Number of records in editorial history: 312369 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 22:39
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Triúr dhá dtug Fionn Fuat
Cú truagh agus eac mall.
Tigearná tire nach mbéadh glic
An trí rud uis measa:-
Ag Ól an Ghloine
Ag deargadh an phíopa
a's a' leagan na drúacha go mall san oidhche
Nó h-íseal na h-uasal
ach thús seal & tiós seal
Tri Rud is measa
Teach deataighe teach gan fatai
agus leabaidh dreancaide
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 22:33
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1. A Crane standing on the bank of a river is the sign of rain.
2. When Crows are noisy storm pending.
3. When birds are flying low sign of rain.
4. Robin lamenting outside house, indication of hardship.
5. If a robin luene [?] chirping on a bough on a wet day it would be a sign the weather was to rise
Crows, pigeons, sparrows, thrushes, robins, wrens, swans, water hens, cranes, starlings, magpies are found here.
Starlings build on eaves of houses
Crows build ion trees. On the first of March the crows can be heard making great noise deciding where to build their nests.
Lark makes its best in a meadow.
Swallow builds on eaves.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 22:25
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gasúr. Níkor labair an gasúr. "Deul mise agus tusa a amadán", arsa an cigire, "cé méad é sin". "Dá amadán" arsa an bhoicín
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 22:21
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Chuaidh sgoláire bocht isteach go siopa ar an mbaile seo tráth. Chonnaic sé pota beag galanta leagtha ar an mbord agus sgríobhnóireacht air nach raibh daoinne eile ar an mbaile o ndán deanamh amach acht é fhéin. Séard a bhí air "is fearr an taobh eile de'n tom ná an taobh seo".
Chuir sé fairnéis ce'n áit a fuair siad an pota agus d'innsigheadh dhó. Chartuigh sé an taobh eile de'n tom agus fuair sé pota óir ann.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 22:17
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Ins an t-sean aimsear réabadh [?] long ar charraig atá amuig rud beag sa bhfairrge.
"Thomson", b'sin
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 22:16
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Bhí go leór óir ag Brian Ruadh agus a mhac. Líon mac Bhriain croiceann ghamhna le h-ór agus chuir sé síos i bportach e. Nuair tháinig sé abhaile thar éis an t-ór a bheirth curtha i bhfolach aige dubhairt a athair leis "Is stócach gan chéill thú. Tá an fear ag ardú Cnoc Maoilín go mbéidh an t-ór sin aige go fóill". Agus b'fhíor dó. Tháinich fear treasna an portaigh ag gearradh aithfhiorra is chrom sé síos ag níghe a chosa. Sháith sé méir a choise sa gcroiceann agus chrom sé air. Fuair sé an croiceann líonta le h-ór. Vhroch sé ar a dhruim é aguis d'fhill sé abhaile.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 21:26
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These accounts were given to me by Paddy Lynch of Roberstown.
In 1846-47 there was a great famine throughout all Ireland. In this district there were little villages about half a mile from each other and about twenty houses in each village. The cause of the famine was the failure of the potato-crop. There was plenty of wheat in the country but the people had to sell it to pay the landlords. After a while the people got sick from starvation and the hospitals weren’t able to hold all the people, so a rich man in Spandow who had a very big house turned it into a hospital.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 21:25
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herself now that March was over she would have another year to live. But March borrowed three days from April and (in) these three days were the coldest ever came, and they killed the old cow.
The "cross day" is not known in this district.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 21:23
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The farmers all try to begin to plant the potatoes before St. Patrick's day but they are never late to plant them until the crow can hide in the ash tree.
A story is told about an old cow. She was a very boastful old cow and March was to kill her. The days were cold and it rained its hardest but still it did not kill her. The last day of March came and the cow got up and ran round the field thinking to
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 21:22
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in the country and many people died with diarrhoea, cholera, and Black-fever. Those years were called black 1846-47. This account was told to me by my father and Mr Francis Farrelly, Kilbeg.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 21:20
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The people who lived through the famine and now nearly all dead, and the stories about it were handed down to the next generation. The year before the famine was a year of abundance, the potatoes were so plentiful that the people threw them in the dykes.
There were men who went to Drogheda to sell their potatoes; one of the men’s names was Owen Gaffney and another Henry Smyth. They could not get anyone to buy them and when they were coming home they threw them into the Boone. The year of the famine there came a terrible blight and the potatoes decayed. Some of them decayed before they were dug and others in pits The people died in great numbers with starvation.
Pat Brien, Mr Farrelly’s grandfather went from the Silvergate to Lough Sheehan to get two barrels of potatoes. Potatoes were very scarce and the people had to go miles before they could get any. After the famine a lot of sickness was in
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 21:12
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His mighty hand he rested them,
Upon a pitchfork handle,
His trumpet then he sounded,
To put the damned in motion”
This account was told to me by Mr Francis Farrelly Kilbeg.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 21:10
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There are two kinds of travelling folk going around this district. There are gypsies and tinkers. They are easily distinguished from each other. The gypsies go around pretending to be able to tell fortunes and stories. The tinkers go around selling small articles. Some of them are tradesmen. They make tin cans and saucepans and sell them. The gypsies go around in bands. They live in tents and vans. The wives of the tinkers go around selling the tin cans and saucepans their husbands make. The tinkers light a fire and cook their meals on the roadside. A good many travelling folk go around this district especially before fairs and they make their home about here during the summer months. The Murphy, Gavans, Romney’s and the Whites are well known about here. These travelling folk are going around since the time of the plantation of Ulster. They were put out of their homes and went around this way ever since.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 21:03
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a Lios. While the man was digging Casey was Crippled. He was in bed for sometime. He was brought one day to Shiela Rodeys and placed on a height where he had a good view of the races which were to take place. He was not long seated on there when he was thrown down the hill; and he never left his bed until he died.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 21:02
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Old Jim Curtains uncle named Casey hired a man from Mitchelstown to dig
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 21:02
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These accounts were given to me by Paddy Lynch of Robertstown.
In 1846-47 there was a great famine through out all I
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 21:01
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There is a Lios near Michael Flynn's house. One night the people that owned it were milking the cows in the field near it.
There was one cow in side in the Lios and this man went into milk her. And after a couple of minutes he was told go out. He got and went out, and he asked his comrades was it they that said it. The said that it wasn't. He went in again and he began milking the cow. And heard the same words. He caught the stool and went out.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:59
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Curtin cut a tree in it and he got struck. It is said that people were buried there. Last year there they ploughed it and when they came near the Lios they saw the graves. They were red earth on the graves and they were divided with black earth.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:58
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There is a Lios in Curtains ground, and James
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:58
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I am in my sixty-fourth year.
When this man died he was buried in Kilmainham Wood churchyard. He was my great great grand father.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:58
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There is a Lios near James Foxe's Cross in Loughananna in the parish of Kilbehenny. Mr Buckley told his men to cut the trees in the lios. They would not cut them. A Scots man was also working there and he said "Is it afraid to cut it ye are". The men said "Let you cut the first bush and we will continue." He cut it and he began to eat his shoulder. One of the work-men named Bill Fitzgerald of Coolagoranroe went for the priest. The priest came and after a while he got alright. He did not stay longer than a week in Ireland.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:57
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In olden times there were no National Schools and the only means of Education the people had was what they called hedge school masters. These men usually went around from place to place teaching in farmers’ houses and sometimes in barns and stables. Their pay was very small, some times only 2/0 a week - just what ever the poor children could afford. In Kilbeg parish there were four hedge school - masters that I know of. One was at Staholmog where a man named Marty Clarke taught. He was also a good poet. Like his fellow teachers of those times he was very poor, and could not afford to dress himself very well on his small pay. One time that he was in want of a coat he was teaching in a rich man’s house where he saw many coats hung up on the wall. This is how he asked for one :- “Is wrote in scripture,
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:55
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Lios Ard Glathair is the leading lios in Ireland because it can be seen from every other Lios. It is about twenty feet higher than the field around it. It is said that there is a castle underneath it, and the chimney is still there, but it is covered with soil. The Danes used to live in the Castle.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:53
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One night two men were coming home from Mitcheltown after a fair. A friend of theirs were dead. They went into the house and stayed there until twelve o'clock. When they were coming home they saw the dead friend behind them.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:52
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no luck at all.
Another rhyme is-:
Monday's child is fair of face,
Tuesday's child is full of grace,
Wednesday's child is full of woe,
Thursday's child has far to go,
Friday's child is loving and giving,
Saturday's child has to work hard for her living. But the child that is born on the Sabbath day
Is bonnie bright good and gay.
Friday is the luckiest day to begin ploughing or sowing.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:52
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light over him. He disappeared. Some thing cold was laid on his shoulder. The man fainted and he fell into the fire Assana and got killed.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:51
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Where the Sheep river flows past Barrett's Wood a woman used to be heard beetling clothes very often. She was called the "Beetling Woman". There was a round stone on the bank of the river opposite the corner of the wood and a sheet used to be seen wrapped round the stone, also a candle lighted there in the night. One night a man crossed over the stone round which the sheet was wrapped. He went astray going home that night and could not get home until morning.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:50
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One night a man was going home from a neighbour's house. And he made a short cut through fields. As he was going through the fields heard a whistle and he answered it back because he thought it was his brother. When he came near his own house he saw a big man and he crushed him against the ditch. The other man roared and his father heard him. But when he reached the spot where he lay he was dead.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:50
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Friday is the luckiest day in the week. On Friday people change from an old house to a new one. Saturday is very unlucky to change. As Saturday flitting is a short sitting.
It is also said Monday for health, Tuesday for wealth, Wednesday the best day of all, Thursday for losses, Friday for crosses and Saturday
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:49
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Another night not long afterwards a woman went to a neighbour's house for some eggs. But the woman was going to bed, so she told her come next evening. As the woman was going to bed, she looked out a the window and saw a man coming up near the gate through which the other was going. Next day she asked the woman if she saw the man, and she said she saw nobody.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:48
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The most recent storm was a blizzard and it is the only one I remember. The storm took place on the 25th February 1933 and when it was over there were to be seen drifts of snow eighteen feet high. The sheep went for shelter to the ditches and got snow bound and were covered all over. On the following morning February 26th I went out along with my father in search of the covered sheep. We started our search at 8 o’clock and by degree? we were finding them out, and after all there were only two lambs lost.
A man named Cullinan? who was going on a walk to James Clarke’s of Kilbeg about three years ago lost his way in a fog and was found dead on the following morning by Clarke.
In the year 1931 from June until the middle of December there was a terrible drought period and the people were drawing water to their cattle from June until Christmas.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:47
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Once a man who was living out near the mountain got drowned. One night some men were going to a party near by. On the way they saw a man dressed in black sitting on a stone. One of the men decided to follow him, but suddenly he disappeared.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:47
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and had to remain in bed for days.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:46
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A few years ago it happened that some neighbours wanted a house over near "Toor Cross" on the road to Burncourt. This house is called McCullip's. It is uninhabited for years. They argued over it for some time, so at length, one man made up his mind to remain in the house all night.
At midnight that night, he heard a quaint noise, and on entering the house, immediately there appeared a calf drawing a little cart.
He got an awful fright,
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:46
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You can fool all the people some of the time, you can fool some of the people all the time, but you cannot fol fool all the people all the time.
You cannot make a silk purse out iof a sow's ear.
If silk were woven and flax in gear in spite of art the bárraoileach would appear.
Always be true to thy work and word.
Be sure you are right, then go ahead.
Character is higher than intellect.
Do kind deeds every day if you can.
Education is the road to competence.
Fortune favours efforts well begun.
Good characters make good citizens.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:45
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One night a girl was coming home from a dance. It was the middle of the night. When she was coming near her own house she saw something white at a distance. She walked on until she came to her own gate. She looked back and she saw the white object jumping over a ditch. "It is a ghost" she said, and she fell on the road in fear and when she arose again the ghost was gone.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:44
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Once upon a time there was a man living near the graveyard in Killchenny. One night he was going home very late and he saw something white and he got frightened. He called his wife to open the door but she didn't hear. He stood at the door for a while and the white object vanished. After a while he went over near the graveyard and he saw a piece of a coffin and bones. He ran back to tell his wife and he saw the ghost in the yard again and it followed him up to the door and he fell down in a weakness. He was so frightened that he never went out late again.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:43
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Honest labour beareth a lovely face.
Industry is the greatest of conquerors.
Judge nothing by appearances alone.
Keep alive the spark of conscience
Laugh and the world laughs with you.
Manners adorns one's conduct.
Nothing worthy is ever lightly won.
Open minds makes observant scholars.
Poor are they who have not patience.
Quiet perseverance gains the prize.
Rise with the lark; with him to bed.
Speak correctly if you speak at all.
They think little who talk too much.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:42
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which there was no house but his own. It was very late in the night. He was about a mile from his own house, when he met a black-pig on the road. He was about to hit the pig with his whip, but it disappeared. He went on a little farther and the horse began to frighten and he was thrown out on the road. He got many cuts on his head and the horse got his leg broken. He had to stay on the road until morning, a man was passing and found him.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:42
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Honest labour beneath a lovely face.
Industry is the greatest of conquerors.
Judge nothing by appearances alone.
Keep alive the spark of conscience
Laugh and the world laughs with you.
Manners adorns one's conduct.
Nothing worthy is ever lightly won.
Open minds makes observant scholars.
Poor are they who have not patience.
Quiet perseverance gains the prize.
Rise with the lark; with him to bed.
Speak correctly if you speak at all.
They think little who talk too much.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:41
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One night as a man was coming home from a dance, he had to pass by two houses where nobody was living. Before he got tot eh first house he saw a ball of light. He went on until he came to where he saw it, and again he saw the light. He would not be let pass by a dog, that attacked him and light shone round him, and he had to turn back again and go home a different road.
One night a man was coming home from a fair, with a horse and creel, he had to go by an old road in
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:40
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One night as a man was coming home from a dance, he had to pass by two houses where nobody was living. Before he got tot eh first house he saw a ball of light. He went on until he came to where he saw it, and again he saw the light. He would not be let pass by a dog, that attacked him and light shone round him, and he had to turn back again and go home a different road.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:39
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When he got near the lios, he heard music and dance. When he got to the lios he stood and listened to the music. After a while he fell asleep. When he awoke, he was old and grey, because he had been two hundred years asleep. He lived only two days after.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:37
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Years ago there were men coming from a wake in Kiltankin. They saw four hurling matches. There were green hurleys, blue hurleys, white hurleys, and red hurleys.
The red and white hurling-men, beat the green and blue hurling-men. This happened in Phil-pots lios in Kiltankin.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:36
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wife wants a child, the child wants a nurse, the nurse wants a dog, the dog wants a bone, the bone is left alone."
The children then supply the wife, the child, the nurse, the dog and the bone.
When the bone is left alone, the person acting as the bone must leave the ring. This is continued until all the child are put of the ring.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:36
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About fifty or sixty years ago, a leipreehaun used be seen in a field near Dan Williams's wood in Kiltankin. Several people tried to catch him but he disappeared through the ground. People say that if you could catch a Leipreehaun, for they always keep a purse of gold with them you could keep it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:35
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There was a man living in Kiltankin. He was going with the fairies. Every night he had to go to a certain field where the fairies used be hurling. He had to the goals for them. During a term of seven years he was dumb.
They made him a promise that if he minded the goals well he could get a wish. His wish was that all his children would be lucky, and they were.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:34
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degrees, it is fit for churning and if it is not more water is poured in.
The dash is moved from side to side to gather the butter. When the butter is all gathered on the churn and when the milk is clear the butter is made. The butter is lifted from the churn with a strainer into a tub, and the milk is washed out of it with cold water, then there is salt mixed in it and it is washed again.
Then it is weighed into lbs, and if it is going to be sold it is prepared with butter paper.
Churns are generally three feet long and two feet wide at the top and bottom. There is a churn in my Grannie's. The sides
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:31
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Mary Mac Gowan lived in it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:31
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1. There is a forth in Mrs Mollaghan's field of Forosa, and there are fairies in it.
Some years ago there were laps of hay taken out of James McGoldrick's of Forosa, and was got in Mrs Mollaghan's forth.
2. There were fairies seen in a field on our farm, near our house. They were seen about ten years ago. On one occasion a little man was seen wearing a green coat, and a tall red hat. He was carrying a very small spade in one hand, and a little green bucket in the other.
3. At Forosa cross-roads a witch is often seen by many people having the form of a hare. This witch is supposed to have been a woman whose name was Essie Manning. It is said that she lived in a little hut near the cross-roads, and she used to make poteen. The priests used to warn her and tell her quit making it, but she would not.
So when she
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:30
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There is a churn at home. It is about ten years of age. It is three and a half feet high and three feet wide at the top and two and a half feet at the bottom. The parts of it are, the crib, the body, the lid, the dash, the cup.
There is a cut in the side of the churn, for the lid to go down on it. Butter is made twice a week in Summer and once a week in Winter. If a stranger came in and churning going on, he would take a brash of the churn, lest he would bring the butter with him.
The churning would be finished in an hour in Summer, and in Winter boiling water is poured in, and it is tested with a Therometer and if it is sixty
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:27
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She builds her nest with hay and moss and hair. The crow lays four eggs. The magpie five or six eggs which are white in colour.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:27
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The most common birds in the district are the crow, the magpie, the blackbird, the robin. The crow builds her nest in a high ash tree. The magpie builds her nest in a hawthorn bush. The blackbird builds her nest in a whin. She builds her nest with hay, moss, and clay. The robin builds her nest in the side of a mossy ditch
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:25
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About here travelling folk are called basket-men.
The travelling folk sell combs, laces, needles, and glasses. They go about walking and some of them go on bicycles. Some of them sell the making of clothes. They are called peddlers. They sell cloth for suits, or womens coats. The bask men sell collar-pins, shirt-buttons, and tie pins. They are not very poor. There are different kinds of travelling folk, some of them sell tins. They are called tinsmith or tinkers.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:25
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where it meets the main road. From here the old road lay in line with the present day road until at Morgans of Lisnabuntry it cuts away into the hills and appears again at Lynches of Enagh.
Its line from this was along the present day road till at Ardlow school it goes away into the country and eventually coming out at and passing the stone wall it again joins the main road at Carnalynch.
From here it is the same as the main road until at Pigeons Brae it takes a direct line to the left to Bailieborough entering the town at the national schools
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:24
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Well in Reilly's land in Barraugh. There is a cure for warts at it.
There is a holy Well in Drumshanbo in the bog. It is a round hole. There are cures for warts at it. The visits are made on Monday, Thursday and Friday.
There was a holy Well in Mc Garry's fields and it was closed ten years ago.
There is a Holy Well in Payten's land, there is a cure in it.
The Well is like a pot, it is covered with a big flag.
There is a Holy Well in Paddy Mulvey's field.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 20:22
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There is a Holy Well in Bawn in Tom Quinn's land. It is a stone with a hollow in it. It is said that Saint Patrick knelt there and left the track of his knee.
There are cures for warts at it. Anyone has warts go there and they are cured. You have to make three visits to the well and put a pin in the well or something. The visits are made on Monday, Thursday, and Friday.
Story connected with the well.
One day Saint Patrick went into a house in Bawn and asked for food. The woman of the house began to cook a meal for him. It was a dog she cooked, she gave this to Saint Patrick to eat. But the minute Saint Patrick touched it, the dog leaped off the table and began to bark. The woman followed Saint Patrick and it is said that he fell and left the track of his knee where the holy well is now.
There is a holy Well in James McKeon's field it is believed that Saint Patrick blessed it.
There is a Holy
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 18:50
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Long ago, in most country houses, the fire used to be on the hearth-stone.
The ashes used be piled in a heap, on one side. This ashes contained red embers. It was a custom to roast potatoes in this ashes. Potatoes, cooked in this way, were called 'Casts'.
Eggs were cooked in the same manner. A roasted egg was called a " [?]"
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 18:43
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Tanning
In Ireland long ago people tanned the skins of dogs. The skins were steeped in hot lime for two days to take off the hair. Then alum and oak water were used to damp it. Then it was left dry. This was used to make footballs. Bryan McSweeney of Glenamuckla was able to make footballs from dog skins.
Whips
Whips were made from four pieces of flax woven together. Some whips were composed of rushes.
Nails
Nails were made from rod iron. The rod iron was heated, and from three to six nails were made from each heating. John Hickey of Taur was a nailer.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 18:39
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Thatching was a local custom in this area long ago. Convenient to every farm house a haggard was preserved for the growing of twigs. These twigs were made into scallops. The twigs were pointed at both ends. The roof was put on the house and then a sod was put on the roof.
The sod was sewn with a very strong needle to the tiobhán, and then the thatch was put on the sod, the thatch was fastened to the sod with scallops. The thatch was put on in bays about 1ft 4ins wide. It is ridged on the top with three rows of scallops, when the bays were finished off. Then the thatch was cut and made level on the eave of the house with a thatching knife.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 18:34
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When the flax was pulled, it was left on the ground to bleach. Then it was made into sheaves and steeped in a pool of water. After a few weeks it was taken out and dried. Then it was pounded with a round stick to weaken the fibre. Then it was cloven with a cloving tongs. It was cloven so that the flax could be easily made into sciotins to be wound into thread.
Then it was hackled to separate the good flax from the broken flax. It was then cloven secondly, it was then made into scoitins. Then it was spun with a linen wheel, this wheel was worked by the foot then it was sent to the weaver to be made into linen. Shirts and towels were made from this linen.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 18:34
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Long ago there were a lot of Landlords. Some of them were very cruel to their tenants. When some of the people were not able to pay the rent they were turned out of their houses.
The name of the landlord which owned the land of Creeher was McGivor. He lived in a small house in Creeher.
Landlords usually lived in big houses in their own lands. Some of the poor people were not able to pay the big rents which the landlords put upon
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 18:24
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them and they had to go away to other countries or some of the old people went to the County Home.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 18:19
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a good night - feasting, drinking, singing, dancing etc returned home in the morning. It often happened that there was a skirmish during the procedure. The fortune or the greater portion was paid over to the young man or to the father during the night.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 18:12
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60 (Contd)
They usually took with them a large bottle of whiskey. The man of the house on admitting them, was duly entertained, and after some healths being drunk the message was delivered. The man - father or brother of the girl - usually told them that he would send a messenger with with answer in a few days. This procedure was called the asking & if it became known it was on everyone's lips that Mary or Bridget so & so was asked.
The answer being in the affirmative a night was arranged to settle marriage arrangements fortune etc might be fixed. This was usually done in some public house in local town. The fortune - supper, day of wedding etc were arranged. It often happened that a match was broken for five pounds in the fortune business.
Everything arranged, the supper night arrived. The girl was not supposed to appear in public during the procedure.
The young man took with him a group of his brawny friends all men, ten or twelve or perhaps more & after spending
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 18:09
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to school there and the shelf where the books were kept may still be seen. (a bole in the wall like a window which had been built up)
Mr. James Rothwell's mother was taught there. He says Mrs. Conor was poor and had only six or seven pupils. She was probably a local lady and some families went to her. She depended on her pupils for food etc and she used go home with different children every evening and stay till bed-time so as to get her meals in the different houses.
Her school furniture consisted of a desk which was the "body of an old asse's cart) and round that she instructed her children.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 18:03
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Ruins are not very important as they were all dwelling-houses of locals.
Interesting items are (a) "The Robbers Cave" on John's Hill: (b) "The Nine Stones" marking graves on the way to Mt. Leinster. (c) The ruins (only a heap of stones) of a castle said to be originally on the top of Mt. Leinster. (d) The "Cup and Saucer" two large stones - one supporting the other at the beginning of the River Clody near Mt. Leinster. (e) Aileen's castle (just a mound) in Clonmullen and the other castle to which she fled beside the hose of Master B. Hall-Dare near Bunclody. (f) The remains of an old graveyard in Rothwells field in Kilbranish near Mt. Leinster - nothing remaining but mounds and stones which bear neither marks nor writing. (g) Another graveyard like that in also in Kilbranish near the bridge at Kilbranish N.S. (h) Parts of the wall remaining ( at the end of the "Long Lane" in Barnahask) - of the local school where some of the local people were taught by a lady Mrs. Conor in years gone by. Nobody remembers it but old people heard their grandparents saying they went
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 17:56
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nowadays as in the days of yore even poteen was brewed locally.
Turf is not cut much now but timber and "bushes" (whins) and "sceacs" (sceach) are used as fuel with the addition of some coal.
Rabbits abound in the district and are trapped and ferrited for sale in Bunclody.
Wells are most uncommon but springs in the hills cause constant streams of water directed quite closely to all the houses so that a constant supply is always available even in the Summer.
Water supply is also used to drive machinery for grinding oats, pulping turnips, churning and even blowing the "fanners" (bellows).
Slates are got in the local slate-quarry of Glaslacken but are of a poor, soft, quality and weather easily. They were used more formerly than they are now.
"Aileen Aroon" is said to have lived in Clonmullen a townland near Barnahask. The story of Aileen Aroon is written further on in the book.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 17:50
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Barnahask is a townland about two miles from Bunclody in Co. Carlow.
It is on the top of a hill, about six hundred feet above sea-level while the "town" (Bunclody) is about one hundred and twelve feet above sea-level. John's Hill opposite Barnahask is roughly one thousand feet above sea level and the Blackstairs Mts. are not more than three miles away by road.
It is a stormy wind-swept place and trees afford little shelter. The soil is good but large granite rocks and stones and dotted over most of the fields and hinder tillage.
Sheep-rearing is very largely carried out as the hills afford suitable pasture for them.
Barley is the chief grain crop grown and the farmers finding a good market for both these live rather comfortably and eat well but porter etc are not drunk as much
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 17:46
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A good many of the practices which I am about to narrate, are not now carried out, but were until quite recently.
When a young man, was about to be married he usually had a certain girl in his eye. He felt his way with the parents of the girl & perhaps with brothers, until he was he was fairly sure of his ground.
He then made known his intentions either directly or through some friend to his parents - if alive - or to his brothers & sisters if he had such. If he had no parent or anyone, he had a free hand & there was no need for consultation. Sometimes it happened that the parents or brothers or sisters blocked the course of procedure and caused endless trouble. However assuming that everything was alright two friends were selected to go to the house of the young girl. They usually went there at a late hour and after all having to rest, so that in case of disappointment the public would not be aware of the fact.
over
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 17:39
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There is an old barn in the townland of Maghernakill in our parish which still stands in perfect condition. In it a hedge school-master named McArdle taught as late as the year 1850. Broomfield School which I attend was built in
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 17:39
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the year 1848 when the famine raged in the country. The railway line from Dundalk to Castleblayney was being laid at this time and the poor famine-starved people availed of the work offered in order to make a little money - and very little they got for this labour too.
Many works of public utility were undertaken during the years of the famine. Braes were cut and in many instances the labourers got about four pence a day. Several houses still stand where stirrabout or porridge was doled out to the starving peasantry and some are known even to-day as "Stirrabout Houses"
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 17:23
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fairy asked Parra for a rope, with which to carry off his corn, but Parra refused to give the fairy a rope. Then the fairy went to the ditch and made a thumb rope. He spread out the thumb rope, and gathered in all the oats that both had cut.
Parra and the fairy then fell out, and they hammered and beat each other over the field. When morning came there was one ridge cut and two standing (the two that the fairy had cut down)
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 17:20
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Tobairín Domhnaigh
(Old name for Maghernakill) probably the well was laid down on a Sunday.

Poll Eislin (Eibhlin)
is a well in Mr Matt Connolly's farm in Tullyvara.

Ballin Átha and Balla na Cip

Greann na mBoc (Granniboc)
It is said that Rory McMahon had a deer park there around the year 1690. Rory held the pass near Áth Clochán (near the Cuingler's Bridge (Repeal Bridge) and charged Cíos at this pass. The place is called Balla Cíosa and it goes round Upper Box.

A story is told about a boy called Parra Jondie who was shearing oats with a hook long ago at this place - Áth Clochán - The oats grew in ridges. One night Parra was cutting the oats, when a fairy came up to him and offered to cut two ridges for Parra's one, on condition that Parra would give him all the oats he'd be able to carry off with him in the morning. At cock-crow the little fellow said he'd have to go. The
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 17:11
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Donaghmoyne church. The McMahon's surrounded the church on St. Patrick's Day.
The O'Neills were beaten.

POLL na MUICE

GLEANN na gCORP - near Donaghmoyne Church.

CÚL A CLAMPAR (rout)
where the Englsih defeated the McMahons.

Baile Lurgan - the old name for Castleblayney

MÓIN a GLEANN - Moneyglen

Locha Beannachar (Cliffs)
Castleblayney lakes - old name

TURCAR = Tuaisceart

DISCEART - ( a townland near Manann Bridge )

TUAIDH - Tooey North probably a boundary of Farney.

BAILE CAPALL
the old name for the present townland of Carrickalisnanarney near Ashburton N.S., Culloville.

LEIM an FHIR MIRE
is a name of a rock in the townland of Carrickalisnanarney.

SPELLIC na LEIMNIGH - (a cliff near Tray)

LIOS SHLUAIGH DANANN
a fort in Aughrim near Culloville)
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 16:57
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Cerr was the daughter of a chieftain from Donaghmoyne. (The feast of Cerr occurs on the 5th of February)

TOBAR LASAR (flame)
Manann was a druid and challenged St. Patrick to test which God was most powerful. It is said that Manann brought on darkness. St. Patrick stuck his crozier in the ground, prayed and dispelled the darkness. It is said that when the saint pulled his crozier up out of the ground a well sprang up.
There are two little hills in the vicinity of this well viz. Manann Mór and Mannan Beag.

Mannan Castle is now a National Monument. It is said that a man named Doonan, about five hundred years ago offered to build a castle for the English on this mound. The local chieftains however did not relish this idea and so a local chieftain stole up and cleaved the head off Doonan.

Battle of Donaghmoyne
In the year 1508 a battle was fought at
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 16:32
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There once lived an old army officer named Captain Boylan. He had a beautiful Mansion surrounded by big grounds in Hilltown about five miles from Drogheda.
It is said that when Captain Boylan was dying his last words were, "O Hilltown, Hilltown, How can I leave you. Heaven is nice but Hilltown is nicer".
When Captain Boylan was dead his ghost was seen opening and closing the gates for the men with the carts coming in. Then he would go into the stables and see that the men would feed and put the horses up.
At last the men were so terrified that none of them would do their work. So a priest was sent for and he said a small hut should be built. When it was made the priest said some prayers and cast Captain Boylan's spirit into it.
The hut to this day is to be seen in the wood a short distance from the Mansion.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 16:31
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There once lived an old army officer named Captain Boylan. He had a beautiful Mansion surrounded by bid grounds in Hilltown about five miles from Drogheda.
It is said that when Captain Boylan was dying his last words were, "O Hilltown, Hilltown, How can I leave you. Heaven is nice but Hilltown is nicer".
When Captain Boylan was dead his ghost was seen opening and closing the gates for the men with the carts coming in. Then he would go into the stables and see that the men would feed and put the horses up.
At last the men were so terrified that none of them would do their work. So a priest was sent for and he said a small hut should be built. When it was made the priest said some prayers and cast Captain Boylan's spirit into it.
The hut to this day is to be seen in the wood a short distance from the Mansion.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 16:24
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to her and he asked her would she leave the light on in the room and would he call down in the night and see if she was alright. But she would not allow him to do this.
When the butler wakened in the morning he put on his clothes and went down to the bedroom as fast as he could.
What he saw nearly made him faint. She had been dragged out of the room and killed and her body was burned to a cinder. After this the room was sealed up again.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 16:20
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In an old big mansion there lived two old ladies who loved their house very much. When they died they did not want to leave the mansion and their spirits were often seen in it after.
A priest was called and he commanded the spirits to go into the bedroom where the two old ladies used to sleep. When the spirits were in the room he got men to seal up the room.
The niece of one of the old ladies came over from America with her husband to live in the house. She was a curious woman and she wanted the room that was sealed up to be opened as she wanted to sleep in it.
The butler told her that it would be dangerous to open the room. But she did not mind him and ordered the room to be opened up and a bed put in it.
This was done and one night she went into the room to sleep in it. The butler was afraid something would happen to happen
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:59
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One day three men met and one of them was supposed to be very brave.
So the two men made a bet with the brave man that he wouldn't go into the Donore churchyard and stick a fork in the middle of the churchyard at twelve o'clock at night and show that he was in the churchyard.
So that night the man took a fork and went to the churchyard to stick the fork in the middle of it.
He did so and when he went to leave he found that something was holding the tails of his overcoat.
He was afraid to look round as he thought he would see a ghost holding his tails. He fainted and when the men found him in the morning they saw that he had stuck the fork in the tails of his overcoat and that was what was holding him.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:53
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Behind the Present Protestant Church in Mary St. are the ruins of a Catholic Monastery which Cromwell the English invader knocked down when he besieged Drogheda.
An order of monks named the Carmelites were living in the monastery when Cromwell attacked the town.
There is a tunnel leading from the ruins and it passes under the river and on until it reaches Monasterboice.
It is supposed that the monks dug it in case they had to make an escape if the monastery was attacked.
In a field at the bottom of Cromwells Mount lies a large round stone below which Cromwell is supposed to have buried his treasure.
Underneath the steps leading down from the graveyard to Mary St. a bishop was buried and that is why the steps were put there.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:51
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Behind the Present Protestant Church in Mary St. are the ruins of a Catholic Monastery which Cromwell the English invader knocked down when he beseiged Drogheda.
An order of monks named the Carmelites were living in the monastery when Cromwell attacked the town.
There is a tunnel leading from the ruins and it passes under the river and on until it reaches Monasterboice.
It is supposed that the monks dug it in case they had to make an escape if the monastery was attacked.
In a field at the bottom of Cromwells Mount lies a large round stone below which Cromwell is supposed to have buried his treasure.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:50
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are, at present, two parishes in South Leitrim namely Upper Drumreilly and Lower Drumreilly. They were formed in comparatively recent years.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:49
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with each other.
Now for a different view. Some people say that Tobar Bóee means the well my Hugh or of my dear Hugh and that it was St. Aidan who established the school and monastery at Clerhán. "Aidan" means little Hugh. He (Aidan) was a Breffni saint. He was born in Templeport (Co. Cavan). He was called also Mogue (Mo Aod' Og) Muh - ee-óg or my little Hugh. If this is correct, then Tobar B óee would be called afther him and Inishmagrath Island (in Lake Allen) too, might bear his name for it could be "Inis Mogue React" or the "Island of Mogue's Order", Now, it is likely enough that this view is correct as some maintain that Fahey (the graveyard) means Hugh's foundation also that Yugan (Electoral Division) means "little Hugh".
Aiden certainly belonged to Breffni. He always erected his buildings in lakes or near them. It is believed he was born in Templeport parish, which was once called "Drumreilly Parish". Ballinagleragh was known in the past as "Lower Drumreilly". As we know there
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:43
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When I was living at Cappagh in Dunleer my mother used to tell us that the big house in Corlis Road was haunted.
One day I was going past the Avenue gates of the big house when I heard a great noise behind me.
I looked round quickly and what do you think was behind me but a big coach being pulled by two headless horses and on top of the coach was a headless coachman driving the horses.
The coach went in the Avenue gates and came out the other gates and then disappeared.
I ran home as quick as I could and then I fainted.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:42
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Ballinagleragh means the home of the clerics. It got the name in the early ages because the saintly bishop Bó-ee founded (some think) a great school or seat of learning there in the sixth century. The great edifice was near the well (Tobar Bó-ee) in the townland of Clerhán. Clerhán was the land belonging to the schools and monastery. Hundreds of bishops and priests, it is believed, passed through that great school of Clerhán.
Ballinaglera has ever been true to its name, for it has always given many priests, brothers and nuns to the Church of Patrick. Moreover, bishops, priests, nuns and friars, in the penal days, fled to Ballinagleragh for safety.
Bishop Bó-ee was a relative of St. Asicus of Elphin. From the latter he got the famous bell 'Ceolán bó-ee', which was long preserved in a silver case in the church of Ballinagleragh.
Bó-ee was bishop of Ardcarne in Roscommon near Coolavin. We are told that Saints Bó-ee, Asicus, and Cailin of Fenagh were in constant communication
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:38
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This happened for about three days and then the master made up his mind not to take the stone away. The stone is there since and nobody ever tried to take it away.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:36
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Many years ago an old lady lived in a cottage in Hand St. and there was a big stone beside the cottage. It is still there.
The stone was said to have been thrown by Finn Mc Cual and he somewhere in the west of Ireland.
One day a man who made head-stones and monuments told his men to go with a horse and cart and bring back the big stone so that he could make a head-stone out of it.
The men went to the cottage to get the big stone but it had vanished.
The men went back and told the master what had happened. That night when one of the men was going home he saw that the stone was in it's place.
Next morning he told the master about the stone. Again the men went with the horse and cart but the stone had vanished again.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:28
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Long ago, in most country houses, the fire used to be on the heart-stone.
The ashes used be piled in a heap, on one side. This ashes contained red embers. It was a custom to roast potatoes in this ashes. Potatoes cooked in this way, were called 'casts'.
Eggs were cooked in the same manner. A roast egg was called a " {?}"
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:25
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:25
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There was a house & every night there was cardplaying in it. This man used to go every night & they played for money.
There would be arguing & bad talk going on.
This man had to walk a mile & a half home by a short cut through the "Bull track. This night a man was sitting on a stone waiting for him. They started to talk & the stranger took out a deck of cards & they started to play.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:21
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Here's to the cocks that crow in America,
Waken the people in France,
Rise in rebellion in Ireland
and make the Protestants dance.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:20
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When old women used be finished milking a cow they'd say:
"Coisreacan Dé ort" , and make the Sign of the Cross on the cow's thigh.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:18
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4. Thro' the wood and thro' the wood and their heads down
(Nails in a man' shoe)
5. A hopper of ditches
A "leaper" of thorns
A bonny brown cow
With two leather horns
( A hare)
6. Why is the earth compared with a black-board?
Beacuse people multiply on it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:15
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1. There's a goose in yonder meadow
She's of a gosling size
Anyone that buys her
Has need to be wise
She has feet in her belly
And walks upon none
She goes far from her dwelling
And seldom come home
A Ship
2. Why is a loaf on the spire of church companed with a race horse
Because it is high bred (bread)
3. It's cut in the wood
It sounds in the town
It earns its master many a crown
A Fiddle
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:14
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Monasterboice Catholic Church and all the school-children would go every Autumn through the fields gathering blackberries and then they would sell them and then they would give the money to the Priest to pay the debt on the church.
The Priest would hold a ball about a week before Christmas for the school children every year.
One Christmas I and some other children were coming home from the Blackberry Ball, as we called it at about twelve o'clock in the night.
We were near the graveyard when we heard a sound like horses trotting behind us. We looked round and saw the dead coach coming towards us.
We were terrified and we jumped into the ditch. The coach went past us and went through the graveyard gates and disappeared.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:13
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would not tell
They asked him what he would like as a present. He asked for land on which to build a church. This he got on condition that there would never be a bell put on the church. Even now there is no bell on the church.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:11
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At dances in low houses, they would sometimes let a goat fall down the chimney.
Very often, when an old man lived by himself, the chimney of his house was stuffed with a bag of hay.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:10
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succeeded in guessing the right number, the dallóg was put on some other fellow's eyes.
Pipity, popity, play me a pin.
Two used play this game. One boy would have both his fists clenched and he'd have a pin in one fist. The other boy would not know in which fist he had the pin concealed. However, He'd beign the rhyme saying:
"Pipity, popity plays me a pin
This is the house that Jack lived in
Open the door and let me in"
(A word, from the ryhme, named on each fist, alternatively)
Perhaps the pin would not be in the fist on which the word "in" fell. The other boy would hide the pin again and repeat the rhyme. The game was continued in that manner.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:09
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houses have no rent to pay. They have free light and fire and seven shillings per week for life. The tenents were selected by the clergy of both denominations.
This story is told about the burial of Lord 'Blayney. On the day of the funeral two horses were in the hearse and after going on a few yards they stood "still" and refused to go on. Two more were put "in" but it was no good and finally two more were put in but still they would not move. A priest was standing near and he said that he would get the corpse to the graveyard
He ordered the people to loose the horses out and put his pony "in". Immediately the pony moved off and the funeral was carried out.
That evening some of Lord 'Blayney's friends took the priest out for a row on Muckno Lake. They asked him how he got the hearse to move but he
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 15:03
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A dallóg used to be put on some person's eyes. A boy in the company used hold/put up so many fingers and say "Hurley, Burley, Thrumpery, Thraysey, Go to a pot and mark a daisy". Limeon Alley hunt the buck. How many horns (fingers) stand up?" The person with the dallóg used have to guess. Perhaps, he'd say 6 when there were only 2. The rhyme used to be repeated again and again, the fellow ith the dallóg having to guess each time. The dallóg used be kept on his eyes till he'd guess the right number. When he
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:57
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This really happened. When I was young I was living in Monasterboice and I used to go to Monasterboice school.
I often heard people talking about a Ghost coach. People called it the Dead Coach. They said that at the Red Gap Hill the coach would suddenly appear. It would be black all over and there would be nothing pulling it but you would hear the trampling of the horses. The coach would go terrible quietly along the Monasterboice road.
When it would reach the graveyard it would go through the gates and then it would disappear.
I would not believe this when I heard it.
At that time there was a big debt on the
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:55
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the ring used hit the boy in the centre with the rope. The boy (in centre) used make a grab to take the rope from him but he'd pass it under his legs to the next boy who used hit the boy in the centre with the rope also. The boy, from whom the boy in the centre would take the rope, used have to go into the centre of the ring then. And so the game was continued in this way for hours
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:54
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A number of boys used sit in a ring in the midde of the floor. One boy used to be in the centre. The boys in the ring, used have a short súgán. One of the boys in
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:52
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the ring used hit the boy in the centre with the rope. The boy (in centre) used make a grab to take the rope from him but he'd pass it under his legs to the next boy who used hit the boy in the centre with the rope also. The boy, from whom the boy in the centre would take the rope, used have to go into the centre of the ring then. And so the game was continued in this way for hours.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:51
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awaiting decision
He said, "If you please and God bless you and your work, I will give you one warning and that is if you can at all stay in at night because the day is for the living and the night is for the dead". With that the priest vanished'.
I have known the Priest that told me the story well.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The most famous landlord in this district was Lord 'Blayney. This country was taken of the Mac Mahons the old Irish chieftains and given to Lord 'Blayney Mac Mahons castle was partly demolished and Lord 'Blayney built a new castle which is still there.
Many people say that this occured during the time of Cromwell. Lord 'Blayney was a good landlord although a story is told concerning his burial which the old people tell to show that he was the "devil himself".
Lord 'Blayney left money to the bank to build houses for the old people who had no means of living but were respectable.
Twenty houses were built and ten were to be given to Catholics and the other ten to Protestants. The people in these
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
if there were ten people with her none of them could see the ghost except herself. She used to see him in the house too. He used to raise the bed in which she lay. None of her people could see him.
Her father went to the priest. The priest celebrated mass in the house. The spirit was still worse tormenting her. John Creamer, her father, brought another priest (Fr.Tom Mc Gauran). Fr. Tom read prayers and the girl saw the spirit getting smaller and smaller.
The priest kept on reading until the spirit got as small as a snail. Then, he put the spirit through the key-hole. The people of the house held a bottle at the other end of the key-hole and the spirit fell into it. The priest then corked the bottle and buried it.
People wondered that the spirit assumed the form of the school master.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Her father came in to the house a few minutes afterwards and she asked him where was the master? He got enraged and asked what master was she speaking about. He said he saw nobody. After sunset the girl (Anne) could not leave the house as the spirit used to accompany her.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This is a true story. Fr Ginity told me this story too. It happened near Dundalk at a lonely Church.
He said, "I was just ordained about a week, I went to see some friends. I started on my travels about 8 o'clock in the middle of Winter. It was a fine night.
When I came to the Church I heard noise. I was going along whistling and humming quite and gay. There was three gates in the front of the Catholic Church, one Big Gate and two gates, and steps going up to each.
Out stepped a Priest in a College Cloak and a prayer book in his fingers partely opened. I said, 'Good night Father'. He made me no answer, I said again, 'Good night Father'. I got no answer. I said the third time, 'Good night Father in the name of God'. He said, 'Good night Father', is it here you are Father', he said, "Hear I am for twenty years and got nobody to talk to me but yourself, I would be in Heaven only I did not say Masses I should". I said, "I will say them for you Father'.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About 50 years ago, Anne Creamer, Greaghnafarna, Dowra(now in America) was coming from school. She met, as she thought, her schoolmaster. He accompanied her to her house. She asked him to come in but he declined the offer. He said he would go down to her father who was mowing a meadow near the house.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
cutting off her finger.
The butler went to England and there was a reward offered by Mrs Harmon for saving her life. But he did not bother to come to get it. This woman lived for a few years after.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a woman whose name was Harmon and who lived in Harmon's garden. She was very rich and had many valuable jewels.
Her wish was when she would die that this particular ring that she used to always wear would not be taken off her finger. This ring was very valuable.
She had a butler and he was very clever. He decided to get the ring when she would die. A while after when she died as they thought. The night after the butler went to the church-yard and dug up the coffin. He opened the lid and tried to get the ring off her finger.
He could not get it off so he got out his pen-knife and he cut the finger off.
The woman got up out her coffin and when the butler saw this he ran as fast as he could and the woman walked home. She was only in a trance the butler saved her life by
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
town was changed.
It is from this old story that our parish and our lake Muckno, the Killarney of the North got their names.
Many people hold that at sunset one can see a "rode through the water from Mullandoe to the Demesne.
Many years ago the lower part of Muckno Lake was a swamp and was called Loch Eochta. Lord Blayneys ancestor's in order to beautify their holdings had the Fane river damed to flood this swamp. There was a road through this swamp which was used by the people around here to go to Blayney directly or to go to the Dundalk road. It is the road can be traced in the loc and around which the stories grew.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and when she got Brabaiyons away in England the first opportunity she got she killed her with a carving knife and cut up the body with a chopper. These were kept as curios in Coney Hall up to thirty-five years ago and I had them in my hand.
She put the body in a well which used to be under the kitchen floor with a large stone flag cover.
The murder was not found for some time but the police were set on the track to find missing Emile Boucher and found the remains in the well.
Margaret Skeane was arrested, found guilty and was sentenced to fifteen years penal servitude.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a book written by an English writer called the haunted house by the Boyne this story was about a murder commited in a lonely house which the author of the book thinks to be along the Boyne out side the big bridge on the Marsh and which was said by old people to be haunted.
But the house where the murder was commited is Coney Hall below morning - town. The Brabayons owned the house and the last of them lived there alone with one servant as house-keeper he spent most of his time in London and Margaret Skeane the house-keeper had things mostly to herself.
One day he brought home another maide from England called Emile Boucher a French girl.
Margaret got jealous of Emile
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 14:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
only that but the stones were vanishing after a few days of this they decided to sit up and see what was happening.
Midnight came and suddenly a black pig was seen swiming towards Mullandoe. Up he came to the wall that had been built that day and hacked at it until he had it down. He then started to swim across the lake towards Mac Mahons castle with a stone in his mouth each time. St Maeldoid took this as a sign that a church was not to be built there so he abandoned the idea. The old town of this district was at Mullandoe. But when the planters came and Lord Blayney built the castle in the Demesne the site of the old
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 13:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
while in the centre is a huge tree. In this tree hundreds of pins can be seen. This is a belief that if you stick a pin in this tree in the name of the Holy Trinity you will be cured of the toothache.
There is a wishing stone in this graveyard and anyone who sits in it for the first time will have their wish granted.
The following story is related about Mullandoe.
Many years ago St. Maeldoid and some monks decided to be build a church in Mullandoe
They procured stones and set to work. On going out each morning they discovered that there previous days work had been knocked down and not
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Our district is in the Electoral Division of Crossalare. The soil is preety(?) rich in it and little hills are evident in every direction. On most of the outstanding or highest hill, forts are to be found.
Agriculture is the main industry and the potatoes grown in our district cannot be beaten anywhere. The women of this district go in freely for rearing turkeys, geese, duck, hens and chickens. A farmer with a farm of fifteen or a less number of acres will rear
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
from two to three dozen of turkeys in addition to a dozen geese, a dozen ducks, and about twelve dozen of hens.
There are farmers in this district who sold hen eggs at eight shillings a dozen during th time of The Great War, which finished in November 1918, and some of them frequently recount this fact - though not with any wish for a recurrence of those days.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mrs Keenan of Drummonreagh has the cure of "Pains".

Peter Goodman of Tusker - who was the seventh son of the family has the cure of the evil.

Mrs Goodman of Tusker, has the cure of the sprain.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Owen McMahon (fourteen years) of Clonavogy, Broomfield - pupil at Broomfield School collected the following matter:-
Local Place Names
The Bush Field
Tom's Meadow
The Piggery
The Cowans
The Dhughog
The Barrick Field
The Parlora field
The Chimney field
The Relican field
Maggie's hill
Dork's Hill
Gallis Hill
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
this statement, for I have seen when I was a scholare at Sreenty N.S. a boat upon this lake - but only during one year. The boat belonged to Pran. (?) McCarey of Liseril.
It is said that the fairies used to play football on Ballytrain fort. An old man called Johnnie Gartlan once told a story concerning this fort. Once a man was standing in Gartlan's yard ( a house now belonging to Mrs McConnell of Ballytrain) and on hearing a shout in the direction of the fort he hissed dogs in the direction of the fort ( whence the sound emenated ). The man living in Gartlan's house (who owned the dogs) rushed out to see what was amiss and found the man outside who did the hissing - all black in the face. This latter was an Amadán ever after.

SRAITH BRADACH
(Peter McNally's meadow now belonging to Johnnie Keenan who is married to Peter McNally's sister, Emily) Sraith Bradach (thieves meadow)

Cill a Cearra
(Killahere graveyard within a mile of Ballytrain). It is thought that
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and Lisnafeadalong from Shirley.
Fr Hollan urged the building of the bridge, as some time previously a man and his wife were drowned at this spot.

LIOS na LEANBH
(Keelan's fort in Drumgorra half-way between Shercock and Carrickmacross)

Carn a Coinnsine (Con Sionnaigh) (?) in Drumgorra

Clochán Dubh (The Flower Boyle's bridge) near Ballytrain.

Poll Oncú (near Ballytrain)
Baile Tréan (Tréan - Fíonn's grandfather)
Tréan Mór grave is on the top of Corraghy Hill

Lios Ioroil (Liserril near Ballytrain)

Loch na Machaire (Sreenty Lake)
or Loch na Macroidhe (?) (youths)

It is said that the sons of the chieftain Ioroil were drowned in Loch na Macroidhe and ever since no boat has been seen on the lake. (I myself wish to contradict
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
that a bishop was killed in this spot.

There is a Tobar Giostra(?) in Dunogue

Lug a Da Doras is a cave in Terrygarvin at the lime-kiln on the Carrickmacross Shercock road.

Other local place names:-
Bean Oinseach
Ruth an Ghearrain Bhain
Rath Searran (near Magheracloone)
Rath Seachran ( in Knocknacran, Magheracloone)
Poll na gCromán (the crows) at Terrygavin

In Carrigharta there is a hill called CNOC MÓR or Contabhairt Namhaid. Scouts used to be posted on this hill in the penal times, watching lest soldiers might approach, when priest would be celebrating mass.

Re Ball na mBalla bridge above-mentioned - between Donogue and Derrylavin - this bridge was erected by the Rev. Brian Hollan, Vicar of Magheross Parish in the year 1724 when the vicar was in the 80th year of his age. Brian was a registered priest and he got the rent of two townlands Fearthagorm
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
went from the Main Guard to the priest's door and put her hand on the door, and left the blood stains on it. They painted it and the the blood came out through the paint of the door. It had to be taken down and a new door put up.
Information recieved from:-
Mrs Sweetman
1 Pedter Street
Clonmel
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
5th Jan. 1939
Local Heroes.
(Father Sheehy.)
Father Sheehy was hanged on Gallows Hill. His body was dragged by a car to the Main Guard where he was beheaded. His head was stuck on top of a spear. His sister begged for the head and would not get it. She put out her apron and by a miracle it fell into it. She
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
5th Jan. 1939,
Corrections.
1. tassels tassels tassels
2 woman's woman's
3. horse horse horse
4. house house house
5.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
wear long cloaks, and white shoes, with a suit and stockings to match.
The women used to have a bridesmaid and the men a best-man. Then after the wedding they used to have their wedding breakfast in the woman's hose and the neighbours used get an invitation to it the night before the wedding.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mollaí na Gruis
Na Srath
Ó Malaí
Para Siubhail
Na Cathmhain
Pola Coise
Carraig an Earainn
Padna
Gá Iochtra
Croc Árd

BALL na mBALLA bridge at Derrylavin - between Donogue and Derrylavin (built 1724).

There is a well at Derrylavin called TOBAR a CLARC.
The story is that a Father Clarke was pursued by yeomanry in the penal times. The priest was crossing a meadow where some men were engaged in making hay and those men covered the priest with hay to hide him from the yeomanry. The day was very hot and after the yeomanry passed the men were thirsty, so the priest stuck his stick in the ground and a spring came up. (As a matter of fact many springs are found in that spot.)

LOG an EASPUIG
The bishop's hollow, is in the townland of Taplagh - convenient to Jonny McGahon's house. It is said
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
24th Nov. 1938.
Local Marriage Customs.
In olden times the people used not get married in the month of May or on Friday, because they thought it very unlucky. The women used wear long frocks and a white hat with coloured tassels on it. They rode on horseback to be married and the men used
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
16ty Nov. 1938.
Corrections.
1. stich stich stich
2. makes macks makes
3. healthy healthy
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A good beginning is half the work.
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Classification of pupils according to colour of hair
Very dark 6
Dark 16
Fair 18
Red 8
Classification of pupils according to colour of eyes
Brown 18
Blue 40
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
3rd Nov , 1938.
Proverbs. (local)
A bird in your hand is worth two in a bush.
Thinking twice is worth nine.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
The more hurry the less speed.
A stich in times saves nine.
Early to bed early to rise makes a man healty and wise.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 12:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Classification of pupils according to colour of hair
Very dark 6
Dark 16
Fair 18
Red 8
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The names of pupils on Rolls in Rashina N.S. on 1st Jan 1935 were as follows
28th June
Egans 17 17
O'Connors 9 2
Keenaghans 8 5
Hanamneys 6 7
Foleys 5 -
Devereys 5 2
Digans 4 4
Phelans 3 4
Rourkes 3 3
Guinans 2 -
Corcorans 2 -
Donoghues 2 -
Hennesseys 2 1
Maloneys 2 1
Reids 1 -
Dalys 1 -
Kennnedys 1 2
Murrays 1
Cloffeys 1
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
of good weather. And when it is going to rain the swallows will follow the insects.
[-]
Corrections.
follow follow follow
is is is
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
27 th Oct. 1938.
Weather lore.
When the smoke comes down the chimney it is a sign of rain. When the sky is full of stars it is a sign of frost. When the cat has her back to the fire it is a sign of rain. When the crows are going round in a circle it is a sign of a storm. When the swallows are flying high that the sign
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The names of pupils on Rolls in Rashina N.S. on 1st Jan 1935 were as follows
___________ 28th June
Egans 17____17
O'Connors 9____2
Keenaghans 8_____5
Hanamneys 6_____7
Foleys 5_____-
Devereys 5______2
Digans 4_____4
Phelans 3_____4
Rourkes 3_____3
Guinans 2_____-
Corcorans 2_____-
Donoghues 2_____-
Hennesseys 2_____1
Maloneys 2_____1
Reids 1_____-
Dalys 1_____-
Kennnedys 1_____2
Murrays 1
Cloffeys 1
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Griggi
Páirc na mBallóg
Carraig Ruadh
The Casains
The Gleann
Mallaigh Crom
Páirc 'a Driseóg
Cathair Pairc
Dris na Monadh
Páirc na nGreimhle
Páirc na nGé
Grogán Páirc
Nith na Casán
Corr a Mhaighe
Séa Mór
Corr a h-Aitinn
An Dubhóg
Over to the Parley Cú
Páirc a Bharr
Páirc an Éadan
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to go then.
Corrections.
olden olden olden
ache ache ache
squeal squeal squeal
leave leave leave
is is is is
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
left the head.
And for warts they used to put their fasting spit on them every morning before their breakfast. They has another remedy also for warts. They used get a bit of straw with a knot on it and used to bless the warts three times with the straw, then put that piece of straw in some class of a pond that would never dry up, and leave it there until it would wither. The warts were supposed
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
29 th Sept. 1938.
Local Cures.
In olden times people had their own cures for their ailments. If they had a tooth ache, they would put a frog in the mouth and when the frog would squeal three times the tooth-ache would be cured.
And for a head-ache they put St Brigid's band on the forehead and leave it on until the pain
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The names of pupils on Rolls in Rashina N.S. on 1st Jan 1935 were as follows
28th June
Egans 17 17
O'Connors 9 2
Keenaghans 8 5
Hanamneys 6 7
Foleys 5 -
Devereys 5 2
Digans 4 4
Phelans 3 4
Rourkes 3 3
Guinans 2 -
Corcorans 2 -
Donoghues 2 -
Hennesseys 2 1
Maloneys 2 1
Reids 1 -
Dalys 1 -
Kennnedys 1 2
Murrays 1
Cloffeys 1
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
22 nd Sept. '38.
Riddles (Local).
Two lookers, two crookers four legs and a fly beater?
Answer:- A cow.
How many strings should you have to the sky?
Answer:- One if it is a long one.
What goes round the world and never moves out of the same place
Answer :- A stamp
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
milking, milking
Biddie Biddie Biddie
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
16th Sept. 1938.
Corrections.
to to to to to
can't can't can't
and ad and
as as as. as
carried, carried, carried
bag, bag, bag,
four, four, four,
woman, woman, woman,
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Biddie she will bite you?
Answer:- A nettle.
Information recieved from:-
Eily Casey
58 Garrymore,
Clonmel.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
not bring either a straight stick nor a crooked stick but I carried my load?
Answer:- A bag of sawdust.
In side the wall and out side the wall but it never tips the wall?
Answer:- A voice.
Ink ank under the bank ten drawing four?
Answer:- A wonan mikking a cow.
In side the wall, out side the wall if you go near
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
down chip-cherry all the men in the town could not climb chip-cherry.
Answer: The smoke.
What has four legs and one foot?
Answer:-A bed.
Black and white and read all over.
Answer:- A news-paper
As green as grass as red as fire and as black as ink?
Answer:- A blackberry.
I went to the wood for a load of timber, I did
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
15 th Sept , 1938.
Riddles. (local.)
Two dead men fighting two bling men looking on, two cripples running for the police and tow dummys saying "Hurry on".?
Answer:- A bag of lies.
Why do a hen pick a pot?
Answer:- Because she can't lick it.
What goes up when the rain comes down?
Answer:- An umbrella.
Up chip-cherry
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Eileen Breen.
11 Glenconnor Cottages,
Clonmel.
Folklore.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
8th Sept , 1938
Corrections.
1 Sacrament Sacrament
2 m ... nights then who ....
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
it to the priest who was never seen again.
[-]
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 11:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
teapot, when she saw the priest. She went in and told her husband and he said, "Go out tomorrow night". So she did, and then went in and told her husband and he said "I will go out tomorrow night" He did so. He saw the priest and asked him was there any trouble on him. The priest said. "I have buried the Blessed Sacrament here and I cannot go to heaven unless it be put back in the church." So the man dug it up and gave
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
1 Sept . 1938.
A Story
In olden times some people called Fenians used go into the churches in this district and steal the Blessed Sacrament. There was a priest one time who had buried it behind an old woman's house. After some time the priest died d and he three nights in search of it.
One night the old woman was emptying her
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
so as to make it still finer and to bring out the toe. A Cloving-tongs was about four feet long.
The flax would then be 'hackled' for the purpose of bringing out any coarse stuff in it. The coarse flax left after hackling was used for making coarse heavy sheets many of which are still to be seen in many of the farmers houses of this locality.
A hackle was a piece of very smooth timber about a foot and a half square and having steel prongs like ordinary nails but much longer. They were not very plentiful and they would be 'hired-out' to those who would require them by people who would have a number of them.
The flax would be now in a most fine state and it would next be spun into ‘scéins’ on a spinning wheel. The people used send it away to be woven into cloth. There were certain men in each locality who used weave the flax into cloth. John Linehan who lived near the church was the weaver in Meelin. He died several years ago. People used make sheet, bolster and pillow-cases, table-cloths etc of the flax-cloth.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Air:- "Maggie in the Wood"
"Where rusheth forth those warlike men,
With maidens fair across the glen,
They remind me of olden times again,
I'll answer you said Thady.
See those teeming youths,
Like the winding waves,
In hot pursuit across the braes,
The ladies all unhooked their stays
to bottle up, Tom Brady.
Then shout "hurrah" on every hill,
And blow your horns loud and shrill,
Yield! we never never will,
Until we conquer Brady,
An old man cried "Ah! Muire is thrua",
When he heard his only cow to *lew.
"Do you mind the day he seized on you
And drove you off at leisure?"
My parents lips, he parched them dry,
My baby boy began to cry,
Ah! What did he care
Should we all die,
The day he made the seizure,
We fought for fame without a frown,
And won it in Drumkeeran town,
Where we knocked the Chief and Doonan down
* lew for low
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Eily Casey.
Folklore.
Eily Casey
58 Garrymore.
Clonmel.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Corrections.
St. Patricks Day.
Invite, invite, invite,
dancing, dancing, dancing,
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Rich people throw up money after the ceremony. There are wedding presents given from friends and relations If people are rich they can get married in their own houses. The customs observed at marriages are to invite people to them and have great singing including and feasting. After that the newly married pair go on their honeymoon.
Information received from:-
Mrs. Sweetman,
1 peter Street,
Clonmel.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
24 th November, 1938
Local Marriage Customs
The week before Lent there is a rush on Marriages, because there are seven long weeks and nobody can get married except on St Patrick's Day. The two lucky days are Wednesday and Sunday. The unlucky days are Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the woman answered and said "Yes." Then she stepped outside the door to the priest and the priest went in and served mass for him. When the mass was finished the priest spoke to him. He told him he was coming on that altar for fifty years and he could not get anyone to serve mass for him. He told him he was paid for a mass from a person and that he forgot to read it before he died. The person that the mass was paid for was in Purgatory and he would be relieved to Heaven when the mass would be said.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Information received from:-
Mrs Sweetman,
1 Peter Street,
Clonmel.
Corrections.
basin, basin, basin.
blend, blend, blend.
finely, finely, finely.
squars, squars, squars.
Mrs. Sweetman,
squares
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Flax. The following account of the treatment of flax was supplied by Florena Angland, Meelin, Newmarket, Co. Cork.
The ground was ploughed in spring time and prepared for this crop in the same manner as for any cereal crop. The flax seed was then sown broadcast with the hand. When the crop was ripe it had a rich yellowish colour like that of wheat. The flax was then pulled (not cut) and the soil shaken off the roots. It was then put into a dyke of clean water (or where water from a spring-well flowed). Heavy stones were put on the flax to keep it down, and it was left in this position for about three weeks. This process was called "Bogging the Flax".
Then it was taken out and spread out thinly in the field and allowed to 'bleach' in the air and sun for about a fortnight. It would be turned several times so that it would dry while in the field. It used then be made into small little sheaves and brought into the kitchen and dried near the fire - 'over the fire'. When thoroughly dried it would then be 'pounded' with pounders (an article like a carpenter's mallet but having a longer handle). The pounding took off the scale or shell on the outside of the flax and made the flax very weak and fine.
After being pounded it would then be 'cloved'
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Two heads are better than one.
The early bird catches the worm.
Information received from-
Mrs. Sweetman,
1 Peter street,
Clonmel.
Corrections.
hand, hand, hand.
The echo follows the song as the punishment...
1 Peter Street,
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
3 rd November, 1938.
Proverbs.
A stick in time saves nine.
A bird in the hand is worth two in a bush.
Early to bed, 'early to rise makes a man healthy wealthy and wise.
The echo follows the song as the punishment follows the wrong on and on and on.
The longest way round is the shortest way home.
A onion a day keeps the doctor away.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One night a priest went on a sick call in Glen Mór and on his return he was surrounded by a big mob of fairies who wanted to stop his horse and harm him. Máire Ní Murchadha saved him but he had to promise her that he would never talk about her in the public.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Corrections
And when it blows from the North we will have hail or very cold wheared
comes, comes, comes.
... the moon it is also a sign of bad weather
Information received from:-
Mr. Sweetman,
1 Peter street,
Clonmel.
weather, weather, weather.
Street, Street, Street.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a mark where a duel was fought near the cross of Eyries. It was fought between two persons by the name of "Seán an Innse and Marcus Ogue. Seán an Innse was Marcus Ogue's uncle
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
square and it is closed for the last fifty years.
Information received from:-
Mr. Sweetman,
1 Peter Street,
Clonmel.
Corrections.
the cemetery, the cemetery,
....and the last corpse....
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the woman answered and said "Yes." Then she stepped outside the door to the priest and the priest went in and served mass for him. When the mass was finished the priest spoke to him. She told him he was coming on that altar for fifty years and he could not get anyone to serve mass for him. He told him he was paid for a mass from a person and that he forgot to read it before he died. The person that the mass was paid for was in Purgatory and he would be relieved to Heaven when the mass would be said.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nellie Sweetman, 17 th October 1938
Old Graveyards.
There are five graveyards in St. Mary's parish. The cemetary, St. Nicholas', St. Steohen's and St. Mary's
These are the graveyards in which unbaptised children were buried. Old church Powerstown is round in shape. St. Nicholas' churchyard in the Old Bridge is round and the last corpse was buried in it forty years ago. St. Stephen's churchyard is
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Líám O Murchadha - aois 14bl
gCleann i Glas Con
Cathair Garbh
Fuaras an sceul so ó
Tadhg Leháin, Aois 68bl.

There is a holy well in the western shoulder of Knockoura hill. It is under a small rock, and there is beautiful scenery from it. A person can see the Fastnet rock, Bull, Cow and Calf rock and Bantry Bay etc. Long ago people used to pay rounds to the well on certain days. Rounds are not performed now. A saint is said to have taken a drink out of it, but the saints name is not known. People used to be cured at the well. When people used to pass by the well they used always leave some relic behind, (coins, pieces of clothes etc.) and even to the present day this is carried on. The well is almost covered over now with grass and heath.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a woman who used to take care of Grangegeith chapel in this district. Every morning she used to open the chapel at six o'clock. This morning when she went in, there was a priest standing on the altar and he spoke to her. He asked was there anyone there that would serve mass but she was frightened and ran out of the chapel. The next morning she went to the chapel as usual to open it and the priest came out on the altar again and he asked the same thing, but she ran out of the chapel again. That day she told the priest and the priest told her he would go with her the next morning and if the priest came out again and asked the same question as before she was to say "Yes." The next morning the priest went with the woman and he stood outside, and the woman went in. The priest came out as usual and asked the same question and
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It goes around the house after breakfast around the house after the dinner around the house after tea and what is that?
Answer - A brush.
Ink ank under a bank ten drawing four?
Answer - A woman milking a cow.
Information received from:-
Nellie Sweetman,
1 Peter Street,
Clonmel.
Corrections.
what is that ----
milking, milking, milking.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
22 nd Sept 1938.
Riddles (local)
What turns without moving?
Answer:- Milk turns sour.
It's white and black red all over?
Answer - A newspaper.
Patches upon patches without any sticking?
Answer - A head of cabbage.
As I went up a slippery hill I met my Uncle Tady I cut off his head and drank his blood and left his body easy?
Answer. A bottle of wine.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Other names:
Muinteán
Caol
Cumar Cám
Inse an tOl uisg.
Milíns
Fé bhuidhe
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Gort Fliuch
It is so called because long ago it was all in a swamp, until there was a river cut there.

Páircín na Paoraig - Field of the Powers
Inse an Droichead - Field of the Bridge
Log na Mona - Field of the Turf

Pairc Uctar - Field of the Cream. It is said that long (ago) the people used to make all the churns there

Gort Mor - The big field
Pairc Bhig - The small field
Cúilín - The upper field
Gort an Gollan - The field of the big stone
Gub na Coille - The Mouth of the wood
Pairc Lár - The middle field
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
which every one must taste it
Answer:- Death
Information received from:-
Nellie Sweetman,
1 Peter Street,
Clonmel.
Corrections.
Candle Candle candle
As I looked out my gay....
and can't catch....
1 Peter Street,
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I saw the world shaking and was'nt that a terrible thing?
Answer- a field of oats.
A father Mother sister and brother running all day and can't catch each other.
Answer - Four wheels of a car.
Behind the hill there is a house in the house there is a table and in that tha table there is a drawer in the drawer there is a cup in a cup there is a cup.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
15 th Sept 1938.
Riddles. Local.
Every stick grows in a wood except one sticks
Answer:- Candel stick.
Betty inside the ditch Betty out side the ditch and if you touch Betty she will bite you.
Anwer:- Nettle.
As I looked out my gay gold window I lost my gay gold ring
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
safty from the soldiers. The soldiers heard the children crying and murdered them all.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
would if tunrn it. While they would be in the rope they would say "All in thogter, this fine weather when I count twenty the rope must be empty five, ten, fifteen, twenty.
Information received from:-
Nellie Sweetman
1 Peter Street.
Clonmel.
Correctios.
two, two.two. too too too. Betchel goes we play. answer keep until th all in together,
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Padhruig O Néill - aois 14bl.
Gabhair
Cathair Garbh
Fúaras an sgeul san o mo athair:-
Conchubhar O'Neill aois 63bl.

Names of Fields:-
The well field,
Pairc na Grúdhta
Muntáin Mór
Ínnse
Innse an Tobar
Gaiphin(?) na gCabhlach
Gort
Gort an Leasa
Gort na Fuinneóige
Gort Árd
Pairc an Tíghe
Cnochan na Cró
Cnocan na Gainimhe
Gort na Clocha
The Caol
Páirc na Máirnéarach

Gort an Leasa:-
It is so called because there is a Liss there. Some years ago a person who was night-walking saw a light there.

Innse an Tobar:-
Some years ago a person was passing there and they heard the noise of churns dashing there.

Pairch na Máirnéarach:-
It means the "field of the slaughter". It is so called because in the time of Cromwell a number of his soldiers were going west to Dursey Is. It is a low field so several women and children went there for
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
side and more at the other side. They would say the riddles and we would answer them and when we would find out the right answer we would run for one of the other side and we would keep on saying the riddles til the last one is left and we would start again.
We also play Tig. We get a lot of children and rattle. Pig pig and you have the tig.
Another game we play is shipping We get a rope and two girls
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 10:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Hospice nearest to Kiltyclogher which which was kept by a young monk who fell in love with her. She passed on to the Shrine and spent her day doing penance and returned. She discovered that the monk was waiting for her, so she did not call at his Guest House but passed on and he pursued her. She knew she was being pursued and when she came to a certain hill she told her maid to go up to the hill and see if he was still following. The maid did so and he was coming so the mistress shouted Rith Ellen. Some people say that the townland of Ratheelan got its name from this event. The correct correct derivation though is Rath Craolan, meaning the
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
holly rath.
The lady and her maid ran on until they came to the townland of Munakil and the young lady dropped dead from exhaustion. News was brought to her father and he came with an army and seized the hospice and burned it. He took the monk, stripped him of all his clothing and drowned him in a lake the other side of Kiltyclogher and that lake is called "Giolla gan Léine." He came back to the spot where his daughter had died and it is thought that he repented for having drowned the monk, and on the spot he built a church which was called Mac Errigal's, hence Kilmakerril. It is said that the boundary wall
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a road leading from Lisgrey cross down to a place called Harrison's bridge and it is called the New Line.
It was made in the year eighteen hundred and ninty six. When it was made first it was only the breadth of a cart. There were no ditches on it and the people used to sit on the side of the road to keep the animals that were in the fields from coming out on the road.
There is another road leading from the Murmod road to the upper chapel of Killinkere and it is called the Doon road.
There was a man
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
killed on this road, and his name was Patrick O'Reilly there is a cross on the side of the road where he was killed. This was made as a relief work during the famine, the men were paid four pence each day they worked.
There is a road leading from the bog road down to Lavey and it is called the hollow lane because there is a hill each side of it and it's down in a hollow.
There is a bit of Lislea lane called the New Line. Before this new part of the lane was made it went down and out through Mat Connell's house.
This new bit of the
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Then come to my house, 'tis the home of a friend
In the greenwoods of Truagh, thou art safe from they foes;
Six sons of McKenna thy steps shall attend
And their six sheathless skeans shall protect thy repose".
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:48
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rejected
awaiting decision
There is an old road leading from the hospital which is about a mile outside this town to Dunancory bridge.
It was made as relief work during the famine times The pay the men got who were working at it was sixpence per day.
There is another road going from the new line to people's houses in the fields and it is called the "bog road" because there is a bog on each side of it.
There is an old road from Virginia to Bailieborough.
Travelling to Bailieborough on the usual road from Virginia one sees the commencement of the old at Corracloughan
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Out from the stately woods of Truagh
McKenna rides at noon,
The sun shines brightly, not a cloud,
Darkens that sky in June.

No eye has he for nature's charms,
They don't delude his brain,
As by flower clad hills he wends his way,
And never draws a reign.

Till above him lay that old grey tower,
Of Glasslough Castle old,
And in it dwelt a damsel,
More dear to him than gold.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
convenient to Derry.
Everyone knows that the soldiers who were fighting for James were badly equipped. They fought with all kinds of weapons. Now one of the McKennas of Truagh fought with an iron crook. A crook was an iron instrument which the Irish used to hang their pots over the fire in order to boil or cook. They use them to the present day.
The Priest informed me that these descendants of the McKennas of Truagh, who now live in the Diocese of Derry, have preserved this crook to the present day, as an heirloom of the McKennas and as a souvenir of the siege of Derry.
He finished his story by saying that there were five or six priests in the Diocese of Derry all descendants of the McKennas of Truagh, and that it was their intention to visit Truagh some time in the near future, and if possible and with permission to have High Mass celebrated in some one of the churches in the parish of Errigal Truagh.

Obtained from
P. Coyle
Killybrone,
Emyvale
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
saucers, plates and spoons and leave to dry in the sun. When dry take home and place in "Babby House"
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cooperage. Charles McCarthy, better known locally as 'Charley the Cooper' lived here in the village of Meelin and was the cooper for the whole locality. He died about + five years ago (January 1933) at the age of eighty-four years.
In his early days and for the greater part of his active life he was busily engaged in the making butter ferkins, meat-tubs and barrels for churning as well as other tubs of ordinary use. Small churns were also made by him as well as milk-pails.
[Sketches of barrels and churns etc.]
Large barrel as used for meat. The large barrel-churn fitted on iron stand. Small barrel-churn for making butter for household purposes only. A milk-pail used in former times for milking the cows. It is now replaced by the ordinary galvanised bucket.
Before creameries were started in this locality there was a great demand for the above articles but the trade has completely disappeared from the district now.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Daisy Chains:-
Pluck daisies. Pierce a long hole in the end of each daisy stem and put another daisy out through the hole. Continue in this way.
Babby House:-
Collect broken pieces of delph and glass. Select some pretty spot on a ditch and arrange the pieces of delph, which have been washed and dried in the same way as they would be arranged on a dresser.
Modelling in Clay:- Wet clay and form cups,
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Last year, 1937, when I was on a visit to Bundoran I met a priest who was stopping in the same house as I was named Father McKenna from the Diocese of Derry.
In the course of our conversation he inquired of me where I was from I told him from County Monaghan. He then asked me if I was acquainted with parish there called Errigal Truagh. I told him I was from the "Green Woods of Truagh". The priest appeared to be very much pleased when he heard this and there he related the following interesting story.
He informed me that he was one of the Truagh McKennas that his ancestors came from Truagh, and settled down to live in Co. Derry.
At the siege of Derry the McKenna clan from Errigal Truagh joined up with James army, when the siege was raised and when the Jacobites had to march away some of this priests ancestors did not follow the army, but settled down and married, and lived there
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
four to form the handles of the basket.
Snares:-
Get five bits of snare wire and twist them together. Make a loop (stone) at one end and put the other end in through the loop.
Candle-stick for Xmas Candle:-
Cut a turnip in half. Scoop a hole to fit the candle and place the turnip on the table flat side down.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The Cooláchs - (Cúl Áth)
back fords near Castle Mary

Reilig na bhFeara nGonta - Clashoquirke, Bansha

The Reilig where the men who were killed in the "Battle of the Hills and Hollows" were buried. It is at the back of T. (?) Ryan's farm-house, near Castle Mary. Perhaps about 100 years ago an attempt was made by the farmer who owned the Reilg, to till it. So many bones were turned up that he decided to put them back and leave it as it was.

Áth na gCíléiri - where the "keelers" (milk tubs) were weighted and left in the river so that the wood became swollen (joinings closed up) and so prevented leaking.
The ford on the river Aherlow at Ashgrove
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man coming from work one night and he met a swarm of cats on the road. One of them said "Grimes" and another one said "Title him" and another one said "Mr Grimes" "Tell him that Miram is dead" and when the man went home he told his wife that he got an awful fright and she asked him what was it.
He said "I met a swarm of cats on the road and one of them said "Grimes" and another of them said "Title him" and another of them said "Mr Grimes." There was a young cat sitting at the fire and he said "Why didn't you tell me that when you came in now. I'll be late for the funeral."
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Get two thick rushes and cross them and then one thin one and interlace it with the crossed rushes until the bottom and side of the basket are made.
Drawing
Bend up the ends of the original two rushes (1;2,3,4) and meet one and three and two and
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
opening. When a bird goes in under the dish pull the cord. Then the cord is pulled the stick will fall and the dish will fall on top of the bird and imprison him.
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Get a piece of elder and take the centre out of it. Then get a thin bit of a stick and tie a cloth on the bottom of it. Stuff the bottom of the elder so that there will be only a small hole in it. Put the thin stick into the elder and then the gun is finished. This is used to "scurt" water.
Bird catcher:-
Put a dish standing on its edge and prop it with a piece of a stick. Leave some bread or oatmeal under the dish. Tie a long cord to the stick and put the end of it in under a window or some other
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Whistle:-
Get a straight piece of an ash stick. Hammer the piece with another piece of a stick and twist off the skin. Cut a bit (cut a) in the shape of a heart out of the skin. Stop the bottom of the skin with a bit of a stick and put a small bit in at the side where the hole is so that you can blow into it
Pot gun:=
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 09:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long long ago there was a mass pat leading from the Mountains to the school yard in Milford. There was a man who was very fond of card playing, and instead of going to mass on Sundays he used to sit on the stile inducing people to play with him. One Sunday he could not get any body to play to keep him company so he started a game himself, and he had only a couple of tricks played when a well dressed gentle-man stood there on the other side of the stile and offered to play a game with him. He was delighted to have the company, and they played game after game. The [man?] who did not got to mass won a lot of money.
They were so interested playing that they never noticed the time passing until the people were going home from last mass in Milford. As everybody had to cross the stile where they were playing the man put his winnings in his pocket, and collected the cards to go aside until the people would have passed. The gentleman went to cross the stile, and when he put up his leg on the man saw he had cloven hooves instead of boots. He got such a shock[?]
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 06:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to the wake. They also followed the remains to the graveyard and wailed all the way.
The person who laid out the corpse was supposed to be there to put it into the coffin. No pins were allowed in the garments and all the garments were loosened before the remains was placed in the Coffin.
All the sheets were taken down and the table turned into the wall, before the coffin was removed. The chairs were turned upside down. Members from each side of the family tried to be first turning the chairs - this meant turning "the death" over on the other side of family.
Four persons bearing the same surname and the nearest relatives carried out the corpse - legs first. The screws were taken off the lid of the coffin when it was placed in the grave. They were placed on the breast plate. It was supposed to be very unlucky to remove the lid once it was placed on the coffin. The person's age was written
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 06:29
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rejected
awaiting decision
ortha. Thánadar ar gháirdín cabáiste do bhí ag Áiféis. "Seadh mo bhuachaill mhaith ar seisean a bhfeacaís aon gháirdín cabáiste chómh maith leis an ngáirdín sin?" "Tá an cabáiste go maith agus go dian mhaith". Ní réidtigheann sin an cheist ach an bhfeacaís aon chabáiste ad shúilibh cinn chómh maith leis. "Tá an cabáiste go maith" ar seisean arís. "Ná dubhairt leat ceana ná réidhtigheann san an cheist, anois tabhair freagra dhom ná biodh ort féin". A bhfeacaís aon gháirdín cabáiste níos fearr ná í". "Do chonnae" do rá Seán. "Conas a chuirí tá san chun tuisgint dom nó cá bhfeachaís é". "Do chonnae ag mo athair agus ag mo mháthair féin. Do chonnae aon tor amháin cabáiste bhfhearr ná a bhfuil id gháirdín go léir". Is deachair san a chreidtúint nó conas a chuirfeadh tú chun tuigsint dom. Bhí eagla chosaidh agus do saighotúirí ag máirseál chun an iarthar. Do shéid an lá ar bháisteach chómh trom agus do thuit riamh as an spéir. Do glaodh ar máthair feniaint
anonymous contributor
2019-11-19 03:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I know two Holy Wells in this Parish. One is situated on the left bank of the river Erne about three miles East of Ballyshannon and the other is near the Abbey Assaroe which is about one mile North West of Ballyshannon. The holy Well on the banks of the river Erne is called St Catherine’s well and the one at the Abbey is called Saint Patrick’s well. The well at the Abbey is visited by many people between the 29th of June and the 15th of August while the other well is visited any day one likes.
Any person who wishes to make a pilgrimage must go round the stations. First of all the person goes to the side of the Ocean, takes off his or her shoes and lift fifteen pebbles from the Ocean side. Then the person must go to the wells and drink three sips of water in honor of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. At St. Patrick’s well there are five beds of stones with a cross at each bed. The person must kneel down beside each bled throw in a pebble and say five Our Fathers, five Hail Marys and
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 00:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Children visit peoples houses for eggs on Easter Saturday. Easter eggs are purchased. On Easter Sunday more eggs than usual are eaten. Easter water is brought from the churches, and blessed salt too. Some of this salt is eaten on Easter Sunday, and is given to animals or human beings when sick.

On May Day the may bush is dressed up in the wood in Redmondstown. When the eight cones or candles are lighted in the bush and young and old dance on a platform beside the bush until the lights burn out. Music is played.

On the fifteenth of August many people from the parish of Piercetown go to the Lady's Island to attend the procession there.

Saint Martin is the patron Saint of Pierctown. An image of the Saint is in a niche in the church wall. Millers of the Parish do not grind on that day. Neither do the fishermen put to sea on that day. Tradition states that on one Saint Martin's day as the local fishermen were going out to fish, they saw a man on a white horse. He warned them of a coming storm, and vanished. Some came back while the majority continued to fish. Before long a terrible storm arose; and they were all drowned.

Patrick Maguire,
Killiane,
Drinagh
senior member (history)
2019-11-19 00:05
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first.

Domhnall Ó Cathalain,
Leathanac

Maighread Ní Mhuinthille
Leathanac
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 23:53
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My Grandmother who is 86 years old says that when she was a little girl the people didnt eat as often as they do now. The men always went to work in the field early in the morning before breakfast and the women skimmed a large pot of milk and put it on the hearth near the fire to heat while they milked the cows. The sour milk would be turned
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 23:51
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into cruds. The men were called into breakfast and they eat the cruds and new milk. The next meal would be at four o'clock which they timed with the sun. For this meal they would have potatoes and milk or fish for the people who lived near the sea. She says there was no tea until later years when people used to cart their butter to Cork City. The car men used to bring a little of it home. But the people didn't dare to drink it like they do now. The people ground their own wheat and make their own flour. But the wheat was scarce and didn't grow so well. The flour in the shops were very dear so it was seldom they had bread. This is how they baked their bread - they put down a big fire, and while it was reddening they made their cakes of wheaten flour. They wet it with sour milk. At that time they didn't know anything about breadsoda. Then they got the griddle and raked out the red fire around an iron with three leg's called the "standard" and on top of that they places the griddle. On the griddle they put the cake. When it was baked on the under side they turned it with their hands. They used have good crops of oats in those times. They used to harden the grain over the fire in pots then they ground it with their own "quarnt". They cooked it by boiling it with new milk. She says that
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 23:47
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Úna Ní Néill aois 14 bl
Gabhair
Fuaras an sgeul seo ó mo sean-mhathair,
Cáit Ní Neíll (aois 86 bl)

A long time ago the bodies of two sailors were washed ashore in a little creek in Pulleen Harbour about a mile from my house. The creek was called "Cuadhas Árd". Like all sailors the name of their ship was written on their jerseys. The name that was written on their jerseys was "The Lhanehattan". The person that was living there in Gour at that time made graves for them on a sunny bench near the sea and buried them there. They marked their graves with two stones and that place ever since is call "the Lhanhattan".
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 23:36
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na trocail. Do tosnuigdar ag guid an mine agus ag á ithe. Do rugadh ortha agus is é an pinós do fuair siad na fice cuig buillí de cat na naoi n-eirball. Do fúair ceann acu bás sul a raibh a phínós criocnuighte.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 23:32
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Maidir le Baile Caisleán Bhéarra sé sin an baile is mó le rádh i mBéarra. Do bhí caisleán ann fadó ar a dtugadh Caisleán Dhíarmuda agus sin é an fáth gur tugadh an t-ainm sin ar an baile.
Ní raibh taisg na túairisg ar an baile seo dhá cead blíadain o shoin. Portac a beadh cuid de'n áit agus thagadh an fhairrge isteac an chuid eile de'n áth atá fé'n mbaile. Ac núair tosnuigheadh ar an umha do bhaint as na míanaig ins na hAillaithe do cuireadh tús leis an mbaile. Is i nDoire Mithín a bhí an sean-Eaglais Chaitilicheach agus bhí roilic san áit a bhfuil tigh an mhinistréara anois.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 23:24
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Fadó in Éirinn is mar seo do theigheadh na daoine go dtí America. Ar dtúis do theigheadh síad go dtí Corcaig ar bárr trocal ime. Ceannuigheadh síad cúpla púnt mine agus theigheadh síad ar bórd luinge. Ní bead aon rud le n-ithe acu ac an mhin.

Uair amháin do bhí fear óg ag imtheacht go dtí America agus b'é sin an cead uair gur cuiread bóna agus carabhat air. Bhí a mhuinéal sínnte aige agus dubairt sé "Ó a Mham táim ceart go leor ac cé scaoilfidh me i gCobh".
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 23:20
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Núair a bhí an gorta in Éirinn do bhí trocal ag teacht suas an tsráid i mBaile Caisleán Bearr agus bhí sé lán de mine. D'éaluig beirt búacailí in aice
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 23:03
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Ballybrasil, one in Ballydanielmore and two near Lisaniska. The Islanders assembled at Ballymore for mass on Sundays. The island was then called the Great Island of the Barry's because it was part of the land given to the Barry's.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 23:00
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What is the difference between a sailor in jail and a blind man.
A blind man cannot see to go and a sailor in jail cannot go to sea
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 22:59
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The Great Island has been named the Isle of Neimeid, because there is a tradition that about the year of the world 2850 a tribe headed by a prince called Neimeid landed on the Great Island.
They are said to be the second colony who landed in Ireland from Europe. Neimeid died of the plague with 3,000 of his followers. about the year 2859 and is said to have been buried in Currabinny Hill. The Great Island was then called Ui Liahain from the Lehane tribe who owned the Great Island and the country around it before the English invaded Cork. At this time it was the custom of the people to live in houses of timber or wicker which were surrounded by mounds of earth called forts of lisses. There is one of them near Ballymore, and another near
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 22:53
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How to cure a wart. These three are the best cures for warts. Cut a raw potato in halfs and rub to the wart every day day until is cured. Another cure is to get a lump of washing soda and rub it to the wart until it is cured. The last cure is get a dandelion and squeeze the milk out of it on to the wart and do not wash off.
The best cure for chilblanes is to heat olive oil and rub it on the chilblane twice every day. until the chilblanes vanish. Another cure is to rub metalated spirits on until they vanish.
The best cure for a headache is to get a sheet of brown paper so that it will just your forehead. Then soak it in vinegar and hold to forehead until pain goes. If comes again when the paper is taken down get a piece of paper that will go right around your head and soak as before.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 22:12
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Beggars are poor people going around living by asking alms and they also have certain vavourite house to stay in for the night.
Those poor people repay the person that gives the alms or lodging or food by praying for them or for the people who have died out of the house. There are not so many poor people travelling around now days as there were some years ago.
More of the poor people especially the old go in to homes.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 22:07
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fire with his tail turned to it. The old people complain of their rheumatism.
The smoke goes up straight out of the chimneys.
The windows that face the sitting sun glitter. You would think the windows would be on fire.
There is a coat of dew on the windows in the morning.
I heard these things from my parents neighbours.
My own name is Andy Driscoll, Rossard, Ballydehob, County Cork.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 22:04
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When the frost is approaching + the sun shines brightly all day. It goes down in a red ball in the evening.
The moon shines brightly. It has a bright golden colour.
The stars are twinkling all night.
The sky is clear all day and the sun sinks to rest.
The wind blows from the north east generally and sometimes from the north, with a bitter sting.
A ridge of fog is sometimes seen in the river valley at nightfall the evening before. The hole that is near Mr Lynch's house is always roaring before frost. This hole is northwards from our house.
The roads harden and the stones tie to the roads.
When the frost is approaching the blackbirds retire to the garden and they get tame. Clusters of starlings gather together in the green fields, around the cow dungs.
The cat lies all day by the
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:49
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There is a ghost at Dick Scully's near the bridge. It is in the form of a white bird and about the size of a blackbird. She stays about the gardens during the day. There is a ghost on the bridge at the blacksticks where the men were drowned a light is seen there every night. There is a ghost at Tommie Kenedy's. It is in the form of a dog and a candle beside. It is beside where a man was killed. There is a ghost beyond JAmes Dolans where Kiearney was killed. There is a ghost in Paddy Rogan's field beside a lone white-thorn bush. There is a ghost at Jonnie Kellehers. It is a white woman. There is a fort in Joe ONeill's field in Gubdorish. Jonnie Reilly of Bohey heard the fairies playing music in it. There is a ghost Forosa bog and a light is seen there every night.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:46
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his best and he was not home until five oclock in the morning.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:45
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whips. She had a dog with her and he went in the bog pass and he was flung with stones.
There is a ghost at the rock of Bohey. One night Patrick Bohan of Bohey was coming by the rock he saw a big black man about seven feet high.
There is a ghost at the pipe at our land. One night John Geelan was coming by the pipe, he heard chains rattling.
There was a ghost at the stone-wall gap. One night Peter Dunne was sitting on the ditch waiting for someone, he saw a man coming up the road. When the man came up to Peter he walked across him and put him up.
There is a ghost in Pat Dunn's byre. One night Pat was coming off his visit when he came to his door a big black woman was standing waiting for Pat. When he was opening the door the woman ran into the byre and Pat ran in after her. When he went into the byre she was gone.
One night James Mullervy was coming by the wicket gate in Rossmore and he fell into the bushes. One night Paul Donghoe was coming out of Joe ONeill's. He left at ten o'clock and he had only to go a mile home he walked
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:42
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There is a fort in our land at home there were a lot of fairies seen in it long ago.
One night the man of our house was in Drumlish and he had a young horse and in the middle of the night my grand mother went up to the road to see was he coming. When she went to the road she heard the trap coming up the road. She went out to stop it. She thought the horse was running away. When she put up her had to stop it a burst of cheers rose up in the air and the fairies hit their horses and went up to the fort and vanished.
There is a ghost at Divins lane. One night Patrick Divin was coming off his visit, he saw two children in their bare feet. The very moment they saw him they vanished.
There is a ghost at the bog pass Fearglass. One night Mary Donoghoe was going somewhere and she heard a lot of horses and lashing of
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:39
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peace would he advise them to have "o peace" he said and he was let back again.
There is a ghost at Willie Prunty's quarry a priest that died was heard saying mass at it.
There is a ghost at Patrick Reynold's lane a light is seen there at a lone tree.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:38
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There is a house in Cloontubrid called Willie Prunty's and a room in it is always locked because there is a ghost in it.
There is a ghost in Tom Gallaher's house.
There is a ghost at Toroso cross-roads, a hare appears there.
There is a ghost at Cloonohill hill a black man does be seen there.
Frank Donnley was brought off by the good people and he was asked which of war or
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:37
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There is a black woman at John J Casseless gate.
There are two women between [?] well and Drumgilra road.
There is a black man at Brenross crossroads, John Reynolds saw him.
Willie Cannings gate is flung out on the road after everyone that goes by at night.
There is a white woman at Stephen Campbells hill. Paddy Connell was coming from fair in Longford and when he came to the half way hill a big van with no horses under it followed him and when he came to a little river the van disappeared. There is a ghost at Tommy Kennedy's hill in the form of a dog.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:34
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There are two big trees in Paddy Rogan's field and there is a ghost beside it. Tom Cassells saw him and he was a big black man.
There is a ghost in Pat Dunne's byre. It is a woman and she stays about the house in the day-time and at night she sits on a stone in the lane.
There is a ghost over from James Dolan's where Kearney was killed, and it is in the form of a dog.
There is a ghost in Willie Reilly's field. Peter Durone saw her, and it was Willie Reilly's sister, that was drowned.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:31
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Long ago there lived two giants whose names were glug and grug. They were very fond of each other. The king did not want them to live in his palace because they used to steal all the fowl from their neighbours. One of them was a very small man and the other was very tall, because every time he passed by, the people used think they had night.
One day the king made up his mind to gather together all his fighting men and that he would give them any request they would ask if they killed the giants. So they went to the giants house and when they reached the place the giants were asleep. The king called them and they came out, so both parties fought together. The king and his men were no comrades for the giants, so they had to return home.
There was an old woman living at the foot of a hill and she had one son
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:28
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came to the altar a few weeks ago and he said it was no altar but it was some kind of an old resting place they had.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:28
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straw. It was about six inches long and four inches wide. People used make them a ter the threshing when the straw would be fresh. It is said that St. Brigid's Cross keeps away the (the) Fairies.
It is said that Angels light on every thorn of the Holly bush on Christmas Eve.
St. Patrick's Cross is made of different coloured ribbons which are sewn on paper. All children used wear them on their shoulders on St. Patrick's Day in honour of the Patron Saint.
On Palm Sunday when Palm is got from the Priest at Mass people put
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:28
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Long ago the people had many old plans, and old cures which are not to be seen or heard of nowadays.
There is a great big rock up at the top of the hill at a place called "T[?] a Cullaig". The rock is made the shape of an altar. There was a head man of the danes, and he ordered all his men to be at this rock for a certain time in the day. Then the head man used to read to them from a big book and they answer him in return. This mass was called "[?]". They continued this for some time. The parish priest ordered them to leave the place, and not to be mocking mass. So they left and they were distributed around from place to place. Then they made a liss and went to live in it, and those places are to be seen still. The parish priest
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:24
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a piece of it in the cowshed. It is said that Palm will keep away all diseases from the cattle.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:23
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As I lay down to sleep
I give my soul to God to keep.
If I die before I wake,
I pray to God (to take) my soul to take,
There are four corners on my bed.
There are four Angel's at my head.
Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John,
God bless the bed that I lay on
God within me
God without me
God in heaven around
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:20
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about me
Here is my version of the prayer
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:20
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Here is my version of the prayer.
As I lie down to sleep
To God I give my soul to keep.
If anything come near me
Blessed Virgin come and waken me
There are four corners on my bed.
There are four Angels round my spread
St. Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
God bless the bed that I
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:18
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Here is my version of the prayer.
As lie on my bed to sleep
To God I give my soul to keep.
If anything come near my bed
Blessed Virgin come and waken me
There are four corners on my bed.
There are four Angels round my spread St
Matthew Mark Luke and John
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:16
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lie on.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:16
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God bless the bed that I lie on
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:15
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Here is my version of the prayer.
Here I lay my head down to sleep
To God I give my soul to take.
There are four corners on my bed.
There are four angels round me, spread.
Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John
God bless my soul and body
And the bed that I lay on
As I lay down on my
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:14
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Here is my version of the prayer.
Here I lay my head down to sleep
To God I give my soul to keep.
If I die before I wake,
To God I give my soul to take,
There are four corners on my bed.
There are four angels round me, spread.
Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John,
God bless the bed that
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:11
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I lie on.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:11
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Here is my version of the prayer.
Here I lay my head down to sleep
To God I give my soul to take.
There are four corners on m bed.
There are four angels round me, spread.
Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John
God bless my soul and body
And the bed that I lay on
As I lay down on my
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:07
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right side.
As Jesus lay on Marys knee
The cross of Christ on my right breast
As Jesus Christ may bring my soul to rest
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:06
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Here is my version of the prayer.
As I lay down my head to sleep,
I give my soul to God to keep,
If anything may happen me
I hope my guardian angel will waken me,
There are four corners
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:04
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on my bed.
There are four angels over me, spread.
Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John,
God bless the bed that I lay on.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:02
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This is the teachers version of prayers
As I lie down to rest,
I give my soul to Jesus Christ
If any evil thing touches me
The Blessed Virgin come and waken me,
There are four corners
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 21:01
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round my bed,There are four angels round me spread.
Matthew Mark Luke and John
God bless the bed that I lie on
God the Father bless me
Infant Jesus defend and keep me
The Virtue of the Holy Ghost enlighten and sanctify me,
This night and for ever Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:59
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A fog in the hollow is a fine day to-morrow and a fog ion the hill brings water to the mill. If we can look at the sun without a glare affecting our eyes it is a sign of thunder.
It is a sign of rain when the sun is clouded.
When the wind is coming from the south west it is a sign of rain and when it is coming from the north east it is a sign of dry weather.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:56
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The south winds bring the most rain to our district. The east winds are the most unhealthy winds.
When the crows and starlings circle together it is a sign of a storm.
It is a sign of rain to see the soot falling and it is a sign also of rain to see a dog eating grass or a cat scrabbing at tables and chairs. When the birds are clustered together and flying low it is a sign of rain. A rainbow in the morning is a shepherd's warning and a rainbow in the (ev)
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:54
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night is a shepherd's delight. When the cat has her back turned to the fire it is a sign of rain. It is a sign of rain when the far away hills are looking near. When the smoke is going up straight from the chimneys it is a sign of (rain) good weather. It is a sign of rain when the wind blows the smoke down the chimney. When we see a blue blaze in the fire it is a sign of a storm. It is a sign of rain to see the insects flying low.
When the new moon comes in on Saturday
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:50
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it is said it is to be a bad moon "Saturdays moon is a month too soon."
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:49
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These are all the proverbs I have heard locally.
A stitch in time saves nine.
Look before you leap.
Be just before being generous.
Think before you speak.
Cruelty seldom needs courage.
A little goes a long way.
Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves.
A good beginning is half the work.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:47
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Cheerfulness is sunshine in the home.
All light tasks were heavy at first.
Live horse and you will get grass.
Rome was not built in a day.
A bird in the hand is better than two in a bush.
A burned child dreads the fire.
Early to bed, early to rise makes a man healthy wealthy and wise.
Empty vessels make most sound.
Between two stools you will come to the ground.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:44
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A penny saved is a penny gained.
A lame tongue gets nothing.
Dont judge a book by the cover.
Children and fools should not handle edged tools.
An empty sack cannot stand.
One natural tooth is worth twenty false ones.
Where there's a will there's a way.
Its never to late to learn.
Too many cooks spoil the broth.
Truth is your fairest guide star.
You never miss the water till the well runs dry.
A good run is better than
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:42
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a bad walk.
Pride always gets a fall.
Its a long road there is not a turn in.
Never put off until tomorrow what you can do to-day.
A friend in need is a friend indeed.
Its often a person's tongue breaks his nose.
Hunger is the best sauce.
A light heart lives long.
He who laughs last laughs best.
Charity begins at home.
A wrinkled purse, a wrinkled face.
An idle man tempts the devil.
No noble tasks were ever
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:39
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easy.
Laziness is a heavy load.
A little pot is soon hot.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:38
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In olden times thatched houses were the most common. The old houses had always in the kitchen. It was called a settlebed. It was placed along one side-wall. The fire places were always at the gable end wall.
In olden times all the chimneys were made of mortar and the gable walls were made of mortar also. Wooden chimneys were also common in olden times. The fire was always on
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 20:36
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stoop down and light a tuft of dry rushes and the light went out. From that day to this, the top of every rush is withered or singed even in a field where there is a forest of rushes.
On his way back from Slieve Bawne St Patrick slept a night in Kilbonsilla - the wood of the willows. The townland of Kilbonsilla is situated at the foot of Slieve Bawne just inside the eastern boundary of Kilgefin parish and adjoining Doughil - the black wood where there were 441 acres of wood so late as 1654
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:32
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an toighe a’ cuartughadh a gcuid ba ar bhí ceo ann. Chuaidh sé go h-Árd ‘a Ratha tamall ina dhiaidh sin go bhfeicfeadh sé rabh ainmeacha an lánamhain ins an phaipéar. D’innis sé an sgéal dó’n sagart a bhí ann. Chuartuigh siad an paipéar agus fuair siad na n-ainmeacha ann. Bhí a ainm fhéin ann. An lánamhain deireannach a phós an sagairt Mac Cullach.
Deireadh.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:32
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greasuidhe bhí an greasuidhe graithe agus ní leagadh sé láimh ar a chuid bróga. Bhí sé ag cuir dis ar péire de fhear eile a bhí a gabhail a posadh an tráthnóna sin. D’fhán an fear seo go bhfuair sé dis ar a chuid bróga fhéin. Thug sé iarraigh annsin an baile a báint amach agus thuit sé na chodladh ar an caoran agus nuair a mhusgail sé bhí sé ar oilean Innis Caol agus bhí an sagart annsin agus an lánamhain. Caithfheadh siad feadhnaise beo a bheith aca.
Shiubhal an sagart isteach fhad leis an sean manastrae agus shiubhal an lánamhain isteach ina dhiaidh.
Posadh iad agus cuir Tamas Maor a ainm leis an phaipéar. Bhí an ceol a ba deise a chualaidh sé ariamh annsin agus d’imthigh siad. Bhain sé an caoran amach airís agus thuit sé na chodladh. An chead rud a mhuisgail é muintear
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:30
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awaiting decision
Bhí fear ina chomhnuidhe shíos annseo I Loch Fad seall maith bliadhanta ó shoin a rabh Tomas Ó’Maor mar ainm air. Bhí sé na oibridhe ana mhaith agus ba gráth leis bheith ar a chois go luath ar maidin I dtolamh.
D’éirigh sé maidin amháin samhraidh go h-an luath. Am sluaistreadh no préataí a bhí ann agus bhí aige le gabhail fhád le gréasuidhe a bhí na chomhnuidhe ar an Fearthainn a rabh Tam Beag mar ainm air.
Bhí leab mór caorain aige le gabhail fríd agus bhí sé ag gabhail treasna an caorain seo nuair a bhí an ghrian ag éirigh.
Chonnaic sé tais agus teas fear a bhí aithne go maith aige ar an t-saoghall seo or bhí sé ina comradaigh aige fhéin lá da shaogall
Labhair sé leis agus d’fhiafruigh sé de rabh aon seort o’ tabhairt buadhartha do. Labhair an tais leis agus d’iarr sé air gan eagla a bheith air or nach ndeánfadh seisean dochar do mar
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
hÉireannaigh agus bhí fear amháin agus sheas sé amuigh taobh amuigh den geata, agus do réir mar bhí na marcaigh a’ teacht amach bhí sé da marbhadh. Mharuigh sé mar sin agus tháinig Sinclear amach annsin. Mharuigh Sinclear seisean agus sin mar bfhuair seisean na strips.
Deireadh.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 20:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Patrick came to Slieve Bawne and as he passed along the mountain he blessed the wells for the people. When he came to Slieve Bawne he was surprised to find the people around the mountain when to bed so early. As he approached a dwelling to make inquires a women came out to meet him. He asked her why the people around here went to bed so early.
The woman told him they were afraid of seeing the fairy lights as anyone who saw them would be gone in twelve months. The saint told her the lights were harmless and not to be afraid. While they were talking one of the lights appeared in the valley. The Saint did nothing but
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a chuaidh sé ‘un toighe d’iarr a bhean ar na searabhaintaigh deifir a dheánadh leis a dhinnear ar go rabh sé cáillte leis an ocrais. D’iarr sé orthu gan lá deifir beith ortha ar go bhfuair seisean a chuid ag Níall Ó’Domhnaill.
“Arú Maigh”, deir a bhean, “ar ndoighe níor ithe tusa do dhinnear ag an créatúr giobach udaigh ach caidé an cineal gleas atá air ar chor ar bith”.
“Bean dílís”, deir seisean, “an tabla a bhfuair mise mo dhinnear aige ní cheannachadh do chuid saidhbhearach an framhe a bhí faoi agus an suidheachain a bhí mé mo shuidhe air. B’fhiú £8 é”.
“Ó maigh”, deir sé, “ce dabhalfadh sin don créatúr giobach udaigh”. Fuair an tighearna talaimh seo ath chuigne ar “Vinegar Hill” agus sé sin thiocadh leis beatha fear amháin a shabhail ag gach eile seisean.
An lá a bhí siad a troid ar “Vinegar Hill” bualadh na
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 20:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí am amháin seall maith bliadhanta ó shoin agus bhí tighearna talaimh amuigh annseo ag Inbear a rabh Sinclear mar ainm air.
Bhí fear de na dalaigh ar an cloch mín ar grád leis eallaigh feuraigh a chaingilt do. Téidheadh sé fhéin suas ‘un na sléibhte a’ amharac ortha cupla uair sa bliadhan. Bhí sé lá amháin agus bhí sé shuas agus tugadh isteach é le dinnear mór a thabhairt do. Fear bocht a bhí ann agus ní rabh ‘n suidheachan ins an teach le duine suidhe air agus ní rabh tabla ar bith ins an teach ach oiread. Nuair a bhí an bidhe réidh cuireadh a cuid. Suidh Niall Ó’Domhnaill ar creipí stol agus cuireadh clár mór treasna ar a dhá gluain. Cuireadh an dinnear isteach ar an chlár. Ní rabh ‘n suidheadhan ag Sinclear le suidhe air ach bearrach a bhí ceangailte I dtaobh an toighe agus shuidhe sé ar mhullach an beirigh. Nuair a rinne siad an dinnear d’imthigh Sinclear abhaile. Nuair
ordinary member (history)
2019-11-18 20:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a pig’s head in the pantry and you will never use it.” There was a bit of bacon in the pantry and my mother gave it to her.
The travelling folk generally travell in bands of in families and when they come to a sheltered place on a side road they put up their tents and stay there for a week or more.
When the travellers come to a house they never tell stories of talk or come in except when they mend a pot.
I got this from my father,
Mr R Mc Whirter,
Drumlayne,
Moynalty,
Co. Meath.
Olive Mc Whirter.
ordinary member (history)
2019-11-18 20:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Travelling Folk
There are not many travelling folk now a-days because they can get a cottage if they want to. They used to make a habit of coming to certain houses to beg but now they come selling paper flowers and other tin things and when they are finished selling they beg for something. Sometimes they beg for money or bacon or milk.
They ask for metals and bottles which they sell to people who own shops.
The tinkers sell different kinds of saucepots and tin pots. They beg their food and steal new raw stuff like potatoes or turnips.
The seventh daughter of the seventh has the power of telling fortunes for silver.
One time a woman came to our house and asked my mother for bacon, “I have none to give you”, said my mother, “you have said the woman, there is a bit of
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 20:08
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awaiting decision
Fish - Trout - salted herring - eels - crawfish and perch were cooked on a grid - iron over turf coals.
Foods on Special Occasion
Potato-cake on Hallow-Eve - and ''Christmas Eve''
Eggs on Easter Sunday - Geese on ''Christmas Day''
Fowl on St Martins' night 11th November
Loaf bread and Milk on St Johns night at the bonfires and sometimes fowl - Potatoes - Bacon, Cabbage Geese formed the wedding supper.
''Cally'' or Colcannon was used on Garland Sunday and November night.
Tea was used by some in 1840 and cost 8/- per lb. The poorer people did not use tea at that date.
Vessels Noggins made by the ''cooper'' were used as cups. Those were made by scooping out a piece of oak - the noggins was without joints and was all one piece. These were scrubbed with sand. There were no plates but shallow wooden dishes also made of oak.
The table was placed along the wall and the smaller children eat the dinner around the cisean of potatoes in the middle of the kitchen floor. Goats milk and some-times the ewe was milked when the cow was ''dry'' and both were used with potatoes oftentimes three times a day.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 19:50
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awaiting decision
the poor inhabitants used to come to hear Mass when they were hunted by the Red Coats. The little dwelling is still in perfect condition.
At one time there was some deed committed. Before this two trout were always seen in the well. The next morning some workmen passing by were surprised to see the well dried up and strange to say nothing remained only brown Rosary beads in the bottom. That same evening the well was full up again but the two trout never returned.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 19:48
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awaiting decision
There is a holy well in Garterbragher about a quarter of a mile from Ballyjamesduff. There is also a slated dwelling house alongside it. It was once occupied by four Friars that lived in the time of the Yeomen.
There is also a Mass Rock at the rear of the small Priory where a few of
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 19:47
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awaiting decision
"A stitch in time saves nine"
St. Bernards Words - "Mind your house and your house"
"A small pot is soon hot"
"Little said is easily mended"
"Spare the rod and spoil the child"
"An hour in the morning is worth two at night"
"A wise head keeps a quiet tongue"
"A good name is better than riches"
"Health is better than riches"
"A burnt child dreads the fire"
"A little leak will sink a great ship"
"A well is never missed until it is dry"
"A kind face is a beautiful face"
"By learning to obey we know how to command"
"Extravagance in youth brings want in old age"
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 19:43
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rejected
awaiting decision
the sky became very bright, and a little red spot appeared in the horizon, this got larger and larger until there was a long strip of red to be seen.
The people who saw this knew there was something going to occur, and they hurried home or went in shelter.
Then just at mid-night there came a gale, which began to get stronger little by little until a fierce hurricane was raging over the country. It knocked and stripped houses and tore up trees by the roots. The hay and corn was knocked in the haggards and blown away.
It was on this night that the roof was blown off Ballyjamesduff Chapel, the building of the chapel was in progress when the storm came.
During the storm the people were in a panic and left their houses to seek shelter outside. When the old age pension act was passed any person who was alive on that night had no delay in getting it, as they were then seventy years old.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 19:39
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was a big wind storm in Ireland one hundred years ago, on the 6th January in the year 1836. It commenced at 12 o'clock at night and lasted until morning or break of day.
The day before was clear and calm without the slightest breezes. Then a few hours before mid-night
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 19:38
approved
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awaiting decision
of gold, he gold got excited and explained what he had found and at once the gold disappeared and he had to return home without any gold, and the place where he dug is still to be seen near Crosserlough.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 19:36
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awaiting decision
Food in olden times was much different to nowadays. When the people would rise in the morning they would do an hour's work before they would eat their breakfast. The breakfast consisted of porridge and buttermilk in a wooden bowl called a naggin. At two o'clock the dinner was eaten. At dinner time the potatoes would be put in a rod basket which was used for the purpose. The people of the house would then sit around the basket having a bowl of buttermilk and a pinch of salt each and eat their dinner. At tea time they would eat oaten bread and milk.
The people did not know what tea was at that time and they were much stronger and healthier than the people nowadays. Tea is in the district about fifty years. Special food was
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 19:32
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awaiting decision
of the lid of a polish box are flattened out with a hammer. The beaten out edge is cut closely with a chisel. Two small holes are made in the centre of the lid with an awl. A cord about a yard long is passed through the holes and knotted at the end. One side of the cord is held in with the other hand you twist round the spinner until it becomes tight and it is pulled in and out like a melodeon.
Skittles
A straight branch of a tree is cut into five pieces a foot long and three pieces about eighteen inches long. The ends of the short ones are made perfectly even so that they will sit on the ground. They are placed on the road in form of a square with one in the middle. The three large sticks are thrown and if the knock the five small ones the person who trows the sticks wins the game.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 19:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Stringing Flowers.
This game is played by girls in the summer when the flowers are plentiful. A bunch of flowers are gathered and a hole is made in the end of the stem of each. Two flowers are taken from the bunch and the stem of one is passed through the hole in the end of the other one. Then the another daisy is passed through the hole of the last one. The game continued in this way until a long string is made.
The Rattler
This game is played mostly by girls. The rattler is made from five rushes woven through each other until only a little piece of the rushes remains. A few small stones are then put into it and the ends of the rushes are tied. When this is shaken it makes a very loud noise.
The Spinner
Usually this game is played by boys in the Winter. The sides
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 18:58
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awaiting decision
The names of local roads are called boreens or bye-roads. Almost all of them lead from the county road to villages. They were made about a hundred years ago. There are not many old roads in this district. Most of them are used as bog roads now. The roads were not used as Relief Work during the famine period.
The pay the people got was four-pence a day and they thought it a good pay. When there would be roads made in the villages the people living in it would work on them.
There are plenty of paths or bye-roads in the district. They lead from Gorrynagowna to the chapel of Drum and they are still used by the people because they are shorter than to go by road. People used to cross the rivers by means of wooden planks before bridges were made.
There is a story told about the ford of Griffins bridge near Taylorstown. Long ago there lived a Blacksmith named
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 16:39
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rejected
awaiting decision
a bhfuaireas an t-eólas seo nár chuibhe sin, toisg gur "geatairí" an focal coitcheannta ar "rushes" ins gach aon bhall.
Fásann adhbhar eile ins na móinfhéasaibh fluicha nó garbha ar a dtugtar "luachar". Féar garbh atá ann, agus baintear é i ndeire Lughnasa agus deintear é shábhailt do's na beithidhigh i gcóir an Gheimhridh. Is dócha gur ón bhféar seo a dtugtar an t-ainm "An Airc luachra" ar ainmhidhe beag a chidhtear go minic sa bhfear seo - saghas Lizard.

Timcheall an cheanntar seo tá rinnce ag muinntear na tuaithe ar a dtugtar "Cros a Chipín".
Rinnce beirte is eadh é, ach is minic ceatharar á dhéanamh leis. Cuirtear cros ar an úrlá le sgiotachán nó píosa cailce, agus deineann an bheirt rinnche
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 16:31
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awaiting decision
"Cros a' Chipín".
Nós a bhí an-choitcheannta imeasg na daoine annso úair b'eadh cros a dhéanamh ar mhunnchillí na bpáistí ar Lá 'le Pádraig.
Cuirtí cipín sa teine agus deintí a dheargadh. Nuair bheadh sé ag dóghadh ar feadh tamaillín, muchtaí é agus annsan deintí an chros do ghearradh ar chasóga na bpáistí. Deintí é sin chun a chur i gcuimhne dhóibh gur ar an lá san a tugadh an fhír-chreideamh don tír.

"Sgiotachán" an focal ar chipín mar sin; nó mar gaedhilg ar an focal "splinter".
In áiteanna eile, fiú amháin i mBéal Atha an Ghaorthaidh tugtar "geataire" mar ainm ar "splinter", acht dubhairt an tsean-duine ón
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 16:22
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awaiting decision
"Peaca Tomhaiste"
Trom an "peaca tomhaiste" a dubairt sean-duine ó Chaisleán Uí Dhonnabhain le siopadóir i nDromdhálíag nuair a bhí sé ag ceannach cúpla púnt feóla, agus theasuig uaidh meadhchaint mhaith d'fághail.
"Knocking the scales" a tugtar air sa bhéarla.
Diarmuid D. Ó Mathghamhna
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 16:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
is ainm dó, agus tá sé timcheall 75 bliain d'aois.

* * *

"TUILLE"
Gnáth fhocal é seo imeasg lucht ceannach bainne sa cheanntar seo nuair a theastuigheann uatha breis beag thar an cheart d'fághail.
'A small drop now for "Tuille".'

* * *

"SGORAIDHEACHT"
Le linn oidhcheantta an Gheimhridh téigheann na fir go tig comharsan éigin chun cluithche cártaí, no seanchas agus cur tré chéile a dhéanamh, Deirtear timcheall na h-áite seo go dtéigheann síad "ag sgoraidheacht". Ionann é seo agus dul "Ar Chuardaighidh" in áiteanna eile sa tír.

Diarmuid Ó Ceallaig
(a bhailig)
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 16:00
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awaiting decision
Sé an cnúdán an breac is aistigh cruth agus déanadh a bhfairrge. Tá a chloigeann ar nós cearnóg. Tá sé reamhar as a chloigeann agus a dheireadh caol.
Tá dhá eite dheiligneach faoí agus os a chíonn. Ní féidir greim fághail ar an gcnúdán beo mar tá sé chomh cnámhach sin go bhfuil sé indon láimh duine a lot le na chuid deilignibh. Ní bheadh an cnúdán indon iascáin bheaga a bhreith leis marach trí spiacáin atá fé na gheolbhach. Tá cnúdún dearg agus cnúdán glas ann. Is idir dhá uisce a fannas cochraigh an cnúdáin go dteagadh an síol óg amach asta. Sgeitheann an cníudán ó mhárta go lár an tSamhraidh. Marbhuightear an cnúdán leis na baoite céadna a fheileanns
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 14:28
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awaiting decision
The above is all that is "known" in connection with Milfor'ds hidden treasure.
The Hayes's dug inside the Teampaillín and did not find anything or see a bull. They dug in the day but the belief is that the treasure must be found at night. The Hayes's live near Drumcollogher now. Mr. Watson says he tried outside & inside the Teampaillín with the divining rod & he maintains there is no gold there.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 14:25
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awaiting decision
Some believe that the gold was buried by residents of Kilbolane Castle, as it is supposed that an underground channel extends from that ruin to the Teampaillín. The Castle will be referred to under "Local Ruins". Others believe that members of a family called Hayes endeavoured to find the treasure.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 14:22
approved
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awaiting decision
As a result of dreams that gold was buried outside the walls of the Teampaillín, at least three attempts, at different times and by different people, were made to dig for the treasure, at night. On each occasion, the treasure-seekers were frightened off by "spirits" which appeared as an enraged bull.
The last attempt was made in 1908.
The Teampaillín is a ruin which is in the townland of Kilbolane, Milford, Ráth Luirc. It will be referred to under "Local Ruins".
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 14:11
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awaiting decision
"Hoddy , doddy.
With a round, black body
And a big, flat hat". = A pot.
A flock of white sheep on a red hill -
Here they go, there they go,
Now they stand still. - - = Teeth.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 14:09
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awaiting decision
What goes round the table, is always cut but never eaten? = A pack of cards.
As round as a marble, as flat as a pan, the head of a woman & the whole of a man? = A penny.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 14:08
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awaiting decision
If a farmer "raised" ten acres of wheat in dry weather, what would he "raise" in wet weather? = His umbrella.
As I was going through a field of wheat, I met a thing that you could eat. It was neither flesh, fish, feather nor bone & after a time it walked home? = A nest of eggs.
It went upstairs black & white & it came down-stairs read all over? = A newspaper.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 14:02
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awaiting decision
Two local illiterates (Jordan & another) were in the Church, at Mass. Jordan noticed that his companion had a child's pictorial prayer book.
Jordan: Why had you the prayer book - sure you cannot read?
?: How do you know?
Jordan: I never saw a priest saying Mass while standing on his head.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:59
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awaiting decision
Mr. Bill Linane, decided to leave his employer (in Ellon), after dinner. He went upstairs & got his parcel of shirts etc.
The employer's wife: "Are you going away, William?
William: No, Ma'am, they are taking me away"
(William feared the fleas)
In another employer's house a herring was placed on one plate for William & a fellow worker. William (Bill) cut a potato & put half on one eye of the herring because, he explained, if the herring saw the two hungry men it would leave the plate.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:53
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awaiting decision
Riddles
As I sat in my wonderful window
I saw a wonderful thing, a big bone badgem tearing my little whirrily furrily wagon. I call out for Tom Fagem, to hunt away the big bone badgem from tearing my whirrily fussily wagon
A dog hunting a goat from eating the cabbage.

The cross of a ploug turns up in the green, the keel of a ship seldo is seen. "A" in the middle without any more makes up a town between Navan and Fore. Crossakiel.
The keel of a ship, the cross of a plough, 'a' in the middle and spell it out now. Crossakiel.
As I went out a slippery gap, I met my uncle Davy. I sucked his heart and drank his blood and left him lying easy.
A. Blackberry
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:52
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awaiting decision
A Synan & Creagh were local candidates for the Cork Council several years ago & a "Synan Meeting" was held in milford. In order to become popular with Mr. Synan, who was very influential, a member of the audience asked "Who would vote for Creagh? Wasn't it a Creagh killed St. Patrick's goal and deprived the Saint of a drop of milk for his tea"?. When Mr. Andrew Creagh, who still lives in Laraugh, Milford, heard the offensive remark he punished his opponent severely & confusion prevailed for a while. (One Jimmy Galvin asked the question.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:47
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awaiting decision
Mr John Watson P.C., Milford and the late Mr Matthew Murphy of the same address attended a political conference in Dublin before electric light was installed here. Both were about to retire to rest in their room in a hotel when the problem of extinguishing the lights presented itself. Though both were very intelligent neither could solve the difficulty & Mr. Watson attempted to tie his "rural cap" over the city bulb to produce the desired effect.
(Mr. Watson says he knew all about the switch but that Mr. Murphy, who blew very hard & waved his hat @ the bulb did not. After unsuccessful attempts Mr. Watson reminded his companion of the switch.)
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:47
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awaiting decision
about the bank it is and fit for any lord it is. A grave.
As I walked out, as I walked in, it from the dead the live did spring. Six did sit, the seventh did fly, riddle me that and I'm willing to die. A Bird's nest in a skull.
What is it if it is too short, cut a bit off it, it will be long enough. A grave.
What is it that when you take from it, it gets bigger, and when you put toit, its gets smaller. A hole.
The bigger no doubt of it, the more you take out of it. A grave.
Patch upon patch, without any stitches, riddle me that and I'll give you a breeches. Head of cabbage.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
about the bank it is and fit for any lord it is. A grave.
As I walked out, as I walked in, it from the dead the live did spring. Six did sit, the seventh did fly, riddle me that and I'm willing to die. A Bird's nest in a skull.
What is it if it is too short, cut a bit off it, it will be long enough. A grave.
What is it that when you take from it, it gets bigger, and when you put toit, its gets smaller. A hole.
The bigger no doubt of it, the more you take out of it. A grave.
Patch upon patch, without any stitches, riddle me that and I'll give you a breeches. Head of cabbage.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:44
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awaiting decision
Riddles
Round the house and the house and never touches a bit of the house. The Sun.
I washed my face with water that never rained or ran, and I dried m face with a towel that was never woven or spun. Washed with the dew and dried with the sun.
As round as an apple as plump as a ball can climb the church over steeple and all. The Sun.
Hitchamor, Hatchamor standing at the kitchen door, there is no one so great or so strong as Hitchamor Hatchamor standing at the kitchen door. The Sun.
Deep it is and damp it is and green
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Riddles
Round the house and the house and never touches a bit of the house. The Sun.
I washed my face with water that never rained or ran, and I dried m face with a towel that was never woven or spun. Washed with the dew and dried with the sun.
As round as an apple as plump as a ball can climb the church over steeple and all. The Sun.
Hitchamor, Hatchamor standing at the kitchen door, there is no one so great or so strong as Hitchamor Hatchamor standing at the kitchen door. The Sun.
Deep it is and damp it is and green
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:43
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awaiting decision
William Linane ate potatoes and used a good deal of sauce but dif not touch his herring on a fast day. The farmer's wife noticed it & asked him why he did not eat the fish. "Well, Ma'am", he said, "I waited till the tide went out to catch it".
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:41
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awaiting decision
Treasure of Cummer's Town
There is a hidden treasure in Cummerstown in a field near the public road. A man was told in a dream that there was a crock of gold in this field. One night he said and two other men went to dig for it. When they had a deep hole made they came to a big crock. They had it half lifted when they saw a funeral coming down the road. They said that they would put out the light. When the funeral had passed they lit the candle again but they could find neither the hole or the crock, all was the same as they began.
Collected by Jphn Fagan, Gehanstown
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:40
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awaiting decision
A few years ago the "Kerryman", Tralee published funny stories in connection with the late Bill Linane who worked as an ordinary labourer in Milford and surround district. The Ráth Luirc (Charleville) correspondent probably supplied the "Kerryman" with several stories about Linane who was very witty.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:40
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awaiting decision
town. The Milford man met friends, remained in a public house and forgot about the telegram until next morning. The recipient, who was very vexed on account of the delay, was informed that if the news in the telegram was good it would be welcome at any time and, if it was bad, the longer it was delayed the better.
When butter was made in the farmers' houses, residents of this district had to cart their supplies to Cork. A ghost appeared on the road on three or four occasions and demanded butter. It informed the carters that misfortune would be their lot if they refused. At two o'clock in the morning three men set out for Cork with butter. On meeting the "ghost", one brave man jumped off his cart, pulled off the white cloak and found that the "spirit" was a Milford woman.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Crossakiel, Kells, Co. Meath.
Told by Patrick Smyth, Donagoran, Crossakiel, Kells, Co. Meath
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Skillet of Gold
There is a Skillet of old hidden in Kit Creagen's field. There is a charm with which this treasure is to be gold. First the person must dream of the treasure and the charm. He must go alone at mid-night to the place. he must try and kill the fairy which is guarding the gold. If he hits the fairy on the forehead he will kill him. Once a man dreamt of the treasure and the charm. He went to the hill and dug for the treasure. He got in part of the way but he got afraid and came back. A life has to be lost before this treasure can be got.
Collected by Nora Smyth Donagoran
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Moat of Diamor
Once a man dreamt there was a crock or gold in the moat of Diamor. He got up early without telling anyone and went to dig. He was not digging long until he came to an apartment. The crock of gold was on the middle of the floor guarded by a big black cat as big as a dog. He made an attempt to get the gold but the cat cae growling. The man fled in terror and never entered it again.
Collected by Nora Smyth, Donnegorm, Crosskiel Kells Meath.
Tale told by Michael Briody
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Moat of Diamor
Once a man dreamt there was a crock or gold in the moat of Diamor. He got up early without telling anyone and went to dig. He was not digging long until he came to an apartment. The crock of gold was on the middle of the floor guarded by a big black cat as big as a dog. He made an attempt to get the gold but the cat cae growling. The man fled in terror and never entered it again.
Collected by Nora Smyth, Donnegorm, Crosskiel Kells Meath.
Tale told by Michael Briody
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The names of towns and townlands are always so named because of some event which took place there or because of some person connected with the place or some feature of the place itself. Round this district there are some townlands such as Kinteera which means a headland Kilbolane which means the church of the round rocky well it is so called because there was a deep well there long ago. Milford means the ford of the mill. Laraugh means the sight of any thing. Ballyhane means Hohnstown it is so called because a man lived there long ago by the of John. Gortnagoul means the field of the hazels it is called that name because there are a number of hazel trees growing there. Coolatour means the back of the tower it is so called because the land is shaped like a tower. Doona means a fort because there was a fort there long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
St Colman McGlennon, Patron of Cloyne, once resided at Inis, Bawnard. He lived in a big wide tree, and near it was a well. The water in this well is stagnant. People come to pray at the this well, and bring beads and pictures with them. These they leave there instead of favours expected.

Kitty Lawton
Bawnard,
Midleton
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 13:00
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awaiting decision
Although I have read that there was a spring-well near the Martello Tower on the Island over three hundred years ago, I am now informed that there are no springs here.
Water is supplied by submarine water-mains from the mainland (Cobh). It comes from Tibbetstown and there is a supply tank on Spy Hill.
The water-main was laid in 1901. Before that water was brought in Barges. The mains starts at Whitepoint and after dipping under the channel reaches the island about 100 yds east of the Ordnance Pier.
There are two storage tanks on the island. One in the Battery tank and the other on the upper portions of the Martello Tower.
After serving this island the main is continued to Spike Island - Part of this mains is submarine. A new fully submarine watermain was laid between the two islands in Nov Dec 1937. Spike Island has a large rain water supply and has storage banks which could supply ordinary needs for about six months.
Dec. 1938. A new submarine water main from Cobh to Haulbowline is being laid at the moment.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Haulbowline Map
Features:-

Cork Harbour

Yankee Pier
Dry Dock
Patent Slip (500 Tons Cap)
Wet Basin
Steps
Naval Side
Chamber Bride
Steps

Landing Stairs
Camber
Breakway
Dolphin
Spencer's Jetty
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Haulbowline Map
Features:-

Cork Harbour

Yankee Pier
Dry Dock
Patent Slip (500 Tons Cap)
Wet Basin
Steps
Naval Side
Chamber Bride
Steps

Landing Stairs
Camber(?)
Breakway
Dolphin
Spencer's Jetty
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Haulbowline Map
Features:-

Back Channel - River Lee - Main Channel
Camber
Main Gate
Dividing Wall
Formerly British Army Depot
National School
Martello Tower
Ordnance Pier

Naval Sise
Camber
Breakwater
Jetty
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Haulbowline Map
Features:-

Cork Harbour

Yankee Pier
Dry Dock
Patent Slip (500 Tons Cap)
Wet Basin
Steps
Naval Side
Chamber Bride
Steps

Landing Stairs
Camber(?)
Brickway(?)
Dolphin
Spencer's Jetty
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A new Co. formed in 1938 to produce steel at Haulbowline. About 300 men are employed there at the moment erecting the factory.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the heart but was never in the centre of the floor. People never heard of houses with no windows. The only floors old people remember were clay ones. Almost everyone had a half door long ago. Long ago turf and sticks were used for lighting the fire in the morning people steeped brown paper in salt-petre. When the brown paper was steeped it was called "touch". Then they had a red stone called "flint"; they would hit a knife (and wo) against the flint and it would make a spark and that
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
that he dropped down where he was, and his friends carried him home.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
Long long ago there was a mass pat leading from the Mountains to the school yard in Milford. There was a man who was very fond of card playing, and instead of going to mass on Sundays he used to sit on the stile inducing people to play with him. One Sunday he could not get any body to play to keep him company so he started a game himself, and he had only a couple of tricks played when a well dressed gentle-man stood there on the other side of the stile and offered to play a game with him. He was delighted to have the company, and they played game after game. The [man?] who did not got to mass won a lot of money.
They were so interested playing that they never noticed the time passing until the people were going home from last mass in Milford. As everybody had to cross the stile where they were playing the man put his winnings in his pocket, and collected the cards to go aside until the people would have passed. The gentleman went to cross the stile, and when he put up his leg on the man saw he had cloven hooves instead of boots. He got such a (shock?]
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:10
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rejected
awaiting decision
The most common article placed in almost every Catholic home is the picture of the Sacred Heart. A light is burned before it in honour of the Sacred Heart.
In olden times St. Brigid's Cross was looked upon as a very lucky cross. It was an old custom to put the Cross in the thatch to keep away sickness and ill-luck from the family. The Cross was made of plaited
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:07
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awaiting decision
If the May bush is stolen it is said that "your luck is stolen" also.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:07
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rejected
awaiting decision
children go the wood and get holly and ivy and the women decorate the house with it. They decorate the (l) pudding with little bits of holly with berries on it. On May Eve a may bush is put up and egg shells and ribbons and flowers are put on it. The boys try to steal it and often the people of the house stay up at night to mind it or bring it inside. It often happens the boys succeed in stealing the May bush
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In our district it is the custom to make a St Brigid's cross on the 31th of January. Usually these crosses are put over the doors of cowsheds so that St Brigid's blessing will fall upon the cows.
St Patrick's Cross is made from green ribbon and people wear it in breast on St. Patrick's day.
On Christmas Eve the
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 12:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
They are then gathered. The large good potatoes are put into the pit which is dug in the field. The bad and very small potatoes are brought home for (harn) farmyard use. The names of the different kinds of potatoes are-: Aran Banners, British Queens Skerry Blues, Champions Shamrocks and Kerr pinks.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:59
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awaiting decision
that were used but none of those remain. The spades that are used are brought in a shop (drawing of spade)
The local people do not help one another in planting the potatoes as in former days.
When the potatoes are coming up over ground they are secondly covered. When they are well over ground they are sprayed for fear of the blight harming them. In October the farmers start to dig the potatoes with a spade
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in the crop by the throwing in the lumps, or dropping the seed. The potatoes are planted in ridges. To prepare the ground it is first ploughed and harrowed and then the ridges are marked. The manure is put out on the ridges in many little heaps. Before the potatoes are dropped the manure is spread. When the seed potatoes are picked out of the pit they are cut in the centre leaving an "eye" on each piece.
Long ago it was all wooden plough
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:52
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awaiting decision
Potatoes are grown on our farm every year. Each year we plant about one acre of them. Sometimes the amount (vario) varies. When the Spring is fine and dry we sow about an acre and a half but on the other hand when the Spring is very wet we plant less. My father and brother put in the crop. Sometimes my sister and I help to put
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
It is only since the great war that doctors knew well how to stop diseases. Before this when anyone got sick in a house the people sent for someone who cold could cure it.
Patrick Duggan of Tievebrack can cure for the whittle. Ennen Catterson of the green road Pollyarnan can cure for the jaundice. James Bradly Corradoey can cure for the ringworm. He burns the head of a match and writes with ink a saint’s name round it to keep it from spreading. Mathew Harpur of Carnadore can cure a sprain by rubbing it with his hand. Ellen Mc Menamin of Pollyarnan can cure for jaundice. She cures it with certain herb she boils.
If you go under a donkey and over his back three times it is a cure for the Whooping cough. Before you begin you must bless
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:50
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:50
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special day set apart each year as a holiday and have a shilling to each child in the school and a suit of clothes to the tenants children. There never were evictions. The landlord gave an untenanted farm to the most needy people on the estate for a grazing plot for their cows which has been given to the same type of people to this day. The landlady had power to evict tenants even though the rent was payed.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:47
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awaiting decision
Creewood is the name of the Estate on which we live. Lady le Blond was the name of the land lady before the land was taken over by the Land Commission and sold to the former tenants about the year 1904. Her agents name was Wynne. She was a good and kind lady to the poor tenants. Her predecessors built a National school on the (estate) estate for the tenant children a had a
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:45
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:45
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The jobbers names were Johnny Mack, Paddy Mack, Tom Matthews. Tom Farrelly and Pat Duffy used bring all pigs from cross of Grange to Drogheda.
When an animal is sold they are marked in different ways. Some buyers cut hair off the animals side and others mark them with raddle.
When a single beast is sold the halter which is tied round his neck is usually given away. The 12th May is the principal horse fair in Drogheda.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:42
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awaiting decision
There were (are) a great many drownings and happenings in my district. The greatest of them all was the great bog slide.
It happened in the year 1900. It rained for a night and a day. This mountain was so soft with the rain that the scroof [sic] on the surface burst and the log water and mud came down the basin of the Black Burn. Joe Young’s house was full of this mud. They did not get back to their house for six weeks.
Nobody lost their lives in the bog slide.
Several people at Castlefin and Lifford cut turf on the banks of the Finn river.
Some time after that thousands of people were around the place. None of them would venture to go up to where the top of the mountain was for if they did they would sink.
That place is called the “Duck Holes” now. There are a great many wild-ducks in it now.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:36
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awaiting decision
(7) Why is a pulled - out tooth like a thing forgotten?
Because it is out of the head.
(8) Which is swifter, heat or cold?
Heat, because anyone can catch cold .
(9) Which is the greatest riddle?
Life for we all have to give it up.
(10) Been at the same time as the world, destined to live as long as the world, yet never five weeks old?
The moon.
(11) What are the three most forcible letters in the alphabet ?
N. R. G
(12) Why is the letter "t" like London?
Because it is the capital of England.
(13) What is the longest word in the
English language?
"Smiles" because there is a mile between the first and last letter.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I dtosach báire caithfidh mé a rádh gur deachair Béaloideas a bhailiú annso. Tá dhá chúis gur mór le rádh iad cuige sin. Siad so iad:-

(I) Níor tháinig daoine cun comhnuithe ar an oileán go dtí tosac na naoú aoise deag nó mar sin. Bhí daoine ann roimhe sin ach saighdiúirí ó Shasana abeadh an cuid is mó acu. Ní raibh mórán acu san ann leis.

(II) Daoine Imirceaca a bhíonn annso igcómhnuí. Níl aoinne thar cionn caogadh blian d'aois ar an oileán fé láthair a rugadh agus a tógadh annso agus fós níl ach aon fhear amháin a bhí in ann a innsint dom gur chaith a shean athair cuid dá shaoghal annso. Cun deimhniú ar an sgéal ar fad níor rugadh aoinne den bheirt acu annso.
Tagann na daoine ar an oileán agus cuireann siad futha ann nuair abhíonn obair le deanamh annso, sé sin nuair a bhíonn droch fhuadar éigin fé "Sheán Mór". Annsan nuair a bhíonn deire leis an sgrios agus leis an gcreac, stadann an obair dar ndóigh agus imthighteann na daoine indiaidh a chéile.
Ac pé cu olc, maith nó donaí an cnuasac beag atá deanta agam, caithfidh mé mo bhuidheacas ag gabháil le gac aoinne ar an oileán anois (1937) - Do chabhruig siad go léir liom - agus go mór(?) mór leis an Sagart an tAthair Mac Sheáin S.O., le Seán Uasal Mac Giolla Pádraig, Feadhmanac S.S. , Bord Oibreac Puiblí agus le h-Eamonn De Búrca Innealtóir.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:18
approved
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awaiting decision
Inis Sionnac

(Map Plan)
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:16
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awaiting decision
On the foundation stone of the Basin (close by the sheers)
is the following inscription:

This stone set by
Earl Spencer K.G.
Lord LIEUTENANT OF IRELAND *
September 29th
1869

* Note two N(?) thus (?)
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:12
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awaiting decision
On a bronze plaque on the wall of "Oifig Oibreacha(?) Puiblí" is the following inscription.

Royal Alexandra Yard
named by
Her Majesty's Command
To mark the occasion of the visit of
The Prince and Princess of Wales
and
Prince Albert Victor of Wales
on the 15th April 1885

Rear Admiral Henry Denis Hickley Commanding

A. Thomas Nav(?) Storekeeper
J. O. Andrews Supt. Civil Engineer
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:08
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awaiting decision
How it got the name Haul - Bow - Lin.

E. Burke of Haulbowline, an electrician and ex-navy man has supplied the following.

"When ships (Sailing) were coming into the port they had to pass this island on their way to Passage and Cork. Often with adverse winds or absence of wind there was danger of striking the island.
In order to clear the island (with tide running) the skipper used to shout " Haul in the Bowlin". This "Bowlin" was a knot put on the sail to train or tighten it. The island was then a rock and marines came to call it the place where they "Hauled in the Bowlin".
"These ships occasionally used a kedge-anchor when they were becalmed."

From E. Burke.
ordinary member (history)
2019-11-18 11:01
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awaiting decision
After a while the man asked the girl to marry him. The girl said she would marry him. Some time after they were married, and they lived in Bonniconlon.
About four or five years there were three children in it. One day O'Dowd went to Ballina. When he was going to Ballina he hid in a stack of oats.
One child saw him hiding the shawl and he told his mother about it. She went out and found the shawl. The she brought the children down to the sea them into rocks. The rocks are there yet.
Written by- John Moran, Bofield
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 11:01
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An old Irish scholar in the Gaoltact wondered if the name had an Irish origin.
He suggested Aill Bó Lín which would mean the "Cliff of the Drinking Pool for Cattle".

From
Séumas Aindí Mór
Cuil Aodha
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 10:58
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awaiting decision
Haulbowline was a scene of great activity during the Great War 1914-18. Before that about 1,400 men were employed but during this war the number rose to about 3,300.
The British Army Regiments stationed were: The Royal Munsters and the R.A.O.C.
The Naval Branches here were R.N. and R.N.L.I.
It was the chief Naval Victualling depot in Ireland. It had oil tankers and a repairing dock and was very useful in case of ships which were damaged in the Atlantic.
German Submarine Prisoners of War were kept on the "Colleen" - a derilict ship now used as a landing stage.
From German Submarine were brought in here during the war that had been captured.
They were: U99, U46, U58, and U.B. 98.
ordinary member (history)
2019-11-18 10:45
approved
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awaiting decision
he find, but a last, a hammer, an awl, and a piece of paper.
When he read the piece of paper, it told him to fix shoes and he would soon get gold. After a while he had a lot of money.
A Mermaid
A man named O'Dowd went down to the sea one day. He saw a girl as he thought, combing her hair. After a while he stole a shawl which she owned.
This girl was a mermaid. She had changed herself into a girl for a while. Then the man started talking to the girl.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 10:30
approved
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awaiting decision
Local cures
As regards those local cures everybody in the district knows who has them and I think it unnecessary to give the author as each child has heard it in his or her home. Some of the cures are mentioned over and over again by the different children.
Mr Pete Heslim Drimmien Bloone Mohill has the cure of the ring worm. He makes a bottle to be taken for it. Written down by Bridie Roohy Augharas Mohill.
P.Quinn of Augharas has the cure of the weak heat. This man lives some miles from the school. The information was handed in by J.H. McNulty who is a relation to this P.Quinn.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-18 10:14
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awaiting decision
In the village of Moate there lives a man named Patrick Kenny. He is not a native of that place but he has lived there nearly twenty years.
When he came to Moate there was no well convenient to him, and therefore he had no water to drink.
One morning he broke a piece of a haw-thorn bush when it was in bloom. Taking the piece of stick in hsi right hand he
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 09:53
approved
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awaiting decision
seller always gives money to the buyer for luck. The amount of luck depends on the size of the beast.
In Collon there used to be a fair which is now discontinued because farmers used sell their stock at home and their was not enough of stock going to the fair.
Three jobbers used to come from Drogheda and buy all the pigs from the houses around our district and all the pigs used be driven down to the Cross of Grange and three carts would bring (to) them to Drogheda.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 09:50
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awaiting decision
The local fair is held in the village of Slane. Fairs are always held in town. Buyers mostly buy the cattle and sheep at the farmer houses or out in the field. There is a fair green in every town. All the cattle are kept there. Any of them that are not sold on the fair green are brought down the street and sold. The
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 09:45
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awaiting decision
the town every day for a three quart gallon of meal.
In the years 1946 and 1847 it was nearly as bad as the famine to have Parnell giving the meal.
Where the McIntyres are living now is the place where the boiler was boiled. In that house the parish priest used to live. He brought the meal and supplied the poor people with it.
The ,men on the roadside had to break stones at sixpence a day. They had to break them for building walls. There was a man by the name of Fitzsimons breaking stones and not a bit in his stomach. He died suddenly while breaking stones. The men who were working with
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 09:40
approved
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awaiting decision
and spilled it. Then he pulled the child out of her arms went out of the field with it and threw it down along side the road.
The woman cursed the boy. Then he tried to hit her with a stick but he was not able. He went away and when he was crossing a gap he fell and it was said he split his skull.
The men about this district had very hard times during the Famine some of them had to work for fourpence a day and some for six-pence a day.
During the famine the food the people used to get was Indian meal. Every day a very large boiled was filled with Indian meal and it was boiled. People used to come to
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 09:28
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awaiting decision
him had to carry him a mile on their shoulders and throw him in a bog.
Mr. Farrelly of Raffoney used to sell Indian meal. The people used to buy it from him and when they would have enough for themselves they used to sell the rest and get a high price for it.
When Mr. Farrelly heard this he stopped selling the meal and instead he made it into gruel. Then the people used to come with a small three quart gallon and fill it with gruel.
There followed many diseases after the famine the best known of which was the cholera disease.
It is said that a woman from Virginia died with this
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 09:25
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disease. The people thought that she died and they put her in a coffin and left her outside the door.
It happened then that there was a man passing by and he heard her moaning. She was taken out of the coffin and it is said she worked on the roads after for a penny a day.
There is a wall on the Oldcastle road which was built during the famine to give work to the local people.
This wall borders one side of the Marqis of Headfort's estate and is three miles long, six feet high and one foot broad.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 09:21
approved
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awaiting decision
pitted them they rotted and melted away.
During the famine the people had to eat Indian meal. It is said that our ancestors used to come into this town for a little gallon of boiled meal and bring it back to the starving people.
Hundreds of peopl died in this district during the Famine. The dead were sometimes not buried while others were thrown into trenches and in bogs.
One day a woman who was starving along with a young child went into a field there were three cows grazing in this field and she milked one of them.
The servant boy came and caught her and he took the milk
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 09:17
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awaiting decision
a hot turnip and put it in under his hat to bring it home to feed his children.
After a while the smoke started coming up through Tommy's hat and another man who was working there kept telling Tommy that his hat was on fire. That is the way the people had to live during the famine.
The people were walking around and they did not know each other with the hunger. The people buried the dead in the bogs, a big pit was made and the dead body's was thrown into it and covered up. The potatoes were the chief food at this time.
When the people started digging the potatoes they were black and afterwards when they
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 09:13
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awaiting decision
This district was very thickly populated before the famine. The people died mostly of the diseases that followed the Famine.
During the famine a rich man named Kellett lived in Cornasesk. He was very rich and he kept a large number of men in his employment.
He paid these men very poorly. He only gave them four-pence a day. Some of these men had large families and they were not able to support them.
There was one man appointed for feeding the cattle named Tom Farrelly. This man had a large Family to support and he was not able to feed them.
One day when he was boiling for the cattle he lifted up
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 09:10
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awaiting decision
The people do not begin to work on Tuesday or Saturday. They do not change from one house to another Saturday, it is said Saturday's flitting is a short sitting.
The correct time for planting oats is before the seventeenth day of April, and for planting potatoes before the seventh of May.
Tradition tells that there was an old cow and she was boasting that the cold wind of March could not blow the skin of her. March had to borrow three days from April to take it of her.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 09:06
approved
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awaiting decision
notable fact about those days are very cold and a bitter east wind prevails. This wind according to tradition killed an old cow on the twenty ninth of March. If this cow would not be skinned before March was out something dreadful would happen. The cow was so tough that it took three extra days to skin her. These were borrowed from April and added on to March.
Hench they were called the borrowing days.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 09:04
approved
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awaiting decision
In most cases Friday is noted as a very lucky day for changing to a new house especially where old people are concerned as they are more superstitious than the younger generation. They always claim Saturday as a very unlucky day. And on Monday all farmers like to start their work. They never start anything on a Saturday.
Whit Week is supposed to be a very unlucky week. It is dangerous to go swimming, boating or motoring on Whit Sunday as the superstition prevails that something dreadful may happen.
The borrowing days are the last three days of March and the first three days of April. A
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 08:58
approved
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awaiting decision
drop on the "touch" and this would light the fire. If people were using turf they would leave two sods of turf up against each other on the hearth when going to bed and a "cluithog" on the top of them. It would be enough to leave a few more sods up against these and they would be light in a few minutes in the morning. Rushlights were used for giving lights at nights.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 08:56
approved
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awaiting decision
[/]
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 08:55
approved
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awaiting decision
The most harmful weeds growing in this district are: Coppocks, pharabin, skutch, rushes, saral, tansey, presha, foxes tongue, bultrans, watercress, ferns, fetches, flaggers, dandelines, wild sally, blackheads, garlic, lady's fingers, grouncil, marrigolds, moss, hemlock, wildfire and daisies. All of those grow in bad land. In good land thistles and nettles grow.
Some of those
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 08:52
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awaiting decision
weeds are used as cures for diseases.
Nettles are given to people as they are good for the blood. St. Patrick's thumb stops a cut from bleeding. Watercress when boiled is very healthy. Dandelions are given to young turkies, and boiled (is) are given to young ducks. Grouncil is also given to young turkies when they are sick. Garlic is taken for a person who has a bad heart. Wild-fire if eaten is poisonous.
The black spot on St Patrick's thumb is supposed that when St. Patrick got a cut
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 08:48
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awaiting decision
on his thumb a drop of blood fell on this leaf.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 08:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The little Leipreachan is known as Gankana and Puicin. He is about two feet in height. He usually lives in a lonely place and sits on a large white mushroom. His usual occupation is mending and making shoes and sometimes he is known as the little fairy shoemaker. In a green coat and red cap he is dressed.
One time a man was cutting soil in a field and he
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 08:45
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rejected
awaiting decision
saw a little Leipreachan mending shoes. He ran up the field after him but could not find him and thus he disappeared from his sight. Shortly after this the man who saw him died. Another gentleman found a pot of gold but that night the Leipreachan came to the door and called him out and the man was never seen any more.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 08:42
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awaiting decision
Long ago children did not begin to wear boots until they were fifteen or sixteen. There are no accounts of people who never wore boots. Some children long ago went both to school and to Mass barefooted all the year round when their parents could not buy boots for them. There are no beliefs connected with the water that feet is washed in.
In this district the boots are repaired
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 08:40
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by Joe Maguire of the Sally Garden. The boots were made by Michael Halligan of Creewood. He was the only one of the family who had this trade. There are no shoemakers in the district at the present day.
Most people wore clogs in former days. No people wear them now. There was no leather made in this district.
At present the old people in the district call boots by their Irish name "brógs."
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 08:37
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awaiting decision
[/]
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 08:37
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awaiting decision
Shops were very common in olden times. There were several small shops in every district and the owners of the shops used to go to the nearest town to buy their goods. Sometimes buying and selling were carried on after Mass. Long ago the markets were held in towns and in villages. It is unlucky to contract business after Mass.
Long ago there a man in this district named
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 07:40
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rejected
awaiting decision
In the parish of Muckno there are three Catholic graveyard and two Protestant ones, Castleblayney and Oram are Catholic and still in use while Mullandoe famous over the North is closed. Francis Kieran of Drumakill was the last man buried there (1915) Frankfort and the Grove are two non - Catholic graveyards
Mullandoe graveyard is round and raised from the surrounding fields like a fort. It slopes gently towards Muckno lake (to the East) which lies a short way below it.
The churchyard is surrounding by a hill of trees
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 06:40
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rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times in Ireland wakes were carried out in great detail. Certain points had to be watched carefully. The dead person was washed, the hair arranged nicely. All the underclothing was put on, also stockings, then the habit. The corpse was placed on the table on a sheet. The corpse faced the east. The table was put between two rafters, so that the sheets hung from them. A dozen candles were lighted on a table standing at the right hand side of the corpse. One candle was extinguished if the dead person was enrolled with a scapular.
Pipes filled with tobacco, and snuff were distributed to all who came to the wake. The people prayed for the dead person as they took the pipe and snuff.
The old people usually had their habits made a couple of years before they died. These they took out and brushed from time to time.
Special persons were employed to cry over the corpse, these were called "caoiners". They got up and wailed when any friend or relative came to
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 06:29
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awaiting decision
written on the breast-plate - usually a year younger, or a year older.
A person was not supposed to go home from a wake alone - not supposed to visit the sick from funeral. The mother should not go to her first child's funeral. A pregnant woman shold not go into the graveyard, or touch a dead person.
If a person met a funeral on the road, they should walk back three steps with it.
The dead person's clothes were given away to some suitable person, and should be worn for three Sundays going to Mass before being altered.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 06:24
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bad luck.
If going in a journey, it was supposed to bring bad luck to return to the house again if the person forgot anything.
It was supposed to be unlucky to light a pipe or anything from a lighted Christmas candle.
It was supposed to be very bad luck to bring in the blackthorn blossom to a house especially, if there was anyone sick in the house.
The old people never burnt the elder tree as it was supposed to be unlucky.
Water from a blessed well never boils.
If a picture hanging on the wall falls off it is a sign that a death will occur in the house.
A certain family in Ballyhorgan hear three knocks on the wall before a member of their family dies. Another hears the "coach and four" passing their door.
Children were not allowed pick flowers or any "greens" on May Eve. If they did the fairies would have something to do with them.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 06:11
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awaiting decision
It was supposed to be bad luck to meet a brown-haired woman first thing in the morning.
If a hare crossed your path it was supposed to be bad luck.
It was not lucky to see the new moon through the window for the first time.
A lone magpie was supposed to bring bad luck.
If the right eye itchy it meant the person would laugh, if the left, the person would cry. The sole of the foot itchy the person would visit a strange place.
It was supposed to be unlucky to change into a new house during Lent, or the month of May. It was supposed to be unlucky to hatch eggs on Friday. If a cow calved on Good Friday the calf was supposed to die.
If a man visited a house first on New Year's morning it meant good luck for the year, if a woman
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 06:04
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awaiting decision
used vie with each other as to which house he would spend the night for the stories.
The scholars sat on boards placed on sods of turf at school. They were splendid writers.
The master got no pay, but was kept free in the houses. Sometimes he got a flitch of bacon going home, also some eggs and butter. They say thet some of Kenea's books are still to be found. He had a very big bibble.
Genea or Mc Kenea was a cripple. He used go from house to house riding an ass. He used play the fiddle at dancing schools.
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 05:57
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There was an old school in Michael Costello's farm in Ballyhorgan. A portion of the wall is still to be seen. A man named William "Genea" (Mc Kenea) taught there. He was a great fiddler and had a wonderful turn for teaching - "teaching was in him". He taught reading, writing and arithmetic. The pupils came from the near neighbourhood. They wrote with quill pens, some of the feather was left on the top for the handle. The master made the pens. They broke very often. He put a hole in the nib and tied it above the hole with light thread, after using this device, the pens used last longer. They also used slate pencils in tin cases and wrote on slates framed with wood. The ink for the pens was made from the elder berry. Kenea was a great story teller. The families
senior member (history)
2019-11-18 05:49
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awaiting decision
John lynch (deceased) of Ballyhorgan Lixnaw, and Fr. Barry (U. S. A.) were one night going the short cut to Fr. Barry's house.
They had to pass the fort - Black Fort - in Gentleman's land. As they were passing the ford they heard the beautiful music and laughing and shouting.
They stood unable to move hand or foot. They felt they were stuck to the ground.
Their hair stood on ends, and the entertainment in the fort continued.
At dawn of day they were able to depart.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:53
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lane is straight facing the public road. The people say this lane was made about one hundred and forty years ago but no one knows anything about it.
The roads were very bad long ago. The stage coach used to travel on them. They were so muddy that the mud used to be up to the axle of the wheel.
After a while a man named Mac Adam found that a broken stone would be a good surface for a road.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:50
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of it are curved. It is forty years old. It was made by a cooper. The top part is called the peck. The separate boards of the churn are called staves. There is a mark on the side of the churn to show how to put on the lid.
Butter is made as often as milk is to be had. My Grandfather and Aunt churns Strangers help at the work. They help afraid the butter would be taken away.
There came a man into my Grannies and he could not churn and he sat in the kitchen for a very long time and he was afraid to go and in the end he asked leave to go. The length of the churning depends on the kind of weather there is.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:47
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Churning is done by the hand and the dash is moved up and down. When the dash is pulled up and if it is clean the butter is made.
The buttermilk is drank and the calves and pigs get some and people make bread and whey with it.
We have a churn at home. It is about twenty inches long and sixteen inches broad. The sides of it are round and it is sixteen years old.
It is a cylinder churn and the parts are the dash the handle and the lid. There is no mark on the side or bottom of the churn.
Butter is made twice each week in Summer and
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:41
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awaiting decision
A native of Iveagh in Ulster Saint Ibar selected for his monastic home the little island of Inis Fáil in the mouth of Wexford Harbour. On this yew covered isle practically a thousand years previous the Celts had set up their pagan worship.
Traditions tells us that a large stone lying at Begerin marks Saint Ibars grave. He was at missionary work in Ireland before Saint Patrick and was probably the earliest Irish eccliastic. He also settled on the earliest pagan sanctuary to dedicate it to God.
Scholars and students on finding his island retreat flocked to him. Among them was his nephew Saint Abban. Saint Ibar established a monastery at Begerin. His feastday is observed on the twenty-third of April. Before the fourth century he (-) the Church in Leinster. Many churches and villages are dedicated to him chiefly the Church of Saint Ibar near the Lady's Island. After his death his school continued to flourish until
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:41
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plundered by the Danes in A.D. 819. It was the first place along the coast to come under their barbarous clutches.
A Cromwellian adventurer that settled in Wexford, tells us that in the ruins of Saint Ibar's church, there was a wooden image of the Saint. The people of Wexford made frequent pilgrimages to this ruin, and settled any disputes that might arise amongst them by oath, before the image.

Saint Abban shared much of the missionary work of Saint Ibar and accompanied him on a journey to Rome. He founded many monasteries throughout Wexford, chiefly one in Ross. His place of retirement was the church of Saint Stephen, New Ross. Saint Abban is buried in Adamstown.

(Got information in Piercetown N. S.)

Peter Murphy,
Ballyfinogue,
Killinick.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:37
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Tom Curran , who used to collect feathers and rags in exchange for delph and other things.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:36
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In the name of our Lord Jesus Christ crucified I lay down to rest.
Bless me, O Lord
Defend and govern me this night,
And after this short and miserable pilgrimage bring me to everlasting happiness.
Amen.
As I walked down in Holy Land,
I met the Blessed Virgin,
Seven Mass books in her hand,
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:35
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The old people often say "one swallow never makes a Summer." If the swallow comes back early we will have an early Summer but if he returns late we will have a late Summer.
All the songsters singing in harmony denotes the coming of Spring.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:34
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America. When he was on the ship the Queen's Cutter followed them to get him. The captain saw it coming and he said if any man that did anything to give himself up to him - the captain. Callen gave himself up and the captain hid him behind the boiler of the ship and when they searched all the vessel except behind the boiler they went back. They came again and the captain put him on the top rigging and they did not find him. He landed safely
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:31
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in America and was never caught. Another man who gave 6d subscription to help to buy the blunderbus to shoot Hussie, When he heard Cudden and Bunn was shot he was threshing oats and the flail fell of his hand.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:29
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another night with him and fired at them. The landlord was not in the vehicle at all but two other men (m) named Cudden and Bunn were (shoot) shot. The horses in the carriage ran through the gates. Callen was the man who shot them. The police came to investigate it on the next day and Callen was ploughing. The policeman told the landlord that he thought Callen was the man who shot Cudden and Bunn. In the meantime Callen got away to
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:26
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Tom Hughes was reared where sun at dawn makes shadows lightly fall,
Against Fincairn's ancient hill made sacred to us all,
For there, tradition proudly tells, an Irish Hero rests,
Strong Finn Mac Coul, the warrior, enshrined on Irish Crests,
Across the road there lies a field beside lone Corravoo,
Where bones of Irish Chiefs are found in Cromlechs closed from view,
Among these scenes Tom's youth was passed, no recreant was he,
For when his chance to fight arrived he well won his V.C.
He feared not death while all around like Autumn leaves men fell,
He fought good fight and gained the day despite the raging hell
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:25
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of bullets, bayonets, shrapnel bombs, Jack Johnsons, gas set free,
Now raise three cheers, and three times three, for Thomas Hughes V.C.

Fras. McQuade,
Main St.
Boys N.S.

Dr Clarke
Castleblaney
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:24
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Travelling folk or "Shulers", as they are called in this district, sometimes call to our house.
These people have been travelling round the country for the last 40 or 50 years.
They sell small wares such as: safety-pins, needles, hair-slides, pencils, collar-studs and many other small but useful articles.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:20
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him and he was to be put out of his home the next day. The tenants of Rathkenny joined up and a blunderbus to shoot Hussie. They were to shoot the landlord as he was coming from Wilkinstown and they stood in ambush at the Miller's cross awaiting him. When they heard his carriage coming the man who was to shoot him failed. Another of the tenants got the blunderbus and said "We will not loose
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:18
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The following poem was made by Dr. J. P. Clarke in praise of Thomas Hughes, Corravoo, Castleblaney who won the V.C. in the Great War for rushing out to where his officer was lying wounded between the German and Allied lines and carrying him back safely under fire.

* * *

Before the Kaiser's war began with frightfulness untold
How many a peaceful hero worked in many a peaceful fold,
How many a valiant soldier strove to keep the home fires bright,
And now the skies weep oer their graves through Europe in the night,
From Suvla Bay to far Ostend from Lemberg to Bordeaux,
They fought and bled, and died, to save these countries from the foe,
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:18
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In Flanders, France and Servia from Seine to Danube's shores,
Brave were the deeds, unwritten still, of boys we'll see no more,
'Mongst five times twenty-thousand men, the pick of Erin's sons,
Who went to fight and help to win 'gainst Germans wrecking Huns,
How few returned with due reward their valour to repay,
But Thomas Hughes, of Corravoo V.C. is here to-day,
A Farney man, whose noble deed upholds our County's pride,
Who saved his comrades, took the gun and stemmed the battleside,
And changed what might have been a rout in blood stained
He ranked with bravest of the brave, the Connaught Rangers
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:17
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the people up there were against him. Passing Creewood on his way to Drumcondrath the vehicles following him numbered about one hundred and Davitt travelled (on) in a two horse brake.
II. When the landlords were in this country the people hated them. In Rathkenny, Hussie was the landlord. In some ways he was good but in others he was very bad. Slevin of Rathkenny had not the rent for
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:15
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awaiting decision
"Shulers" or pedlars, as they are generally called here, very often visit the district.
Some of them are rich and others are poor.
It is supposed they got their trade from their forefathers.
The articles mostly sold are: thread, needles, pins, studs, braces,
These small articles are in constant demand by the people of the district.
Often the people of the house allow them to sleep in their barns.
They often bring news from distant parts of the country.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:15
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When Davitt was going to a meeting in Drumcondrath an arch was erected across the road at Creewood school house. Two long poles were cut in Blackburne's wood and an arch was caught from one pole to the other. In the centre was a large scroll and "Welcome Davitt" written on it. At Rathie's Hill an arch of dead crows was put across the road as
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:07
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awaiting decision
Absolutely authentic accoutn of material for Drama in 3 Acts -
Scene - Johnstown Village - Meath
Time - 1798 (1st act)
1860 (2nd)
1867 (3rd)
1798. Act 1. On the eve of the fatal battle of Tara there was a consignment of porter from Murphy's Brewery at Navan on its way to Dublin. (Murphy afterwards lived and his descendants still live at Kilcarn Park.) When passing Tara, it was freely distributed among the croppies assembled there (some say it was sent purposely to them.) Adter that they fell an easy prey to the "Red Coats".
Act II - 1860
James Coyle Johnsntown. Locally known as "Jippy" Coyle joined the Crusaders to help Pope Pius IX against the Garibaldi who invaded the Papal State.
Poor Jippy not being very steady was sent home from Ancona
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 23:07
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NAME - OWNER
Peculiarities

The Council Bush - On Gallagh road
It is said that the Irish officers held council here before battle of Clontibret 1595.

The meeting of the waters - On the Border
Where the three townlands, Lemgore, Derrynoose(?) and Lisdungormal meet.

Daisy Hill - R.U.C. Barracks
near Armagh

Manawar Hill - near Keady
from Mean a' Bhothair

Fiddler's Bush - Lislaney, Castleblaney
There used be a road-side dance here, and the fiddler sat in a little seat under the bush.

The Ghost Bush - In Annagh on the Priest's road
A Ghost used haunt it forty or fifty years ago.

Hughes Bush - On Lemgar Road. Belongs to John Hughes, Coolartra

The Pound brae - on the Derrynoose road
Long ago the Landlord of Derrynoose would put peoples catttle in it for not paying the Rent
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:59
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they must omit.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:59
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mentioned because its Ireland's best
Until his name and fame were won this Drogheda man did not rest.
But in open competition all nations he did meet,
When he took the world's honour to a hundred and twelve West Street.
And now I think I have the Reason why explained
Four rival bakery firms of whom you have complained
Have used your patent colours with a painters greatest wit
But the (are) medals are trade mark, and that
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:56
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Here is a song that was amde by James Reilly, Creewood, Slane.
For forty years a baker in Drogheda town you've been.
And now that you're anxious to know the reason why you've seen
A Rival Bakery firm
Paint its vans yellow and white,
To make them look as up to date as the ones with Lyon's bread.
Now Lyon's bread I've
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:54
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awaiting decision
There are no tailors in the district. Shirts are made in some homes from shirting bought in towns. Socks and stockings are knitted locally but the wool is bought in towns.
There is only one spinning wheel in the district. It is owned by Nulty's of Bryanstown but it is not in use at present.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:52
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awaiting decision
Owner
FIELD - PECULIARITIES
Kate McKewon, Crossbane
The Glen field - There is a big glen in it.

Peter Mohan, Crossbane
The Mass stone field - There is a mass rock in it.

Mary Eavens, Crossbane
The black bottom - a boggy place

Philip Mohan, Cashel
The soldiers rock field - there is a soldier buried near the rock

Mick Eavens, Crossbane
The Curragh field

Kate McKeown, Crossbane
The byre field

Peter Mohan, Crossbane
The bobhe(?) hill - There is a bobhe in it

Kate McKeown, Crossbane
Covys Rock
The Lime Kiln field

Daisy Hill - Near Armagh

Thomas Keenan, Derrynoose
Annamuck - Got its name from the race of the black pig

John Mulligan, Tasson
Purgatory - It is covered with rocks and cannot be ploughed.

John Mulligan, Tasson
White Hill -
Sandhole field - There is a sand-hole in it.

Felix O'Neill, Lisdungornal
Black Gap - Black thorn bushes grow there.

Terry Moan, Tasson
Middle rock field - Got its name because it is in the middle of rocks.

Tom Hughes - Tyholland
"Willy the Wisp" field - "Willy the Wisp" was seen in it often.

Frank Óg, Tyholland
The brick field

Richard Brennan, Tonagh
Atchy
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:52
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:52
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Many young lads from the neighbourhood decided to level the rath. One young man started the job and he died with a sore hand.
People say that it was the fairies that left him the sore hand as a punishment for interferring with their dwelling place.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:50
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The following story was told to me by my father as we were all sitting by the fire one night.
There is a field on which our house is built. It is called Mammie's field. Before my father got it, it was owned by a man named Mammie. There was a rath in which fairies lived in the field. They used to come into house and borrow any things they wanted.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:48
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a tongs, a hammer a sledge, chisel, a rasp and a vice. The blacksmith shoes horses and asses.
He fixes ploughs and harrows. There is some of the work done in the open air.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:46
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There is only one forge in this district. The blacksmith's name is Dick Farrell. It is situated at the Sally Garden cross. The roof of the forge is made of canvas. There is only one fire in it in which he reddens the irons. In the forge there is a trough of water in which he cools the irons. It is said if forge water is rubbed to sore eyes it will cure them. The implements he uses are
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:44
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When the curlew is heard whistling it is a sign of rain. When we see the Wildgeese it is the sign of rain. When we see the robin in a stable it is the sign of rain. The cross bill gets his name for he was trying to pull out the nails of our Saviour's hands and feet and he turned his bill.
The robin got his red breast for he was trying to pull out the nails of our Saviours hand and His blood got on the robin's breast.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:41
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:41
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of moss and hair.. white eggs with brown spots.
of moss .. green eggs
twigs and hay.. white eggs with blue spots.
moss and hay.. white eggs with brown spots.
Of straw.. white with brown spots
of twigs .. white eggs.
rain and if we see him flying high it is a sign of hood weather.
If the Wagtail hops round the door it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:39
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Wagtail.. a bush
Stonechat.. A Wall
Magpie.. An ivy bush
Curlew.. In rushes.
Bulfinch.. A bush
Yellowhammer.. A bank
Crane.. Tree tops
If we see the crows flying high it is a sign of rain. If we see a flock of them together it is a sign of rain. If we see a swallow flying low it is a sign of
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:37
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awaiting decision
of twigs.. white
of twigs ... white with blue spots
of moss and hair.. white with brown spots
of mud and hay.. white eggs with brown spots
of moss and hair.. blue eggs with white spots.
skutch and twigs.. white
thorns and hay .. blue
of moss, hay and feathers .. white eggs with brown spots
of moss and feathers.. white eggs with brown spots
of straw.. brown eggs with white spots
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:36
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1st Stanza
'Tis the Flemings came from Flanders
I came from Ballylanders
Where wealth and love meanders
Through the garden and the lawn.

2nd
Ah while I stop and ponder
My heart keeps growing fonder
Of beloved Ballylanders
And the townland of Cullane.

3rd
Beneath the Galtee Mountains
Where flows the Morning Star
Is a Modest little fountain
Just east of Griston Bog.

4th
Where the Buckleys and the Hennessy's
The Hayes' and Dineen's
Keep pure their ancient lineage
They mix with no Shoneens.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:36
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5th Stanza
I love to roam the meadows
And stroll through the boreen's
Where they cook the Limerick Bacon
In a skillet full of greens.

6th
Where they serve the harvest dinner
That is sandwiched in between
A half a tierce of porter
And a jug of pure potheen

Composed by
J. H. Fleming
U.S.A.
formerly of Main St. Ballylanders Co. Limerick where his father, Tom Fleming kept a public house and grocery (1929)

Received the above from
E. J. Ryan,
Relieving Officer,
Ballylanders.
to whom Fleming sent his odes from U.S.A. 1929
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:34
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Crow Tree-tops
Jackdaw Chimney - pots
Robin Mossy bank
Wren A bush
Thrush A bush
Blackbird A bush
Pigeon Ivy bush
Hawk A thorn bush
Goldfinch A bush
Chaffinch A bush
Sparrow Eave of thatched house
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:32
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The most common birds in my district are -
The Crow, Jackdaw, robin, wren, thrush, blackbird, pigeon, hawk, goldfinch, chaffinch, sparrow, wagtail, stonechat, magpie, curlew, bulfinch, yellowhammer and the crane.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:30
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J. Mongey captain.
R. Field, T. Field,
R. Sheehy, T. Sheehy,
L. Bellew, H. Lynch,
P. Lynch, B. Mc Gually,
M. Curran, P. Halpin,
J. Kennedy, J. Reilly,
T. McHugh, and McHugh. James McHugh was the best man on the team.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:28
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miles around. A set of medals was given for the best team and Creewood won it.
When they were playing they wore their own pance and green and gold jersies. Goal poasts were used painted in green and white stripes with a red tape attached to the two poasts.
Seventeen men played on the team. The captain always picked the best of the men and put them on the team. The names of the men on the Creewood team were -
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:26
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Sometime ago there as a football team in Creewood. They played Castletown, Ardee, Navan Gormanlough, Bormeen, Drumconrath, Lobinstown and Drogheda, and other team.
They played the Drogheda team in Boyles field. This was a very interesting game and over two hundred spectators were present. This was a draw match.
Creewood was the best team for many
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:23
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meat only on Christmas day. Herrings were eaten. Colcannon was always eaten on Hallow Eve.
Plum pluddings, dumplings and beef was eaten on Christmas Day. Wooden noggins were sued before cups became common.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:20
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Barney Regan
Par. Heronstown
Br. Slane. It got its name from the man who owned it.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 22:19
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Pairc na gCapall
Tl of Creewood
Par. of Grangegeith
Br. Of Slane. A person who owned this field kept all his horses in it.
Pairc Beag
Tl of Creewood
Par. of Grangegeith
Br. Of Slane. This is a small field
Píosa fada
Tl of Creewood
Par. of Grangegeith
Br. Of Slane. This is a long field.
The Slang
Tl. Tankardstown
Par. Rushee
Br. Slane. Because it is a long narrow field
The Forge field
Tl. Tankardstown
Par. Rushee
Br. Slane. There was a forge in this field long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 21:51
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Festival Customs. 22-12.'37
1. To peel an apple and to throw the skin over the left shoulder with your eyes closed. The skin is supposed to form the initial of your future husband.
2. A boy and a girl put two nutshells in a cup of water, if the nutshells stay together they will be married, but, if they float apart the pair will not marry.
3. The father of the house takes an oatcake and he hits the door with it on New Years Eve a certain rhyme is recited and this is supposed to keep the hunger from the door for the year.
4. To be born on the first of December it is said you will get a painful death.
5. To be vaccinated on each arm it is said that person will never be drowned.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 21:39
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yourself and and and [sic] also when you are finished. While you are going under him and over his back he must be eating oaten meal. What ever meal falls from the donkey’s mouth is made into a cake which is ate in three mornings before your breakfast. Anyone whoes [sic] father and mother are of the same name before they are married can lead for the mumps. When anyone is led for the mumps a donkey’s halter is put on them and are led three times round the well. Every time you go round you get a spool ful [sic] of water out of the well. There is a little well along the road which runs through Lisnamulligans [?] above James Patton’s house. If you can find it yourself it will cure warts. There is a well in […] Roulston’s farm of the Kiltown which can cure toothaches and headaches. Another cure for a toothaches [sic] is if you are opening a grave where there was a corpse buried before and get the scull of the person
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 21:36
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It is only since the great war that doctors knew well how to stop diseases. Before this when anyone got sick in a house the people sent for someone who cold could cure it.
Patrick Duggan of Tievebrack can cure for the whittle. Ennen [?] Catterson of the green road Pollyarnan can cure for the jaundice. James Bradly Corradoey can cure for the ringworm. He burns the head of a match and writes with ink a saint’s name round it to keep it from spreading. Mathew Harpur of Carnadore can cure a sprain by rubbing it with his hand. Ellen Mc Menamin of Pollyarnan can cure for jaundice. She cures it with certain herb she boils.
If you go under a donkey and over his back three times it is a cure for the Whooping cough. Before you begin you must bless
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 21:31
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There was also a man drowned in Charles Mortlands of Ballygonigans mill-dam.
His name was Edward Kennedy of Tievbrack.
This man went to bathe in the mill dam one summer’s evening. There were other men with him. This boy dived to the bottom and was drowned. The other boys could not save him.
There was a man named Dan Doherty of Meenlougher. He was drowned in the river Finn.
He and another man went after their day’s work to bathe. Neither of them were good swimmers. This man swam into a turn pool in the river.
About ten minutes after that there were hundreds of people there.
The man had Scapulars on him but he took them off. The priest said if he had kept on the Scapulars he wouldn’t have been drowned.
anonymous contributor
2019-11-17 21:29
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There were (are) a great many drownings and happenings in my district. The greatest of them all was the great bog slide.
It happened in the year 1900. It rained for a night and a day. This mountain was so soft with the rain that the scroof [sic] on the surface burst and the log water and mud came down the basin of the Black Burn. Joe Young’s house was full of this mud. They did not get back to their house for six weeks.
Nobody lost their lives in the bog slide.
Several people at Castlefin and Lifford cut turf on the banks of the Finn river.
Some time after that thousands of people were around the place. None of them would venture to go up to where the top of the mountain was for if they did they would sink.
That place is called the “Duck Holes” now. There are a great many wildducks [sic] in it now.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 21:13
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would get better.
When one got a cold they would boil milk and onions and drink the milk with pepper.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 21:13
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or feet they would render lard and rub it hard on the spot.
Warts were very common among the people and they usually put a raw potato on it and it would disappear, washing soda would cure warts also.
The way they cured toothache was to put a frog in their mouths and it would go, sometimes they would put a clove in the tooth.
The seventh daughter had a cure for sore eyes, when she would leave her hand on them they
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 21:11
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get better.
Another cure for whooping cough is to get a ferret and give him milk and what ever he would leave after him would be given to the child to drink.
A posthumous child had a cure for a sore mouth, when she would blow into it, it would get better.
Camomile and garlic boiled were a cure for a headache, sometimes they would tie a tape round the forehead to ease the pain.
When they sprained their wrists
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 21:09
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Long ago the people could cure most diseases as doctors were not very plentiful.
The diseases they could cure were; sore mouths, sore eyes, whooping coughs, headaches, toothaches, sore throats, colds and sprains.
The seventh son had a cure for ringworm, when he would leave his hand on it, it would go.
A child with whooping cough would be passed three times under a female donkey and they would
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 21:07
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districts. They have big holes dug into the earth for protection. They live chiefly on grass.
Rats and mice are chiefly to be found where there is provision or some food scattered about.
The Rat is much larger and stronger than the mouse, his food consists of different sorts of food.
The mouse lives on much the same food as the Rat.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 21:05
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Wild animals are very numerous in this country, especially in forests and in wood districts.
Foxes inhabit woody districts and bogs where they have their dens for protection.
They go about at night and break into hens and duck or any fowl they can get and it is on these principally they live.
Rabbits and Hares are to be found in woods and sandy
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 21:05
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rejected
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Wild animals are very numerous in this country, especially in forests and in wood districts.
Foxes inhabit woody districts and bogs where they have their dens for protection.
They go about at night and break into hens and duck or any fowl they can get and it is on these principally they live.
Rabbits and Hares are to be found in woods and sandy
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 21:03
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rejected
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Fairies are small men with red coats and caps who live in forts.
Old people say that they are out from sunset in the evening until cock crow.
Long ago people used to go to fairs and they said that the fairies used to sit at the cross roads mending shoes.
It is said that if one caught a fairy he or she would get a crock of gold.
It is said that if one went into a fort where the fairies live after sunset that they would not get out of it until after cock crow.
It is said that it is unlucky to labour a fort where the fairies live.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 21:03
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rejected
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Fairies are small men with red coats and caps who live in forts.
Old people say that they are out from sunset in the evening until cock crow.
Long ago people used to go to fairs and they said that the fairies used to sit at the cross roads mending shoes.
It is said that if one caught a fairy he or she would get a crock of gold.
It is said that if one went into a fort where the fairies live after sunset that they would not get out of it until after cock crow.
It is said that it is unlucky to labour a fort where the fairies live.
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 20:48
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1. A number of girls would go out on Halloween to a hill where large ferns grow, and they would pluck one each and take a small piece off the top and then they would begin counting at the end saying "when will I be married this year, next year, or never. When they come to the last little leaf at the top, whatever words they would be saying, it is a sign they would be married at that time.
2. It is said to ride on an ass around the town at twelve O'clock on Christmas night is the sign that the person will have a happy death.
3. On Saint Patrick's night to wear a green shirt the colour of the shamrock, in honour of Saint Patrick, it is said that person would give his life if necessary for Ireland
senior member (history)
2019-11-17 20:39
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Local Weather Lore.
1. When three birds are seen on a tree at the same time, it is said that tree will be blown down soon.
2. When the mists roll up by the Silvermines and Keeper it is said to be fine.
3. If the hills appear nearer than they are supposed to be wet.
4. When the cross on the top of the Church looks very small it is a sign of bad weather.
5. When the Castle walls look as if they have no windows it is a sign of bad weather.
6. When a large bird is caught in the neighbourhood it is said to be very frosty.
7. When the Castle looks as if it is white washed it is a sign of very fine weather.
8. When the Castle looks as if it has a roof on it, it is a sign of bad weather.
see page 102