter milk. This was called a "Snack" Oat bread was on the table at all meals. And some of it was very often eaten at each and every meal.
The table was sometimes taken out on the middle of the floor: but usually it was along the was and so constructed that when not in use it would shut up against the wall
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:34
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Tá feirm m'athar suidhte i Seanachnoch trí mhíle dtaobh thúaidh den bhaile bheag Cuirreán. Áit deas iseadh é, - sléibhte ar gach taobh dínn ach amháin ar an dtaobh theas áit a b'fhuil an fhairrge agus tá abhann bheag an Fhionna Glais ag rith tríd an fheirm. Tá roinnt den talamh, árd, garbh, sléibhteach, an cuid eile íseal, agus páirceanna, breághtha, móire, réidh agus cúpla seana fotharacha annsa agus annsúd. Atá ainm féleith ar gach páirch acu mar atá:-

GARRAÍ GARBH
- timceall leath cead bhlíán ó shoin ní raibh san páirc fánaach (?) seo, ach aithin is fraoch agus raithneach; treadhbadh é annsan agus bhí sé daitidhthe le cloch, is cairrig agus na h-aon nidh
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:33
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parents, that lived in Doumhaldry in the Parish of Dromard, leohong ford. It was afterwards found out, that this girl had some times previous left her home to look for work, and when she got too weak with hunger, and got no work, she was either unable or ashamed to return home again.
However young Paddy Reilly could not forget the girl whose life he had saved. As times improved her looks improved also. Three years afterwards he married her. They had a family of six daughters. When these girls were growing up Paddy Reilly employed a journeyman shoemaker to make shoes for them. One morning when the shoemaker was leaving, after having shoes made for all the family, he asked Paddy Reilly. "Is there any man in this neighbourhood who has a good deal of money" "Indeed there is", says Paddy, "Old James Woods there above on Kre Rock has plenty of it" "Very well" says the shoemaker, "I will work for him now. But I will go to Mohill today." He went to Mohill, and swore infromations before a Magistrate, that Paddy Reilly conspired with him to rob James Woods of [?]. That night Paddy Reilly was arrested and tried and sentenced to twenty one years transportation in Van Dieman's Land. He was kept there for fifteen years
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:26
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There was a boy living in Cornickavoher named Paddy Reilly in the house where James Lee Carnickavoher, Aughaves Corryallen Coheitrine now lives. He owned a farmer of land there.
One Spring's day in the year 1847 he was standing in the stable door, after feeding his horse, when he saw a young girl of about seventeen years of age walking by the road towards Mohill, and she was staggering. He wondered who she could be or where she was going: for he thought to himself she was very weak and probably from hunger.
The House he lived in stood about six perches from the road; and the bushes now and again hid the girl from his view. In order to satisfy his curiosity he walked down the lane to the main road and looked in the direction of Mohill The girl had passed the lane a few perches: He then saw her again and noticed that she gave two or three quick and high steps and feel against the ditch (mound fence). He ran to her. She had fainted. He lifted her and carried her to his house. His mother was unwilling to let her in at first, But he insisted saying, "What are we going to do with her"? His mother took good care of her and nursed her back to health. In six weeks she was strong again and able to go home again to her
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:26
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Fuair Seámus, praiseach a bhí ró thanaidhe cun a breicfeast ar maidin. Bhí sé cómh tanaidhe san gur rith sé ar fuaid an pláta ina raibh sé ann. "Ó! " arsa Seamus "baineadh sé tosach do'n t-express tráen ag dul isteac geata Baile Átha Cliath".
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:23
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Tá sgeul ag baint leis an ainm seo d'réir na sean daoine. Deirtear gur tháinig long Spáineach i dtír ag bun an Lotair fadó, agus go raibh last d'ór ar bórd aici. Ag teacht ós na Sasnaig a bhí sí
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:16
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Sé túairim na sean gur bé príomh cúis an mí-ádh seo ná an dubh do theacht ar na prátaí agus do loit íad agus na theannta san an éagcóir a dhein na Sasanaigh ar na daoiní bochta nuair a fuaireadh ar seacrán íad.
Deir na seandaoiní na raibh aon teora leis an cíos abhí ag na feirmeóirí as a gcuid tailim - go minich as feirmeacha beaga gan fiú amháin achar do thalamh fóganta ann; ach talamh rinn
cairrgacha is fraoch 's aiteann agus slaugh- Tá cuid den talamh sin sa mbaile seo fós agus tá rían de
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 22:07
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éigint ann acht "Níl luibh ná leigheas in agaidh an bháis"
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 21:52
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Rev. Daniel F O'Sullivan - Present Manager
Rev. Jeremiah Dillon
Rev. James McDonnell
Rev. Michael Horgan
Rev. John Mangan (a Late Bishop of Kerry)
Rev. John McCarthy
Rev. Thomas Davis
Rev. Michael Walsh (The "Father O'Flynn" of A. P. Grave's song)
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 21:46
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1) Cuir greim nó caillfidh tú dhá sníomh
2) Níl aon dul as an mbás

3) Nuair a cruaidhuigheann an t-slát is deacair é do sníomh

4) Má is féidir leath do gnó a déanamh indiu dein indiú é, agus ná cuir ar cáirde é go dtí lá éigin eile

5) Ní dírighe 'fhásann an dhrom sa lachain, ná Lá Fhéile Phádraig i lár an Earraig

6) Ní neart go h-aonthughadh
7) Ná dóghadh coinneall ar phinghin, ag lorg leath-phingine
8) Ní dheineann béal dúnta aighneas
9) Is tréise dúthchais ná oileamhaint
10) Ní thagann chiall roimh aois
11) Bhíonn an fhírinne searbh ach bhíonn sí fholláin

12) An duine a bhíonn an glór aige, ní dheineann sé mórán oibhre

13) Ná tabhair do cúl ar chomhairle maith
14) Ní bhíonn saoi gan locht
15) Ná tréig an duine a bhíonn ar maithe leath.
16) Ná caith do chuid airgidh ar fleadh nó féasta
17) Indiaidh an airgid bhíonn an grádh
18) Féac sar a léimfaidh tú
19) Ní féidir ceann críona a chuir ar corp óg
20) Ní féidir an mhuilinn a chuid oibhre a déanamh
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 21:19
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Chómhnuig an fear úd Williams in áit ar a dtugtar Coill Ruadh in aice le Gortmalughra. Tá an tigh 'nar chómhnuig sé le feiscint ann go fóill acht tá sliocht a shleachta imthighthe leis na bliadhanta. Cuireadh Mac Dómhnaill i roilig Cluan Mhín (Clonmeen) atá i aice le Bán Tír. (Banteer)

The above was got from Mr James O'Connell Knocknanuss. He died aged 83 yrs, about six months ago.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 21:15
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Tá an cnoc beag seo suidhte tímcheall trí mhíle ar an dtaobh thoir de Cheann Tuirc. Is ann a troideadh cath fuilteach 'sa bhliadhan 1647 idir Gaedhil agus na Gallaibh. Briseadh ar na Gall nú ba chirte a rádh ar na Gall-Gaedhil agus d'fhagadh 4000 díobh marbh ar pháirc an áir. De réir lucht staire b'é an tubaist úd i gCnoc na n-Os ba chionntocair leis an mbriseadh a tháinig ar Ghaedhil Chúige Mumhan 'na dhiaidh sin. An Tighearna Ínse Cuinn, an fear iomráidhteach úd go dtugaidís na Gaedhil "Murrough the Burner" mar leas-ainm air, abhí mar cheann-feadhma ar na Gallaibh agus bhí an Tighearna Taafe i gceannas ar na Gall-Gaedhil. Is minic a cuirtear an mhilleán ar Taafe mar gheall ar an lá úd agus de réir mar a cloisimíd ní gan cúis é. Is amhlaidh a bhí buidhean Albanach ag cabhrú leis na Gaedhil an lá úd agus bhí an duine iomraidhteach úd Mac Giolla Ciotaigh /(Culcoitt McDonnell go ndeintear trácht air s'in babhar (?) úd "John Splendid" le Neil Munroe) i gceannas ortha. Mar a thuit amach go minic roimhe sin agus 'na dhiaidh i Stair na h-Éireann d'eirig easaontas idir an mbeirt roimh an gcath mar gheall ar feallbheart a dhein Mac Dómhnaill i "gCath Philiphaugh" a troideadh in Albain 1645. Pé sgcéal é dhuiltuigh Taafe cabhar a bhreith do Mhac Dómhnaill in am an ghádhtair agus buadhadh glan ar na Ghaedhil. Mharbhuigheadh Mac Giolla Ciotaigh freisin agus na h-Albanaigh go léir abhí ag cabhrú leis.
I dtosach an lae bhí eirghe leis na Gaedhil agus thiomáineadar na Sasanaigh rómpa acht d'eirig clampar
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 20:25
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There are very few ruins in Gubbeen now, the ruins of two dwelling houses, and a big corn store, being the only ones. The owner of the corn store was called Fred Brown, the Tyrant. He bought the corn from the neighboUring farmers, and sold it to English traders who came for it in ships. One of the ships was called "Gubbeen". Fred Brown was drowned coming from England. One of the dwelling houses was occupied by a family called Courtney who died at the time of the famine and the other house was occupied by a family called Woods. They removed from that to Corthna, and their descendants are still living there.
There are sites of houses also pointed out by old people. Once house was occupied by a man called Murphy who emigrated to America. Another house situated near the road to Glaun was occupied by a family called Driscolls, who died at the time of the famine.
Several families emigrated to America in the famine times. Their unoccupied houses thrown down and the stones were used to[?] build other houses. There is only one bog in Gubbeen, and there are very little
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 20:21
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For dancing on the river bank
Down where the waters meet.
VII
Those lively boys and charming girls
Of sixty years ago.
Have left this sad and dreary world
Of wars, of toil and woe.
An aged few are lingering on
Old Fenians to the ground
Who loved to join at freeing their land
The sporting lads from Glaun
[-]
[Poll an Oighin a remarkable tarn on the top of Mount Gabriel. There are many legends about it.]
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 20:19
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V
On Sunday when each lively boy
Would step the horn pipe
Those jigs and reels they did enjoy
And dance with keen delight
¨"Follow me down to Carlow"
The winsome "Bonny Kate"
"The wind that shook the barley grain"
"The pigeon on the gate".
VI
Their sports were on the velvet green
And down the river side.
The football match, the hurling team
The crowds from far and wide
The manly boys came down the hills
For dancing in the dell
The colleens fair came o'er the glens
Of lovely heather bell.
VII
The crowds would join "the country dance".
When Sunday sport was o'er
The leading pair were lovely Nance
And Jack from Poll an Óir
The evening breeze was cool and grand
The violin music sweet
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 20:17
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When Seán was in his prime
At shooting cock, to climb his way.
For lonely Poll an Oighin.
The eagle there hath built her nest
High o'er the heather glen
The badger goes to sleep and rest
And Reynard leaves his den
III
He often tracked thro´ moor and vale
And sheltry wood for game
As shot rang out, he winged his prey
And seldom fired in vain
With "Fosco" down the rolling plain
Where partridge would be found
He broke the laws the tyrant framed
The sporting lad from Glaun
IV
The Fenian boys should cross the stream
And down Rathura hill
Where Seán would train the hurling team
To pike and rifle drill.
His violin tunes were a rich treat
At every ball around
His dancing was correct and neat
The sporting lad from Glaun
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 20:13
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I
'Tis sixty years since Seán was young.
And well-known in Schull town,
A favourite with his dog and gun
This sporting lad from Glaun
Chorus-
That land renowned for dancing.
That grand old Irish game.
Dan the Yank and Clancy.
And Tadhg from Turim Céin
II
In frost and snow 'twas only play
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 20:09
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Nuair fágadar an tig bhíodar ag seanacas agus ní raibh aon cuímhne aca ar an bóthar mór fada a bhí rómpa cun cur díobh, agus ní raibh an bothair chómh deas reidh an uair sin agus atá anois agus ní raobh na tighthe go leir ar taobh an bóthair cun dul isteac ann cun do breacfeasta nó do dinnéar. Nuair a biodar cúpla mile slíghe on dtig do stad an capall láithreach ar an mbóthar do bhí mo sean-athair 'á bhualadh act ní raibh corraíghe as an gcapall annsan do cuaidh an capall tamall eile, annsan do connaic mo sean-athair fear mór 'na sheasamh i lár an bóthair. Díarr an fear sídhe ar mo sean-athair cá raibh a thríall, agus dubairt mo sean-athair go rabadar ag dul go Beanntraíghe. Ní raghadh an capall thar an fear. Do bhí sé ag cur ceisteanna ar mo shean-athair agus bhí sé sin 'á fhreagairt. Annsan do rith an capall agus d'fághadar an fear sídhe i bfadh an ndíaidh. Tuit a codhladh ar mo sean-athair agus nuair duisig sé ní raibh aon cuíimne aige ar an bfear sídhe. Do bhí an fear a bhí in aonfhact leis 'á innsint do mar geall air. Nuair a tangadar abhaile bhíodar 'á innsint do muinntir an tíghe agus bí iongnadh an domhan ortha go léir.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 20:03
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an fear [!] is leigeamhala [!]. Níor éirigh an (chéad) dara fear acht shín sé amach a lámh agus ar seisean, "Tabhair an sgilling dom mar tá mé ró-leisgeamhail éirigh." Níor corruigh an tríomhadh fear cor ar bith acht ar seisean, "Cuir an sgilling in mo phóca mar tá an-leisg orm. Chuir an fear saidhbhir an sgilling i bpóca an fhir sin agus d'imthigh leis.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 20:03
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Sgéal Greannmhar
Bhí fear agus a bhean in a gcómhnuidhe i dteac beag uair amháin. Nuair a fuair an bhean bás d'fhág sí a cuid airgid ag an bhfear. Chomh luath agus bhí sí curtha san gcré chuaidh an fear go dtí an teach ósta agus thoisigh sé ag ól agus lean sé mar sin go dtí go raibh gach pighinn dá chuid airgid caithte aige.
Oidhche amháin dubhairt duine do na comhursana go rachadh sé i bhfolach an chéad oidhche eile nuair a bheadh an fear sin ag teacht abhaile ó'n tigh ósta.
Maidir [!] lá ár n-a bhárach chuaidh sé go dtí an reilg agus rómhair sé poll. An oidhche sin chuaidh sé go dtí an reilg agus chuaidh sé síos ins an bpoll agus bráithlín ar a ceann aige. Nuair a chonnaic sé an fear
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 19:56
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i bpáirc in Eadargóíl, agus ceap sí gurab é a fear a bhí ar seacrán. Seán abainm dó agus do scread an bean amac. "Seán an t-Soluis tar suas annso", agus sul ar fhéad sí rud eile do rádh do bhí Sean an Lócrainn ós a chómhair amac.
Do leath scannradh uirthi agus dúbhairt sí "Ó ní hé tusa atá uaim in aon cor ac ceapas gurab é mo fear a connacas. Imthig as mo radharc anois in ainm Dé nó muna himreódach thú in ainm Dé, imthig in ainm an díabhail. D'imtig sé agus sar a raibh an bean istig bhí sé tíos ins an páirc ceadhna arís. Ó shin i leith tá eachtra Seán an Lóchrainn i mbéal gac duine in Eadargóíl.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 19:49
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Lá amháin dá raibh mo sheana athair agus fear eile ag dul go Beanntráighe go dtí an aonac bhí capall agus trucall aca. Do bhí na muca ag scréacarnaig, nuair a bhí na fir á cur isteac sa trucall. Do tosnuígeadar ortha ar a haondeag a clog san oídhche. Do bhí an oídhche go breágh agus bhí an ré agus na reálta ins an spéar.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 19:45
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Bhí bean ann fadó agus is i Mass-mount a bhí cómhnuídhe uirthi. Bean ana cródha abeadh í agus ní bíodh eagla uirthi roimn na pucaí coídhche. Oídhche amháin bhí a fear imtighthe siós an bóthar go h-Eadargóil. Ní raibh éinne sa tig leis an mnaoí agus bfada leí an oídhche agus bhí imshníomh uirthi. Sa deire cuaidh sí amac sa doras agus connaic sí an solas ag spréacarnaig
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:42
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agus dubhairt sé léite an press sin tall a fhoscailt agus bí sé líonta do míncoirce.
Teactra O Dia le bhiad ag na paiste.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:40
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Bhí bean an uair amain agus bhí sceata paiste aige. Oidhche amain bhí siad ag caoineadh leis an ocras, agus ní raibh aon bhaidh aige le thabhairt doíb. Croch sí póta ar an teine agus slaman chloca ann le iad a shasú. Shul a raibh na chloca bruithte tainig féar isteach agus dubairt se léite an póta sín a toghailt do'n téine d'a mbéad chloca éad tá siad bruitte. Dhubairt sí leis gur chloca a bhí an go raivh na páiste ag caoineadh léis an ocars agus ní raibh an bhíad aige le tabhairt doibta. Nuair a tóga sí an póta bí sé líonte de fataí
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:30
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another fort at Kilfalney.
Many superstitions are following these forts and it is most unlucky to have anything to do with them. Some people venture to level them but they were never known to finish the work. In one case the cattle began to die and in another the workmen got sore hands. One fine evening a man was walking past Horan fort. As he was walking along he heard a football being kicked within. All at once it came out he kicked it back. He went in, but saw neither football or people.
There is a fort at Gurrane with an entrance [?]. Near this there is a farm owned by O'Sullivan. One day the woman of the house was inside alone. A strange woman came in and asked for the loan of an oven. She got it and
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:24
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her clothes from her own home before Shrove Tuesday she must not remove them for seven weeks.
Straw boys:-
Boys and men who go around to the houses of those newly married. They wear straw hats or helmets which cover the face and a kind of straw coat. When they come to the house they sing and dance and the leader asks the bride to dance.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:20
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One night a man was going home after playing cards. He met a man with a table on the road and the man asked him to play so they began and when they finished the man with the table took a hundred pounds from his pocket and said "all this I will give to you, if you will give me yourself when you die which will be 14 years from now." They agreed and the man went home. Fourteen years passed and just two days before his doomed day he went to the priest for protection. He offered the priest the hundred pounds but the priest told him to burn it that it was bad. The day came and the priests were reading prayers over the man. The devil came and chains around his neck and when he found out he was beaten he went away in a rage.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:16
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Once upon a time a girl was sick in a house whatever they did for her it would not please her. One day a tailor was making clothes at the house. All the people of the house went out to milk the cows. The tailor watched her but she did not see him. She got a pipe and began to play and the tailor noticed she was an old little woman, The tailor thought of a plan. He got a shovel and left it in the fire until it was red hot. He told her he would strike her with it. She got up and ran out and the other girl came back.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:13
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Jermiah O'Sullivan, Currens.
John O'Sullivan,
Daniel J. and William O'Sullivan
Inchinvima
Michael Collins, Urraghal.
George Walshe, Springmount.
These are all very strong men, and we can well understand, how until a younger generation formed a new team, they proved unbeatable wherever they competed.
The later Currens Tug o' War team though not up to the standard of the old team are yet well able to hold their own in any sports field. The following are the members of this team:-
Dan and Mick Hussey, Kilfilem.
Dan and Moss Callaghan,
Michael Aherna, Springmount.
Dan Daly, Kilfalney.
Denis O'Rourke, Culnacallee.
Daniel J. O'Sullivan, Inchinvima
Maurice O'Connor, Faranndoctor.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:05
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About twenty years ago, there was a famous Tug o' War team in Currens. In 1921 they won the championship of Munster at Killarney beating the Ballyvourney team who also aimed at being the Munster champions
The members of the team were:-
John O'Sullivan, Farrandoctor
James and Dan Daly, Kilfalney,
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:01
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Oaten Bread baked on a griddle in front of turf fire.
Yes, a Quern Stone was found in Carnowen Bog - was given to Rev. Arthur Rose who took it (it is thought) to the Museum in Belfast. Dr. Rose is dead.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:00
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In former times some of the old people were [?] knowledgeable and understood many things about the use of herbs for the cure of certain diseases. There was one woman in this district many years ago she used visit the sick and [?] a charm for the parient.
She used to be out out surprise for the purpose of picking the herbs and extracting the medicine from them. The patient should give her money with a
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 18:00
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"Boot" = something given "into the bargain"
"Tick" = bought without money
Change - money returned when too much was tendered in payment.
"Carl" = auctioned -
Yes, dealers in feathers & rags & scrap iron, horse hair, are still going round now and again - less common than a few years ago. I've heard of a 'tenpenny' bit: "To bite a tenpenny" was a phrase applied to a cross woman whether a ten-penny bit (money) or a tenpenny loaf - I dont know
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 17:56
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 17:53
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There is in Erin that you may share in.
A Spot delightful where into stray.
Each view enchanting each scene a Entrancing.
The place I mean is Tralee Bay.
2
Come here and view it you will never rue it.
But still come to it each Summer time.
You purpose suiting you health.
You are sure to leave it in health prime.
3
Each nook and cranny has legend namy
The best of ancient lore.
Where youth and beauty and love and duty
And virtue flourish around Erin's shore.
4
Ye Alpine climbers and peotic rhymers.
Oh scenic beauties it is your's to tell.
If in your wanderings or long meanderings,
You have met with charms Tralee Bay to excel.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 16:59
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Uair amháin do mhair gClaodach bean[?] agus do bhí sí pósta le fear ón áit ceadna. Do bhí feirm beag aca agus ní raibh ach chupla páirceanna maithe aca.
Do bhí an cuid eile go h-ana cairigreach agus ní raib ach ceithre bó acu ar fad. Do bhí an mhnaoi go h-ana shaidbhir.
Do bhí cearcanna go [?] aca agus do cimeadad sí iad go léir agus dheanfad a lán profíd orta san.
Do cimeadad sí an t-airgead go léír i mbosca fe'n leabhaid agus do marbhócad sí a mhac dá dtéigead sé inaice leis.
Do bhiodh glas ar is ní fheadfaidh aoinne é a osguilt gan rud éigin b'féidir tuag a bheith aca cun é a dheanamh
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 16:57
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those balls.
One of the old customs on November night is to put a tub of water in the floor. The tub would be about a foot in depth and it would be full of water. An apple would be put floating on the water and then the trial would be no who would catch the apple in his mouth.
Others tie an apple to the ceiling and tie their hands behind their backs and try to take a bite of the apple.
Another custom is to put three saucers on the table and to put clay in one, water in another and a ring in the third.
Then one of the crowd is blindfolded and is led to the table and if he puts his hand on the clay. He is the first to die. If he puts it into the water, he will be the first to cross the sea and if he puts it on the ring, he will be the first to get married.
November night is a very holy night. Every body says the rosary on that night. People say that the dead people are up in the rafters of the houses on that night begging and craving of their friends to pray for them.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 16:50
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féachaint ar áiteanna fé thalamh mar sin.
Do chuaidh sé síos agus ní raibh sé abfad thíos nuair a airig sé fothramh ag teacht na dhiaidh. Do léim an rud síos 'na dhiaidh agus do léim sé ar a dhrom agus do thosnuig sé ar é thachtad.
Ansan dubhairt sé cad cuighe dhuit teacht isteach am thig Dearmhad ab'eadh é arsan fear agus cé hé tusa ar aon chuma.
"Is mise sprid an choill seo" ar seisean agus ná tar isteach ann a thuille. Thug sé rud le n-ithe do agus do chuir sé abhaile é tré chasán tré thalamh.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 16:44
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Lá amháin do bhí fear ag gabháil trí choill ar maidin go luath agus é ag dul ag féachaint ar na beithidig a bí ar an gnoc.
Nuair a tháinig sé go dtí na beithidig do bhíodar go maith agus do bhí sé cun teacht abhaile arís ach do thug sé fé ndeara rud tamaillín uaidh.
Do chuaidh sé fé na dhéin agus do bhí cloch mór san áit na raibh pioc roimis sin. Do bhí marcanna ar an gcloc agus do thosnuigh sé ag feachaint ortha ach dhein sé pioc asta.
Do thóg sé an cloc agus cad a bheadh[?] fé ach poll mór doiminn agus casáin ag dul amach a gach taobh de. D'feac sé go h-ana dheas agus dubhairt an fear ina aigne féin go ragad sé sios cun feacaint ar mar do bhí sé go h-ana luath agus ba mhaith leis an fear bheith ag
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 16:32
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Old Customs
About thirty years ago all the boys and girls under fifteen years used wear crosses on St. Patrick's day.
The crosses used be five inches ong and five inches broad.
These crosses used be made of cardboard and white paper. The girls crosses used be decorated different to the boys crosses.
When the girls crosses were made they were decorated with all coloured pieces of cloth. The pieces of cloth used be in five bunches sewed down on each other, one at each end of the cross and one in the middle. There used be green ribbon sewed down in the cloth in the middle of the cross also.
The boy's crosses were decorated the same way as the girls, but there used be a harp drew out on the cross with the yoke of an egg.
All the crosses were worn on the right arm and they used wear them from St. Patrick's day to Lady day which is the 25th March. This used be worn in honour of
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 16:18
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Ans = Her breath.
What is taken of you before you get it?
Ans = Your Photograph.
Where was Moses when the light went out
Ans = In the dark.
One side a woman the other a man?
Ans = A penny.
What is the smallest bridge in the world?
Ans = The bridge of your nose.
Riddle me riddle right where did I sleep last night through a rock, through a reel, through an old spinning wheel through a bag of pepper through a millers hopper through an old sheep's shank bone and such a riddle never was known?
Ans = A moth.
what is full and will hold more?
Ans = A pot of potatoes.
What gets bigger the more you take from it?
Ans = A hole.
As round as an apple as deep as a cup and all the king's horses could not pull it up?
Ans = A well.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 16:14
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What goes round and round the wood and never goes into the wood?
Ans = The bark of a tree.
What is cut but never eaten?
Ans = A pack of cards?
Why does a hen pick a pot?
Ans = Because she cant lick it.
four legs up and four legs down soft in the middle and hard all round?
Ans = A bed.
Black and white and read all over?
Ans = An newspaper.
What always follows a mouse?
Ans = Its tail.
What goes from house to house and sleeps out all night?
Ans = A path.
What goes round and round the house and sleeps in the corner at night?
Ans - A brush.
What has an eye but cannot see?
Ans = An needle.
What goes up the ladder with its head down?
Ans = A nail in a man's boot.
What part of a cow goes into the byre first.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 16:08
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62. A lazy old woman, a hard-working man & twelve little children sitting round a pan. What is it?
(the face of the clock)
63. How many sides on a round plum-pudding?
(Two - inside & outside)
64. What's the use of a cat's skin?
(To keep her warm).
65. What makes a loaf in every window?
(Snow.)
66. What is the difference between a shilling and a penny?
(Eleven-pence)
67. When is a man hospitable and a treat at the same time?
(when he takes you in)
68. Why is the sun like a good loaf.
(Because it is light when it rises).
69. How long did Cain hate his brother?
(As long as he was Abel).
70. Why is an egg too lightly boiled like one boiled too much?
(Because it is hardly done)
71. What kind of ear (eers) have engines?
(Engineers)
72. What is the dead centre of Dublin
(Glasnevin)
73. What is everything on the earth doing?
(Going round).
74. How many hairs (hares) in a horse
(Ten) (There are 10 3-penny bits in a half-a-crown)
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:57
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but has four fingers and a thumb?
(A glove.)
50. What flies with four wings?
(Two birds.)
51. To N's, two O's an L and a D put that together and spell it for me?
(London)
52. What kind of paper is like a sneeze?
(tissue paper).
53. Head without hair, teeth without lips & a leg?
(A rake)
54. Why is Ireland compared to a bottle?
(Because there is a Cork in it).
55. My back's bare, my stomach's empty. I have two heads & I think it's plenty?
(A nippers).
56. Patch upon patch without any stitches. Riddle me that and I'll buy you a pair of breeches?
(A head of cabbage.)
57. Headed like a thimble, tailed like a rat, you can guess for ever but you'll not guess that?
(A pipe).
58. A man had a pair of pants with twenty patches on them. What time was it?
(Time he had a new pair)
59. I have a wee house. It wouldn't hold a mouse. It has as many windows as the King's house?
(A thimble).
60. What has its ears a yard from its head?
(A spade).
61. What is full in the daytime & empty at night?
(A shoe).
anonymous contributor
2021-10-26 15:52
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Nolagh Murder
You feeling hearted Christians with pity now draw nearer
A sad and dismal tragedy I mean to let you hear
It too place in Nolagh townland as you can plainly see
And for the crime the culprit hung did on the Gallow tree
Verse II
On the 30th of January in the year of 1898
He planned this awful murder four lives he too complete
He killed his awful married wife all in her youth and bloom
Verse III
LIkewise his children, mother in law the four possessed one tomb
He left a place called Inniskeen on Saturday afternoon
Bound for the town of Carrickmacross that place he entered soon
The Villian took his lodging there and no one knew his plan.
When he left on Sunday evening with a tin box in his hand
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:49
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41. What is the strongest thing in the world?
(A snail. He carries his house on his back.)
42. Why is a train like a flea?
(Both run over sleepers)
43. What flies high, flies low, has no feet, but wears out shoes?
(Dust.)
44. Black I am, and fair of face. They tore my hair and scratched my face, and took me from my dwelling place?
(A sod of turf).
45. I sat on my honkers, and looked through my winkers, and saw the dead burying the live?
(A person covering up a fire with ashes - raking it - for the night.)
46. A word of five letters I am. Come riddle me out if you can. My first and last are alike, I declare, My second and my fourth alike are a pair. Cut heads & cut tails, I am also a name. Spelt backwards and forwards I am always the same. The test I will leave to my carpenter friend, who oftimes takes hold of me to accomplish his end
(Level).
47. What French word contains all the vowels but only one consonant?
(Oiseau.)
48. What stand on one leg and has its heart in the middle?
(A cabbage-head).
49. What is it that is neither flesh nor bone,
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:42
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29. Why is the crow a sensible bird?
(Because he never complains without cause {caws}).
30. What bears but never blossoms?
The crook.
31. When did Noah strike the first nail in his ark?
(On the head).
32. If it takes half a yard to make a cap, what will it take to make a suit?
(A tailor).
33. As I went through a wheat-field, I saw something nice that I could eat. It was neither fish, flesh nor bone, what was it?
(An egg.)
34. If three men ate 6 potatoes, what would the number of their motar-car be?
(386)
35. A kitchen full, a room full and you couldn't catch a spoon ful?
(Smoke)
36. Through the wood, and through the wood, and through the wood it ran, although it was little thing, it killed a big man?
(A bullet.)
37. Clink, clank down yon bank ten about two?
(A person milking a cow)
38. How man hairs are there in a cat's tail?
(None. They are on the outside).
39. How many feet have forty sheep, the shepherd, and his dog?
(Two)
40. Look at me and you are somebody. Turn my back & you are nobody?
(A person using a looking-glass.)
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:33
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19. Which two notes of the musical scale would you prefer if you were tired?
(Soh - fah - Sofa).
20. Chips-chips-cherry all the men in Derry couldn't climb up Chip-chip-cherry?
(Smoke).
21. A leaper of ditches, a cropper of thorns, an wee brown cow with a pair of leather horns?
(A hare).
22. As round as an apple, as sharp as a lance. If you sat on it, it would carry you to France?
(The moon).
23. I have a little sister, she has but one eye, she'd climb the sky were it ever so high, and wade the sea were it ever so deep?
(The moon)
24. If a chicken could swear, what language would it be?
(Fowl language)
25. What is it that every living person has seen & never will see again?
(Yesterday).
26. Where was Nelson going in his 39th year?
(Into his fortieth).
27. Why does a hen pick a pot?
(Because she can't like it).
28. What goes up and down but never moves?
(The road).
29. Opens like a barn door, shuts like a trap. You can guess for 40 years but you'll never guess that?
(An umbrella).
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:27
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Old Customs
Long ago on St Brigid's night in some of the houses in this district little crosses were made by the old people of wheaten straw or peeled rushes in honour of St. Brigid and they were securely fixed to the scraw under the thatch in the roof by little scollops.
There are two of those made of wheaten straw in Pat Clifford's house at Twogneeves. They were made by his father and are very nicely designed. One of them is there over twenty years. Pat's eldest daughter was put under the patronage of St. Brigid when she was born, the other is there about eleven years and when a second daughter was born, she was also put under the patronage of St. Brigid.
The first daughter died and there a little wooden cross was put by the side of the others to mark the event.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:25
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9. Why is hell like a cobbler's shop?
(Because it is full of condemned soles (souls)).
10. B and O and X in the middle, T and Y come tell me the riddle?
(Boxty.)
11. When is a clock on the stairs unsafe?
(When it runs down.)
12. Why are tall people the laziest?
(Because they lie longest in bed).
13. What is it that is often placed on the table, cut and passed but not eaten?
(A pack of cards.)
14. Why is a cowardly soldier compared to butter?
(Because he runs before the fire).
15. If Ireland were flooded what would be the safest town to live in?
(Cork, because it floats).
16. As I went over Derry's wall, I heard a man give a call. His head was flesh, his mouth was horn, and such a man was never born?
(A rooster.)
17. If a man got sixpence for walking a mile what would he get for walking thirty miles?
(Tired feet.)
18. I am an old unicorn. I have but one horn, and I can give milk like a wee Kerry cow. My grandmother loves me and round the board shoves me, and smiles, a sweet countenance placed on her brow?
(The teapot.)
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:18
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1. Rickety-Rockety clothed in green. The King could not ride it or neither could the Queen. They sent for the wise man who lived in the East. He swore it had horns but it was not a beast.
(A holly-tree).
2. Why are the clouds like a coachman?
(The clouds hold rain - the coachman holds reins.)
3. Why does a beggarman wear a short coat?
(Because it may be long enough before he gets another.)
4. Granny in the corner drinking. Johnny in her cap winking?
(A lamp.)
5. A half-penny wet and a half-penny dry;
four pence half-penny and a half-penny dry,
A half-penny behind and a half-penny before;
four pence half-penny and a half-penny more?
(A shilling).
7. Why is a school-teacher compared to a clock?
(Because he warns before he strikes.)
8. If a man falls off a house what will he fall against?
(His will)
9. There was a man of Adam's race. He had a certain dwelling-place. It was neither earth, heaven, hell, or any other place for a man to dwell in?
(Jonas - in the whale).
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:16
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go near her she would fill you with itch!
A nettle.
Spell saved grass in three letters?
Hay.
Londonderry, Cork, and Kerry spell me that without a K? That
What runs from Cork to Bublin without moving? A railway.
In Amsterdam it is common in Germany it is still it comes twice in Summer but is never seen in Spring? The letter M.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:10
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boy carried on his back about a quarter of a mile to the priest's house.
The priest looked out at the crowd and came to the door. When he seen the rock on the man's back he asked the meaning of it and was told that they had to bring it from Glenbeigh as penance for their sins.
He said it was a pity for the priest to impose such a hardship and said three times "May God forgive him". He then ordered his house keeper to prepare food for the men and gave them their tickets.
After the men going out two of them went to lift the rock on the man's back again who brought it. The priest asked them what they were about. They told him they should carry the rock back again to get absolution. The priest got mad to think that they should do so and ordered them to throw away the rock which they did. The poor priest was no cliver enough to know that a joke was played on him a limestone was as scarse in Glenbeigh as diamonds.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:09
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or before, till the last of them was out of sight and out of hearing behind the hills. And Sheela sorted the money-bags, and loaded her man to the ground with the weight o' riches. But what remained over and above she slung on her own shoulders and away with them over hedges and ditches, by short cut and long cut, by near way and far way, up hill and down dale, till they came to their home on the lonely corner of the mountain. And they bought another wee cow at the fair at the five crossroads, where the cattle of the whole world were gathered together, and they bought a fat pig in the town. But that all happened long ago when there were kings in Ireland and princes in every barony, when the birds sang in the night-time and slept by day-light, when the maidens spoke truth like a lesson and knew only of their own affairs. And if they two didn't live happy together - then that you and I may.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 15:04
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long in the branches when a band of robbers came along. And they built a big fire under the tree, and feasted and drank till you'd think they'd never finish, and sang songs that would put fear in your heart, and shouted, and sharpened their knives, and told bad tales. Till at long last the robber-chief called for his money-bags, and twenty of them were brought to him for his pleasure. And he emptied them at his feet, and he counted his money till you'd think the gold o' the whole world was in his hands. And Sheela the 'Gam' had her neck stretched out and her eyes on the riches, when what would you have happen, but the unfortunate door slipped from the branches, and fell with a clatter among the thieves. And Sheela was so frightened with the happening, that she lost her hold and her seat and down she plops, like a bag o' hay on the top o' that. And the poor mountainy man seeing her fall, put out his hand to hold her, and overbalanced and fell on top o' that.
Now, the robbers thought that the Devil was amongst them, and they up, to a man, and such screeching and racing you never saw, since
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:56
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through forests and fires, up hill and down dale, across rivers and lakes and heavy swamps, with Sheela behind him, and the stars and the moon out before him.
"And what's keeping you," says he, when he missed the old wife from his heels?
"It's the weight of the door", says she.
"The weight o' what door", says he.
"Didn't you tell me to pull the door after me," says she, "and here it is to the good, as large as life and as sound as a bell. But by the Four Waves of the sea, it's a load and a half on a long journey."
Now there's ways the man would have turned his tongue on the 'Trollop', but he was a good-for-nothing sort of a 'Lingle', and "Sheela," says he, "we'll rest till the morning." So they climbed a tall tree, for they were afraid to sleep on the ground, and nothing would satisfy the poor 'Oinseach' of a woman but to pull the door up into the branches, and stretch it out snug and warm like a Christian. "For who knows," says she, "what might happen to it if we left it below, and wilful waste," says she, leaves a woeful want."
Well it so happened that they weren't long
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:46
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:44
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It is the custom for people to decorate their houses at Christmas time with holly and mistletoe. Some say that the reason that holly is used is because that the cross on which Jesus was crucified was made of the wood of the holly tree. Others say that it is because that there are few flowers in bloom at Xmas and the holly branches are a very pretty sight with their bright red berries, and are suitable for decoration on. May day the mayflowers and Marsh mallows are gathered and scattered around the byres, and at wells to keep witches away. On Palm Sunday branches of the palm bush are taken to the priest and blessed by him. The palm is taken home and hung up in the houses or sometimes in the outhouses too until Ash Wednesday of the next year comes. Then it is burned and the ashes and rubbed on the foreheads of the people. It reminds them that they are made of dust and that to dust they shall one day return. People of this district used to go to Lough Patrick and get some water. They sprinkled this water on their cows on the first day of May. Noggins and piggins which were the old wooden vessels the people used, are still preserved in some houses as emblems of sentimental value.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:42
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Canonical Penances
In olden times about ninety years ago. The people at that time used only very seldom go to confession.
Some times after a year or more they may go. It was a custom by parish priests to impose a stiff penance on some of those who used be a long time without going to confession.
By sending them far off journeys to get a ticket from another parish priest as penance for their sins before getting absolution.
The parish priest of Glenbeigh at that time sent thirteen men to get a ticket from Father Carmody parish parish priest of Castlemaine and Keel who lived at Ballinamona.
They made the journey and when approaching the priest's house some bright boy in the crowd thought of a plan. Knowing well that it was easy to impose on Father Carmody as he was an innocent poor man.
They made a good strong hay rope and put a fairly heavy rock of limestone into it which this prime
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:39
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My Grandmother, Mrs Greer of Drumleek North told me a strange story of a leprechan. One day she and my grandfather were in the kitchen. It was almost dinner time and my grandmother put on the pan to fry. A little woman about three feet high and wearing a little red shawl came to the door and asked for a piece of bacon. When she saw the pan on the fire she asked to have it fried. They put the slice of bacon on the pan for her. After a time Mr. Greer said to his wife "turn the bacon for that thing." The fairy woman much offended went over and lifted the bacon in her fingers and ran out of the house.
The old people of this district believe that fairies live in lone bushes and any bush which grows out in the middle of a field or near a fort is sacred and must not be cut down lest some bad luck should fall on the person who touches it. A man in Drumakill cut a lone bush to fence a gap. On the following night a crowd of fairies came to his house and tried to take him and drown him in the river.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:34
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My Grandmother Mrs. Armstrong often told us a story about this fort. One time she worked with Mr. Watters who owned the land round the Fort. This man had a cow which was expected to calve any day and she was grazing on the hill near the fort. My grandmother went out often to see the cow lest she should calve and the calf be lost. She saw the cow grazing as usual one evening, but next day she could not be found anywhere. They searched every place for her. On the third day when by Grandmother went out to look for her again she found the cow grazing beside the fort with the little calf running beside her and an old shawl tied round the cows body to keep her warm. Everyone believed that the fairies in the fort had the cow that day taking care of her.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:23
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Long ago the houses were called mud cabins. They had mud walls in their houses. The roofs of houses were thatched with rushes, and some were thatched with wattles and reeds. The wheat straw is the best for thatching the houses. In later years they began to use stoney slates which were found in a quarry in Creeve near Ballybay. The fires were all in the centre of the floors and there were no chimneys in the houses. The smoke went out through the door. Long ago there were no beds and there was nothing but settle beds and these settle beds folded up like a long seat. There are four or five settle beds in the townland of Drumakill still. The settle beds were placed in the chimney corner. There were no windows in the houses. Our teacher knew a house with a small pane of glass for the only window. The people made a hole in the wall and boarded it up and the light came in through the splits. Long ago the floors were earthen floors and these floors were not level. It wore into holes and people fed the cats in these holes. It was very common to have a half
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:18
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There were no country shops long ago. People went to the towns. Long ago people bought and sold after mass on a Sunday. They do not sell as much as they used to, but they sell the "Democrat" at some chapels after mass yet. They did not pay for all their goods in money but they gave something in exchange. Labour is often given in exchange for goods still. When people go to a shop and get goods without paying for them we say that they get them on "tick". Boot means profit. If any person sells a thing and gets more money for it than he paid we say he made a "boot". When a person pays for an article and gets some money back it is called changes. It is supposed to be unlucky to meet a red haired person on the road when going to buy or sell anything. The person should turn back and let the red haired person past and then the person can turn and go to the fair. It is unlucky to
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:13
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it. Then when it is thick it is kneaded with flour and then it is rolled out. It is put on the fire to cook. Some times is was not put on the fire at all but it was put on the grid iron and it was set before the fire until it cooked. This oat bread was about and inch thick and some people had to break it with the hammer. This oat bread was very hard and that is why the people had good teeth long ago. This bread was either baked on the griddle or in the oven. The people who have the hearth rise an oven and they call it the pot oven or the dutch oven. Long ago people did not use soda. They used a substance called barm. They did not wet it with milk but they wet it with water. The people baked bread once a week. Some people put the sign of the cross on a cake of bread and long ago the bakers put their elbows in the dough.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 14:08
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There were several different kinds of bread made in this district long ago namely oaten bread and several other kinds of bread made with potatoes. They eat a lot of oaten bread. They did not buy the meal they grew the corn and got it ground at home. They ground the corn between two big stones. The people made potato cake, stampy, boxty, and oat meal bread long ago. Potato cake was made with boiled potatoes mixed with flour and it was put on a griddle and cooked. Stampy is much like potato cake only it has oat meal mixed with the potatoes and flour. Boxty is made by equal parts of grated raw potatoes and grated cooked potatoes. Flour was kneaded into it. Oat cake is made with some oat meal and salt in a bowl and boiling water is put on
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:58
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A Champion Jumper
Many years ago there was a man named Jack Deen who lived in the townland of East Shanahill and he was a great jumper and his name won great fame throughout the county of Kerry.
There was also a great jumper living in Waterford and he boasted he would jump the best man in Ireland.
He used travel trough each county in Ireland where he used hear there was a jumper and he used beat him.
One time he heard of a jumper that was in Tyrone and that man also boasted that he would jump the best man in Ireland.
The jumper from Tyrone was counted to be a better jumper than the man of Waterford but the man of Waterford said he would go to Tyrone so he did and when he landed there he went to the jumper and challenged him to jump.
The jumper from Tyrone was three feet higher that the man of Waterford and on that account the Waterford man was cowardly in jumping.
Before the jumping men were
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:35
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The castle a squarely built, standing on the verge of the sea about half a mile inside the mouth of the inlet to Chapeltown strand. The corners are all built of cut stone and the windows are V shaped in the interior and built also of cut stone. There are still three corners standing and the castle is at present 50 feet in height. The walls are about 4 feet thick and a stone stairs leads to the top storey. Only half one arch which upheld the lower floor is still intact. It originally seemed to have had 4 apartments in height as projections in the wall would indicate. It was built of stone of the land on which it stands.
One corner - the South East - is gone from about 3 feet from the ground - the masonry is still lying where it fell, large pieces of it still intact showing it was well built. Local tradition says it was fired at by Cromwell's guns - but there is no record of this. It was always an English garrison + why should Cromwell attack it. The most likely is that an explosion occurred or it was tried to blow it up as no other part of the Castle is injured save that corner. The explosive must have been placed where the stairs began as three feet of the bottom wall is still standing. The mortar used was lime and sand in the construction.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:31
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Tradition says that there was a strong chain connecting this castle with Barrow Castle on the opposite shore so as to prevent all boats coming in or going out unknown to the occupants of the Castle. The chain had to be lowered by an official of either castle before a ship could enter or leave.
Barrow Castle on the opposite headland is a circular building about twelve feet high now with door and roof. It was once much higher - it fell or got torn down + the stones were drawn. It appears both were erected at the same time and for a similar purpose, although they are as much unlike as anything could be.
On the Barrow side of the inlet at a place called the Randy - probably derived from "Rendey-vous" of the French smugglers or "Rinn" of Irish. There is still the remains of an old pier made of large flags of stone now covered with sand.
Another landing stage seemed to have been standing on the Fenit Island side farther in from the Castle
Timothy Flaherty (now dead) + owner of a farm in the island remembered as a young lad helping to up-root strong oak piles whose stumps were standing on the beach. He dug them up with his father who told him that
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:24
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Who was it? That all the world was at his funeral. He was born before his father, christened before his mother and had the virginity of his grandmother. Ans, Abel.
The beginning of eternity the end of time and space the beginning of every end and the end of every place? Ans. The letter E.
As I went to Mallow I saw a great wonder two pots boiling and no fire under? Ans. Two pots of lime.
A boat went down the Blackwatere full of people and there was not a single person in it? Ans They were all married.
What is the most dangerous time of the year?
Ans. Spring, because the cowslips about the bullrush is out and all the buds are shooting.
Where do the bad soles go? Ans. To the cobblers shop to be mended.
What are four impossible things to get?
Ans A boot for the foot of a mountain, a sheet for the bed of the ocean, a tooth for the mouth of the Blackwater and a towel to wipe the face of the earth.
What is it that walks on four legs in the morning on two legs in the middle of the day and on three legs in the evening?
Ans. Man because he walks on his hands and knees in the morning of life and he walks on his two feet in the middle of life and with a crutch in his old age.
What is it? That all men bring first to life.
The poor man has the rich despise,
The miser spends the spendthrift saves
And all men carry to their graves? Ans Nothing.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:17
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Lucht Siubhal:- Criostíona Ní Dhómhnaill a chuis síos.
Thig lucht siubhail go dtí teach s’againne. Sé iad na daoine ceadna a thigeas i gcomhnuidhe.
Thigeann fear dar bh’ainm “Joe Swiggie” agus fear eile “Mc Goldrick”
Thigeann “Joe” as Co. Fearmonach agus thigeann an fear eile as Róscoman.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:16
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Important Dates During Black and Tan Trouble
There was a round up in Keel flying column in January 15th 1921 and there was another round up in the hut in February 6th 1921.
There was an ambush in Rae's house Keel by the Tans in January 4th 1921. The roads were cut in the Keel district in March 15th 1921.
There was another ambush by the flying column in Killoglin Barrick March 22nd 1921 and the same in Lispole in April 26th 1921.
On May 15th 1021 the roads were cutting to block the Tans coming from Dingle to Castlemaine. There was an ambush at the Tans at Glenbeigh in June 1st 1921 and Milltown ambush couple of days before the Free State troops.
The Free State trouble started in the 10th September 1922 and there was an ambush in the Free State army in the Keel mountain in the 23rd November 1922.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:16
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dhach leis an chuid eile.
Bíonn na mná ag iarraidh bainne agus uibheacha agus bíonn na fir ag iarraidh tae. Bíonn paidreacha agus déiliní le cuid aca agus ní bíonn ag an chuid eile acht mallachtaí agus mionnaí móra.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:15
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Lucht Siubhal.
Thig rud mór lucht Siubhal thart fa’n cheanntar seo. Tigeann na daoine ceadna thart achan bhliadhan. Tig “John Kelly” as Ard na Ratha agus tig “Charlie the Fairy” as na Cealla Beaga. Bíonn earraidhe le díol ag cuid aca. Bíonn bláthannaí deasa aca agus ceannuigheann na daoine iad ar pingin amháin.
Bíonn fáilte ag cuid de na daoine (roimpe) rompa. Ghnidheann siad leabaidh beag cois na teineadh daobhtha. Bíonn paidreacha deasa ag cuid aca agus deireann siad na paidreacha ma thiubhrann tú a ghach daobhtha. Siubhlann siad uilig ar a gcois. Ní bhíonn mórán faill aca codladh agus a fhághail no bíonn siad ag innse mórán seán sgealtaí. Bíonn giota beag arán le cuid aca istigh I mála agus ní bhíonn a
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:15
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Lucht Siubhail.
Tigeann na daoine céadhna thart comhair a bheith tart idtolamh.
Tigeann “Charley the Fairy” isteach againn agus “John Kelly” as Ardratha
Bíonn a láimh ar a taobh igcomhnuidhe ag “Charley the fairy” agus bhí dhá shúil fiadhanta ina ceann aige.
Bíonn camphor do dhíol acu agus snathadaí móra ciora fosta. Sin na h-earraidhe a dhíolann siad. D’íolann cuid acu saor agus cuid eile daor.
Dhíoladh chuid acu deireadh a bhéadh leobhtha ar leath choróin. Bíonn mála saic le cuid acu Malaí leathar le cuid acu. Bíonn mála leobhtha le bratógaí a chruinnuighadh fosta.
Luigheadh siad ins na coillte agus ins na cruacha féir.
Fannann cuid acu leath uair agus cuid acu cúig bhomaite.
Bíonn biadh le cuid acu acht caithfhide tu biadh a (b) thaibhairt do’n chuid eile. Bíonn asal le cuid acu
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:14
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bainne do na páiste.
Bíonn a gcuid biadh fhéin le cuid aca. Fanann cuid de’n lucht siubhal tamall maith. Ní thig cuid eile aca acht go dtí an doras.
Bíonn an cuid is mo aca ag siubhal do’a gcos.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:13
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Tá cuid mór daoine siubhal thart fá an ceanntar seo. Chomhair a bheith gurabh iad na daoine ceadhna a thig i gcomhnuidhe.
Bhíodh fear bocht ag dul thart annseo fríd na toighthe agus bhí sé iongantach maith ag dul chéoil. John Kelly a bhí mar ainm air. Ní leigfeadh cuid de n-a daoine isteach lucht siubhail ar chor ar bith.
Bíonn cuid de’n lucht siubhal ag díol bláthannaí.
Bíonn sean mhála leobhtha. Bíonn cuid aca ag cruinnuighadh airgead agus préataí. Bíonn na mná ag.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:12
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Bhí na preataí bruithte againn agus thug muid cúpla ceann dó, agus cúpa bainne. Dubhairt sé nar ‘ith sé preataí le mí roimh sin.
Annsin d’iarr sé loistín agus fuair sé é. Bhí an leabhaidh déanta ag cois na teineadh. Chuir muid chochan isteach i mála mór ar an urlár. Cupla sean cotaí agus a bhí mar eadhaigh againn.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:12
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Bhí daoine siubhal ag gabháil thart indé.
Bíonn (f) siad ag cruinneadh uibheacha, agus cuid eile airgead agus cuid eile bainne.
Tháinig fear againne.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:11
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Bíonn siad ar loistín ag cuid de na daoine. Cuirtear cothain isteach i málaí ar an urláir agus cupla sean chotaí ar a mhullach. Bhí a gcuid biadh fhéin ag cuid aca agus caithfear biadh a tabhairt do’n chuid eile.
Bíonn paidir beag aca agus seo an paidir. “God put the bad hour past you”. Bíonn chuid aca ag iarraidh uibheacha agus bíonn an chuid eile ag iarraidh pingineacha. Bíonn páistí le cuid aca agus bíonn siad ag iarraidh bainne fá na gcoinne. Bíonn sgaifte mór aca le chéile.
anonymous contributor
2021-10-26 12:10
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378
marbh in aon chor ach gur sgiobta le na daoine maithe a bhí si."Ac "ar sise "abair le'm fear má ta aon grádh aige orm teacht go dtí Lios Cathar Seircín Oidhche Samhna agus capall liath agus sgian dubh h-ánnla a breith leis .Abair leis freisin mar tiocfaidh fé dódheag a clog nách mbeidh aon maith ann.Abair leis dul go dtí an dorus na leasa agus drom an capall a cuir inaice leis agus bhuail oscleochadh an dorus dhó agus ragad abhaile leis ac ma teipfead air é sin a dhéanamh bhéidh mé ins an lios coidhche .Tháinig an oidhce ,ach do lag mhisneach ar an fhear bocht agus thá an bhean bhreag sin 'san lios fós.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:10
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Anna Ní Mheallaigh a chuir síos
Tá daoine ag dul thart ó theach go teach ag cruinnuighadh a gcuid bídh.
“Mickey the Bat” an t-ainm atá ar duine aca. “Joe Waugh” an t-ainm atá ar an fear eile. Bíonn “Mickey the Bat” ag ceannacht asla agus da ndíol arais.
Bíonn cuid eile ag díol canaí beaga agus rudaí eile agus bíonn siad ag díol “camphor” fosta. Bíonn cuid aca ag cruinnuighadh sean eadaigh agus sean bróga. Bíonn málaí móra aca agus iomchuireann siad adhbhair leabaigh ins (an) na málaí.
Bíonn na malaí deanta de leathair agus bíonn málaí saic ag cuid aca fosta.
Bíonn fáilte mór ag cuid de na daoine rompa agus druideann an chuid eile an doras ortha. Nuair a thig siad isteach i dteach ní fhanann siad i bhfhad.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:09
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Lucht Siubhal:-
Bríghid Ní Chailín a chuir síos :-
Tigeann lucht siubhal thart ag cruinnuighadh annseo go fóill. Bíonn siad thart go minic.
Na daoine ceadhna a mbíonn thart chomhair a bheith idir Samhradh as Geimhreadh. Seo na daoine a bionn’s thart :-
“Joe Swiggy” “John Mc Goldrick” “Joe Waugh” seo leas ainm siocar é bheith fanacht ag “Dannie Waugh” i mbaile na Cairraige. “Mary Magroy”, a fear as [?] Árd na Rátha “Josephine Clod”, as Connachta a mhathair. “Maggie Kill a Bumby” as Co. Mhuighéo “Hanah White” as Fear Monach. “Faic” as Connachta.
Nuair a thigeann [?] siad go dtí an doras buaileann siad é agus abruigheann siad “Dia annseo”, abruigheann na daoine istoigh “Dia is Muire dhuit”
Tigeann siad isteach annsin. Bíonn sopa pictiúirí snaithaide agus “Camphor Balls”.
Ceannuigheann na daoine rud mór uaidh idir sópa i agus rasúirí agus “camphor Balls” Geibheann siad na rudaí beaga saor agus gnídh siad praifid ionnta.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:08
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Sgéal fá fhear siubhal:-
Bhí bacach ag dul thart fad o shoin darbh ainm “Seághan Milí”. Bhíodh sé ar loistín i dtuam i dteach “Phill Den”
Bhí sé iongantach beannuighthe. Bhíodh sé ag urnaighe ar fad agus bhéadh sé ag deánamh scabail. Bí sé iongantach maith do pháistí agus bhéadh sé ar an Aifrinn ‘ach aon Domhnach.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:08
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ins na toighthe a mbíónn siad ar loistín ionnta.
Dhéan na daoine leabaidh daobhtha sa choirnéal. Bíonn siad ag iarraidh biadh le h-ithe.
Bíonn cuid acha iongantach maith ag damhsa, agus cuid eile maith ag ceól. Bíonn cuid aca ag iarraidh préataí agus bainne.
Bíonn morán sean sgealtaí ag cuid aca.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:07
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Liam Ua Domhnaill a chuir síos:-
Tigeann lucht siubhal thart o am go h-am.
Chomhair a bheith na daoine ceadhna a thigeas i gcomhnuidhe. Tigeann “John Kelly” thart go minic agus morán eile. Bíonn cuid aca ag díol blathannaí agus rudaí.
Bíonn luthgháir ar chuid de na daoine riopa. Druideann cuid eile de n-a daoine an doras ortha. Fanann siad cupla lá
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:06
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sopa. Fuair siad na rudaí seo go saor ins na siopaí. Díolann siad iad annsin agus gnídheann siad praifid beag ortha.
Bíonn fáilte ag cuid de na daoine riopa, druideann daoine eile an doras ortha.
Caithfidh tú biadh a thabhairt do chuid aca. Bíonn a gcuid bidh fhéin le cuid aca fósta. Chodhluigheann siad ins an chóirnéal ar malaí no sean rudaí mar sin.
Bíonn siad ag siubhal d’a gcos.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 12:05
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Lucht Siubhal
Éibhlin Ní Cáilin a chur síos:-
Thig lucht Siubhal go dtí an doras ag cruinnigadh báinne agus preataí agus rudaí eile.
Ní h-iad na daoine ceadhna a thig thart i gcomhnuidhe.
Tig “Mary Mc Groary” agus “Micky The Cat”, “Mac Goldrick” agus Josephine Clod. Tá “Mac Goldrick” bacach agus bíonn bata leis.
Tháinig “Mary Mc Groary” as Co. Mhuigheo.
Bíonn earraidhe le díol ag cuid aca cor uair. Bíonn “Mary Mc Groary” ag díol bláthannaí agus pictuirí. Bíonn “Joe Boyle” ag díol “camphor balls” agus
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 11:36
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with the grown ups and as they had no coppers they, usually pitched buttons of every kind.
I well remember an incident which occurred on a particular Sunday evening which furnished me with information for the following story.
It was the eve of St. John and we boys were very busy collecting fuel for the Bonfire and pitching buttons. We piled the fuel on the Rocherewey [?] cross roads and then commenced pitching. Nearly was a lot of men pitching coppers. Two of the men Jimmy Devers and Michael Mc. Donnell were disputing a halfpenny. Michael threw up the halfpenny and called out "Head". Jimmy called out "Harp" and the halfpenny fell on the road. Jimmy picked up the halfpenny and ran away with it but Michael quickly pursued him. Four of us followed the chase but were unable to keep with them we went to a very high fort
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 11:17
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Pisreoga
1/ One should' nt leave a wake house alone.
2/ One shoud'nt work in field at hay etc. at night.
3/ It is not right to cry a person for twenty minutes after death, because the soul has not left the body.
4/ Some people round here leaves a plate of boiled potatoes on the table at night for the fairies.
5/ The bridegroom brings a married woman with him to his marriage. i. e. she accompanies him in the car to the chapel where the marriage is to take place.
6/It is not lucky to break delph the day of ones wedding.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 10:49
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would be dribbling all night.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 10:49
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198 If a funeral went the nearest way round to the graveyard, it would be unlucky
199 Falling in the grave-yard is a sign that that person would be the next to die.
200 Wearing new clothes or new shoes going to a funeral is unlucky.
201 If a person died and another person wore his or her clothes, the clothes were torn the deceased would appear to some friend of that person and he or she would tell that person to tell his friend to sew the clothes if that person
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 10:49
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197. Never sell milk to a red-haired person on May Day.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 10:48
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(94) If there is a sop hanging to a hen's tail it is the sign of a funeral.
(95) If you gave away anything on May morning you would give away your luck.
(96) If you hadn't clean water in the house for the night you would be made go out for it.
(97) If there was a star in the wick of when you would light it, it would be a sign that a letter would come across the sea to you
(98) If you cut your leg with an iron you should burn the iron in the fire or if you didn't the leg would not get better.
(99) If you did not wash the cups before you went to bed you would have bad luck
(100) If you burned a piece of paper and if it did not all burn, it is a sign of a letter coming across the sea to you.
(101) If you build a house on an old path
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 10:44
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across the bog from Rathangan and it met the Coach Road at a place in the bog called the Curlews Coill.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 10:44
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The wakes around here about fifty years ago were entirely different. When a person died that time, the people of the house in which the person was dead used to pay special women called "Kenners" to lament and cry over the corpse. This lamenting was often hear a quarter of a mile from the house, and it usually lasted for about an hour.
When the corpse is waked now for a night, they coffin it next day and four men of the one name always shoulder the coffin out of the house to the church. If the house is'nt near the chapel they put the coffin in a hearse until they reach about a quarter of a mile from the chapel and then they shoulder it for the remainder of the way. When they reach the chapel the same four that shouldered it out of the house must again shoulder it into the church and graveyard.
The Banshee used also be heard about a week before certain people died, particularly by people with "o's" and "macs" by their names, but now she is'nt heard as frequently as she was years ago. At other times lights used be seen around the house which indicted the same thing.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 10:34
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bliadhain nuair a cailleadh é. Tá sé curtha i bhFionntrágha.
Máire Ní Shéaghdha, Baile Móir, Dainghean.
Thug Pádraig Ó Shéaghdha, Baile Móir, Dainghean, di é.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 10:31
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File
Do bhí file 'na cómhnuidhe in Imleach dárbh ainm Seán Mac Gearailt. Seán Phaddy an Imlig a tugtaí air. Ba ó dhúthchas a bhí an fhilidheachta aige. Tá gaolta do i mBaile Móir agus cúmann siad filídheacht leis. Do chúm sé an "Paidirín Páirteach" agus "Paddy Saucepan." Feirmeóir do b'eadh é. Tímcheall ceithre mbliadhna déag ó shoin ó cailleadh é. Bhí sé tímcheall ceithre fichead
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 10:06
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reconstruct and slate it, and Dean Mawe again reconstructed the present Chapel and added the two side transepts.
In a very old Ordinance Map of the parish of Anna there is marked in a field at a spot about 150 yards to the west of Anna Abbey and in a direct line for Thonakilla, two points are marked on the map with two Crosses and marketed Saint Keir and what these marks would mean I do not know or whether large flagstones would be buried at these points I cannot tell. This is in the field west of the Church very close to the lower boundary stone ditch.
The large rock at the Northern Point of Anna Island in known as Carra [?] an Fholair on the Eagle's rock and was said to be 50 feet high but was continuously cut down by lightning to its present level. A pair of Sea Eagles rested on its crest of old.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 09:49
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cóta air.
Freagra:-crann gabháiste
11. Muilthín bréagh a thuit le banne agus níor briseadh cnámh na cos leis
Freagra:- Seilmidhe
12 Coíleach sa ghleann agus é ag damhsa ar leath chos
Freagra:- Gusán graoigh
12 Ceárd a dhéanfas péire brog
Freagra:- Dhá bróg
14. Súidh thall ort é ní trom leat é agus tá sé ort in a dhiaidh sin
Freagra:- d'ainm
15 Cé hí an ghé bhan na an ghé donn an gandal
Freagra:- Níl ceann ar bith aca an gandal.
16 Tá sé shuas ta sé thall ta sé ag brian ar a chuidh. Tá sé thrídh an sáile leath agus gan é níl blás ar iubh
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 09:43
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Freagra:- Salann
17 Chuala me géim ar chúl chruic Meadh Ní duine agus ní beithidheach é agus níl sé beo aríamh Freagra:- leach oighre
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2021-10-26 09:41
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1. Tomháis. Teachtaire beag o theach go teach agus bíonn sí amuigh san oidhche
Freagra:- Bóthrín idir dhá theach
2. Do tháinig sé isteach ar ghuailnibh daoine agus do chuaidh sé amach in - na snáitín síoda.
Freagra:- Móin.
3. Chuaidh mé suas an boitrín thainig mé anuas an boitrín agus thugas an boitrín ar mo dhruim.
Freagra:- Dréimri
4.Boithrín soir an thaigh ar áilei ceann na gréine fear an chota dhéirg agus snaothe dearg in-a léine.
Freagra:- Glíomach
5 Molt mór teann idir dhá
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2021-10-26 09:37
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deficiency. Accordingly, any time he was asked what time was it he would proudly produce his time - piece and exhibiting the face to to the watch to his questioner, would exclaimed in surprise tones - would you ever think it was that time? Apparently, from by information, this ruse, did not work so brightly, but nevertheless, it gave an occasion to those in the know to stimulate their humourous proclivities.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 09:35
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leor bleanseóga ag fás air.
Loc géal:- mar tá go leor bric geala ann.
Loch camh:- mar tá sé cámh.
Loch na cloice:- mar tá cloch amhuigh in-a lár.
Árdáin na h aitinne. Garrda a bhfuil go leor aithinne ag fás ann.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 09:32
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Feadán sméar:- Áit a bhfuil go leor sméara dubha.
Poll mor:- Poll atá iongantach mór
Garrdha úr:- Garrdha nach bhfuil i bhfad déanta.
Gleann dubh:- Gleann a bhfuil dath dubh air.
Garrdha na bpréachán:- Garrdha a bíonns go leor preacán ann.
Garrdha dubh:- Garrdha a bhfuil spot dubh in-a lár.
Cnoc na Gualanna:- Áit a bhfuil Gualainn ar an gcnoc.
Árd na móna:- Árdán a bhfuil go leor móin air.
Ardháin na gcloch:- Árdáin a bhfuil go leor clocha air.
Poll an chonnín:- Poll a bhíonns coinníní ann.
Croch na bpleann sé óg:- Cnoch a bhfuil go
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2021-10-26 09:28
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Tráig na rón Nuair a thriomhochás an tráig sín. Bhíodh uisghe ar gach taobh dí. Bhiodh na róin ag luighe uirrti ag déanamh a sgiste.
Garrdha Thomáis:- Bhí fear in-a comhnuidhe sa ngarrdha sin darbh anam Tomás OUallacháin Fuair sé bás agis dfág sé an garrdha sin ag m-athair mór.
Poll an Muilleann:- Muilleann a bhíodh ar meilt coirce agus seagal a b ann.
Bothán Brian:- Bhí fear ann darbh b-anam dó Brian ONéill agus bhí bothán aige sa chnoc Cailleadh é agus tugadh an t ainm sin ar an mbothán.
Seann Gharrda:- Garrdha atá iongantach sean
anonymous contributor
2021-10-26 09:27
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A Story
Once there were two little boys named Jack and Billy. They were twins and they were so much alike that you would not know one from the other. They had only one suit of clothes so they could go to school every second day.
One day Billy went to school without Jack and the master asked him where was Jack that he was not at school. Billy answered that they had lost one suit of clothes and they could go to school only every second day. The master said that he could get him a suit of clothes if he answered the following three questions. "What was the weight of the moon?" "What was the depth of the sea?" and "what was in your master's mind?"
He went home and he told the story to Jack but he himself could not answer the questions. Then Jack said he knew the answer and that he would go to school the next day. When he entered the school next morning the master asked him the questions. He asked him what was the weight of the moon, and Jack said four quarters, one cwt. He asked him what was the depth of the sea, and Jack said the throw of a stone, because when a stone is thrown in, it goes to the bottom and that is the depth of it. He asked him what was in his master's mind, and Jack replies, "Oh, it's well I know what is in my
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 09:24
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it three times and 15 Paters, Aves and Glories. Then you kneel on the between the rock and well and say 5 paters, 5 Aves and 5 Glorias. Then you come over to well proper again and go around of the water and if you like bring some of it home to use. When the the station (i.e. 3 visits) is completed you look to see a bubbling in the well or maybe you might be fortunate enough to see the trout. which would be a sure sign that your request would be a granted. Mrs Naughton of Pouladowhay still comes to this well and performs the station. Some people leave a bit of nag etc behind us pail of the station. Which would be a sure sign that your request would be granted. Mrs. Nowghton of Pouladowhy still comes to this well and performs the station.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 09:24
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[-]
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2021-10-26 09:23
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Croch na h-ailba móra;- mar tá ált mor ann
bogach,- mar tá go leor bogach ann.
Pháirc mhór;- mar tá páirc mhór ann.
Cabi Árdán na cairine;- mar tá goleor caibineacha ann.
Garrdha bán. mar is féar uilig atá ag fád ann
Píosa phaitín; mar ba le fear dar b-ainm Paitín Ó Gallcobhair é.
Píosa mór, mar is píosa mór leathan átá ann.
Clochán: mar tá goleor clocha agus go leor cupóga ann.
Bárr an ghob; mar tá gob mór ag sineadh amach ann.
Árdán na h-aitinne. mar tá go leor aitinn ag fás ann.
Nochla :- mar is gharrdha beag atá ann.
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2021-10-26 09:18
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Árdán Pháidín, mar is ag fiar dar b-ainm Páidín O Maidín a bhí sé.
Árdán na gcearc:- mar bhíodh goleor cearca ar an árdán sin fadó.
Garrdhá na slat, mar bhíodh goleor slata móra ag fás ann.
Garrdha na bplanndaí:- cabaiste ag fás
Árdán na gCloc; mar tá goleor clocha ar an árdán sin.
Árdán na pháighe; mar bhíodh daoine ag cur fiamainn agus múirín amach ar an árdán sin agus ghá measgadh le na chéile agus dhá chur amach ar an árdán sin mar leás.
Árdán na gclocha gearrtha:- mar bhíodh daoine ag gearradh clocha agus ag déanamh tighthe móra dótha
Creog na ndaoine marbh, mar bítear ag marbh daoine annsin fadó
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 09:13
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[-]
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2021-10-26 09:11
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1 Ní thagann ciall roimg an aois.
2 Ná bris reacht is ná déan reacht.
3 Mol an óige is tiocfaidh sí.
4 Is glas iad ná cnuic i bhfad uaim.
5 Cuir smacht ar do leanbh in a óige.
6 Dubhairt bean liom gur dhubhairt bean leí, glór mór i gceann beag.
7 Is milis an rud an t-anam.
8 Is goire ceabhar Dia ná an doras
9 Bíonn ceann caol ar an óige.
10 Is fearr éan amháin ar bhois na dhá cheann ar tor.
11 Ní fearr biadh' ná ciall.
12 Bíodh faitchíos ort agus ní baoghal duit.
anonymous contributor
2021-10-26 09:07
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in Arkinagap carded and wove and knitted his stockings.
The children had to bring a penny and a sod of turf for which they were taught calculations Writing geography and singing. They had no maps and the geography was mainly local. This Mr. Furlong was from Knocksham rock and was very old. He was succeeded by a teacher named John Toole son of Mat Toole who lived in a little thatched house at the cross roads at Knockananna where Foleys now have a grove. There was a little path that went to the school and it is still used as a Mass pathe. The pupils who attended Mr. Furlongs school were Mr. Reilly, Bridget Byrne, Pat Graham who was Miss Grahams (now over 80) father Ellen McSweeney Bridget Whelan and Nicholas Connor who was a grandfather of the compiler of this note book. Mr. Furlong had six pupils and Mr. Tool had five or seven she was not sure as to the number.
anonymous contributor
2021-10-26 09:06
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Hedge Schools
Heard from Mrs. Thos. O'Reilly Hacketstown formerly Ellen O Driscoll Higginstown now called Ardnaboy, Knockananna. She was born in 1847 and her father was born in 1799 and he told her about the old school in Knockananna. He was a stone breaker by trade. It was situated where Mr. O'Keefes old house was and was made of wood and stone and was thatched. Wooden bloacks were used to write upon. The teachers name was Furlong and he wore a gray jackett and a knee briches with brass buttons down the side and had a silk bow at the knees. He also wore a pair of steel grey stockings and a pair of black shoes with large buckles at the toe. Sometimes he wore a frieze coat lined with red plaid while a woollen hat completed his outfit. Led Carton made his clothes and Pat Byrne known as Pat the hatter from Arkinagay made his hats while Anna Byrne who was a sister of Pat the Slough who taught
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2021-10-26 02:22
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Who was it? That all the world was at his funeral. He was born before his father, christened before his mother and had the virginity of his grandmother. Ans, Abel.
The beginning of eternity the end of time and space the beginning of every end and the end of every place? Ans. The letter E.
As I went to Mallow I saw a great wonder two pots boiling and no fire under? Ans. Two pots of lime.
A boat went down the Blackwatere full of people and there was not a single person in it? Ans They were all married.
What is the most dangerous time of the year?
Ans. Spring, because the [?] about the bullrush is out and all the buds are shooting.
Where do the bad soles go? Ans. To the cobblers shop to be mended.
What are four impossible things to get?
Ans A boot for the foot of a mountain, a sheet for the bed of the ocean, a tooth for the mouth of the Blackwater and a towel to wipe the face of the earth.
What is it that walks on four legs in the morning on two legs in the middle of the day and on three legs in the evening?
Ans. Man because he walks on his hands and knees in the morning of life and he walks on his two feet in the middle of life and with a crutch in his old age.
What is it? That all men bring first to life.
The poor man has the rich despise,
The miser spends the spendthrift saves
And all men carry to their graves? Ans Nothing.
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 00:26
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There were the remains of an old mill - but no one could understand how a mill worked on the beach + what power drove it. More likely it was a landing stage. The channels in Barrow Harbour is full of drift sand and the position of the channel or deep water course varies from year to year, so a few landing stages might be necessary.
Light boats must have been coming in to this harbour as it is shallow + very dangerous + no boat could enter except near high water.
The surrounding country of limestone formations is full of caves and it is said the smuggled goods were transferred to these + left there until opportunity offered to take them quietly away.
One man Michael McCarthy (71) a nature of Barrow, farmer, told me how he was one day in their own land. He was with his grandfather who was digging potatoes near a fence and suddenly his spade went right down to a cave. They cleared away the clay + opened it up to find it contained a lot of stuff like Snuff. The grandfather said then "Ah my boy I know what it is. That is a bundle of
senior member (history)
2021-10-26 00:13
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Tradition says that there was a strong chain connecting this castle with Barrow Castle on the opposite shore so as to prevent all boats coming in or going out unknown to the occupants of the Castle. The chain had to be lowered by an official of either castle before a ship could enter or leave.
Barrow Castle on the opposite headland is a circular building about twelve feet high now with door and roof. It was once much higher - it fell on got Tom [?] + the stones were drawn. It appears both were erected at the same time and for a similar purpose, although they are as much unlike as anything could be.
On the Barrow side of the inlet at a place called the Randy - probably derived from "Rendez-vous" of the French smugglers or [?] , There is still the remains of an old pier made of large flags of stone now covered with sand.
Another landing stage seemed to have been standing on the Fenit Island side farther in from the Castle
Timothy Flokerly (now dead) + owner of a farm in the island remembered as a young lad helping to up-root strong oak piles whose stumps were standing on the beach. He du them up with his father who told him that
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 23:38
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The castle a squarely built, standing on the verge of the sea about half a mile inside the mouth of the inlet to Chapeltown strand. The corners are all built of cut stone and the windows are V shaped in the interior and built also of cut stone. There are still three corners standing and the castle is at present 50 feet in height. The walls are about [?] feet thick and a stone stairs leads to the top storey. Only half one arch which upheld the lower floor is still intact. It originally seemed [?] have had [?] apartments in height as projections in the wall would [?]. It was built of stone of the land on which it stands.
One corner - the South East - is gone from about 3 feet from the ground - the masonry is still lying where it fell, large pieces of it still intact showing it was well built. Local tradition says it was fired at by Cromwell's guns - but there is no record of this. It was always an English garrison + why should Cromwell attack it. The most likely is that an explosion occurred or it was tried to blow it up as no other part of the Castle is injured save that corner. The explosive must have been placed where the stairs began as three feet of the bottom wall is still standing. The mortar used is as lame and sand in the construction.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 23:26
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Illustrated Map for the Story
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2021-10-25 23:26
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Cúl - back of head, or long hair
Spág - big foal or big hand
Spágach - a nickname
Smig - a little beard on man or goat
Pluc - fat cheeks are usually called "PLUCKS"
Gob - a big ugly mouth
Clab - a big ugly mouth or a wide-open laughing mouth
Pus - sulky-looking: pus-ing = sulking
Guth - too talkative

Smuis = smush - an ugly face - "I'd like to break his SMUSH"
"If you were to see the old SMUSH of her!"

Glúineach - swelling and pain in the knee
Fuileach-folach (full-uck) - swelling and pain in wrist
Fultac, fuilteach - soreness at the quick of nail

Oidhreacht (eye-rickt) chafing of the skin from cold or rough clothes

Minéarach - min-air-uck - a disease in children, liverish
Gág - cracks in hands or feet - "gawgs"
Pucall nó Piocall - a baggy appearance under the chin
Glug - noise made in swallowing liquid
Slug - Swallowing noisily
Plac - devouring food - usually said "plocking food"
Gamóg - a great plentiness of food
Mada - ( a big mada - very commonly applied to brazen girl)

a "Diana" - a spoiled petted girl or a delicate girl
- was applied to a weakly delicate animal
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 23:24
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A grádh mo chroidhe
A Chroidhe
A Chuisle
A Chuid - Boy, a Chuid" - an expression = oh dear
A Chuid mo Croidhe
A Stór
A Mhic
A Mhuirnín - ( V. sound )
A Leanbh
A Leanbh mo Chroidhe
A Leanbh Bocht
A Cíonadh ( a queen-oo )

Pánaidhe or Pánaigh a nickname or a little stout woman
Am - lach (am-lack) = harmless - without "depth"

A Mhuire 's Truagh = Oh, my sorrow!
Och baca fada, OR bócha fada = ditto
Go deo, go deo = ditto

Scáileán - a little bit of girl miserable-looking
Gug - silly
Onch - a bad-tempered person
Báirreach - scolding woman
Sudóg - a soft harmless chap
Bléinreach - said to a baby by old Granny
Gall or Goll - "The Goll" A nickname on a girl still alive
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 23:23
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Dalta - a big girl: a foolish p. - used kindly
Slímhín - (shlieve-eén) a sly mean person
Seóinín - undue leaning for English
Bailgín - a stout stumpy man
Brighleóg - (brill-y-eog) - a stout little lively man

Bonnrach - a little plump child
Bunróg - ditto
Sumachán - ditto

Buachaill - a "go" boy - oh! that's "himself)
Cailín
Gasún - (gossoon) - garsún
Dócairín - a crabbed person
Pusacán - a sulky person

Slis - (1) an untidy person - "slissh-ing" along
- (2) big long feet

Gáileach - (1) the eldest son
(2) nick-name - the "Gáileach Farrell" died 1925
Greim Gáileach - a feast for the first-born son

Glinc - a lad whose brain is "touched"
Maithreach - good-looking person
Gruamdhach - (grummack) of gloomy countenance
Luiméarach - (limb-air-ack) a long thin person
Lúbán - awkwardly shaped = in a lúbán
Lug nó Log - ignorant
Cleite - light-headed - feather-headed

Blostarach - a strong lump of a chap
Bloscach - ditto
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 23:22
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Saying, "Ocón mo brón, my Ellie, I won't live another year."
Who should be there in faces gay, When all around were sad, Jim Naughton and his lassy, They did not look so bad, He says "My Dearest Mary, Our youthful days are spent, Prepare and we'll get married, At Easter after Lent."
Next and there God bless the pair, Comes Macky and his dear, At the Laune side he sits his bride, Upon his sword of green, And whispers slyly in her ear, The air of "Cathleen."
Another chap we can't surpass, His talk would turn a mill, He coaxed the Nurse's servant, And her name was Nancy Till, It's at the gate each night he waits, By the people I am told, Until the hour of twelve o'clock.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 23:17
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Cahill indeed you wanted a feed To fill your long stomach with all you could get
But he don't seem to care
About our smiles in Puck Fair
Light hearted and airy he's still going about
He don't care where he'll lodge
If he only could cadge
A good bite of meat or a stomach of stout.
Who's the lazy one
Fat and an asy one
That tramps along by the side of Jeraeem
But she only have got
To look into the pot
They call her that maiden Nora Batheen
Next on the race
Mike Brien's pointed face
With his tie full of drippin and land
Long he remains for a toothless old maid
Who washes the rashers in Flenty's back yard.
Moll Riordan's place
Is next on place
And patie plats on beside
He swears so loud
Of her he's proud
And say's she'll surely be his bride
"It will be fine
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 23:13
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The first I will start a nice Skellig's list
The next man I mention is bold Paddy Brien He have an old hat it is like a boraun
He is mad and distract after Maggie Curnane The next comes Jen Healy, a tall slender stalk He goes to the gate every night for a walk To see Elen Evans who once was a nun But lost her vocation Jer's bride to become. Next comes Pats Curney a stump of a batch He keeps in his pocket a ten-penny watch He courted a maiden and a fair [?] seas And her name is Main Shea from Gorthleen Eross.
O Cahill comes then with a horrible grin He look so black and his face look so old He never will find or pick up any kind Either a maid or old woman for love or for gold But he hides in the nook watching Blainer's old cook
He chucks up his collar and calls her his pet
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 23:03
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There is a certain fort in Ballymacprior and a certain farmer used to see a hare in it.
One day he got his greyhounds and went to the fort and chased the hare, but he did not succeed in catching it. The hare used to lie down until the hounds were up to it then it would get up and run ahead of the dogs. This it did several times for about a fortnight. One day at the end of that time the hounds were too fast for the hare, and one of the dogs took a bite out of the hare's thigh.
When the farmer saw the hare escape it he gave up all hopes of catching it.
When the farmer was going hunting another day he chanced to pass by the fort and he saw a man come from the place the hare used to come from. The farmer began to talk to the stranger about hunting. The farmer began to tell the stranger about the great hunt he had after the hare and how the dog took a bite out of its thigh. The stranger said that he was the hare and he showed the farmer the sign of the bite in his thigh.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:55
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In the year 1866 the Fenian Brotherhood (many of whom were known personally to the author of this tale) mustered their forces in Cahirciveen and set out by road to Killarney. Armed with rifles they came to Kylemore and were joined there by the Kylemore Boys who had already taken the "Stage House" (then a government building) at Kells. On the way they met Father McGinn who blessed them. They then proceeded to Kells, where they met a man on horseback. They ordered him to halt, but he refused and spurred on his horse to get away. Two shots were fired at him but they missed. A third man, who himself had no gun, snapped a rifle and took aim wounding the horseman just as he rounded the corner of the road. The Fenians searched him and found a paper containing all their names and other information which he was taking to the Red Coats in Cahirciveen. They took him to a house on the roadside and sent for a priest. They also got a nurse from Killorglin, Mrs. Hogan, who dressed his wounds. The dispatch rider, whose name was Duggan, was only one of the spies. He was in league with two others, Sullivan and Moriarty.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:54
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There are two kinds of churns, namely, the barrel churn, and the dash churn. The dash churn is made up of four parts namely, the timber, and the dasher, the cover, and the claibin.
Our churn was made in the year 1930, and it is eight years old now. When my mother is making the churn, she scalds the churn first, then she puts the milk into the churn, and makes the churn by striking the dasher up and down until the butter comes in the churn.
When the churn is nearly made, small grains of butter come on the top of the milk. When the churn is made she takes the butter out, and washes the buttermilk out of it, then she salts some of it. She gives some of the milk to the calves, and she keeps more of it to make the bread.
Sometimes when people are making a churn, the butter never comes in the churn. Long ago, a woman was making a churn, and a strange woman came in, and she struck no stroke in the churn, and no butter came into it.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:51
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1. A part of a rainbow in the sky in the morning called the "dog".
2. Grey clouds in the sky in the morning.
3. The sun covered with black clouds.
4. The halo around the moon at night.
5. The thrush and blackbird coming very near to the house.
6. The cat near the fire.
7. The dog eating grass.
8. The sun hidden in the heavens, and a white cloud around it.
9. A copper coloured sky.
10. If a star ran too near the moon.
11. The smoke coming down the chimney.
12. Blue light in the fire.
13. Soot falling down the chimney.
14. The ants with the wings on the road.
15. The gad fly on the cattle.
16. The rocks shining.
17. The fords of the rivers making a loud noise.
18. The wind from the south-west.
19. High tides.
20. The swallows flying low.
21. The seagulls flocking into the dry land.
The sign for a storm, was a rainbow on a Saturday evening.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:45
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There was a mason there long ago and they called him Seán Long. He lived in a little hut all alone. One night it got late and he went to bed. As he was lying in bed it was getting later and fairies came in and started to dance and enjoy themselves. When it got late in the night they said they would be leaving. They got a saucer on the flag of the fire-place with ointment in it. They stood round the fire-place one by one and anointed their foreheads with it at the same time putting on a red cap saying "I picked up all my crumbs and touched nothing with my thumbs" up the chimney they went until the last one anointed himself saying at the same time If Seán Long would rise he would surely win the prize. Seán jumped out of the bed with his night shirt and saw a red cap near the fire place. He put it on saying at the same time "I picked up all my crumbs touched nothing with my thumbs" high over to England. He went into a public house through a key hole and they drank all
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:41
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240 If there is a burning in the house it is a sign of a marriage or a removal.
241 If salt is borrowed it is said to be very unlucky to return it.
242 It is said to be very lucky to fold paper money on the length, as it makes it go longer.
243 On May morning all the farmers let out their cows at three o'clock and the first to have all his cows in a field is said to be going to have a very lucky year.
244 If you meet sheep on the road, and if you touched wood, you may be expecting very good luck, but if you meet pigs it is a sign of very bad luck.
245 If you looked at the new moon over your right shoulder you would have very good luck
246 If you winked at a sweep you would have good luck.
247 If you get a stray black cat you will have good luck.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:36
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224 If a cat looked at you after washing his face, people say you would die soon.
225 It is unlucky for a cow to calve in June.
226 If a baby was born with a veil on his head, a captain of a ship would be glad to get it, because if he had it his ship would never sink.
227 If your nose was itchy, someone would be talking badly about you.
228 People say if there are three people buried on the same day, the last corpse brought to the graveyard must mind the gate until the next corpse arrives
229 You should not open a grave on a Monday.
anonymous contributor
2021-10-25 22:35
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awaiting decision
One night when my grandfather was living in Gorilas his father had a white horse. So one night when it was snowing they went to the field for the horse and she was not to be found anywhere. Then they went looking for her and they could not find her. It was about twelve o'clock in the night and the people's feet were getting cold because they had no shoes but lopeens made from ropes and rags. They returned home and they
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:34
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rejected
awaiting decision
217 If you crossed the road when a funeral is passing, you would be the next to die.
218 A person getting married should never wear black.
219 If two people were going to be buried on the same day, the last person to be buried would be minding the gate of the graveyard until another person dies.
220 If you went to a well for water on Christmas night, you would find wine instead of water
221 If you were sick in bed, it would be wrong to look at yourself in a mirror
222 A person should never get married on a Friday
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:31
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211 It is very unlucky to meet a "foxy" haired woman early in the day.
211 It is supposed to be unlucky to give a needle for a loan to anyone without putting a stitch of thread into it.
212 If you borrowed a bucket of clay, the person to who you gave it would die within a month.
213 If you held an umbrella over your head in a house, your hair wouldn't grow any more
214 The night a person is dying a horse bearing a headless man and a coach passes his house and that is called "The Headless Coach."
215 It is very unlucky to go into
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:30
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rejected
awaiting decision
would be dribbling all night.
211 It is very unlucky to meet a "foxy" haired woman early in the day.
211 It is supposed to be unlucky to give a needle for a loan to anyone without putting a stitch of thread into it.
212 If you borrowed a bucket of clay, the person to who you gave it would die within a month.
213 If you held an umbrella over your head in a house, your hair wouldn't grow any more
214 The night a person is dying a horse bearing a headless man and a coach passes his house and that is called "The Headless Coach."
215 It is very unlucky to go into
anonymous contributor
2021-10-25 22:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the mountain. Cúm an Aipreann, where Mass was said in the open. Daile-na-h-Eaglaise is now a graveyard, and while many eminent men are buried there, we hear of a Captain Lúgán, who was the first laid to rest there. At that time coffins were not in vogue, his body was swathed and bound with súgáns and placed in the grave. It was alleged that his captain Súgún was a highway man and many of is exploits took place on the then public road which passed through Egan's farm in Tahilla.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:27
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awaiting decision
did not sew the clothes, the deceased would appear again and again until the clothes would b mended
202 Meeting a dead person on the road would mean that that person would want to take you to the next world with him.
203 If a fork fell on the floor, a gentleman is sure to come in the door; and if a knife fell a lady.
204 Seeing a full moon through glass is unlucky.
205 Coming home from a wake is not right
206 If you gave away anything on May Day you would give away your luck.
207 If a person broke a mirror he or she would have seven years bad luck.
208 Long ago it was believed that if a person cut his or her hair on Monday, it would never grow again
209 If two persons died on the same day and if one funeral was after the other, the second corpse
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:21
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197. Never sell milk to a red-haired person on May Day.
198 If a funeral went the nearest way round to the graveyard, it would be unlucky
199 Falling in the grave-yard is a sign that that person would be the next to die.
200 Wearing new clothes or new shoes going to a funeral is unlucky.
201 If a person died and another person wore his or her clothes, the clothes were torn the deceased would appear to some friend of that person and he or she would tell that person to tell his friend to sew the clothes if that person
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:17
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136 If a person sneezes before breakfast on Monday, he will get a letter; on Tuesday, he will get something better; on Wednesday, he will sneeze for danger; on Thursday, he will meet a stranger.
(137) You should never bring an old cat into a new house.
138 You should never look at the new moon through glass or you will have bad luck for that month.
(139) If you sing before breakfast you will cry before supper.
(140) If your right hand is itchy you should rub it to wood and you would get something good; rub it to leather and you would get something better.
(141) When the youngest child in the house dies the mother should not go to the funeral.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:15
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(128) It is not right to kill a white hare in a fort.
129 If you cut your hair on Friday night you will have bad luck.
(130) It is unlucky for a wedding partly to meet a funeral or to have an accident.
(131) If a picture falls off the wall and the glass is not broken it is a sign a person is going to die.
(132) It is unlucky to bring white thorn into a house.
(133) It is not right to take a short cut with a funeral
(134) It is unlucky to put a dirty cup on the dresser at night.
(135) If a person saw a white horse and then rubbed his hands to a pole he would have good luck the next day
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:07
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rejected
awaiting decision
make him come out of the bed and throw it out
(117) If the left of one's nose is itchy there is somebody talking badly about them
(118) If two hens are fighting there are visitors coming
119 If you have steel in your person the fairies cannot harm you.
(120) It is bad to kill a hare in a fort.
(121) It is unlucky to burn a deck of cards.
(122) When the first child dies it should be buried in the nearest graveyard.
(123) It is not lucky to build a house on a passage in a fort.
(124) It is not right to take a new grave for a young member of the family.
(125) It is unlucky to meet a red-haired woman first thing in the morning.
(126) A black cat is supposed to be lucky, but if a person turns it away from the door the person will have bad luck for twelve years.
(127) It is considered unlucky to put a pair of boots up on a table.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 22:02
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awaiting decision
the fairies would be living in the house by night
(102) It is very unlucky to bring flowers into the house on May morning.
(103) It is not right to stay out late on the night of all Saints?
(104) You should not go out on Christmas Day except to go to Mass.
(105) If a man died in the house you should sell the horse or if you did not you would have bad luck.
(106) If you were dreaming about the dead you would hear of the living; if you were dreaming about the living you would hear of the dead.
(107) If a woman gave eggs for hatching she should give a penny for luck.
(108) If a person gave a hen away she is supposed to give away her luck
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:59
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awaiting decision
(94) If there is a [?] hanging to a hen's tail it is the sign of a funeral.
(95) If you gave away anything on May morning you would give away your luck.
(96) If you hadn't clean water in the house for the night you would be made go out for it.
(97) If there was a star in the wick of when you would light it, it would be a sign that a letter would come across the sea to you
(98) If you cut your leg with an iron you should burn the iron in the fire or if you didn't the leg would not get better.
(99) If you did not wash the cups before you went to bed you would have bad luck
(100) If you burned a piece of paper and if it did not all burn, it is a sign of a letter coming across the sea to you.
(101) If you build a house on an old path
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:55
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rejected
awaiting decision
before the year is up.
(88) The last one buried in a church yard is supposed to mind the churchyard until someone else is buried there.
(89) If you dream of the dead, you will get news from the living
(90) If you dream of your mother, you will get bad news; if you dream of your father, you will get good news
(91) It is not right to enter a new house empty-handed.
(92) It is not right to let a baby look through a mirror until it is six months old.
(93) It is not right to push a baby's pram without the baby being in it
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:53
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awaiting decision
thing together they are supposed to live another year.
(82) If you are walking the road by night you are supposed to walk in the middle of the road because otherwise you might be falling against the fairies that are near the fences.
(83) The person who gets up the first in the morning is supposed to go to bed the first one that night, otherwise he would have bad luck.
(84) If you saw a black cat the first thing in the morning you are supposed not to go to bed until you see another black cat that same night or else you would have bad luck for life
(85) To hear a bell ringing in one's ears you are supposed to die before the year is up
(86) When two are getting married, whichever one of them goes out of the church the first is supposed to be the first to die.
(87) If two people are walking along the road and if another comes and walks between them it is a sign that the two people will be separated.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:49
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awaiting decision
(69) If a person got killed out-of-doors, the person who would find the corpse should never carry it to his own house, because they say if he did somebody would soon die out of that persons house.
(70) When a person dies thirteen candles are lit in the room, and then one is quenched to show that one is dead
(71) You should never show a child a funeral.
(72) You should never cut a child's nail until it is three months old.
(73) A pair that get married should never go to mass the first Sunday after getting married.
(74) You should never come from a wake alone.
(75) You should stop the clocks in the house when a person dies.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:31
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rejected
awaiting decision
13 An rud a sgríobhanns an phuca leigheann sé feín é.
14 Is minic a bhíons an tádh ar an duine a bhíons ag ól.
15 Níl fhios ag fádh ná ag file. cé acu is fearr an luas na an [?]
16 Ní théigheann teas thar feocadh, ach teigeann cosanáirde ar sodar
17 Muilin déan deifir.
18 Tá breach san fhairrge chomh maith agus ceapadh go fóill.
19 Cleamhnas na cairnille, ná cáiris crbista bfhad o bhaile.
20 Tá leath domhan n-dhiaidh an bhean - ruadh, tá an domhan i leig i leir n dhiaidh an bhean bhán agus is minic a cheapanns an bhean dubh in fear is féarr.
21 Is fuirist a ghul thart lé teach
anonymous contributor
2021-10-25 21:25
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awaiting decision
bhás ná scaoil an tríomhadh snaidhm. Do dhein Tadhg mar a dubhairt an bhen leis. Nuair a scrios sé Oileán na gCánóg dubhairt sé ná raghad sé abhaile go dtí go mbeadh fhios aige cé'n bun a bhí leis an tríomhadh snaidhm. Do chuaidh a bheirt páirtithe bog is cruaidh air gan é dhéanamh. Dubhradar go rabhadar buidheach go leór mar gheall ar an méid de'n bhfarraige a bhí curtha dhíobh acu. Nuair a chas sé isteach i Góilín do scaoil sé an tríomhadh snaidhm i n-aimhndheóin na bpáirtithe. Do shéid an gala is mó a shéid ó shoin, agus do stracadh na seolta agus do briseadh an crann, agus do caitheadh isteach i n-Oileán beag an bád.
Ar feadh dhá mhíle tímcheall an Góilín níor fhág an gála coc féir ná díon ar thig gan reabadh. B'shin an turas dereannach a thug Tadhg Rábach i n-a bhád.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:24
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As what we called Mc Enna' dream.
But quite contrary to my wish
The strong was there the weak to crush,
With rifles and buck-shot supplied
Which they received with Bourish pride,
To follow up the bloody game.
Of making law trangressors tame
3rd)
'Twas after long an silent pause
I asked a man what was the cause
Of this commotion and display
Or would it be a battle day
He answered you must understand
We occupiers of the land
Upon this day alas! quoth he
Served with ejectments we will be
To have us from the homes expelled
Where hitherto our fathers dwelled
And where in infancy we were objects of paternal care
I asked him was there any chance,
Of curbing the police advance
Or were they free to domineer
Without check or obstruction there
Said he that question all depends
Upon the strength of land league friends
4)
But if they come prepared and strong
They will resist the men of wrong
We were discoursing thus when lo
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:22
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awaiting decision
mhadhaidh gan fhiacal.
22 Ní hé lá na gaotha la na sgolb.
23 Is aith an mac an saoghal
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:20
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rejected
awaiting decision
In our district, we hear many stories from the past of the sufferings endured by the priests and people to preserve the faith and to attend the holy sacrifice of the Mass. Baile na h-Eaglaise, Cúm an Aifreann, Dún Cille all in Tahilla district, remind us of those days of hardship. Baile na h-Eaglaise, town of the Church in the old days, it was the home of ecclesiastics. Owing to the vigilance and cruelty of the soldiers, desirous to crush the religion, the priests were forced to hide in the mountains. In Baile na h-Eaglaise, there is an underground tunnel which extends to Dunquil, where the priests resided and built their altars. In time of great danger, the people who attended Mass, were forced to take shelter here for days. When it was known that the soldiers were not in the immediate vicinity, the priests and people climbed
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:18
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rejected
awaiting decision
Ardár na gcloca géarrtu. Tá gó leor cloca géarrtha ar ar an ardan.
Poll bán. Poll mór is ead é lé piosa bán tálamh ins lár.
Poll na mbroc. Bhíodh go leor buac ag teach anuis go dtí an áit fódó ag íte fatai cuilé sórt.
Péadar mór o ginelláe. táinig sé as duithéaga agus chuir sé faoí ar an árdan. Sin é an fath in dtugtur ardan peadar air.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:15
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awaiting decision
Long ago there was a an old woman living in a little hut in Drongawn. She was a widow and had three sons. At that time Cromwell's soldiers were fighting in Ireland. There was an Island near her hut and its still there. There were stepping stones going into the Island. The name of the Island is Oileán na Gcraobh. This widow had a pot of gold and she was afraid of invasion. To protect themselves from Cromwells soldiers
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:12
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
Garrdha fartaig. Mar ba le fear darb ainm fart [?] ag an garra.
Árdán na haitin. Ta gó leor aitin ag fás an an árdan sín.
Bogac. Talamh boghach is eadh an talamh sín.
Cúl n Árdán. Tá an áit ar thaobh árdán.
Árdán Pheadar, bale Pheadar Mór an árdán fadó
Pollán na Phuca. Deirtear ga raibh ann.
Bárr na h Aibhne. Tá an áit ag bárr abhainn.
Poll na gcat. Bí go leor cait ann fadó
Carraig glas. Carraig Mór Glas is eadh é.
Poll Mór Poll mór ís eadh an áit
Pullan na Raithní. Ta go leor raithní ag fas ann.
Cnoc na h-ailte móra. Tá aill mhór ins an cnoc.
Loch ard. Tá an loc sin suas go h-ard sa cnoc
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:05
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rejected
awaiting decision
As gob na h-Áirde do beadh é.
Árdán na n-easóg:- Mar bhí sé lán le h-easóig
Árdán Mhícheál Seoighthe:- Mar bhíodh teine bréagh cnámh ar an árdán si chuile oidhche Fhéil San Seáin ag Mícheál Seoighthe.
Léana bháire. Mar bhíodh go leor gasúr ag imirt baire ann.
Lagrach:- Mar bhí lagrach bréaghtha doimhin idir na cnocáin.
Currach dearh:- Bogach dearg a bhí ann agus glaodhadh currach dearh air. Mar b'shin nádúr an talamh.
Bárr na h-aibhne:- Tugtar an t-ainm sin air mar bhí uisge na h-aibhne ag teacht amach as Loch Árd.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 21:04
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rejected
awaiting decision
Do chómhnuig bean i mBaile Mhúirne fado tímpeall ceád agus a triochadh bliain ó shion agus bean ana aérach ab'eadh í leis.
Bhíodh gach lá ag obair go dían agus ní raibh puinn rudaí in-aon-chor le deánamh ach do bhíodh rud éigin aice á dhéanamh aice i gcómhnuidhe Bhíodh na daoine go léir ag magadh fé'n bhean san i gcómhnuidhe.
Bhíodh sí i na suidhe tímpeall a leath h-uair tar-éis a cúig nú uaireannta roimh eiríghe gréine agus bhíodh na daoine á rádh ná raibh aon chiall ag an bhean ach do bhí go deimhin agus ansan do taghadh na daoine dhá bhfiosarúghadh úaireannta.
Do bhí an bhean san pósta leis agus do bhí tig breágh cómhnuighthe aice ar feadh a shaoghal go léir.
Bhíodh sí gach lá ag dul ó áit go h-áit agus do téigheadh sí ó lios go lios leis ar feadh cuid mhaith de'n aimhsir leis.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:57
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awaiting decision
Garrdha dubh. - Mar ní raibh sé abálta dada fhás agus bhí sé dubh.
Curach Mór. Mar sé an rud a bhí ann curach bhogaig agus ní raibh tada curtha ann fadó.
Garrdha Pháidín:- Mar fear a raibh Páidín air a bhris istosach í. Páidín Ó Caothlín as Cnoc na Ceasach do beadh é.
Garrdha bán:- Garrdha nach raibh tada curtha ariamh ann agus bhí sé cineáil ban.
Malaidh. Mar talamh righte atá ann.
Alt na Uaigh mhóire:- Áit a bhfuil uaigh mhór ag teacht isteach ó'n fhairrge.
Árdán Mór:- Mar árdán breagh mór a bhí ann agus deir na sean daoine go raibh taidhbhsigh ann.
Árdán Sheáin Aoidh Ó Caiticín. Mar bhí a chuid móin gearrtha uilig ar an árdán san aige.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:56
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awaiting decision
béich. Do bhíod sgeal ag na sean daoine faoi sin. Do rith ganndal ina dhíaid tailliúir uair amháin thosuig an tailliúir ag béichead agus dubairt "Is lúachmhar an t-anamh. Sin
é an fáth a tughadh tailliúir air. Sean-fhochal a dtaobh táilliúir "Níl i tailliúir ach an naomhad cuidh dfear."
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:56
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awaiting decision
Dúbhairt sé gur thug na daoine a bhí istigh san tigh tabhairne an beath-uisge go léir do gan aon airgead agus do bhí sí sasta leí féin ansan.
Cúpla neomantaí na dhiaidh sin do thuith an fhear marbh agus ní raibh sé marbh in aon-chor ach ag leogant air agus do ceap an bhean go raibh sé marbh.
Do chuaidh sí amach agus do dhein sí poll mór san gairdin a bhí amuch an doras agus do cuir sí é isteach ann agus do bhí ana bhron uirthe agus dubhairt sí go raghad sí síos leis do osgail sí an poll airís agus do chuaidh sí isteach agus do dhun sí an poll airis agus do fuair sí marbh istigh ann agus níl a thuille mar geall ortha ó shoin.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:56
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awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:55
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awaiting decision
Garrdha dubh. - Mar tú raibh se abálta dada fhás agus bhí sé dubh.
Curach Mór. Mar sé an rud a bhí ann curach bhogaig agus ní raivh tada curtha ann fadó.
Garrdha Pháidín:- Mar fear a raibh Páidín air a bhris istosach í. Páidín Ó Caothlín as Cnoc na Ceasach do beadh é.
Garrdha bán:- Garrdha nach raibh tada curtha ariamh ann agus bhí sé cineáil ban.
Malaidh. Mar talamh righte atá ann.
Alt na Uaigh mhóire:- Áit a bhfuil uaigh mhór ag teacht isteach ó'n fhairrge.
Árdán Mór:- Mar árdán breagh mór a bhí ann agus deir na sean daoine go raibh taidhbhsigh ann.
Árdán Sheáin Aoidh Ó Caiticín. Mar bhí a chuid móin gearrtha uilig ar an árdán san aige.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:49
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awaiting decision
I live in Rossmore, it is an Island and there about nine houses in it and each one has a farm. There are many old stories told about the Island and there are names for fields and Cnocéns there. There is also a holy well in the Island it is in the south side of our farm. This well is there thousands of years and it is there yet and the water in it is fresh although the sea flows in to it. It is said that a horse with a priest on his back jumped from the Overside about three miles across and that he landed near this well on the rock. The sign of his hooves were to be seen on the rock for years but after a time the sea wore it away. When the priest landed he said Mass over the well and it is said he blessed the water, and very often people go to take a drink of the water. This well never goes dry.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ansan dúbhairt sé leó gur dhearmhadh sé an t-airgid d'fhághaint i n-a dhiaidh agus do labhair an bhean leis ansan "airiú cá bhfuaris an t-airgid go léir i gcóir an beath-uisge go léir.
Do bhí sé ar buille ansan agus ní dúbhairt sé aon rud leí in-aon-chor mar is dócha go raibh eagla air. Bhíodh na daoine go léir ag maghadh fé leis agus ní h-aon ionghnadh go raibh leis ach do bhí leis.
Ansan bhíodar go léir ag magadh fé ar feadh na h-aimsire sin. Ní raibh focal ag teacht aoinne ansan ach do bhí fearg ar gach aon duine.
Nuair a bhí geall leis leath úair a cluig caitte do thosnuig an fear a bhuille nú an fear a bhí ar meisge ag bualadh gach duine a bhí ann.
Ansan do thosnuig gach aoinne a bhí ann ag maghadh fé'n bhfear ach ní raibh aon mhaith dhóíbh ann mar do bhí sé ró mhaith dhóibh ar fadh
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:46
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awaiting decision
I ngach paróiste beagnach bíonn tailliúir no do ann. Teigheann cuid acu tart o theach go teac agus fanann cuid eile in a tigthe féin ag obair. Triúr tailliúir atá ins an
ceanntar seo anois. Bhí beirt no triúr ann fadó freisin agus nuair a bhí culaith éadaige ag teastáil ó duine do theighead sé go dtí teac an táilliúra leis. San bord a súidheadh an táilliúir i gchomhnuidh nuair do bhíod se fúagáil.
Ní raibh aon inneall acu san amh sin ach ag obair lé anathaid agus snáth. Bí méarachán a bhí acu freisin agus do bhi sé an-mór agus doimhin. Déanamh an táilliúir culaith eadaig san amh sin ar sé sgilleacha ach anois íocheann síad púnt ar culaith eadaigh.
Tugad táilliúir ar na táilliúirí mar an brígh céadhna ata ar liúir agus
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:43
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awaiting decision
the three brothers dug a cave down in to the middle of Oileán na Gcraob and the widow and her three sons dwelt in it. One day she wanted to cook a meal and so she made a fire. Cromwell's soldiers were on top of Dunkilla fort which overlooks the Island and they saw the smoke. They came down and the three brothers were out in Drongawn The soldiers came on them and cut the heads of them They lay in that field until they rotted and at the present day they call it Inse na nÓganach The mother was in the Island when this happened and she knew they were coming. She threw the pot of gold into the water between Oileán na gCraobh and Drongawn and it is supposed she threw herself in afterwards.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:37
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awaiting decision
and off went the beam with the man. They passed through Munster passing over fields in every jump until they reached the Shannon. All the horses jumped the Shannon and the poor man's horse jumped after them and when he landed on the other side he said, "mo greimin é bo léim a seana béim cheáctu" As soon as he had these words said down the horse came and turned into a beam again and the man had to walk home and he was left as poor as ever.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:33
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Long ago there was a an old woman living in a little hut in Drongawn. She was a widow and had three sons. At that time Cromwell's soldiers were fighting in Ireland. There was an Island near her hut and its still there. There were stepping stones going into the Island. The name of the Island is Oileán na Gcraobh. This widow had a pot of gold and she was afraid of invasion. Top protect themselves from Cromwells soldiers
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:29
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The landlords were men who had charge over certain districts. Mr. Wardn was the landlord over this district of Letterfinish long ago. He remained in the place for about ten years. These landlord were very cruel and they used to throw the people out on the road if they did not pay their rent. There were several families evicted and they used to stay in neighbouring huts. The people used to go around gathering money for those who were evicted. When the landlord came he did not give the people time to take away their belongings, but turned them out immediately.
The landlords used to get possession of the lands by taking the cattle, sheep, pigs, horses, cows, etc. Some of the people used to have big farms, those farms used to be divided up between other farmers and each had only a very small piece of land. The landlords had tenants and they used to make them pay tithes to them, such as money and stock. There was one man in this district by the name of Michael Sheehan who was evicted.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:24
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uibheacha acu lé n-ithe ag gach béilí mar ní itheadh síad aon ubh ar feadh
an cárgais. Aoine an céastha ní ithidís aon béili go dtí do dhéag a clog. Do bhí cáca mín coirche acu annsin.
Amh Nodlag do bhíod rudhai acu cosmhail leis na rudai a bíonn
acu anois lé n-ithe.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:20
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There is one forge in this parish. The owner of that forge is pPatrick Foley. There were old people living in that forge before, it was called a forge. It was a small thatched house, but there is a slate roof on it now.
The smith makes all kinds of farm implements, such as spades, shovels, pikes, harrows and ploughs. The door of the forge is of a horse-shoe shape. There is only one fireplace in it. The smith has to keep a big fire burning in the forge so as to redden the irons. He has a bellows to blow the fire. He makes shoes for horses, mules, and donkies. Long ago the smiths used to make shoes, for cows, if they had sore feet and could not leave them on the ground.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:17
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taé isteach i gcanna ar feadh uair no leath-uair sar a ólaidís é. An céad uair a raibh taé acu ithidís na gráinne tae agus do caiteadh síad an taé amach. Do shíl síad gur sin é an caoi ceart.
Do bhíod caráisthe no glúaisteáin ag daoine ag dul thart gá díol tuairm is cuige blíadain ó shoin. Sgillingh ar púnt .
Ditidís go leór feóil san t-sean aimsear geibidís é ar trí pighinn ar púnt. Do mharbáchaidís mucha freisin agus do bhíad go leór eisg
acu freisin.
Cachai mín coirche agus cacai fathai is mo a itidís an amh sin.
Do ithidís go leór fathai freisin. Do cuiread siad isteach i críathar iad i lár an urlár. Do theighead muinntir an tige go léir thart timhcheall annsin ga n-ithe.
Domhnach an cásga do bhíad
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:16
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Long ago in the olden times our grandmothers and grandfathers had good healthy food. There wernt as many toothaches that time as there are now. They had good mixed bread and home-made oatmeal, plenty milk and fresh hake. Even they used make their candles out of tallow. They used to shape it into moulds. They split bogdeal splinters for light too. They made their own flannel, they carded the wool and spun each roll till the pin was full.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:12
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The hardships and troubles which our ancestors endured to eke out an humble existence would fill us with awe and amazement, as well as with admiration for them.
They made their livings on small farms, each containing the grass of one or two cows and a donkey for there were no horses used then in this part of the country. Of course in these small farms, there were no ploughs, but all the work was done with spades. They ground their own flour and oatmeal and also made potato cake or stampee, from raw potatoes and flour. They used to go on Strand before dawn every morning for manure and used to draw the baskets of manure long distances on their backs. They wore clothes woven by themselves from the wool of the sheep bred on the mountains.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:12
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In our district, we hear many stories from the past of the sufferings endured by the priests and people to preserve the faith and to attend the holy sacrifice of the Mass [?], [?] [?] all in Tahilla district, remind us of those days of hardship. [?], town of the Church in the old days, it was the home of ecclesiastics. Owing to the vigilance and cruelty of the soldiers, desirous to crush the religion, the priests were forced to hide in the mountains. In [?], there is an underground tunnel which extends to Dunquil, where the priests resided and built their altars. In time of great danger, the people who attended Mass, were forced to take shelter here for days when it was known that the soldiers were not in the immediate vicinity, the priests and people climbed
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:08
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Burnt briar leaves podered finely are a cure for chafed skin.
The roots of Iris boiled and pounded and applied as a plaster is a cure for sores in the head.
The inner bark of elm boiled to a jelly is a cure for burn's
The leaves of dandelion pounded and the juice strained off and drunk cures liver complaint
The outer bark of a young oak tree boiled and the juice applied to the breast of an animal that has been skinned by a collar soon brings skin on the wound.
The camomile flowers dried and boiling water poured on them is a cure for neuralgia and other nerve pains.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:08
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Many indeed are the stories told of the time when the fairies were supposed to play an important part in the lives of our forefathers. At the present day there are many story tellers who relate with great pleasure the doings of the "good people". To one of these story tellers I chanced a stray and heard the following good fair. Whether or not it is true you can use your own discretion
As this old lady was returning home from school one evening she met a lady who she mistook to be a neighbour and saluted her as such. The lady told her not to go around the road this evening but to go the nearest way she could as if she went she should meet six men. But as the old lady did not take the advice of the one who was sent to save her and as she went home she met the six men dressed in blue just as the lady explained. She, of course was frightened and blessed herself. The men all of sudden disappeared into the sky in a large blue flash of light. She
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:04
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The ancient Irish were very much given to fairy stories and many old people still believe in them.
I heard a queer fairy story from one of these old ladies, who has a firm belief that fairies existed, and who finds much pleasure in relating the stories she heard in her youth. Though I do not believe it, I will relate the story as I heard it. Early, one morning when this old lady was but a little girl, on hearing a loud noise she got up, to see if the sheep which were in an outhouse to be shorn next day, were safe. On finding the sheep safe, she stood in the doorway as the noise continued. In a level field near the house, she saw a huge ball being played, but could see nobody playing it. It was being struck by hurleys which left marks on the field.
Suddenly, the ball vanished into the and the noise ceased. On looking in another direction, she saw a little barrel being kicked down a hill
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:04
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On Hallow'een night I heard from an old man this story of a Hallow'een night many years ago. A certain farmers daughter on this night took a lantern and went out to pull a head of cabbage and make a wish. After she had done this, and was turning around to go to her home, she saw in front of her a figure cloathed in white. The girl was so frightened by this strange appearance that
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 20:00
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15. Economy is half the battle of life.
16. Well begun is half done.
17. Go to bed with the lambs and rise with the birds.
18. He who steals a pin will steal a greater thing.
19. One look before you is better than two looks behind you.
20. Never put off until to-morrow what you can do today.
21. It is too late to spare when all is spent.
22. Think twice before you speak.
23. Early to bed, and early to ruse makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.
24. Persevere to the end and you shall be saved.
25. Make hay while sun shines.
26. Truth is your fairest guiding star.
27. A friend in need is a friend indeed.
28. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
29. A blind man often runs the farthest.
30. Plough deep while sluggards sleep, and you shall have corn to sell and to keep.
31. By and by is often too easily said.
32. Virtue everywhere is true nobility.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 19:58
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San amh fadó do bíadh trí béilí acu san ló. An bricfastha an dinnéir agus an suipéir. Dithidis an bricfastha ag a deich a clog. Do bhíodh síad ag obhair ar feadh dá uair an cluig roibh an bricfasta. Dithidís an dinnéir i lár an laé agus an suipéir tuairm is a deich a clog san oidhche. Ní ólaidís mórán bainne fadó mar díolaidís ag an margad é.
Bainne bláthach an bainne is mo a ólaidís an amh sin. Nuair do bhíod an béile thart acu do crochaidís an bord leis an balla. Nuair do bhíod síad ag ithe do arís do cuiread síad an bord i lár an urlár.
Túairm is céad blíadain o shoin an céad uair a tháinig taé isteach san tír. Do cuireadh síad an
anonymous contributor
2021-10-25 19:58
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Cat is very popular game in this parish. Boys and sometimes men play the game at the cross-roads in the evening. The games is played as follows:-
1. First two stones are got. The stones are about three inches high. They are placed about 4 inches apart.
2. The cat is placed on the stones. The cat is made of stick. It varies in length, generally about four or five inches long. The ends are pointed like a pencil.
3. Then there is stick about three feet long. The player uses the stick like a leaver. As the cat is flying through the air the player shouts “ Everything, straight lines and boundaries”. This means that if the cat goes over a ditch or wall the player is not out. It means also that where ever the cat falls it must be thrown from there. The cat may be kicked towards the stone’s while it is moving. The stick is laid on top of the stones after the cat has been struck. If the cat is caught while flying through the air the person who strikes it is caught out. When the cat falls there is scramble for it. Whoever gets it tries to knock the
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 19:38
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1. A rolling stone gathers no moss.
2. A stitch in time saves nine.
3. The day of the storm is not the day for thatching the house.
4. Even the truth cannot be believed from the liar.
5. A word in court is better than a pound in purse.
6. A proverb is the wisdom of many and the wit of one.
7. A good character is better than a great fortune.
8. Custom is the plague of wise men, and the idol of fools.
9. Look before you leap.
10. Set the beggarman upon horseback and he will outride the moon.
11. Friendship multiplies joys and divides griefs.
12. Talk of the deer and he will appear.
13. Opposition is a life of trade.
14. A good run is better than a bad stand.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 19:35
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to make medicine of the Dandelion. They used to boil the leaves of it, and drink the juice of them.
The old women used to gather the pennyleaves and boil them with mutton soup, and they used to put the juice of them to any sores, or burns.
They used to cut up the chicken weeds, and mix it with grain, and they used to give it to the fowl, when they had no potatoes.
The bonicine was used for dying clothes. They used to boil the leaves, and then wash the clothes in the juice.
The dockleaves used to grow, in the gardens, and they used to destroy, the farmers' crops. The dockleaves used also be used for curing any pain.
The ribleaf is good for cuts, it is cut up with a knife, and mixed with butter.
The sally is burned in the fire, and the burned part, is blown through a quill, and put into the eye of an animal, that would have a stye in the eye. The burned sally was used long ago, to make the sign of the cross on the left shoulder, of the outer garment,
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 19:29
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It happened some time ago. There were two men living together James and John. They were to go to the strand the next morning cutting weeds for manuring the garden. They made up their minds which ever one of them would wake first would call the other. They had no clocks in the house, they were very few clocks in those days. Some time in the night John heard the call and he heard footsteps down in the kitchen. He jumped out of the bed and came down stairs but could see nobody. His brother James was still sleeping in the other room. He called him up and was surprised to find he didnt hear anything. They got ready to go to the strand as they thought it was near day-break. It could be about two oclock that time. As they were on their way to the strand John saw two teams of men in a large field near the road playing hurley. One tall man in the crowd called John to come in and play with them, this side was short a man. John refused to go in. Two men ran towards him and struck him with their hurley's but the tall man stopped them. James did not
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 19:24
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19 Never throw out the dirty water till you bring in clean water.
20 Better late than never.
21 A new broom sweeps clean.
22 The man that's landing is always mending.
23 You never miss the water until the well runs dry.
24 Smooth water runs deep.
25 It's better to be envied than pitied.
26 Cleaniness is next to godliness.
27 Every day is not rainy.
28 Every cloud has a silver lining.
29 Unity is strength.
30 A stitch in time saves nine and nine saves many.
31 A bird in your hand is better than two in a bush.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 19:21
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9 Never do anything at night that you'll be sorry for in the morning.
10 There is no place like home; if you only have a table and a chair, you know you are always welcome there.
11 Wilful waste makes woeful want.
12 For age and want save while you may, No morning sun lasts a day.
13 Look before you leap.
14 Never rise too high for fear of a fall.
15 In the want of a nail the shoe was lost. In the want of a shoe the horse was lost, All was in the want of a horse-shoe nail.
16 Time nor tide waits for no man.
17 A good beginning is half the work.
18 Never go the byroad while you go the highroad.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 19:17
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The following are some of the old sayings of the old people:-
1.
'Tis easy enough to be pleasant,
When life goes by with a song,
But the man worth while is the man who will smile,
When everything goes dead wrong.
2/
It's long lane that has no turning.
3/
A fool and his money are soon parted.
4/
Never put off till to-morrow that which you can do to-day.
5/
The old dog for the long road and the pup for the puddle.
6/
Your son is your son till he gets him a wife,
But your daughter is your daughter for the whole of her life.
7/
Better alone than in bad company.
8/
'Tis a bad wind that does not blow something good.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 16:51
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é an neomat a bheidh an focail deirineach ráidhte aige.
Do bhíodar ag teacht cómhgarach de'n bhaile fén am so. Nuair a shroiseadar an tír do tháinig an t-each breach chúcha agus dubhairt Mac an Rígh "Is breágh an t-each é sin" ar seisean "agus béarfaidh sé abhaile go dtí an pálás go breágh do sinn" ar seisean.
Do bhí sé díreach chun dul in áirde ar an gcapall ach do tháinig Sean suas cuige agus do lámhach sé é an neomat san. Do baineadh geit as mac an Rígh ach do thosnuig na daoine ag gearán mar gheall ar an gcapall breágh do mharbhúghadh, ach dubhairt mac an Rígh go raibh Seán sa Rí-Theaghlach ó rugadh é féin agus go raibh sé ana dhílis do féin, agus dá athair roimis agus go raibh fios a gnótha féin go maith aige i gcómhnaidhe.
Do bhí san go maith is ní raibh
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 16:43
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Do bhí Seán ag éisteacht leis seo feadh na h-aimsire.
Do labhair seana-préachan eile agus dubhairt "Ní bheidh sí aige ansan féin" ar seisean "Mar nuair a bheidh an féasta aca an oidhche sar a pósfar í nuair a bheidh sí ag rinnce beidh sí ana mhilítheach agus tuitfidh sí i laige ar an dtalamh." agus geoghaidh sí bás i gcionn trí lá."
"Ach an bhfuil aon leigheas ann dí ?" arsa préachán eile. "Tá" ar seisean "Cadé an leigheas é?" arsa'n préachan. "Nuair a thuitfidh sí ar an dtalamh i laige, má ritheann aoinne cúiche agus í a thógaint suas agus trí broanacha fola a dhúir ó méar tosaig a láimh clé mairfidh sí.
Ach cé aige go bhfuil an fios san?" ar seisean. "Agus má thá a fhios ag aoinne féin é agus má neosann sé d'aoinne beo é iompóchfar chun cloiche
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 16:39
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Nuair a chuala an comhursa sin leig sé air féin go raibh an oiread sin d'faitchíos air gur chaith an fear bocht eile an oidhche amuigh. Chuaidh sé féin abhaile agus é ag gáiridhe agus d'innis sé an sgéal do na comhursana go léir agus fhaid is mhair an fear bhí sé in a bhailéabhar ag na comhursana ag magadh faoi.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 16:39
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Sgéal greannmhar
Uair amháin bhí fear ag [!] bean agus ingean in a gcómhnuidhe i dteach beag. Oidhche amháin chuaidh an bhean agus an cailín ag cuairt. Nuair a bhí siad imtighthe dubhairt an fear leis féin go mbeadh féasta fatá [!] aige.
Fuair sé fataí agus chuir sé isteach ins an ngriosach iad. Tar éis tamaill thoisigh na fataí ag feadaíl. Nuair a chuala an fear na fataí ag feadaíl, tháinig faitchíos air. Chuaidh sé amach go dt[í] teach a chomursan agus dubhairt sé go raibh taidhbhse san teach aige.
Tháinig a chómursa isteach agus chuaidh sé go dtí an teine. "An an feadaíl sin a chuala tú," ar seisean. "Seadh," ar [!] an fear eile.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 16:09
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No restless wave in fury beat
Upon their rock bound lone retreat
With anxious look they scanned the bay
Whose tranquil waters round them lay.
And soon behold! a huge wild boar,
Swam swiftly to the island shore.
In haste it climbed the steep hill side.
And straightway sought the rampart wide.
Where now the moonlight faintly shone.
O'er trench and mound and walls of stone.
The stones by some strange power controlled
Were down the hillside headlong rolled.
With hastening steps, by crag and fen,
The wild boar sought the shore again
And vision strange! twas seen to take.
His burden o'er the misty lake.
The watchers in their corracks rude
With pliant oars their freight pursued.
And lo! the spoil was found upon.
Green Churchill's broad and grassy bawn.
The wondrous visions of that night,
Proclaimed to all what Heaven deemed right.
For on that Isle, traditions tell.
God willed no monk should ever dwell.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 16:03
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An island rose all bleak and bare,
The wild boar's favourite haunt was there.
No wild flowers decked its rugged sides.
No copsewood grew its slopes to hide,
No stately trees of giant form,
To wrestle with the Winter's storm.
Twas here St. Maeldoid wished to rear,
A sacred shrine surpassing fair.
Where lonely monk and Anchorite.
In hallowed prayer could oft unite,
Skilled hands the chosen site prepare,
Foundations deep are laid with care.
Night comes, the toilers home have gone
To wait to-morrows welcome drawn.
Not dreaming that the morning's sun
Shall gleam upon their work undone
A grey light steals athwart the bay
The herald of the coming day.
The Holy Abbot seeks the shore.
And gazing the calm water o'er,
A strange sight meets his wondering eyes.
That holds him mute in sad surprise
Some evil worker dared to spoil
The earth works raised by patient toil.
The stones which formed the basement wall.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 16:03
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And strangely vanished one and all,
In heath, and gorse, and dingle shade,
A long and anxious search was made
But all in vain for none could trace,
The plunderer to his hiding place.
And though the untowards event
And filled them with astonishment
The Saint undaunted bad his men,
Resume their willing toil again.
Until the shades of eventide
Fell o'er the calm lake's bosom wide.
III
When evening into night had grown.
And darkness wrapped the island home,
Saint Maeldoid sent a chosen few
To guard the Isle the long night through.
Deep stillness reigned o'er wood and wave,
And all was silent as the grave,
No sound disturbed the slumbering dells
Nor scared the wakeful sentinels;
The dewy night crept slowly on.
The mystic midnight hour had gone.
When lo! quite near a sound was heard.
And yet no wind the thicket stirred.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:58
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An island rose all bleak and bare,
The wild boar's favourite haunt was there.
No wild flowers decked its rugged sides.
No copsewood grew its slopes to hide,
No stately trees of giant form,
To wrestle with the Winter's storm.
Twas here St. Macldoid wished to rear,
A sacred shrine surpassing fair.
Where lonely monk and Anchorite.
In hallowed prayer could oft unite,
Skilled hands the chosen site prepare,
Foundations deep are laid with care.
Night comes, the toilers home have gone
To wait to-morrows welcome drawn.
Not dreaming that the morning's sun
Shall gleam upon their work undone
A grey light steals athwart the bay
The herald of the coming day.
The Holy Abbot seeks the shore.
And gazing the calm water o'er,
A strange sight meets his wondering eyes.
That holds him mute in sad surprise
Some evil worker dared to spoil
The earth works raised by patient toil.
The stones which formed the basement wall.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:53
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Dark waving woods and vales of green,
With tranquil dales and hills between,
Steep hills whose wooded summits hide
Fair Muckno's dark blue waters wide,
Here proud Mac Mahon's castle stood
In lonely Concra's sheltering wood.
Or Temple crowned the upland fair
The huntsman sought his quarry there.
Full often in the early morn,
The fearless hunter's echoing horn,
Through silent glens and woodlands rang
While from its lair the fleet hind sprang,
Tossed its proud antlers in the air.
Nor ventured long to tarry there.
By Muckno's calm and glittering bay.
The timid hind sped on its way
Through Concra wood across the vale.
To seek the heights of Annahale.
Where lingering yet the dews of night
Flashed in the early morning light.
Nor paused on wood crowned hill to view
If hounds and hunter still pursue.
II
Close by the shore where Muckno's wave,
To hill and grove reflection gave.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:47
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The most popular of all the local songs was "Sweet Mary of Lord Blayney's Demesne. It was composed by a man of this district and it describes a beautiful girl called Mary who was a housekeeper in Lord Blayney's castle. The poet was in love with her. None of the people living now can repeat it, but an uncle of mine recited three verses of it at a luncheon five years ago. Unfortunately he has passed away since then, and before we began to collect folklore so we can not get any other account of the song.
The following poem or song was written by Rev. Father Rapmund in 1892 when he was curate in Castleblayney. It explains the local legend of Muckno and the visits of the black pig.
In ancient Muckno's wide domain
The varied scenes of hill and plain,
Present a landscape bold and grand
Unrivalled in our northern land,
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:38
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Once there lived an old woman in Moyrus who was dying and she left her house to one of her daughters in America. She said that no one else was to live in the house but the daughter she left it to. When the old woman died another daughter of hers who was married came to live in the house.
A few months later a priest who was just after being ordained came to live in Moyrus during his holidays. He went for a walk one day and as he was passing the graveyard he heard a noise and he though it was a wall that fell. He looked into the graveyard and what did he see but a coffin standing up. He went to the nearest house and told the people of it about the coffin and they buried it.
It was not long until the report went around the island and the people who owned the corpse came to bury it but it was
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:37
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he came to a pump, he twisted it on, but to his horror he could not fill it. He tried to fill it in every pump, and well, and stream he came up to, but he could not.
He prayed to God for help but he could not take it off, and every time he tried to fill it the water went through it like a sieve.
One day as he was going about down-hearted he met the same old woman on the road. She asked him for a drink and he said with the greatest of pleasure Maam. He ran off to the nearest pump, twisted it on, held the bowl under it, and to his great surprise it filled.
At that moment the bowl fell of his neck and he ran back with it to the woman.
She thanked him for it and he went home a happy man.
When a person asks a thing that can be easily given in the name of God it is not right to refuse it.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:25
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rejected
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oatmeal which came from the mill after grinding was steeped in water in a crock overnight. Then it was strained and the liquid was put on in a pot over the fire and stirred until it thickened.
There was another dish called "brose". A cupful of oatmeal was placed in a bowl and boiling milk was poured over it and it was then eaten.
Long ago people eat a lot of salt herring. They put a stick through the tails of the fish and hung them up beside the fire. They eat dumplings at Hallow'een and at Christmas they eat beef. At Easter they eat a good many eggs. When the people had no milk they made a thing like milk with oaten meal and water and they called it bull-milk. The people had noggins and piggins before they had cups and they made their spoons out of cow's horns.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:19
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rejected
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The local fairs are held in towns. The nearest fair to us is Castleblayney. The fair is held every month on the first Wednesday at eleven o clock. Some times buyers go to farmers houses to buy cattle. In Castleblayney the place where the cattle are sold is called a "cow commons" and it is called the cow hill in Ballybay. There is a special street for the fowl, and the horses and pigs are sold on the main street. There is no toll to be paid on cattle in the fairs round about here, but at Christmas we pay a penny a head on the turkeys. It is paid to the town clerk. When people sell cattle they get luck money and the person who buys the calf gets the luck money. This luck money is called a "luck penny." When people sell cattle they give a luck penny about a shilling or half crown people do not give much for a pig. When the bargain made they strike the palms of their hands together to show they are agreeable. Some people spit on the luck
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:14
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measuring tape, scissors, thimble, needle and thread and a gooses. The goose is a very long smoothing iron for pressing seams too. he has a long narrow board for pressing on. The shirts are made in the homes. The shirts are made out of wool and cotton and long ago the shirts were made of linen. Long ago people scutched their own flax and spun it into thread and then they wove it into cloth. Socks and stocking are kitted in the hoes still and some people have a knitting machine. The wool is not made in the homes now but it is bought in the shops. Long ago people clipped their own sheep, they dyed it and spun it into yarn and they knitted it into stockings. There are no spinning wheels in this district now. White is the usual colour to wear on wedding days. When any body is dead people usually wear black on confirmation day children wear white for purity.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:10
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rejected
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There are no tailors in this district. Now the tailors make the clothes in their own houses but long ago the the tailor went to the houses and he stayed over night if he was not finished over night if he was not finished making the clothes. When the tailor came to a house he made clothes for all the family. Tailors nowadays stock clothes and people can pick the cloth and the tailor makes the clothes. People made their own cloth long ago. Cloth is not spun or woven locally now. People do not wear clothes now made out of such cloth. There are many different kinds of wool tweeds made into mens suits. Cotton is used for children's frocks and women's too. The tailor sat with his legs crossed on a table in a little niche or poke that was in the houses long ago. He did not take up extra space in the kitchen. The tailors thimble is different from any other thimble for it has no bottom and he sews with the side of his finger. The tailor has a
anonymous contributor
2021-10-25 15:05
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rejected
awaiting decision
367
Pishrogues.
All dirty water should be thrown out on Christmas night because it is said that all clean water is changed into wine three times on that night.it is not right to leave feet-water inside any night ,but on New Year's Night it is not right to throw it out straight but sideways because it would put whoever is out astray.
When in a graveyard it is not right to walk over a grave because the old people say you would be dead before twelve months.When bringing a mare to a stallion it is not lucky to meet a person with a fault because that fault would be in the foal.One day Austin O Brien was coming from the stallion with a mare and the first person he met was an old piper with one eye.He at once thought of the piper's fault and said "Mhuise may bad luck to you ,you blind fool how well it is you I met ."When the mare foaled ,the foal had only one eye.
If a cock crew
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:00
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rejected
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ó Baile Min.
D'ólfadh sé a léine is do glaodhadh ar bhairrile díghe.
Is dá mbeadh aige Éire go léir go gcaithfeadh sé í.
Nuair a cloisfidh na cómharsain agus muinntir Baile Mín
an triall a thugamair leó síud is ba dhóbair go raghadh a i ndéin.
Máire Ní Shéaghdha, Baile Móir, Dainghean.
Thug Pádraig Ó Shéaghdha, Baile Móir, Dainghean, di é.
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 15:00
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rejected
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they would have to send out and get one more, or send the thirteenth one home. When two are washing in the one basin they both spit in it in order that they may not quarrel. Magpies are supposed to be very unlucky. There is a rhyme which says: one for sorrow, two for joy, three for a girl, and four for a boy, five for silver, six for gold, seven for a secret, that will never be told. When a banshee is heard crying near a house it is a sign of a death. If the two horns of a rainbow are in the one townland it is the sign of a death in that townland. If you put new shoes on the table it is unlucky. "See a pin pick it up all that day you'll have good luck." Froth on a cup of tea is a sign of money. When people wash the sugar bowl it is a sign of a visitor that day. A tea leaf on a cup of tea is for a sweet heart. You are supposed to take it out and put it on the back of your hand and hit it with your other hand and say the days of the week. Whatever day it comes up you will
senior member (history)
2021-10-25 14:55
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rejected
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isteach ann in-aon-chor.
Ní bheadh an buachaill sásta agus dubhairt sé go raghadh sé isteach ann ar aon chuma agus sa deir