Number of records in editorial history: 468604 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 10:03
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1) Bhí mise lá san Ghimread ar an tuirle tuain an ceann dirneach sa Diardain mhí na bfoileach nach bholch é an uain. Ní raibh sparch ahan le cuir in maoinis mná mo thiansa na mo teasaidh cruaid
2) Acht ag guidhe ríog na ríogacht le me tabairt ar ais go Báile Ata Cliáth
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 10:02
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awaiting decision
1) Bhí mé ina Acail is bá mian líom fhagáil.
Bhá maith an ait ag straóisoirí
Bhí bíadh ag leabaid an is mile failte.
(Bhá m) Is curaid sláinte ag stráoinsoiré.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 10:00
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Casadh teangann
Ceithre ceallach beir ar an mbealach
Canon a crosacha bheith cluasach
Cioca ceallach beir ar na bachacha
Canon an chrosaigh bheith cloisigh
Aghaid as a chuid a triall ar an gcailligh
Beir ar na bachacha canon na crosach bheith cluasacht
Má raghadh fuighleach ar na cailigh beir na bachaigh
Canon na crosaigh a bheith cluasacht
Má raghadh fuighleach ar na cailigh beir ar na bachaigh
Canon na crosaigh a bheith cluasacht
Má deineann fuighleach ar na gcailligh, beir ar na bachaigh
Canon na crosaigh bheith cluasach.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 09:59
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An ruadh lár
Tá dhá lár ruadh ar dhá bhruach an mhointeán
Tá lár aca níos ruadh ná an ruadh láir
Sé deireadh lár ruadh leis an ruadh láir
Preith a lár ruaidh thar abhaile a ruadh láir.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 09:58
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Tóimhseacháin
An mó beal aitinn o Chaiseal go bean Bhéara?
Ní cóir ar mo cosaibh ná leathar ar mhéaraibh, bain sé an bárr díobh agus cuirfead-sa le chéile íad.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 09:54
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A man was driving cattle from Coothill to Monaghan. He reached Nart hollow about 3am. The cattle stood still and would go no further. He heard a voice say “ stay here and sleep the night” then he saw that the cattle were enclosed in a pen. Contented he lay down and went off to sleep. In the morning he awoke to find the cattle quite safe and proceeded to Monaghan. The fairies had guarded the, during the night.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 09:54
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I) Am ceatram lá gan fhógmair bhaid trí cuirse in mo ceoil mór is dfág araim gan smuid ar bhith acht pluich an carra ceo.
2) Tá liondubh ar mo croid sa a cuireadh míle fear cun báis sé an rud a deir mo muintear líom gurbh sioch ar tháobh an báis.
3) Bhíod mo curadh dhéanta leat go abainn na gceap sa cláir is triur baain óg as minas le mé a cuileadh os cionn clár.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 09:35
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In former timers there were more houses in the district. There are the ruins of six houses in the townland. Some of the people that lived in these old houses emigrated to America.
The land is hilly and fairly good. In the valleys there are bogs, adjoined by streams. There are three lakes in the district.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 09:34
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My home townland is Aughareagh. It is situated in the parish of Drum, in the Barony of Dartry, Co. Monaghan. There are about nine families living in the townland, and about thirty of a population.
The family name most common is "Stewart." The majority of the houses in the district are thatched There are two old people living in the townland, and both of them are over seventy years of age. They do not know the Irish language, but they can tell stories in English. Both of them are called "Stewart," and one of their addresses is
Tonnytallagh,
Drum P.O.
Newliss,
Co. Monaghan.
The other person's address is
Aughereagh East, Drum, Newbliss
Co Monaghan.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 09:33
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One Christmas a man and his Grand-daughter were going to Killala. They were buying provisions for the Christmas festival. They had an ass and creels with them. The little girl was riding on the ass in front of the man.
When they were coming home at Cortoon the ass went in a gap and went across the tide. When the man came as far as the gap he saw the ass crossing the tide. He could do nothing but look at them.
The child held the "scurogs" all the time and they landed safely on the other side. The man went around the road to the other side expecting to find the ass and the little girl there but to his surprise they were not
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 09:33
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awaiting decision
A Story about a Priest
When a priest was on the run in Ireland and He came to Mullafarry Killala. and asked a man named Carrol to hide him. Mr. Carrol said that he had no place to hide him but that he was building a stack of turf and that he would hide him in it if he wished. The Priest agreed and he hid him in the stack. When the yeomen came they offered £5 to anyone that would give them information about the Priest, Although he was a Protestant he refused to give any information to the yeomen. The present Carrols of Mullafarry are the desendants of that Mr. Carrol.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 09:30
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When there is bad weather aproaching the cat sits with his back to the fire. When there is rain aproaching he scrapes wood, cloth and bushes. He is very bold then.
A sow is supposed to see the wind and when there is a storm apraoching she is very cranky. A dog eats grass when there's a storm aproaching because he feels sick and nature tells him its the best medicine.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 07:54
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This townland is situated in the parish of Annaduff, and in the barony of Mohill. This townland is called Corduff, because it is very dark tursty land. There are nine families residing in it and the approximate population is 54.
The most popular families are the Reynolds Mc Garrys, Bohans, and Kevilles. The houses are low and thatched and the walls are whitewashed. There are many old ruins in it, one of which belonged to a family named Gannon and there is another which belonged to a family called Cassidy.
These families were evicted in the famine days and died of starvation on the roadside. There are four old people in my townland, one called John Bohan being 84 years . They know no Irish but an old man named Peter
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 07:51
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good weather, but when it appears black, it is the sign of rain
When the midgets are busy, it is the sign of rain. When crickets sing loudly it is the sign of rain. When clocks creep plentifully about it is the sign of rain. When many snails are see on the ground, on a summer's nigh, it is the sign of rain.
When smoke goes up straight it is a sign of good weather, when smoke falls to the ground it is a sign of rain. When fires smoke the house it is a sign of frost. When soot falls it is the sign of rain. When blue is seen in the ashes it is a sign of rain.
When corns ache it is the sign of rain. When a faraway noise can be heard easily, it is the sign of rain. When chilblains itch it is the sign of rain. When salt goes damp, it is the sign of rain. White frost brings rain. When a shower of hailstones (unexpected) comes, it is followed by frost. If the ash tree blows out (buds) before the oak, it is the sign of a wet Summer, if the oak blows first, it is the sign of a fine summer.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 07:47
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It is a bad sign to see a dog eating grass. When a horse stands with his back to the hedge it is a sign of rain. When a horse lies flat in the middle of a field it is the sign of a good day. When swallows fly low in the sky, it is the sign of rai. When starlings and crows are together in the sky it is the sign of wind It is the sign of a storm to see cattle crouching under the ditch. When sheep are out in the field it is the sign of good weather. When a dog eats grass and his inside can be heard moving it is the sign of rain. The yellow frog brings fine weather, the rusty frog brings rain. It is the sign of frost to hear the blackbirds screeching in the evening. It is a sign of storm to see the swans on the land. When hens pick their feathers it is a sign of rain. When the walls of house are damp, it is the sign of rain. When the wren sings under the hedge it is the sign of rain.
When the Dublin red is seen in the morning, it brings rain, some time of the day.
When fog is seen coming down the mountains, it is a sure sign of rain; when fog is seen going up the mountains it is a sign of good weather. When there is 'fire' on the hills it is a sign of good weather. When water in the canal is crystal clear, it is a sign of
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 07:45
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acted as master. Each pupil used to bring a contribution to recompense the master.
This school existed in the year 1832. The English tyrants in order to prevent the Irish from gaining any learning had a standing army to prevent any hedge-schools or classes to be held throughout Ireland.
But the Irish boys were detailed in turn to stand guard and give warning to the school master when any soldiers were approaching.
By these means the Irish gained some little education in spite of the English soldiers and government to keep the Irish in ignorance.
In those days the subjects taught were reading, writing and some Arithmetic. They used to write with quills and ink made from berries.
This tale was told to me by Bernard Toole, Corrick, Dromod, Co. Leitrim.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 00:44
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Tá an áit sin in aice le Suidhe Finn I gComán. Bhí ór curtha i bfolach ann ag na Danair fadó. Tháinig fear ó Chonnacht aon lá amháin agus do dhein sé poll mhór chun an óir d’fhághail. Bhí sé seachtmhain ar an obair. Chuaidh sé síos ann annsan ach ní fhanfadh aon lampa ar lasadh ann. Nuair a tháinig sé amach thuit na clocha agus an ghairbhéal isteach ann agus do líonadh an poll arís.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 00:33
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awaiting decision
Tá an ainm sin ar an áit na bhfuil Suidhe Finn ann tá dhá chasadh ar an abhainn Carrthaighe atá ag rith síos in aice leis go Dúmhcha.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 00:24
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Tá Caisleán Wynn i gleannBeithe. Bhí “Wynn” agus a arm na gchómhnuidhe ann. Tighearna talmhan a beadh “Wynn” Cuir sé a lán daoine amach ar an mbothar nuair a bhí an droch aimsear ann agus do scrios sé an áit mór timcheall. Nuair a bhíodh an sagart ag dul thar an Caisleán bhíodh na saighdiúirí ag caitheamh pílear leis. Do chuir an sagart mallacht ortha. Chuaidh sé isteach san seipéal agus léig sé a leabhar paidre. Annsan tháinig sé amach dubhairt sé le na saighdiúirí
“An bhfuil sibh ullamh anois”
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 00:23
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raibh an crann ag fás sar a bhaineadar é agus níorbh bh’féidirleo an t-ór d’fhághail.
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 00:22
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rejected
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raibh an crann ag fás sar a bhaineadar é agus níorbh bh’féidirleo an t-ór d’fhághail.
Caislean “Wynn”
Tá Caisleán Wynn i gleannBeithe. Bhí “Wynn” agus a arm na gchómhnuidhe ann. Tighearna talmhan a beadh “Wynn” Cuir sé a lán daoine amach ar an mbothar nuair a bhí an droch aimsear ann agus do scrios sé an áit mór timcheall. Nuair a bhíodh an sagart ag dul thar an Caisleán bhíodh na saighdiúirí ag caitheamh pílear leis. Do chuir an sagart mallacht ortha. Chuaidh sé isteach san seipéal agus léig sé a leabhar paidre. Annsan tháinig sé amach dubhairt sé le na saighdiúirí
“An bhfuil sibh ullamh anois”
senior member (history)
2021-01-25 00:07
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ó’n áit sin ach chuaidh sé treasna báighe an Daingin annsan agus tháinig sé isteach ag Fionn Trágha Ach tháinig Fionn agus na fianna roimis annsan. Bhí cath ann ar feadh bliadhana agus lá agus do bhuaidh Fionn Mac Cúmhthaill ar Daire Donn . Deireann daoine eile go raibh Fionn Mac Cúmhthaill ag rith in diaidh Diarmuid Ó Duibhne mar do ghoid Diarmuid Ó Duibhne Gráinne uaidh, an bhean a bhí le pósadh ag Fionn. Ach ní phósfaidh sí é mar bhí sé ró-aosta. Bhíodh Fionn ag faire ó Suidhe Finn go bhfeicfeadh sé Diarmuid agus Gráinne. Tá áit deich míle i dtaobh thiar de Suidhe Finn i gCealla agus tá an ainm leabadh Diarmada ann mar d’fan Diarmuid agus Gráinne oidhche ann nuair a bhíodar ag rith ó Fionn Mac Cúmhthaill
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:55
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awaiting decision
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senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:53
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There is a graveyard in the villa of Aughamore (Ballyhausis, Co Mayo in which there is the ruins of an old church and there is suppo to be a horn of gold found th A man named Patrick Quinn, from Glan, (Kilkelly Co Mayo) dream of it three times and he would get it by going there to a funer So he went there and he saw the horn of gold but he was ashamed to take it in the presence of the people so he thought he would wait until they would be be all gon When they were gone, he went for [?] gold but it had disappeared. A man from Co Sligo dreamt of it three tim and he also had to go there to funeral. He went and he got th horn of gold. The place where th horn of gold was can be still see
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:43
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Sin cnoc mór atá in aice mo thighe. Tá sé ar chúl na sgoile, ag feachaint amach ar báige an Daingin. Bíodh Fiona Mac Cúmhthaill na shuidhe ann fadó, agus a airm in einfeacht leis. Bíodh sé ag feachaint amach ó bharr an cnuich ar an fhairrge ar eagla go raibh Daire Donn ag teacht, agus a airm i longaibh aige. Ba é rígh an domhain é sin, Bhí an domhan ar fad ach amháin Éire. Tháinig sé isteach in aice le Ros Beithe ar longaibh é féin agus airm láidir. Ach rith Fionn Mac Cúmhthaill siar agus thosnuig sé ag caitheamh cloch síos ortha ó bharr an cnuich a bhí in aice le Ros Beithe. D’imthigh Daire Donn
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:22
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“Da chluais chapail ar labra has loingseach.”
Then all the great company were smitten with fear and every eye turned on the king and he in his confusion put up his hand to stop his ears and in doing so he loosed the ribbons of his cap and up flew the two ears. A great roar came from the crowd and the king fell flat on his face. When he looked around him he was along except for the harper.
At first all Ireland wondered at the horses ears as time went by they forgot and ceased to talk about it. As for the king he was so ashamed he would not show himself in public. But then he made nothing of it anymore and when he knew there was nothing to hide he felt a load lifted from his mind like ‘Taidgin’ felt when he told his secret to the tree and he got sorry for the poor barbers he had killed and he pensioned their people. And ‘Taidgin’ made no more of cutting his hair than he would of cutting yours or mine.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:19
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Dá la déag an Nodlaig:- Tagann na leatnta on lá roime lá Nodlag go an cead lá den mblaida uair, agus tagann na sean daoine dá lá deag an Nodlaig air na leatnta sin. Mar sin é an tam ar rugadh ar Slairteor Iosa Criost sna mblianta fado chun bhíonn an crib i dteach an Phopail ar fead na fhá lá deag sin agus tig le na daoine dul síos agus é feiceal lá ar bhit ar mait leo dul sios
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:16
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senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:16
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There was once a man called James Duffy living in Glan (Kilkelly, Co-Mayo) He used to go out to a place called Ballinful every night visiting. On his way out he had to pass by a fort. One night as he was coming home he heard great commotion in the fort, so he stood and listened. He saw a number of horsemen coming out a gap in the fort and one of them shouted to his friends to be careful. there was a man watching them, and mind that girl on the last horse. Now James Duffy said to himself he would mind her too, so when the last horse was passing he pulled her down. and brought her home, but alas he found she was dumb. He kept her for a year. Well that night twelve months he was sitting by the fire smoking and he said to his wife this night
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:15
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the kings harper and anyone who would be so bold as to play against. When the harpers of Ulster, Munster, Leinster and Connacht had played the king called his own harper to him to play.
But before the feast the harper had taken out his harp and found it all worm holes. So he went to the forest for wood to make another one. And where should he go but to the sally-tree to which ‘Taidg’ had whispered his secret.
When the king told him to play he said “By your hand, O King, ‘tis afeared of this harm. I am to-day for it plays without my fingers touching it. I fear there is a spell on it.”
“Spell” said the king, “What folly is this? Play, man, play”.
But scarcely had the harper struck the harp strings then they began to roar like thunder breaking over the house and a thousand men breaking stones and a loud voice roared
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:15
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(They kept [?]) Yes she said I was crying. this day twelve months my daughter was buried. Well, now said James Duffy what would you give to see her again. I would give all I possess she said to see one sight of her, but I cannot So James Duffy turned out on th lawn and whistled and the gir came up the lawn leading the horse. When the woman saw her she fainted. after a while she recovered and James Duffy was taken in to the house and we treated, and the girl and her parents lived very happy after
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:11
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other man who was saying that the salesman should tell lies.He asked him how did he get the money he told him and he said he would go under a tomb stone. He went under the tomb-stone and the cats came again. One of the cats said that anyone who wanted anything or that any one who had anything to leave should do it now quickly. One cat said he left a bag of gold here and I want it now. The cat said get it now. They went searching and they got this man and they thought it was he who brought it and they killed him.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:10
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from the "good people" but where you are from I don't know. I belong to the County Sligo she said and I came from very aristocratic people My father has a mansion like that one I see across from me known as the Tavrane House. James Duffy asked her if she would like to go home and she said she would so the following day he saddled up his horse and set off with her They kept travelling on until they came to a big avenue. Then the girl said, this is where my father lives. There was a big mansion in a lawn about one hundred yards up. James Duffy went up to the house and knocked at the hall door. The mistress of the house herself came to the door and said Good Day sir, what's your trouble. You seem to be like a woman that's after crying he said to her
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:09
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What with the shock and the weight of the secret that was on him ‘Taiog’ fell ill and fell a raving, and when the doctor came to him he says, “Doctor, I have a secret and if I don’t tell it I’ll die, and if I do I’ll not be allowed to live”. And when the doctor heard how he’d promised he’d never tell anything with ears or tongue he said “Go down to the sally-tree by the river and cut a slit in the bark and whisper your secret into it and the load of it will be put on the tree. And if ever it should happen that weight of it should break the tree down, why, then it must fall into the river and be drowned altogether.
So ‘Taidg’ stole away to the sally tree and cut a slit in the bark and said. “Da chluais chapail ag Labreadh Loingseach.” And then he went home singing for the lightness of his heart.
It came to pass that in that year the king made a great feast. He bade all the four kings of Ireland with all their lords and ladies to the feast to hear the mighty harp playing contest between
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:08
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Níor bféidir leo corruighe mar bhí siad ceangailte leis an dtalamh agus níorbh bhfhéidir leo aon piléar eile a caitheamh leis. Dubhairt an sagart ná feadfaí riamh an braon anuas a stop ar an gcaisleán agus go dtiochfadh lá ná bheadh ‘ na chómhnuidhe ann ach na preacháin. Thuit sé amach mar adubhairt an sagart. Tháinig saighdiúirí Sasana go dtí an caisleán gach samradh chun traeneál ann roimh an Cogaidh Mhóir. Bhíodar ag teacht arís i mbliadhain 1920 ach an lá roimhe sin. Tháinig an Arm Poblachta na h-Eireann agus chuireadar tré teine an caisleán agus tá sé na fhothrach anois in aice an bhóthair ag dul ó gleannbeithe go Cathair Saidhbhín
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:00
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A Cacaí Teallaigh was a cake made of oaten meal and milk left on a stone or a leaf of cabbage on the heart to bake.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:00
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a year ago I got the girl. I thin I will go out to-night and see can I hear anything about her. He set out for the same road as he did before. As he was coming hom he stood at the same gap again. He had not long to wait until the horsemen came out again. On of them turned back and said this night twelve months James Duffy took Nellie Donovan from us. What good is she to him when she is dumb said a voice, he does not know about the pen that is tuck in the back of her head. That was all James Duffy wanted. When he went home he made her comb her hair until she got the pen out. As soon as she got it out she asked him where she was. He told her. He said he need not ask her wha her name was as he knew it
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 23:00
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A Cacaí Teallaigh was a cake made of oaten meal and milk left on a stone or a leaf of cabbage on the heart to bake.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:58
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Bhí an mac (mac an tseanfir nu mac an cinn na an chloiginn abhí ar an altoir) ag siubhal roimhe go dtainic sé comh fada le bóthar mor mín. Lean sé é agus tar eis tamaill thainic sé com fada le leuna mór fairsing. Chonnaic sé go raibh an fear gann ann acht bhí sé lán le caoraibh a bhí teann reamhar compoirdiúl. Rinne sé iongantas de sin.
D'imthigh sé leis go dtainic sé chomh fada le paírc mhóir go raibh neart feir a fás ann. Bhí sé lán le beithí a bhí tanuidhe caithte craidhte. Bhí na cnámha ag teacht amach trid a gcraiceann agus bhiodar ag troid agus ag bruighin le ceile. Rinne an mac iongantas de sin agus d'imthigh sé leis.
Níor bhfada go dtainic sé go dtí paírc eile. Bhí claidhe ann agus chonnaic sé beirt fear ann agus sluasaide aca agus bhí siad ag cartadh agus ag caitheadh an cré ar a cheile. Rinne an mac iongantas de sin freisin. D'imthigh sé leis agus ar tuituim na h-oidhche thainic sé chomh fada le teach bheag ar thaoibh an bhothair
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:56
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stayed there for a few days When they were going to their own home They had another feast in the man's house. At a wedding two meals were given, one early in the night composed of boiled meat and turnips, and cabbage or and potatoes or cabbage and the other meal about six o'clock in the morning of tea, bread, butter, or jam. Neighbours and relations are invited to the wedding and they sang and danced and drink porter or whiskey all night. During the night the straw boys came, so called because they wear straw and false faces they ask for freshments and had to have a dance with the bride. They always got drink
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:56
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The next day the barber came in. He stood bowing, bowing and all the blood in his body ran down in his brogues. So the king looked at him a said “You can go where you please when you cut my hair. But first you must swear by the kings that you’ll never tell anything t hat has ears or tongue what you’ll see this day.”
Then he sat on his throne and took of his green cap and up jumped two brown horses ears as long as if they belonged to an ass. The boy never knew how he got through the job. Once he nearly cut the edge of one ear, but the king roared so loud while he put down one ear and cocked up the other. He’d give the world to be somewhere he could go and faint and be finished with the business.
But it was over at last and the king gave him five guineas and said that if he told of it, then if he didn’t hang or transport him he’d do worse he’d see him married to such a scold of a woman that he’s wish he’d never been born.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:53
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There was once a man called James Duffy living in ylan (Kilkelly, Co-Mayo) He used to go out to a place called Ballinful every night visiting. On his way out he had to pass by a fort. One night as he was coming home he heard great commotion in the fort, so he stood and listened. He saw a number of horsemen coming out a gap in the fort and one of them shouted to his friends to be careful. there was a man watching them, and mind that girl on the last horse. Now James Duffy said to himself he would mind her too, so when the last horse was passing he pulled her down. and brought her home, but alas he found she was dumb. He kept her for a year. Well that night twelve months he was sitting by the fire smoking and he said to his wife this night
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:49
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rejected
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Bhuail sé ar an doras agus leigeadh isteach é. Seanfhear a bhí istig ann agus d'fhailtigh sé é; thug sé suipeár maith do agus chuir sé ar leabaidh compoírdiul é i n-einfeacht le beirt pháisde.
Ar maidin thug sé a breicfeasta dó. D'innis an mac óg do annsin faoi na rudaí a bhfaca sé ar a bhealach chuig an teach agus d'fhiafruigh sé ar an seanfhear innseacht dó cen chiall nu miniú a bhí leis na h-iongantaisi a chonnaic sé.
Labhair an sean fhear leis annsin agus d'innis sé dhó an chíáll a bhí leis na rudaí a chonnaic sé.

NA CAORAIGH REAMHRA
Daoine bochta a bhí ionnta seo ar feadh a saoghail a bhí sásta le toil Dé agus a choinnigh A dlighe. I ngeall ar sin bhiodar geanamhail i n-ámharc Dé.

NA BEITHÍ TANUIDHE
Daoine iad seo a bhí saidhbhir le saidhbreas saogalta acht ní raibh siad sásta le toil Dé agus bhí ocras ortha i gcomnaidhe ar mhaoin agus airgead saogalta. I ngeall ar sin ní raibh siad dathamhail i n-amharc Dé ní raibh siad faoi na cumdach.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:47
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and then went away satisfied. about 40 or 50 years ago the people went on horseback to weddings The women sitting on pillins behind the men.The women to send in some clothes before she go into the new house. it is said. She must not return to her own home for a month after she leaves it this visit is called the months visit.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:46
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get flogged for letting her disturb me. What brings you here, your old sinner” says he to the poor woman.
“O, please, your majesty, don’t take my ‘Taiofin’ from me, for if you do, there’ll be no one to give me a decent burial.”
“And who the devil may ‘Taiofin’ be?”
“O, your majesty, he’s the one that’s to cut your hair to morrow, and I’ll never be seeing him alive again at all, at all”
“Call the sentry”, cried the king to his page.
“Please, your majesty, his gone to see the flogging.”
“It doesn’t please me that he should take the liberty. Call the steward then.”
“Sir, he’s gone too”
“Then call the guards”.
“O Sir, they’re all getting flogged.”
“Well, begone” he says to the woman, “since I cannot give you the chastisement you deserve. You shall have your boy back safe and sound, but if ever I set eyes on you again, I’ll hang you.”
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:43
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trom-trom ceard atá os do cionn.
One person puts his head down and another person puts something over his head and said "trom-trom ceard atá os do cionn if he does not corect corectly he puts some thing else over his back untill he guss corectly.
April Fool.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:41
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awaiting decision
High-windows, hide and seek tick dallóg, Jack stones stops thread-the-Needle. Lurbog lorbog all sit around the fire with feet
lurbog Lorbog.
Be Oneil Neil opribean pribean o surle isteach go flaíte
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:37
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awaiting decision
will always have money.
Cures.
1. Whooping cough. If a ass is milked and the milk given to the child.
2 If some body meets a man riding on a white horse and ask for a cure whatever he tells them to do will cure the whooping cough.
3. Toothache. To put a frog into your mouth and let him bite the tooth is supposed to be a cure.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
will always have money.
Cures.
1. Whooping cough. If a ass is milked and the milk given to the child.
2 If some body meets a man riding on a white horse and ask for a cure whatever he tells them to do will cure the whoopinjg cough.
3. Toothache. To put a frog into your mouth and let him bit your tooth is supposed to be a cure.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:36
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rejected
awaiting decision
The Barber and the King with horse’s ears.
This story is about a king who would only allow his hair to be cut once a year. He lived in the middle of Ireland. Well he had his hair cut but once a year and after that nothing more was heard of the barber who cut it.
When seven barbers vanished there was never a barber in all Ireland who would come within a mile of the castle gates of the king for all the gold in the River Shannon. So the king sent round a proclamation that all the shavers in the country were to draw lots and whoever drew the short straw must cut the kings hair. The first lot fell upon the son of a poor widow woman. When she heard this she ran through the palace gates and rushed into the big stone hall.
“What does this mad woman want?” roared the king.
“Go” he shouts to his sentry and put the guards into the dungeon and see they all
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:36
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Bhí seanfhear ann uair amháin agus bhí mac aige. Bhí an mhac pósta acht cailleadh a bhean agus a bheirt phaisdí. Bhí fiaca orra agus d'imthigh an mac le airgead a shaothru leis na fíacha d'íoc. Tamall in a dhiaidh sin cailleadh an sean fhear freisin, acht sul a bfuair sé bás ghuidh sé Dia nach bhfagfadh an t-amharc as na suilí go bfeicfeadh sé a mhac airíst,.
Cuireadh an sean fear sa reilg. Tamall in a dhiaidh sin bhí beirt fhear ag siubhal trid an reilg agus chonnaic siad cloigeann fir ann. Thug duine aca speach don chloigeann, acht dubhairt an fear eile leis nar cóir dó é sin a dheunam, go mbfeidir nach ndeanfadh sé é da mba rud é go raibh an ceann in a bheatadh. Thog sé suas an cloigeann agus d'fág sé é isteach i dtom neanntog.
An oidhche sin chonnaice sé an ceann airíst agus labhair an ceann leis. Dubhairt an ceann leis an sgeul a innseacht don sagart agus an cloigeann a cur ar an altoír go dtuitfeadh na suilí amach as. Rinneadh amhlaidh.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:35
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will always have money.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:34
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1. Fox. He lives on the the mountain and comes down at night to steal fowl. In the fox's tongue there is supposed to be a cure for drawing out a thorn or any other object that got into the flesh.
2. Rabbit and hare, live in holes in the ground and are killed and sold by hunters.
3. Weasel. People are afraid to rob a weasel's nest, because his spit is supposed to be poison. One day a man from Bohomore robbed a weasel's nest when he went home he saw a crowd of weasel's outside the window ready to suck his blood.
It is said that if any one can get a purse made of a weasel's skin
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:28
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awaiting decision
Capóg an fearbán smother up the potatoe crop.
Chicken Weed; Is used as a cure for mumps or enlarged tonsils. The weed is heated near the fire and then put to the aflicted part.
The Herb of the Seven Cures, So called because it has seven stripes and is suposed to be able to cure seven diseases. It stops bleedings. It prevents blood poisining. One side of it draws blood and the other prevents bleeding.
Dandeloin; The water in which the dandeloins is boiled is a cure for heart disease.
Duileasc; is dried in the sun and then eaten.
3. Potatoes.-
We set potatoes every year. My father
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:26
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man. Then they got him under the stack of straw and it was left on the man that was asleep under it that night. So they brought to court the man that slept in the stack of straw. So he pulled out the piece out of his pocket and it fitted in the man’s coat that killed the man. So the other man was free so he went home and lived happily with his wife and son.
Collected by
Patrick O’Connor
(Grandson)
The Brook
Balling
Told by
Mrs Borland
The Brook
Ardnaree
Ballina
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:25
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2. Herbs
Capóg an fearbán smother up the potatoe crop.
Chicken Weed; Is used as a cure for mumps or enlarged tonsils. The weed is heated near the fire and then put to the aflicted part.
The Herb of the Seven cures, So called because it has seven stripes and is supposed to be able to cure seven diseases. It stops bleedings. It prevents blood poisining. One side of it draws blood and the other prevents bleeding.
Dandelion; The water in which
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:25
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ceithre lá. Tógtar é annsin nuair atá an bárr tuitighthe sios go tóin an bharaille agus curitear isteach sa bpota nu san "still" é. Cuirtear teine bheag faoi. Teigheann an caipin ar an bpota annsin agus an piopa casta, an "worm" thíos i mbairille fuar uisge. Teigeann an gal amach trí an pioba cam casta agus amach i soitheach beag atá faoi. Deantar é seo leis an mbeóir ar fad. Tá an "singil" agat ansin.
Nuair atá an singil ar fad tarrnuigthe caithfear é cur isteach sa bpota aríst agus é a tharraint airíst. Tá poitin agat ansin.
Is fearr an ceud galun a thiocfas amach na an chuid eile dhe An "Blogam Bróach" nu "Tús a' Phota" a dtugtar ar seo. Tá sé an láidir agus bionn tóir air le h-aghaidh scoilteacha. Cuirtear fuar uisge isteach san bpoitín annsin go mbí sé lagaigthe aca síos go "Proof."
Deanann cruithneacht poitin láidir - acht ní bhíonn sé
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:24
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again. He set off to look for work. He was going on the road at night and he came to a house and went in to see if he would get the nights lodgings. When he went in the man and wife were fighting. Then he thought of third advice. He left the house and he went to sleep in a stack of straw at the back of the house. At the dead hour of night the wife and another man killed the husband and put him under the stack of straw beside the other man. The man was not asleep and he had a snips in his pocket. So he took out the snips and he cut a piece of the mans coat that was putting the dead man under the straw. So the next morning the soldiers were on the look out of the missing
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:20
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house to kill the man in the bed and he thought of the second advice. So he took his pipe and sat down and smoked it. When the man in the wakened and looked out he saw the man sitting at the fire. He said, “Mammy look at father”. Then the wife got up and he told her to get something ready to eat for him. She said that there was no bread in the house. The man said to his wife that he had bread with him. So the wife got tea and she opened the parcel and cut the cake. When she was cutting the cake she found the seven years wages in the cake and they were very glad. A long time after that he had no money or food he had to look for work
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:19
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Comhortha eile go bhfuil sé laidir má coinnigheann sé na coiricíní nu na boiligíní le tamall maith théis craitheadh a thabhairt dó.
Deantar poitín mar seo:-
Faigtear dabhac mór nu baraille, nu dhá bharaille reir an méid arbhair a bhíos aca. Annsin cuirtear an tarbhar i malaí agus togtar ag an loch é. Deantar é cur a bogadh san loch go ceann seachtmhaine. Togtar é ansin agus cuirtear ar an gcill é chun é do thiormú. Caithfidh na daoine a bheith an-aireach sann gcaoi nach mbeadh an tarbhar doighte. Ní beadh moran poitín ar an arbhar agus rud eile ní bheadh sé go maith dá mbeadh sé doighthe. Ar a bheith tirm do caithfear é thabhairt ag an muillean chun é do mheilt. Abhaile leis ansin agus cuirtear i mbarraillí é. Cuirtear uisge te, (a bhí fiuchta) air agus braith. Cuirtear cludach maith ar an mbairiile agus fagtar ansin é le oibriú. Déanann sé oibriú i gcionn
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:17
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raibh an crann ag fás sar a bhaineadar é agus níorbh bh’féidirleo an t-ór d’fhághail.
Caislean “Wynn”
Tá Caisleán Wynn i gleannBeithe. Bhí “Wynn” agus a arm na gchómhnuidhe ann. Tighearna talmhan a beadh “Wynn”
Cuir sé a lán daoine amach ar an mbothar nuair a bhí an droch aimsear ann agus do scrios sé an áit mór timcheall. Nuair a bhíodh an sagart ag dul thar an Caisleán bhíodh na saighdiúirí ag caitheamh pílear leis. Do chuir an sagart mallacht ortha. Chuaidh sé isteach san seipéal agus léig sé a leabhar paidre. Annsan tháinig sé amach dubhairt sé le na saighdiúirí
“An bhfuil sibh ullamh anois,”
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:16
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there. They asked the man if he would come this way with them, he was going to go when he thought of the first advice and said he wouldn’t. So he went the straight road. As he was going he heard the screams and he knew that it was the robbers. They robbed the other men that went with them. Then he landed when it was night and all the people were in bed. There used to be a spade at the doors of the houses. So he shoved in the spade and came to his own house and left the parcel on the table. Then he lit the fire and he sat down. When the fire lit up it shone brightly. He seen a man sleeping in the bed with his wife. Then he got up and took the spade from the end of the
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:14
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ró mhilis. Deantar poitín laidir milis ón eorna. Is feidir poitin a dheunamh as seugal acht cé go mbionn sé an mhilis ní bhionn sé laidir. Ní feidir acht fuisgín lag a dheunamh ón gcoirce. Fuisge maith a thagas
ó cruighneacht agus coirce
ó cruighneacht agus seagal
ó cruighneacht agus seagal agus coirce.

Eirigheann an poitín deas le linn aimsire acht é bheith deanta go maith. Eirigheann sé lobhta mura (?) mbí sé deunta i gceart.
Deantar poitín anois beagnach as gach rud - as fataí as an biathair, as siucra agus as Methylated Spirits.
Fear misniúl a diolfad moran den poitin a deantar anois. An locht is mo atá air bionn an iomacca deifre ortu dhá deunam ar fhaitcios go mbearfaidhe ortha agus ní feidir beóir nú poitín a dheunam go maith as aon rud acht amhain arbhar.
Tá an beoir atá fagta agus an troisg go maith le h-aghaidh beithí.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 22:12
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That if he got hungry that he could eat it. So the woman did. Then the boss asked which would he take a cake and three advices or his seven years wages. The farmer paused a while then he said that he would take the cake and three advices. The farmer told him the three advices, first never to take a near way to keep the straight road, second when he would be in temptation to kill any one to smoke his pipe, third not to stay in any house where the man and wife would be fighting. So the farmer gave him the cake and he set off for home. As he was coming home there was a near way. It was about one mile nearer for his house. As he was passed there was a lot of men standing
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:38
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Na Prátaí
Cuirimíd prátaí gach aon bhliadhain. 'Sé an chéad rud a dheinimíd ná an talamh do leasú le h-aoileach na mbó, na gcapall, na muc. Annsan riascáilimíd cuid de agus fágaimíd cuid eile dhe le h-iompóghadh. Gearrann na sean mhná na scioltáin. Deir siad ná déanfadh sé an gnó súil a fhágaint i sgioltáin gan an chuid cheart de'n bhiadh d'fágaint ann chómh maith. Is é an tslíghe a cuirtear ins an talamh riascálta iad ná, trí sgioltán treasna i bhfód trí cosa corcán. Annsan deintear an chré do thaoscadh isteach ortha le sluasaid. Sé an tslíghe a chuirmimíd fé sgríb iad ná fód d'iompóghadh ar dtúis. Annsan leathtar sgioltáin in aice san ó bhun go barr an ghoirt. Iompuightear sgríob eile isteach i gcoinnibh an chéad cinn ag clúduightear an sgioltán san. Anois leath-tar sgioltán ins an dá chlais agus iompuightear fód isteach i ngach clais
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:26
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Kings of world be obedient, through the invocation of Mary which is not weak, and may they renounce the false religions. To those who are in the pit of pain, in fire whose portion is of evil, design thy relief to them O Mary and adamen [?] say O Cleric.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:24
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In the days when landlordism was prevalent in Ireland, when the miserable Irish peasants were ground beneath the yoke of their tyrannical oppressors, this district was included in the estate of the King Harmans. These landlords had far-reaching influence and extensive possessions. A large tract of land, about ten miles, statute measure, in length, and approximately from two to five miles in width, was under their juris-
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:21
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- Building a new house - ten pebbles are thrown in ground (site) first: if any are interfered with over night, those proposing to build become suspicious & the site is cleared.
- On New Year's morning people hesitate to be first to raise smoke - and ashes are not thrown out on that day.
- On Hallowe'en - a dish of champ is left and a vessel of clean water and house swept.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:19
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alike, go not far without thee. I am under thy shelter amidst the brave. O protecting shield without being by their blows. O holy Mary if thou wilt hear thy suppliant I put myself under the shelter of thy shield. When falling in the slippery path thou art my smooth supporting hand staff. O Virgin from the southern clime may I go to heaven to visit thee. There is no hound in fleetness, or in chase; North wind or rapid river, as quick in coming to the bed of death as the mother of Christ. She flies to the aid of all those who are entitled to her kindly protection. O heart without sin! O bosom without gall! O Virgin woman who hath chosen sanctity, in thee I place my hope of solvation from the eternal torture of pain. O Mary, gentle, beautiful, meek, mild, and modest, I weary not invoking thee. Thou art my guarding staff in danger. Turn thine eye O woman friend upon the distressed nobles of Erin. To them restore their lives and obtain from the Eternal Father for every sinner amongst them who stands in need of succor, mercy and remission of all their sins. Redeem them O Virgin they are in misery, without dissimulation may the
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:18
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Long ago people wouldn't remove from one house to another on a Monday or Friday as they considered it unlucky. They used to plant crops in the dark moon as they considered it lucky, and they also killed a pig in the dark moon. The people used not begin any fresh work on Black Monday.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:14
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Scitháirí blower.
Take a twig of elder - scoop out the soft white centre. Put in a haw in the hollow and blow. Boys play this trick on one another. When you blow, you shoot the haw at the other person.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:09
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- Building a new house - ten pebbles are thrown in ground (site) first: if any are interfered with over night, there [?] to build become suspicious & the site is cleared.
- On New Year's morning people hesitate to be first to raise smoke - and ashes are not thrown out on that day.
- On Hallowe'en - a dish of champ is left and a vessel of clean water and house swept.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:09
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O, direct me how to praise thee though I am not a master of poetry. O thou of Angelic countenance without fault thou hast given the milk of thy bread to save me. Draw me under thy protection O loving mother of thine only son and under thy protection I place my body, my heart, my will, and my understanding. I am a sinner full of faults, and I beseech thee to do it O woman, physician of the miserable diseases. Behold the many ulcers of my soul! O Temple of the three Divine Persons, the Father, Son and Holy Ghost. I invoke thee to come and visit me at the hour of my death and judgement. O Queen to whom it has been granted by the Eternal Father to become the mother of his only son I implore thee to save me. O vessel who has carried the lamp more luinous that the sun draw me into the harbour out of the transitory ship of the world. O flower of beauty, O mother of Christ, lover of peace and mildness; O queen of the saints, of the virgins, of the angels; O honeycomb of eternal life. Surpassing power and presumtuous valour
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:07
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Years ago when they were no toys the people used make toys of their own. The kite was the chief toy. Some of the old people were very skilled in making them. Another homemade toy was the pop gun. It used be made chiefly of elder by driving the soft middle out of it and then it used act much like a water-gun.
Every young lad used have his own bowl for bowling. That time they used make it out of the soles of old [?] shoes.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:06
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Poitín
An beoir i mbairille.
Caipín
1. An beoir
2. An cead tarraint
3. An pota
teine
Fuar uisge
Uisge fúar
Im
Poitin
Má tá an poitín i riocht bluire beag ime a coinneál ar uachtar na dighe tá sé "os cionn Proof!" Annsin feadfaidh tú uisge a chur isteach ann go dtuitfidh an t-im go tóin an ghloine acht gan nios mó uisge a cur isteach ann. Tá "Proof" agat ansin.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:04
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In olden times the children had not any toys but those they made at home. At Christmas when they killed a goose they used make a "Leap-Jack" from the breast bone. They tied a piece of string to each end of the bone and joined them together. Then they got a short little twig and put it in the centre of the string and twisted it around until it
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 21:01
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Our pagan ancestors had many queer Cures for every sickness. The Milk of the sheep was supposed to be a great cure for measles and the donkey's milk was supposed to cure whooping-cough.
A black cat's blood was supposed to cure wild fire. Another funny cure was if a child was bad with croop one would stand at each side of a donkey and pass the child under the donkey three times. Another belief was any person that would lick a lizard had a cure in their tongue for a burn. Another belief was to make "plaus na peiste" several times over a dying cow and it would cure her.
[-]
Plas na peiste was a knot made over a dying cow. It was made by putting two knots on a cord and open them by another kind of knotting. I know how to make this,
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:59
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Bríseach - smoothed over on 1st Nov. or on following morning, ashes are examined to see if there is trace of foot on them.
- Hole made on thatch when corpse is leaving house. Clock to be stopped when there is a death in the house.
- Not to get hair cut on Monday or wash hair on Wednesday.
- Cobweb to stop bleeding
- On Bonfire night a piece of stick is taken and thrown in each field of crop and a prayer is said.
- A Whistling Woman is said to be unlucky.
- A Redhaired woman also unlucky.
- Cure of Erysipelas - a person bearing the name of Mc Elroy supposed to have this cure. Water is sprinkled over person's head sitting in doorway before sunrise and after sunset.
- Going to live in new house on Friday
This practice still observed rigidly in this locality.
- Putting a corpse face down in a coffin - this is a pagan custom
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:58
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hold an open-air party. They lighted a fire and either roasted or boiled the eggs. These they ate with bread or roasted potatoes. Next comes St John's Eve when the young men lighted large bonfires - much larger than those constructed nowadays - and danced, sang, and played music around them till well nigh morning. They also bought food and drink with the money collected, and feasted merrily. Next comes St. Martin's day in the month of November on which some people killed a lamb or fowl and in the night held a feast. The next and final feast was St. Stephen's Day on which the young men used collect money and with it buy food and drink.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:57
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agus an cuid thios thuas agus bionn an dlú eatorra. Mar sin a sniomhtar an flainín agus an ceann easna agus an breidín.
Ní bhionn aon dath curta ar an flainín. Deantar an ceann asna le inneach geal agus dlú deanta as olann breac nu olann daithte crón nu dubh. Sé an dath a usaidtear le breidín láib, scrá cloc (fásann sé seo ar carraigreacha ar an slíabh), agus reilóg a fhasann sa bportach. (Deirtear gur as an reileóg a ndearnadh na sguirsaí a bhí ag na saighdiuraí a bhí ag bualadh Ar dTighearna)
Tá adhbhar eile a mbionn córda ann a dheanann an figeadóir. Tá sé níos truime na an ceann asna agus figheacain na pluidhe a tugtar eile (?). Bionn "ceithre chos" ag obair i n-ionaid "(?) chosa" sa bhflainin agus san ceann easna. Tá an t-eadach seo trom agus teagarach acht ní morán de a deantar anois. Deireann na daoine go bhfuil sé ró throm
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:55
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Cough. Light Whiskey Punch was a cure for Measles. The seventh son was supposed to have many powers, such as healing certain diseases for instance boils when breathed on by him would quickly heal up. It is also said that when he makes a circle around a worm he is unable to escape outside that ring.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:54
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In almost every house supper was over by nine oclock. In cases where there was a "camp" or gathering of people, a feast was often in progress at midnight. A "camp" was the name given locally to a number of neighbouring farmers who went in turn from house to house in their immediately neighbourhood to "switch" and "beetle" and "clean" flax. While part of the company were engaged in the above-named tasks other members were employed in making "boxty". This they smeared lavishly with butter and ate it with "noggins" of new milk. A "noggin" was a wooden vessel resembling a cup which held a half pint or sometimes a pint.
The old Irish people devoted certain days to the eating of certain foods. Therefore in order to omit none we will start at the begining of the year and proceed onwards. The first great feastday in year is St. Patrick's Day, and on this day the people paid fitting honour to our great National Saint. In certain houses "sprees" or "parties" were held, and the people feasted and made merry. Next comes Shrove Tuesday or as it is commonly called "pancake night". Some of the people in bygone days used eat pancakes for supper on this night while others ate salted herrings. Next comes Easter Sunday when young and old ate eggs. The children used collect numbers of eggs and
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:53
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In the olden times people were mostly dependent on herbs and home made cures. A plant called the "Cos Dubh" was supposed to cure fever when it was brewed like tea, and then the water in which it was boiled, drank.
In cases of boils and swellings a plant called the "Traon-Lubh" was used to either break or reduce the sore.
This plant grows on the bank of a stream, and should be gathered before twelve noon, and then boiled and applied as a poultice. The "Water-Cress" is supposed to be a great blood purifier used as a salad or a tea. Wild sage when pressed out in water is supposed to be a cure for backache. A tiny little plant with a brilliant little flower called "Eyebright" is supposed to clear and cure the eyes. Dandelion tea is good for the liver, and is supposed to be used in making Stout. It is said that if a goose blew on a boil it would cure. Donkey's milk was an old and favourite cure for Whooping
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:51
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he goes to a grave-yard & takes a tooth from a skull with his own took & rubs it against the tooth which he is suffering with & repeats three "Our Fathers", afterwards it is supposed to be cured.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:51
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In the townland of Derrioreen in farm which belongs to John Lyons there are several of those huge white boulders in several fields. Quite near the house in a haggart there is one large stone projecting from the ground. It is supposed by the old people that this farm was one of the old-time burial places or raths. Some years ago the owner John Lyons, in renovating a stall interfere
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:50
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with the large stone in the haggart. Soon afterwards the met with a bad car accident which permanently lamed him. A very old man in the townland Larry Finn (since died) shook his head and was of opinion it happened because he meddled with the old fort.
Mr Gallwey N.T. Knockskeagh, Clonakilty told me that he read long ago, in an old book that the townland Derrioreen was one of the first settlements of the earliest inhabitants in Ireland.
Letter where there are several remains is the next townland.
It has not been discovered whether there are any souterrains connecting the old remains or forts in the two townlands.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:50
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agus an cuid thios thuas agus bionn an dlú eatorra. Mar sin a sniomhtar an flainín agus an ceann easna agus an breidín.
Ní bhionn aon dath curta ar an flainín. Deantar an ceann asna le inneach geal agus dlú deanta as olann breac nu olann daithte crón nu dubh. Sé an dath a usaidtear le breidín láib, scrá cloc (fásann sé seo ar carraigreacha ar an slíabh), agus reilóg a fhasann sa bportach. (Deirtear gur as an reileóg a ndearnadh na sguirsaí a bhí ag na saighdiuraí a bhí ag bualadh Ar dTighearna)
Tá adhbhar eile a mbionn córda ann a dheanann an figeadóir. Tá sé níos truime na an ceann asna agus figheacain na pluidhe a tugtar eile (?). Bionn "ceithre chos" ag obair i n-ionaid "De chosa" (?) sa bhflainin agus san ceann easna. T
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:46
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In the townland of Derrioreen in farm which belongs to John Lyons there are several of those huge white boulders in several fields. Quite near the house in a haggard there is one large stone projecting from the ground. It is supposed by the old people that this farm was one of the old-time burial places or raths. Some years ago the owner John Lyons, in renovating a stall interfere
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:45
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flavour partly compensated for the want of flour. Instead of baking, the cakes were boiled. First of all a number of cakes about a half of an inch thick were placed on top of each other in a large pot of spring water, and put to boil, slowly, on the fire. The cakes were kept at a steady boil from a half an hour to an hour and then taken out on a dish. The scum which accumulated on their surface was removed and they were left to cool. When required, each cake was cut into quarters and allowed to fry in bacon gravy until they were quite brown. This was a very delicious bread and was a serious rival to the potatoe-bread.
In the years after the Famine peope did not depend so much on potatoes, and resorted to meat and other forms of food. The principal kinds of meat used were bacon and veal. These meats were supplied by a local butcher who made it a livlihood. In those times calves were sold at a half a crown or five shillings each, and each calf was divided into four parts and sold at the rate of one shilling and three pece per quarter. In some cases fish were used, usually fresh herrings. At fair or market the people bought herring from the many fish-dealers who came from the town of Sligo and from Maugherow.
As a rule people did not eat late at night
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:44
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Dá scór bladhain ó shoin bhiodh tuirne i ngach tigh sa bparróisde. Ní dóigh liom go bhfuil leath scór ann anois mar is fíor bheagan de ceann asna, nu flainín nu breidín a deantar anois. Cuimnighím feín nuair a biod triur figheadóirí agus amannta beirt nu triur figheadoíri siubhail leo ag obair annseo. Nil acht duine amháin ann anois agus marach go bhfuil roinnt talmhan aige agus go ndeanann sé feilmeáracht ní cothochadh an figheadóireacht é. Faghann sé an cuid is mo den obair o mhuinntir an tsléibhe.
Nuiar atá an olann cearduighthe amach in a rollaí sniomhtar iad ar an tuírne. Sná atá ann annsin. Togtar annsin é chuig an bhfigheadóir agus cuirtear ar an gcrann deilbe é agus as sin istigh sa seól. An t-Inneach tugtar ar seo. Teigheann an figheadóir ar an seol annsin agus lionann sé go leor maidí beaga le sna le cur sa spól. Caitheann an figheadóir an spól o thaobh go taobh le sna. Teigheann an chuid thuas thios
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:41
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The people long ago were poorer than they are now a days. They only ate two meals in the day and potatoes were eaten the twice
They were eaten the twice morning an evening. The meal consisted of potatotes in the form of bread and in the evening the potatoes were teamed into the basket and set on a stool. The men the women and the children sat round the basket and ate their fill.
They never drank tea but at every meal they drank milk. They drank butter at dinnertime. The bread that was eaten was potatoe bread.
The bread was made on a griddle in front of the fire
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:38
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by the coals and allowed to become hot. On its edge also close by the flag was placed the cake which usually ranged from sixteen to twenty inches. The fire was kept regulated continually and when the cakes were baked (which often took an hour and a half) they sometimes attained a golden brown hue. Cakes baked thus were far in advance of those baked in an oven in modern times.
Potatoe-bread was another popular form of bread which did not become prominent until many years after the Great Famine. Wheaten flour was needed to add to the potatoes, and as this was absolutely unknown in these parts prior to the Famine period, none of this bread was made.
Next in importance to the oaten-bread came boxty-bread. This bread began to be made throughout the whole district, each year, at the time of digging the potatoes. This was the only food used throughout part of the Winter. The majority of Irish peasants in those days were steeped in poverty, being rack-rented out of existance by merciless heartless landlords. Consequently they were forced to econimise in every possible manner. When making boxxty they used such potatoes as were taking the dry-rot. Another reason for doing this was that these potatoes having somewhat a sweet
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:36
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Married in White you have chosen alright.
Married in Red you will wish you were dead.
Married in Blue your love will be true.
Married in Green you're ashamed to be seen.
Married in Yellow you are ashamed of your fellow.
Married in Pink your'e spirits will sink.
Married in Gray you will rue the day.
Married in Black alas and alack.
Married in Brown you'll always frown.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:32
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Bhiodh triur nu ceathrar figheadoirí sa bParróisde an uair sin - ag deunamh ceann asna, flainníní, breidin agus lín eadaigh. Níl ann anois acht an t-aon duine amhain. Leanann sé breidin, ceann asna, agus flainín ar a sheól. Figheadoir a bhí a athair roimhe agus a shean athair.
Tosnuigtear an obair le olann mar seo. Nuair a bhios an olann glanta is feidir cardáil a dheunamh air. Deanann na mná é seo le cardaí. Tá na cardaí deanta as adhmad agus bionn na fiacla deanta as iarann. Róllaí olna a bhios deunta ag na cardaí le dul ar an túirne.
Tá an carda cosmail leis seo
(Sceitse)
Nior mhór da cheann a bheith ag an Carduidhe
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:31
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was available they broke a piece off a cake and ate it with new milk. More often than not they placed it in their pocket and ate it while they trudged along the road. It was a very nutritive food and a small quantity of it was sufficient to satisfy the most ravenous appetite.
People made it a rule to have a quantity of oatmeal in the corner near the fire. This was ground from their own oat crop in the local mill. The women before commencing baking made many preparations. First a board or table was scrubbed and scoured scrupulously clean and on this they kneaded the bread. To the oatmeal, well-to-do people added some butter and carroway which helped to make the bread brittle. The women in those days used to vie with each other to see who would bake the thinnest cakes. There were two ways in which this bread was baked namely: on a grid-iron, and on the bare hearth stone. The latter was by far the commonest form of baking. A grid-iron in those days cost at least seven shillings and sixpence which was indeed a large sum for so trivial an aarticle. When baking on the hearth it was scrubbed thoroughly clean, and a bright glowing, smokeless fire was lighted. A large light sandstone flag was placed on its edge close
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:23
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was finished the ledges were pushed to the right or left and the table dropped into its place beside the wall.
It was not until after the great famine that wheaten flour was introduced into these parts. For many years after this great national catastrophe wheaten bread was considered a rare delicacy, if not a luxury among the average Irish peasantry. For very many years after its introduction nothing greater than half a hundred weight of flour was brought into the houses of the poorer classes of this district at Christmas, and seldom was more bought until the following Christmas. There were three main classes of bread used, namely, oaten bread, boxty-bread, and potatoe bread. These three kinds of bread were made in almost every district in this country especially in mountainous regions, and, though there may be a slight variation as regards the way of making, still the materials used are the same. In the following paragraphs I will endeavour to illustrate the different methods employed in cooking these foods.
Of the three kinds oaten bread was the most popular. On certain days peasant women of olden days baked a number of cakes and placed them on top of the meal in the oatmeal bag. Then whenever a member of the family was going on a journey, and that no other food
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:20
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Níl acht aon tailliur amháin sa bparróisde seo faoi lathair acht bionn beirt congantóirí aige anois agus airíst. Oibrigheann sé a inneall in a theach féin. Ní theigheann sé o theach go teach. Bíonn eadach aige le díol.
Ní mar sin a bhí an sceul fadó. Ní raibh trí scór bladhain o shoin de thailiuraí sa bparróisde seo acht an t-aon duine amhaín. Ní raibh aon inneall aige - obair láimhe ar fad a bhiodh ar siubhal aige agus bhiodh sé ag dul ó bhaile go baile agus o theach go teach. D'fanfadh sé idteach go mbiodh obair an tighe sin ar fad criocnuighthe aige.
Fear beag abhí sa tailliur seo. Thuit sé de chrann ubhall agus é 'na ogánach agus d'fhan an cruit as sin amach. Ní fhaca mise é ríamh acht gur chuala mé cainnt faoi. Bhí ceol ag a mhac in a dhiaidh agus ag mac a mhic, Sean O Doncaigh a rinne leathú ó 2RN (Staisiún Radio) ar an bhfidoíg mhóir go minic.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:16
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"Schillit", of oatmeal porridge and a large saucepan of buttermilk. The supper consisted of the same and was eaten just after the day's tasks were finished. For potatoe-diggers their dinner was provided by roasting a quantity of potatoes in a large turf fire which was lighted for the purpose. Whenever the workers were attacked by the pangs of hunger they regaled themselves on the delicious "roasters" along with thick-milk or buttermilk.
In the majority of country houses in those days a table was never used. Instead a wicker-work basket, which resembled a coracle used by the ancient Britons, was filled with potatoes and laid in the centre of the floor. Around this an entire family gathered each one supplied with a saucepan of buttermilk. In large country dwellings, when a large number were present at mealtime the table was placed in the cetre of the floor, but in cases where only a few were present it was usually placed convenient to the window if not exactly alongside it, so as to obtain sufficient light.
Sometimes people living in small stuffy cabins constructed a curious kind of table. It had no feet and hung by the wall. When in use it was supported by two ledges, and when the meal
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 20:02
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A horse shoe is nailed to the cow house door for luck The hens is called to their feeding tauc t
The pigs are called puris and the calves are called suck suck and the lambs are called ma ma.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:58
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W have cows pigs asses horses at home moilin an bhó breac when a man is driving the he say
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:57
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There was a man one time and he had a good farm of land and it was well stocked with cattle. But as time went on all his cattle died and he had no means of living. There were two men living beside him and these were very well-off—a big farm of land and a grand castle. When these two men saw the other man's cattle all dead they thought they would get his land too.
One day they had an awful row with each other and that night the poor man was coming home thinking on what he would do when he met a little old man. "Hello, John" said the old man. "How do you know me?"
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:57
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We have a churn with a dash at home it is three feet high I do not remember when it was made we churn onse a week in summer and onse a week in winter. If a stranger comes in he must take a turn at the churning for fear he would bring the butter My mother takes out the butter puts salt in it we make soda bread with the butter milk When my mother is starting the churning she puts a grain of salt in the churn
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:54
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We have Cows, pigs, ass, and a horse at home. maoilin and bo-breac. When a man is driving the cow he says haibde gab amac Rushes and old straw are put for beding Their tyings are called buirtin or crom-naisc, a horse shoe nail is nailed to the door for luck.
The hens are called tioc ducks are called fiot Calf are called suck
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:50
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Many old stories have been handed down to us about Saint Patrick's journeying through this country.
I got this story from a friend of mine who came on a visit to our house last night.
When Saint Patrick was travelling through Aughnamullen East a fish called the eel bit him He prayed that an eel might never be seen in Lough Eagish lake. According to the old people of the locality from whom I have sought information on this question this class of fish has never been seen in this lake.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:49
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because Saint Patrick was supposed to pass this way on his journey to Croagh Patrick and to ask for a bull to share among his followers and to have shared the bull on this day.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:48
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1. Good Friday is a good day to sow oats.
2. If you sow oats on the day of a full moon you will have a bad crop
3. Trí - lá - na - Riabhoige, The three first days of April, so called bacause long ago March with its cold severe weather almost killed an old cow and when she was not dead on the 31st of March, March borrowed their Day from April to finish her. Ever since then the three first days of April, are cold rough and stormy.
4.
Domhnach Roinn chothromh an tharbh. the last Sunday in July is locally called this
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:43
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I live in Carrountleva, in the Parish of Bohola, and in the barony of Gallen. There are ten houses in our village now. They have all thatched roofs. Kilgallon is the most common name in it. It is called Carn -an- tsleibhe because it is situated on the side of a mountain. There are two people over seventy in our village. They speak English but are able to speak Irish. There are three old ruins in the place. The young people always went to America or England. The land is hilly, mountanous, and with out trees. There is no lake in the district, but we can see Lough Conn and Croagh Patrick from the school door.
Bohola was formerly called Baile - Crann
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:41
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1.
I live in Carrowntleva, in the Parish of Bohola, and in the Barony of Gallen. There are ten houses in our village now. They have all thatched roofs. Kilgallon is the most common name in it. It is called Carn -an- tsleibhe because it is situated on the side of a mountain.
There are two people over seventy in our village. They speak English but know Irish. There are three old ruins in the place. The young people always went to America or England. The lands are hilly, mountainous and without trees. There is no lake in the district, but we can see Lough Conn and Croagh Patrick from the school door. Bohola was formerly called Bhaile - Crann.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:31
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came into the hut, and she said no, that she did not see any hare". They said that she would have to get up until we see and the woman got up, and there was blood in the stool under her so they found out then that she was the hare, but she had changed to an old woman, and they killed her and lived in peace ever afterwards.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:30
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had. One day a beggar went in to a house looking for alms, they told told him their story. He told them that if they got a pure black hound that they would catch the hare and they would have milk. So they got a pure black hound and followed the hare. The hare thought that she would trick him like the others. when she was at the top the hound was at the top as soon as her, and when she was at the bottom, the hound was as soon her. When the hare saw that the hound was keeping up to her, she jumped into the window of a hut that was near by. When she was going in the window, the hound pulled a piece out of her back. When the men came as far as the hut, they went in and they saw an old woman sitting by a fire, they asked her if any hare
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:22
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There was once a hare out in Treenagleragh, and she used to suck all the milk the cows had. So when the people went to milk them, they had no milk. One morning a man went out to milk his cows, and the hare was sucking them, so he told all the neighbours about her, and they gathered a band of hounds, and followed her. When the hounds were at the top of the hill the hare was at the bottom, and when they were at the bottom she was at the top and so on like that till at last the people could not stand her any longer. She used to go into the barns and suck all the milk the cows
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:15
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There is only one blacksmith in the district. He shoes horses, asses and mules and makes ploughs and gated it has a tatched roof. The door is not shaped like a horse shoe but an ordinary door he has only one fire in it. long ago it was supposed the blacksmith had the power of turning anvil on the one he
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:15
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senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:15
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There is only one blacksmith in the district his father was not a blacksmith he puts shoes on horses It has a thatched roof the door is not shaped like a horse shoe but an ordinary door he has only one fire in it long ago it was supposed the blacksmith had the power
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:12
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Blacksmith; There is only one blacksmith in the district. He shoes horses, asses and mules and makes ploughs and gated it has a tatched roof. The door is not shaped like a horse shoe but an ordinary door he has only one fire in it. long ago it was supposed the blacksmith had the power of turning anvil on the one he
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:11
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Long ago the women wore their first pare of shoes to the marriag instead of shoes . the wore troigcaurs which were stocking without and soles. The children in this district go barefoot in summer and wear clogs in winter. Shoes are not make in this district but the are mended by a shoemaker called black Ned.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:08
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rain.
9. When we are going to have rain the hens pick themselves and go under cover.
10. When we are going to have bad weather the cat stay near the fire.
11. If the smoke goes up straight we will have fine weather.
12. If soot falls down the chimney we will have fine weather.
13. If the sky is red and very bright at night we will have a storm
14. When the birds fly low we will have rain.
15. The dogs eat grass when we are going to have rain, and drinks water when we are going to have fine weather.
16. If there is a fog in the valley we will have fine weather.
17. On a wet day if it is bright on the horizon the day will clear up.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:05
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8. If the day is going to be wet the cows horses and asses go near the ditch and turn their backs to the wind and rain
9. When we are going to have rain the hens pick themselves and go under cover.
10. When we are going to have rain the cats stay near the fire.
11. If the smoke goes up straite we will have fine weather
12. If soot falls down the chimney we will have fine weather
13. If the sky is red and very bright at night we will have a storm
14. If the birds fly lo we will have rain.
15. The dogs eat grass when we are going to have rain
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 19:01
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1. Nepin is cloudy when we are going to have rain.
2. When we can see Lough Conn we are going to have fine weather
3. When the sea gulls come in land screeching we are going to have rain.
4. If a crowd of flies are seen in the evening we will have rain.
5. If the sun sets red in the evening we will have fine weather
6. If there is a ring round the moon we are going to have rain.
7. If the rain bow is seen at night we are going to have fine weather and if it is seen in the morning we will have stormy weather.
8. If the day is going to be wet the cows horses and asses go near the ditch and turn their backs to the wind and
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 17:16
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There was one shoemaker in my district long ago as there is now whose name is Owen Moffatt. He makes boots and shoes and repairs them also. Long ago shoemakers were more numerous because they made all the boots for the people of the districts but nowadays they are made in factories. Boots were not worn until about eighty years ago and up to that times clogs were worn by all the people.
There were two clogmakers in my district long ago whose names were Pat Donoghue and Farrell Keane. Tanned hides that were worn in clogs and the people bought a large piece of hide to the clogmaker and he made the clogs. Before clogs were worn up to about the year 1860 untanned hides were the foot - coverings.
There were four holes bored in the piece of hide and when this was shaped on the foot it was tied securely with two narrow stripes of hide. Children go to school barefooted nowadays in summer but wear boots in winter. When the people wash their feet they wait until the following morning to throw out the water as it is believed to be unlucky to throw it out that night.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 17:15
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senior member (history)
2021-01-24 17:13
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One night a man went out gambling. When he was returning home it was midnight. On his way home he had to pass a chapel.
As he came near the chapel he saw a priest walking up and down the pathway and he was reading a prayerbook. Immediately he knew it was a ghost. He began to tremble with fright. He ran home to bed. Next morning he told the strange thing he saw. His brother would not believe him. His brother said he would go with him the next night.
They arrived just to see the priest walking through the iron gate and the mans brother fell dead.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 17:10
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was one shoemaker in my district long ago as there is now whose name is Owen Moffatt. He makes boots and shoes and repairs them also. Long ago shoemakers were more numerous because they made all the boots for the people of the districts but nowadays they are made in factories. Boots were not worn until about eighty years ago and up to that times clogs were worn by all the people.
There were two clogmakers in my district long ago whose names were Pat Donoghue and Farrell Keane. Tanned hides that were worn in clogs and the people bought a large piece of hide to the clogmaker and he made the clogs. Before clogs were worn up to about the year 1860 untanned hides were the foot - coverings.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 17:07
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rejected
awaiting decision
pick up = learn
lying = in bed through illness
in with = friendly with
and e.g. He is very lively and the weight of him (for one as heavy as he).
duncle = dunghill
making e.g. Tis fine weather tis making.
roughness = plenty e.g. I like the roughness of milk
great = friendly
with myself = alone
near e.g. I ever went near him (I did not interfere with him.)
dark = blind e.g. He is getting dark means he is losing his sight.
Through (the) other = cré na chéile
The day = to day. the year = this year.
with = of (die with the hunger.
bother (I wouldn't be bothering my head with him.
made I made for home
troth.
with that (leis sín).
covered - clothed (from clúmhdaithe)
Luck was with him from bhí an t-ádh leis.
dropping = sowing potatoes
In Wicklow town boys use "out of" instead of "from"
(A chap out o' Rathnew)
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 17:04
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rejected
awaiting decision
of gold was covered up.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 17:03
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rejected
awaiting decision
There is a fort north of Newcastle West. It is called Dungeeha fort. Some people say there is a pot of gold hidden there.
A great many years ago a man heard the story. He got an axe and a lantern. He went out to the fort at midnight. It was a very dark night. He did not know where to dig for the gold. At last he found the place. He was two hours digging for the gold. At last he found it. He was just going to take up the gold when he saw a big bull running towards him. He let down the lantern and ran home.
When he came back next morning he found his axe and lantern but the pot
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 16:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was one shoemaker in my district long ago as there is now whose name is Owen Moffatt. He makes boots and shoes and repairs them also. Long ago shoemakers were more numerous because they made all the boots for the people of the districts but nowadays they are made in factories. Boots were not worn until about eighty years ago and up to that times clogs were worn by all the people.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 16:51
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to thirty years ago in this part of the country.
The names of the various coins are,
halfpenny = make
penny = wing
three penny piece = kid's eye
sixpenny bit = tanner or a goat's eye
shilling = bob.
Pound = quid.
The fourpenny piece the five shilling and four shilling piece, the sovereign and half sovereign have all gone out of use.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 16:43
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rejected
awaiting decision
There were very few shops in olden times and people had to go to the nearest town to make purchases. There was buying and selling carried on after Mass and is yet. There was usually a shop near a Chapel and anything wanted was got there. The articles sold were groceries such as, tea, sugar, soda, tobacco, flour, and meal. Money was not always given for goods, but labour was given instead. The labourer worked for a certain number of days for the shopkeeper for goods purchased. The word "boot" is used when a person is exchanging something. He sometimes gets "boot" that is money with an article or animal inferior to his own. If a person gets anything on credit he is said to get it on "tick". To "rise" it or to "strap" it is commoner round here. When a person gets money back it is called "change" but "cant" is never used. It is considered unlucky to transact business on Hansel Monday or on New Year's Day. The markets were always held on a Friday in Ballaghadereen and are still. Dealers in rags used to go round, up
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 16:40
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rejected
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One time a man and woman lived together very happily. As they were working in the fields one day a crow came and sat on the tree near to where they were. Suddenly she flew away and the man seeing her said to his wife, "look at the black crow". She replied that was a white one. They argued over it for a considerable time and finally the man left her and did not return for twenty years. On the day he returned home his wife gave him a "Céad míle fáilte" and prepared a fine meal for him. When he was finished they sat at the fire for a long time talking. Then they began talking about what brought him away and his wife said, "and this day and that day the black crow was a white one". They argued again for a long
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 16:39
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One time there was a Scotchman, an Englishman, and an Irishman seeking for work. One day they saw an advertisement for a driver. The person who went for this position was obliged to drive for a gentleman and his family in a van along a big river. The three men went for this position. The gentleman asked the Scotchman "how near could he drive them to the river and bring them safely" The Scotchman answered "I could drive you withing the breadth of the vechile and bring you safely". "very good" said the gentleman. Then he asked the Englishman "how near could he drive them to the river and bring them safely". The Englishman replied "I could bring you within a hair's breadth of it" "better still" said the gentleman. Then he asked the Irishman "How near could he drive them to the river and bring
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 16:22
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rejected
awaiting decision
There were very few shops in olden times and people had to go to the nearest town to make purchases. There was buying and selling carried on after Mass and is yet. There was usually a shop near a Chapel and anything wanted was got there. The articles sold were groceries such as, tea, sugar, soda, tobacco, flour, and meal. Money was not always given for goods, but labour was given instead. The labourer worked for a certain number of days for the shopkeeper for goods purchased. The word "boot" is used when a person is exchanging something. He sometimes gets "boot" that is money with an article or animal inferior to his own.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 16:05
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí me feín ag bainfeis ar oileán i gConamara ceithre bliadhna ficeadh ó shoin. Bhí faisiun ag muinntir an oileaín seo go bfagadh siad buidéil poitín annseo agus annsud sa teach sa gcaoí go bhfeadfadh na strainseíri iad a thabhairt leo nuair a bhead siad ag dul abhaile lá ar na bhaireach. Amannta d'fagfadh siad na buideil ins na bádaibh. Bhí sé de nós ag muinntir an oileáín nach mbacfadh siad leis na buidealaibh seo beag na mór. Ceapadh siad nach mbeadh sé onórach bacadh leo.
Bhí fear amhain sa teach a raibh olta go maith agus cuireadh ar badaidh é sa seomra go mbeadh dreas codlatha aige. Ní raibh an leabaidh ro ghar do balla, do bhalla an tighe agus perbith tabharnal a bhí ag an bhfear bocht thuit sé sios idir an leabaidh agus an balla. Chodail sé tamall annsin agus nuair a dhuisigh sé tug sé iarracht theacht amach. Ar a bhealach amach thainic buideal ola, olá lín in a bhealach. Bhain sé an corc as agus sul ar fhead na daoine a bhí sa seomra an buideal a thogail uaidh bhí an ola ar fad olta aige. Shil an fear bocht gur potiín a bhí ann.
Bhí sé dona go leor ar feadh cupla lá acht níor theastuig purgoid uaidh ar feadh coicidhíse.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 15:54
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Tugadh cupla gloine dhó agus in a dhiaidh sin tugadh mug mór anbhruith dó. D'ól sé é sin freisin agus d'eirigh sé on leabaidh annsin mar d'aithruigh sé é fein ag eirigh tinn. Chuaidh sé sios ag an teine agus chuir sé steáll mór den rud a bhí olta aige amach. Sgearr gur chuir sé taoisg eile amach sá teine agus é shuidhe in aice na teineadh. (?) Las sé sin agus dhoghadh a chrombeal agus an feasóg a bhí air agus gruag a chinn agus a eadan. Bhí sé dona go leor annsin agus ní bhfuair duine ar bith san ait amharc ar go ceann sé míosa. Tharla go bhfuair sé droc thinneas in a dhiaidh sin. (-) agus thuit an sean chraiceann de ar fad agus as sin amach bhí sé chomh dhathamhail is bhí sé ríamh. Níor thóg sé Pledge anaghaidh óil nu tada. Di'iarr mé fein de lá amhain gur chas sé liom an mbeadh faitchíos air deoch a ól. Dubhairt sé nach mbeadh acht ar seisean "go mbeinn cinnte nach mbeudh bó adharcach i ngar dom". Mhair sé 'na shlainte go raibh sé os cionn na deich mbliana is ceithre scór.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 15:43
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thosuigh se ag sileadh agus rith an sruthán poitín sios le fanaidh agus faoi an bhfear sínte. As sin chuaidh an sruthainín go dtí an teinead gur las sé. Doghadh an fear bocht go mór, gur doghadh an bríste, na stocaí, an bainín agus an leine a bhí air. Ní fhead sé corruighe bhí sé comh dallta sin ar meisge go raibh gach rud a bhí air doighthe acht amháin na bróa agus crios leathair a bhí air.
Tharla go raibh tubán mór adhmaid lán de beóir inaice leis an stil agus thainic bó bainne i ngar dó agus d'ól sí é. Bhí sí fein ar meisge agus thosuigh sí ag sugradh leis an bhfear le na h-adhaircaibh. Tharla go ndeaca na h-adharca isteach sa gcrios leathair a bhí ar an bfear bocht agus d'arduigh sí suas é agus thosuig sí ag rith siar 's 'níar ag búthrúach go ndeacha sí amach ar an bóthar. Siar léi tríd an bhaile agus madraí na h-aite 'na diaidh. Ní raibh a fhios ag an bhfear bocht cá raibh sé. Faoi dheire thainic fir an bhaile timcheall uirrí agus thogadar an fear bochtt anuas agus thugadar abhaile é.
Nuair a dhuisigh sé sa tráthnona am ecínte bhí sé dona go leor agus thosuigh sé ag blaidhríuch ag iarraidh tuille poitín
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 15:33
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Bhí fear san ait seo tamall o shoin, agus bhí an tóir, nu dúil mhór aige i n-ól. Lá amháin chuidh sé ag teach stille (ait a raibh daoine ag deunamh poitín). Ní raibh an beóir tarrnuighe aca acht fíor bheagan. Biodh a fhios agaibh go bhfuil beóir fein ságach laidir le n-ól - an chuid a bhíos ar bhárr na dabhaca go mór mhór. Tugadh cárta dhe dó agus annsin d'iarr feara an phoitin ar an cuairteóir fanacht ag tarraint na beóire 'na "single" go rachfadh siad féin abhaile chun dinnéir. Bhagair (?) siad air gan morán a ól, neart fuar uisge a chonneál san dabhaich, agus gan cead a thabhairt do dhuine ar bith a thiocfadh an bealach bacadh leis an stil nú leis an mbeóir: gheall siad go mbeadh neart le n-ól aige nuair a bheadh an poitín tarrnuighthe. Dubhairt seisean go ndeanfadh sé sin agus d'imthigh an bheirt eile abhaile.
Dubhairt mé go raibh duil mór ag an bhfear seo i n-ól. 'Dól sé trí chárta den beóir agus chuid mhaith den singil go raibh sé ar meisge. Thuit sé 'na chodladh annsin inaice na teineadh. Stára ar meisge mar bhí duil an nimhe neanntt (?) aige i bpoitín.
Nuair a bhí an pota beag lán
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 15:15
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bfairrge é an fhaid sin nar fhead na daoine é fhail airíst.
Bhí Seán Seoíge as Uachtarárd in a fhear an laidir. Chonnaic mé fein é. Cailleadh é tuairim's (?) triocadh bladhain o shoin. Bhí sé in a sheanfhear an uair sin. Chualaidh mé go raibh sé dá cheud a dhiriu (?) suas, ceann in a láimh clé agus ceann in a láimh dheis.
Bhí ear eile in a chomhnaidhe i nUachtarard suas le trí scór bladhain o shoin. Padraic a' Runaidhe a b'ainm dó. Bhí sé i riocht mala mór gainimhe a bhriseadh agus a láimh chur isteach ann go dtí bachlann a laímhe le buille dá dhorn. D'imir sé fice cluiche liathroid laímhe i nGaillimh lá le (?) gaisgidheach a thainic ann ó Bhaile Atha Cliath le coimhlint leis. Bhí an bheirt aca sáruighthe amach. Bhí an buaidh ag Runaidhe agus thainic sé abhaile. Bhí sé 'na chomhnaidhe an uair seo i nGaillimh agus bhí a mhac in a dhochtúir. Chuir an mac iachaill air siubhal trí mhíle síár go Bearna agus ar ais airíst. Thug sé gloine fuisge dó agus chur sí in a chodladh é ar shop tuige ait a raibh corr (?) draincead. Ní bhfuair Runaide morán suaimnis ar feadh na h-oidhche acht ní raibh tada air. Bhí an fear eile seachta 'na chorp aít ar codail sé i leabhaidh cluimh. Chualaid mé go raib Runaidhe i riocht mala dá cead nu fir (?) cloch a caitheadh thar a cheann.
(Slan agaibh)
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 15:10
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Always taking out of the meal tub and never putting in soon comes to the bottom.
The breeding of a cat breaks out through his eyes.
Two heads are better than one.
Never leave until to-morrow what you can do to-day.
It is better to be sure than sorry.
You never miss the water until the well runs dry.
He who fights and runs away may live to fight another day.
A good run is better than a bad stand.
Look before you leap.
It is better to be idle than badly engaged.
A watch pot never boils.
Too many cooks spoil the broth.
A good woman is better than a fortune.
A fortune in a woman is better than a fortune with her.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
Never put a boy on a man's errand.
A humble life with peace and quietness is better than a splendid one with danger & risk.
The early bird catches the worm.
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
He that goes a borrowing goes a sorrowing.
Silence is golden.
Silence gives consent.
Shut mouth catches no flies.
What a fool writes, himself reads.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 15:08
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The second boat was safely bound
The ropes they were made fast
The crew were getting into her
The captain being the last
When a heavy sea came rolling on
And swept the boat away
And left the captain to his fate
That night in Dunlough Bay
The captain being an Irishman
With courage stout and brave
He tried to reach the rigging
His precious life to save
But on his trying to do so
A heavy sea came on
And swept the captain overboard
As you may understand
But Providence proved kind to him
There was luck for him in store
He got upon a bullock's back
And was safely brought to shore
Where he was kindly treated
By the people of that place
And so that ends my little song
of the wreck of Dunlough Bay.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 15:07
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After a storm comes a calm.
See a pin, pick it up, all the day you will have good luck, See a pin and let it lie all the day you will have to cry.
A half loaf is better than no bread.
Faint heart never one fair lady.
The longest way round is the shortest way home.
A car on the road is worth two on the ditch.
There's hope from the ocean but none from the grave.
Best hurlers are always on the fence.
A stitch in time saves nine.
For want of a nail the shoe is lost, for want of a horse the rider is lost, all for the care of a horse shoe nail.
Sticks and stones my break my bones but names will never hurt you.
Never judge the book by the cover.
After a gathering comes a scattering.
After a storm comes a calm.
It is a bad wind that dont blow good for someone.
For age and want save while you may. No morning sun lasts a whole day.
Those have a short Lent who owe money to be paid at Easter.
A good word never broke a person's mouth.
God made the back for the burden.
He who has much get more.
The truth is often bitter.
Strife is better than loneliness.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 15:06
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potatoes. The other meal about six o'clock in the morning of tea, bread, butter, or jam. Neighbours and relations are invited to the wedding and they sing and dance and drink porter and whiskey all night. During the night the straw boys come, so called because they wear straw and false faces they ask for refreshments and have to have a dance with the bride. They always got drink and then went away satisfied. About forty or fifty years ago the people went on horseback to weddings the women sitting on seats called pillions behind the men. It is said that it is lucky for the bride to send some clothes or someperson belonging to her. to her new home
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 15:04
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{drawing of the spade in the left margin}
Potatoes are grown in large quantities in this district. Each farmer grows about one acre. Sometimes the ground is manured before being ploughed, but it is sometimes put out on the drills. Small farmers sow the potatoes in ridges and the larger ones in drills. It is the plough that is now usually used but a few use the spade. The potatoes are cut up in parts called sgiolláns. Old women are often hired to set them. During the summer months the potatoes are hoed and risen to twice. They are also sprayed to prevent blight. They are dug out with a plough or digger. Men, women and children pick the potatoes. The potatoes are stored in pits. These pits are are trenches dug in the earth, the potatoes are put in them and covered with straw. Then the straw is covered with earth. In olden times the people used not buy any starch. They used scoup out all the inside of the potato raw and pour boiling water on them. That was how the starch was made. The following are the names of the potatoes grown here. Kerr's Pink, British Queens, Aran Banners, Aran Chiefs, Epicures Great & Champions; Arran Banners yield the heaviest crop. Kerrs pink also grow well.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 15:00
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The sheep often die after eating this. The Cuckoo-pint is also poisonous. This is a bulbous herb common in Spring and early Summer. Stock seldom eat this as it is so bitter.
The fox-glove, the ox-eyed daisy and wild poppies may be found abundantly in poor land. Goose-foot also grows on good land.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:58
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The fluid in its stem will cure warts. It is also good for Kidney trouble. It is said that it only grows in bad land. Birds and poultry are fed on dandelion.
Ragwort.
This herb is also called "buachalán". It grows out in certain kinds of fields. When boiled down the water can be used as a linement for cuts sores and bruises. it also grows in meadows and takes a lot of good out of the land. it is used for curing sickness in horses. The ragwort is very much relished by sheep.
Dock leaf
This weed grows in corn and in summer when the corn is being cut it is picked out so as to stop it from growing again. it is very hard to pull it as it has a very long root.
Yarrow.
This is a great weed for invalids. It grows on very wild places.
Heath.
This is always growing on hilly districts. In olden times the Danes used make a drink out of it. They never gave the secret to anyone.
Daisies.
These grow only on good land.
Sorrel.
This herb is very good to quench the thirst. It is usually found on the bank of a river. - is chewed.
Poisonous herbs
The worst of the poisonous herbs is the hemlock. This weed causes a lot of damage to the sheep particularly in Springtime when grass is scarce.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:54
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This Thursday got the name of salting Thursday. The month of May is supposed to be an unlucky month for marrying, Matches were made in the districts and money and cows given as fortunes. Matches, are seldom made now in the district and money is given as a fortune. Up to about twenty years ago two people were married in the evening and a wedding was held, sometimes the night before in the bride's house and other times in the bridesgrooms house. Then they went home after the marriage. At other times the bride returned to her father's house
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:52
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Thistles.
The thistle and couch grass are spread generally by underground stems. Thistles however only grow in good land. Its seed is also blown about by the wind and so it spreads quickly. When it grows through corn it makes it very hard to handle. The thistle should be cut down before a blue stripe comes on the top of it. When this comes on it, the seeds begin to ripen and they are then blown away by the wind easily.
Scutch grass.
This is another harmful weed because it is very hard to remove it and when it is being pulled other plants are also pulled up. Chicken weed can be seen growing in every sort of land especially in bad land.
Cornkale.
This is harmful because it grows through the corn and chokes it. It also stifles other seeds as well as corn.
Nettle.
This herb is regarded as useful by some people. If it is eaten three times with potatoes in the month of May the person that eats it will not get sick for the remainder of the year. The leaves of the nettle are usually boiled before eaten.
Dandelion.
The dandelion that grows so abundantly around the country can be of several uses to us.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:51
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Marriages were usually celebrated before Lent. They called this season "seraft". On the Thursday before Ash Wednesday "Thursday been market day in Kiltimagh, salt used to be thrown on the young people as they passed up and down the street, to preserve them for another year until the next season of marrying came.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:48
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No 2
Micheal Bride dreamt one night, that there was gold to be found in one of his own fields in the farm. In this field there is a lios, and it was there he dreamt it was to be found. He dreamt the secont time of it, and in his dream he thought he was diging for it, and that under one brown stone the crock of gold was to be found. Next morning when he got up. he went to the field, in which he dreamt it was to be found. When he came to the place he saw the very same stone in which he dreamt it was under. But he made no attempt to get it.
No 3
When Lord Cork came to Youghal, he went into Saint Mary's church. When he was inside, he saw a priest. The priest ran for the Chalice, and going to the door he went out, without opening it. Only for that he would be killed. They tried all Youghal for him, but he was not found. He had not much luck for himself and his army, met Edmond Supple and his army at Ballndinish. Supple killed him, and he was buried in the quarry near by. About a hundred years after, a man was braking stones in the quarry. His hammer fell into the cave, he went for it, and he saw a shining thing, and what was it, but the lords body, and a coat of gold on it, he sold the gold for fifty pounds in Cork.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:48
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He left the purse on the anvil, and he got the two best sledgers in the village.They sledged with the two sledgers while they were able. The devil told Willie that if he would let him go that he would not troubled him ever again.
He never troubled Willie again until Willie died. Willie went to the gates of Hell and was wrapped at them. The devil asked him who was there and Willie said "Your old friend Willie." O said the devil let us bar the doors or he will kill all of us. They handed him a wisp and lit it and say "Go with this we will not let you in here" He is walking around the world ever since with the wisp in the his head, and this is the light we often see at night.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:47
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agus ar báine. Phill Máire Bobanta na bhaile agus chaith sí saol sona sasta ó sin amach.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:46
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the house until he met Willie out side. The devil said that he would not go into the house with Willie, and that they would have to go. They set off to-gether, and there was a public house before them, not far from Willie's house.
They came near the public house, Willie said that he wanted a drink and that heard that the devil could change himself into money. You ought to make money of yourself said Willie, and come into my purse until I have a drink. The devil made a soverign of himself and humped into Willie's purse. Willie went home again with the devil in his purse. He left the devil in his purse until next morning.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:45
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awaiting decision
ghnaitha mé" arsa Máire Bobanta. Phill sí airíst leis.
Tabhair chugam mó claidheamhán solasta agus mó bhearna bhriste bearnach" arsa seisean. D'imthigh sise agus ghoid sí an dá nidh seo agus ar shiubhal leithe. Lean seisean í agus dubhairt sé "Tá bás mó thriúr ingheanach ort" "Tá sin orm" arsa sise. "Tá mó chlaidheamhán solasta leat" arsa seisean. "Tá sin liom" srsa sise. "Tá mó bhearna bhriste bhearnach leat" arsa seisean. "Tá sin liom" arsa sise. "Caidé a dheánfas mé leat anois" arsa an rí. "Tá" arsa Máire "cuir isteach i mala mé annsin chroch ináirde mé. Imigh chuig an ghabha agus fágh súiste deánta. Toisigh annsin agus bhuail mé. Rinne an rí mar h-iarradh air agus nuair a fuair Máire ar shiubhal é dubhairt sí "Sgaol, sgaol, a chleite" agus sgaol an cleite an mála. Annsin thainig Máire amach as an mhála agus chuir sí an madadh agus an cat agus léir cupaí agus plátaí isteach ann agus as go bráth leithe fhein. Nuair a thainig an rí agus suaiste iarainn leis thoisigh sé a bhuaileadh an mhála Thoisigh an madadh agus an cat a sgreadaí. Shíl seisean nuair a chualaidh sé an trup a bhí ag na cupaí agus ag na plátaí gur cuid cnámha Mháire a bhí sé a bhriseadh. "Tá tú a fághail anois a Mháire Bobanta agus má tá fhein is maith a shaothruigh tú é," arsa seisean. Stad a sgreadaigh ins an deireadh agus d'fhosgail sé an mála, Nuair a chonnaic sé caidé a bhí san mhala bhí sé ar mire
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:42
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awaiting decision
devil came to him and said "Since you did not wish for Heaven you will have to come with me." Willie asked him to come in until he would put on his jacket, and to sit on the chair.
The devil said that he would give him seven years if he would let him go off the chair, and Willie said that he would let him go.
When the seven years were up the devil came to Willie again, and Willie was turning a horse's shoe, and he asked the devil to take the sledge to help him to turn the shoe. The devil took the sledge, and could not stop sledging until Willie would give leave. The devil gave Willie seven years more, but to let him go. When the next seven years were up, the devil was afraid to come near
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:38
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rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a blacksmith called Willie. He was a very wise man. He got three wishes. The first wish he had was that any one who would sit on his chair could not leave it until he would tell them to leave it.
The next wish was that any one who would take his sledge he would not be able to stop sledging until Willie would tell him, and the third wish was that any money that would go into his purse could not leave it until he would take it out.
He was telling his wife the wishes he made, and she said to him "You foolish fellow why did you not wish for heaven."
One fine morning he was going with the cows to the field and
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:33
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awaiting decision
potatoes but it used to be about forty years ago. Potatoe Cake is made by mixing boil potatoes, salt, and flour together. The mixture is flattened out into the shape of a cake and baked in an uncered pan.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:32
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awaiting decision
4. Potatoe Cake is made by mixing boiled potatoes, salt, and flour together. The mixture is flatened out in the of a cake and baked in an uncovered pan.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:29
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awaiting decision
a steveen, I do the "goggering", That is to throw the slits into the holes. Then they are smothered with a block.
After a few days he puts manure on the ridges and puts clay over it. When the young stalks appear he covers them again with clay. This is called moulding. In June they are sprayed with bluestone and lime or washing-soda. In October they are dug and put in holes. The holes are made above the ground and is first covered with rushes and then with clay. Then they are left there until needed.
The names of the potatoes we set are; Champions, Dates, Queens, Arran Banners, Kerry Pinks, and Epicures.
A food called "Boxty" used to be made from the rotton potatoes.
3. Starch is not now made from the potatoes, but it was made forty years ago.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:28
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rejected
awaiting decision
again puts clay on the ridges this is called moulding. In June or July before the blight appears they are sprayed with bluestone and lime or washing-soda. In the end of October they are dug and put in a hole in the ground. They are covered with rushes and then with clay. They are left there untill needed we set champions, dates, queens, aranbanners, Kerrypinks, epicures, Aranbaners grow the bestSciollán goggering spraying mallet.
A food called "Boxty" used to be make from the rotton potatoes.
Starch is not now made from
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:23
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rejected
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a steveen, I do the "goggering", That is to throw the slits into the holes. Then they are smothered with a block.
After a few days he puts manure on the ridges and puts clay over it. When the young stalks appear he covers them again with clay. This is called moulding. In June they are sprayed with bluestone and lime or washing-soda. In October they are dug and out in holes. The holes are made above the ground and is first covered with rushes and then with clay. Then they are left there until needed.
The names of the potatoes we set are; Champions, Dates, Queens, Arran Banners, Kerry Pinks, and Epicures.
A food called "Boxty" used to be made from the rotton potatoes.
3. Starch is not now made from the potatoes, but it was made forty years ago.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:16
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awaiting decision
1. We set potatoes every year. My father ploughs or dig the land and make ridges. My mother cuts the potatoes into slits, and my father sticks them with a spade or steveen. If he is setting with
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:14
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awaiting decision
3. Chicken Weed; Is used as a cure for mumps or enlarged tonsils. The weed is heated near the fire and then put to the aflicted part.
4. The Herb of the Seven cures; So called because it has seven stripes and is supposed to be able to cure seven diseases. It stops bleedings and prevents blood poisining.
5. Dandelion; The water in which the dandelion is boiled is a cure for heart disease.
Duileasc; It is dried in the sun and then eaten.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:09
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neon agus dorchadas shuidh Máire ar chluic ag deánamh a sgithiste, Ní rabh i bhfad go dtáinig éan fhad leithe agus dubhairt sé " chuid ar leith na gcoimín a Mháire" Thug Máire leath an tuirtín dó'n éan "Tarraing cleite as mó ruball a Mháire agus bhéirfidh sé fríd gach gabhadh a choidhche thú. Rinne Máire mar h-iarradh uirthí. D'imthigh sí léithe annsin aus chuaidh sí fhad le teach a bhí fá ghiota dithe. Seo an áit a rabh a beirt deirbhsiúra ar fastódh agus rinne sise fostódh leis an fhear fosta. Bhí an triúr i gcuideachta a chéile airist.
Bhí éad ag an fhear seo dó'n triúr no bhí siad deas dóigheamhail agus bhí a thriúr ingheanach féin grándha agus bhí siad fallsa. Rinne sé amach iad a chur chun báis. Chuir sé a chuid ingheanach féin ag an bhalla san leabaidh agus chuir sé éadach dearg ortha. Chualaidh Máire seo agus i lár na h-oidhche d'éirigh an triúr agus chuir siad ingheanacha an rí (toighe) ar an cholbhadh. Luigh siad fhéin ar an taoibh thiar daobhtha agus chuir siad an t-eadhach dearg ortha fein. D'éirigh an rí agus marbhuigh sé a chuid ingheanach fhein. D'imthigh an triur eile ins na fátha fásaigh.
Ar maidin chonnaic an fear go rabh a chuid ingheanach marbh agus go rabh an triúr eile imthighthe. Lean sé iad agus bheir sé ar Mháire bobánta. "Tá bás mó thriúr ingheanach leat a Mháire Bobanta" arsa seisean. "Tá sin liom" arsa Máire Bobanta. "An dtiocfaidh tú airíst a Mháire Bobanta" arsa seisean. "Tiocfadih má bhéireann mó[?]
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:06
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2. Capóg, and Fearbhán smother up the potatoe crop.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:01
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neon agus dorchadas shuidh Máire ar chluic ag deánamh a sgithiste, Ní rabh i bhfad go dtáinig éan fhad leithe agus dubhairt sé " chuid ar leith na gcoimín a Mháire" Thug Máire leath an tuirtín dó'n éan "Tarraing cleite as mó ruball a Mháire agus bhéirfidh sé fríd gach gabhadh a choidhche thú. Rinne Máire mar h-iarradh uirthí. D'imthigh sí léithe annsin aus chuaidh sí fhad le teach a bhí fá ghiota dithe. Seo an áit a rabh a beirt deirbhsiúra ar fastódh agus rinne sise fostódh leis an fhear fosta. Bhí an triúr i gcuideachta a chéile airist.
Bhí éad ag an fhear seo dó'n triúr no bhí siad deas dóigheamhail agus bhí a thriúr ingheanach féin grándha agus bhí siad fallsa. Rinne sé amach iad a chur chun báis. Chuir sé a chuid ingheanach féin ag an bhalla san leabaidh agus chuir sé éadach dearg ortha. Chualaidh Máire seo agus i lár na h-oidhche d'éirigh an triúr agus chuir siad ingheanacha an rí (toighe) ar an cholbhadh. Luigh siad fhéin ar an taoibh thiar daobhtha agus chuir siad an t-eadhach dearg ortha fein. D'éirigh an rí agus marbhuigh sé a chuid ingheanach fhein. D'imthigh an triur eile ins na fátha fásaigh.
Ar maidin chonnaic an fear go rabh a chuid ingheanach marbh agus go rabh an triúr eile imthighthe. Lean sé iad agus bheir sé ar Mháire bobánta. "Tá bás mó thriúr ingheanach leat a Mháire Bobanta" arsa seisean. "Tá sin liom" arsa Máire Bobanta. "An dtiocfaidh tú airíst a Mháire Bobanta" arsa seisean. "Tiocfadih má bhéireann mó
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:01
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Garrdha dubh, Pairc Ghlas, Boloigín Paircín, Dairín, sean-pháirc, Garrdha-na-coille, Garrdha-ruadh, páircín-tighe, Paircín - Wilson, Cnocháin-na-h-uan, páirc -na-gcapall, Paírc-Bhán, Garrdha-na-ngamhan, Garrdha-na-bplannda, poirtín, Gort-A-Mhullaigh.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 14:00
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1. Fields. Garrdha dubh, Páirc Glás, Boloigín, Paircín, Dairín, sean-pháirc, Garrdha-na-coille, Garrdha-ruadh, Páircín-tighe, Paircín - Wilson, Cnocáin-na-h-uan, Paírc-Bhán, Garrdha Sleibhe,
Garrdha-na-ngamhan, Garrdha-na-bplanda, Poirtín, Gort-A-Mhullaigh.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 13:57
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dog and from you if I can said the cakeen. "Indeed you will cakeen," said the bull. He rolled on and he met a fox. The fox asked the some questions, and ashed him would he let walk with him. The cakeen said that he could walk with him. They walked on until they came to a river. The cakeen asked the fox how we will get across the river. The fox said "come on my head, and I will carry you" "A no, you would eat me" said the cakeen.
"Come on my back, and I will carry you" "A no you would eat me" said the cakeen. The fox said, "Come on my back, and I will carry you." "A No, you would eat me" said the cakeen. The fox said, "Come in my tail and I will carry you". "A No. you would eat me" said the cakeen. The fox said nothing, but ate the cakeen up.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 13:51
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There was once an old woman, and an old man who lived in a house, and they put down a cakeen. When the cakeen was baked, it jumped out of the pan, into the pot and from the pot out the door. It rolled away, and it met a dog. The dog said "Good morrow cakeen" how far did you travel cakeen". I travelled from an old woman, and an old man, and from a pan, and from a pot, and from you if I can". "Indeed you will cakeen", said the dog. He rolled on until he met a bull. "Good morrow cakeen" said the bull, how far did you travel" I travelled from an old woman, and an old man, and from a pan, and a pot, and from a
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 13:47
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 13:46
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We have cows, pigs, an ass and a horse at home.
The Grey cow
Maoilíngan bho breac
When a man is driving the cow he said Gabh amach. Ruishes and old straw is put for bedding Their tyings are called buircins A horse is nailed to the cowhouse door for
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 13:43
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On Novembers night if a person
over seventy years in our village They speak English but they know Irish. There are three old ruins in the place. The young people always went to America or England. The land is hilly, mountanous, and with out trees. There is no lake in
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 13:43
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On May day if anyone washed his or her face with the dew of the grass, the sun would not burn him. The best runner was David Morely and also he was the best jumper. The best mower was Patrick Franey he would mow 140 stooks of oats in one day.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 13:40
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Sean-sgéal
Bhí bean ann am amhain agus bhí triúr ingheanach aicí mar bhí Gráinne, Nuala, Máire bobanta. Lá amháin dubhairt Gráinne go gcaithfeadh sí féin imtheacht agus saibhreadh dithe féin " Éirigh a mhathair agus deán tuirtín damh" arsa sise." Cé aca is feárr leat tuirtín beag agus mó bheannacht na tuirtín mór agus mó mhallacht" arsa an mhathair. "Is fear liom tuirtín mór agus dó mhallacht" arsa sise. Fuair sí sin agus d'imthigh sí. Casadh fear uirthí agus rinne sé í a fhastódh
Bliadhain agus lá na dhiaidh sin dubhairt Nuala go rabh a deirbhsiúr ar shiubhal le lá agus bliadhain agus go rabh sí ag dul ar a chuairt chuici." Éirigh a mhathair agus deán tuirtín damh", arsa Nuala."Cé aca is feárr leat tuirtín beag agus mó bheannacht na tuirtín mór agus mó mhallacht" arsa an mhathair. "Is fearr liom tuirtín mór agus dó mhalacht. Fuair sí sin agus d'imthigh sí. Rinne sí fastodh ins an teach cheudhna ina rabh an cheud bhean.
Bliadhain agus lá 'na dhiaidh sin dubhairt Máire bobanta go rabh a deirbhshiúr ar shiubhal le dhá lá agus dhá bhliadhain agus go rabh an dara bhean ar shiubhal le lá agus bliadhain agus go rabh sí fhéin a imteacht fosta. Éirigh a mhathair agus deán tuirtín damh" arsa Máire. "Caidé an seort tuirtín is feárr leat" arsa an mhathair. "Tá" arsa Máire "tuirtín beag agus dó bheannacht".Fuair sí sin agus d'imthigh sí. Eadar
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 13:38
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awaiting decision
the district, but we can see Lough - Conn and Croagh - Patrick, from the school door.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 13:38
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awaiting decision
Sean-sgéal
Bhí bean ann am amhain agus bhí triúr ingheanach aicí mar bhí Gráinne, Nuala, Máire bobanta. Lá amháin dubhairt Gráinne go gcaithfeadh sí féin imtheacht agus saibhreadh dithe féin " Éirigh a mhathair agus deán tuirtín damh" arsa sise." Cé aca is feárr leat tuirtín beag agus mó bheannacht na tuirtín mór agus mó mhallacht" arsa an mhathair. "Is fear liom tuirtín mór agus dó mhallacht" arsa sise. Fuair sí sin agus d'imthigh sí. Casadh fear uirthí agus rinne sé í a fhastódh
Bliadhain agus lá na dhiaidh sin dubhairt Nuala go rabh a deirbhsiúr ar shiubhal le lá agus bliadhain agus go rabh sí ag dul ar a chuairt chuici." Éirigh a mhathair agus deán tuirtín damh", arsa Nuala."Cé aca is feárr leat tuirtín beag agus mó bheannacht na tuirtín mór agus mó mhallacht" arsa an mhathair. "Is fearr liom tuirtín mór agus dó mhalacht. Fuair sí sin agus d'imthigh sí. Rinne sí fastodh ins an teach cheudhna ina rabh an cheud bhean.
Bliadhain agus lá 'na dhiaidh sin dubhairt Máire bobanta go rabh a deirbhshiúr ar shiubhal le dhá lá agus dhá bhliadhain agus go rabh an dara bhean ar shiubhal le lá agus bliadhain agus go rabh sí fhéin a imteacht fosta. Éirigh a mhathair agus deán tuirtín damh" arsa Máire. "Caidé an seort tuirtín is feárr leat" arsa an mhathair. "Tá" arsa Máire "tuirtín beag agus dó bheannacht".Fuair sí sin agus d'imthigh sí. Casadh
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 13:37
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2. Herbs
Capóg an fearbán smother up the potatoe frop.
Chicken Weed; Is used as a cure for mumps or enlarged tonsils. The weed is heated near the fire and then put to the aflicted part.
The Herb of the Seven cures, So called because it has seven stripes and is supposed to be able to cure seven diseases. It stops bleedings. It prevents blood poisining. One side of it draws blood and the other prevents bleeding.
Dandelion; The water in which
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 13:30
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1.
The games played in this district are High-windows, Tich, Jackstones, Hide-and seek, Dallog, Spinning - tops. Thread-the needle.
Lurabóg, larábóg, all sit around the fire with feet stretched out, one says the ryhme lurabóg. larabóg, bí-ó-Neill, Nest-o-priobán priobán- suilteach súileach-sisinán isteach i bhflaitheas. The foot on which the last word falls is pulled in, the game contunues until all the feet are pulled in.
Trom,-trom,
One person puts down his or her head, Another person puts something over his back and says trom-trom ceárd atá ós do chionn. If he does not
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 12:59
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sheas an múile suas gan craiceann gan fiadhnach. Scannruigh Seumas ar fheiceal sin (?) dó, acht níorb leis do b'fhaillighe é. Chuir sé lomra na gcaorach agus craiceann an gabhair ar an múile agus cheangal sé iad ar an múile le driseacha. Mhair an múile dhá scór bladhain in a dhiaidh sin agus ní raibh bladhain as sin amach go bhfuair an múile bás nach mbiodh seacht bpaca olna agus ceithre bharaille do smeuraibh dubha fásta air.
Lá a raibh Seumas bocht théis theacht abhaile fliuch baidhte on margadh fuair sé an bhean na suidhe ag an teine go te teólaidhe compóirdiul. Labhair sí.
"Muise, a Sheumuis, ar sise "tharla fliuch tú, teighrigh amach ag an tobar agus tabhair isteach caintín uisge."
Chuaidh Séumas amach agus thug sé an t-uisge isteach agus dhoírt sé chuile dheor a bhí ann anuas ar a cloigeann.
"Anois" arsa Seumams "a bhean chóir, tharla fluich thú, teigrigh amach thú féin agus tabhair isteach caintín eile."
Sul a bhfuair Seumas bás bhí gabhaltas mór talmhan aige agus neart beithí agus caora agus seisneach capall.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 12:49
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Bhí fear ar a' bPolach (Roscathail, Co. na Gaillimhe) tuairim 's trí scor bliadhain o shoin. Seamas Mac Carthaigh nu Cartúir ab ainm dó. Phós sé bean as Lios Uachtar, áit taobh thiar de Uachtarárd. Sé an spré a fuair sé le na mhnaoi gabhar agus caora. Ní raibh teach na árus (?) ag Seamas bocht nuair a phós sé ach níor bhain sin an mhisneach de. Nuair a bhí sé féin agus a bhean théis pósadh thug sé léi abhaile í agus ar an mbealach abhaile dóibh thug sé isteach i bpuitín gabhar. Ar an bpoinnte thosuigh sí ag clamhsán faoi an áit - bhí sé ró bhocht - ní raibh teallach ná simléar ann agus boladh láidir na ngabhar i ngach áit ann. Dubhairt Seamas léi go mbfearr é go mór ná an ait a bhí aige féin nach raibh ait ar bith aige. Fuair sé tuagh annsin di agus chuir sé iachall uirthi cleiteacha a ghearradh agus cabán a dhéanamh. Nuair a bhí sé sin deunta aici thug sé laighe di agus dubhairt sé léi scrachacha a bhaint agus iad a chur ar an gcabán. Fuair sé speal di annsin agus dubhairt sé léi cíb a ghearradh. Beigean di é a dhéanamh agus beigean di scolb a bhaint agus díon a chur ar an gcabán. An fhad is bhí sise ag obair bhí Seamas féin ina shuidhe síos ag caitheadh tobac.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 12:48
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Lá ar na bhárach thainic comhursana an bhaile agus rinneadar súas sort tíge doibh as cloca agus cuireadar ceann tuighe air. Bhí an caban ag Seumas annsin le h-aghaidh múile a bhí aige.
Lá in a dhiaidh sin chuaidh Seumas síar airíst go Lios Uachtair le h-aghaidh an spre d'fhail - gabhar agus caora. Thosuigh sé ag deunamh ceatha agus é ag teacht abhaile agus cheangal sé an gabhar agus an caora in a gcuingir agus chaith sé ar a dhruim iad agus as go bráth leis abhaile agus bhí sé ag dul isteach an doras sa mbaile nuair a bhuail an cheud deor baistíghe den cioth air.
Lá ar na bharach mharbhuigh sé an chaora óir nach raibh pioc le n-ithe aca. Chait sé lomra na gcaorach ar mhaide a bhí ag dul treana an tighe. Nuair a bhí an chaora itthe beigean dó an gabhar do mharbhú. D'fhag sé an craiceann thuas ar lomra na gcaorach.
Lá ar na bhaireach thosuigh sé ar cupla galun poitín a dheunamh. I ngan fios do d'ól an múile go leor don leann an iomarca de agus thuit sé ar meisge. Shaoil Seamas go raibh sé marbh agus d'fheann sé é agus dhiol sé an craiceann le tinncéar a bhí ag dul thart. San tráthnona
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 11:48
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An Chuas Díomhaoin:-Do thagadh mórán adhmaid isteach i ngach faill acht an fhaill seo.
Bóthar na Lathaighe:-Pluda ann i gcómhnaighe
Bóthar an tseana tíghe:-
Slíghe an Dúna:-
Bóthar an Droma:-
An Carraig Dhubh:-
Seana scoil na Teirite:-
Na Coiréil:-Bhítheas ag baint cloch ann.
Gort Cháit:-
An bhriaghaire:-
Faill an Chaisleáin:-Tá caisleán ann.
Poll an Cheóil:-Bíonn ceól le cloisint ann.
Gort an Liochtáin:- Do bhí cnocán cloch ann fadó. Tá siad tógtha anois.
Leaba an Ghaiscídhig:-An áit go mbíodh an gaiscídheach ina chodhladh.An Chuas Díomhaoin:-Do thagadh mórán adhmaid isteach i ngach faill acht an fhaill seo.
Bóthar na Lathaighe:-Pluda ann i gcómhnaighe
Bóthar an tseana tíghe:-
Slíghe an Dúna:-
Bóthar an Droma:-
An Carraig Dhubh:-
Seana scoil na Teirite:-
Na Coiréil:-Bhítheas ag baint cloch ann.
Gort Cháit:-
An bhriaghaire:-
Faill an Chaisleáin:-Tá caisleán ann.
Poll an Cheóil:-Bíonn ceól le cloisint ann.
Gort an Liochtáin:- Do bhí cnocán cloch ann fadó. Tá siad tógtha anois.
Leaba an Ghaiscídhig:-An áit go mbíodh an gaiscídheach ina chodhladh.
Máire Ní Fhiannachta Baile Móir
Thug Eóghan Ó Fiannachta dom iad.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 11:12
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tú ag dul leis an chomhlaith" arsa seisean. "Tá" arsa sise" fá choinne leabfha" "Bhal tá tú níos críonna na mise" Nuair a bhí an oidhche ag teacht rinne siad leabaidh ináirde ar chrann a bhí i gcoirnéal páirce agus luigh siad . Ní rabh i bhfad go dtainig gaduidhthe thart agus bhí siad indhiaidh mála mór airgid a ghoid. Shuidh siad síos ag bun an chrainn a chunntas an airgid agus dubhairt fear aca "Níorbh ionghantas ar bith dá dtuitfeadh an tóin as an spéir indiaidh an chreach a thóg muid." Le sin thug an bhean léim anuas na mullach agus theith na gadaighthe. Thug an péire seo leo an t-airgead agus d'imthigh siad na bhaile breágh sásta leo fhein agus chaith siad saoghal sona suaimhneach.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 11:03
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a bhí ag fás san gharradh a shnathadh leis an bhá. Nuair a d'imthigh fear an toighe chuir sise fá dhéin an bhuisteóra go mairbhfeadh sé an bhó dithe. Mharbhuigh seisean an bhó agus nuair a d'imthigh sé rann sise an bhó ar an chál.
Nuair a thainig fear an toighe an oidhche sin dubhairt sise "Rann mise an bhó agus an cál ar a chéile." "Caidé a dubhairt tú" arsa seisean, "Tá, gur mharbhuigh mé an bhó" arsa sise. "Ó tchídhim, tchídhim, " arsa seisean " gur ag éirigh amaideach atá tú". Ar maidin an lá thar na bhárach nuair a bhí sé ag imtheacht dubhairt sé "Sábhail an t-airgead seo fá choinne na coise tinne". Ní luaithe a d'imthigh fear an toighe na seo isteach fear agus é bacach. "An tusa fear na coise tine" arsa sise. " Is mé go díreach" arsa seisean. "Bhal seo airgead a d'fág fear an toighe fá dó choinne" arsa sise. Nuair a fuair sé an t-airgead d'imthigh sé agus é breágh sásta
Nuair a thainig fear an toighe an oidhche sin dubhairt sise. "Bhí fear na coise tine annseo ó shoin agus thug mé an t-airgead a d'fág tú fá na choinne dó.""Orú amaideach a bhí tú agus amaideach a béas tú" arsa seisean. "Tarraing an doras amach in dó dhiaidh" arsa seisean "agus caithfidh muid imeacht chruinnuighadh" Thóg sise an chomhlaith ó na h-innsí agus d'imthigh sí 'na dhiaidh. D'amharc seisean na dhiaidh agus tcídh sé ise agus an chomhlaith ag teacht "Cá bhfuil
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:40
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Sean-sgéal
Bhí fear ann in am amháin agus ní rabh fhios aige cá h-áit a gheobhadh sé bean mhaith le na chuid airgid a chongbhail. Lá amháin bhí sé ar an aonach agus chonnaic sé triúr cailíní. Bhí beirt aca gléasta go deas agus bhí an bhean eile go measardha cóirighthe agus ní rabh amaidigh ar bith ag cuir as dithe. Dar leis fán go dtiocfadh leithe seo a bheith maith go leór agus chuir sé ceist uirthí an bpósadh sí é. Dubhairt sise go rabh sí sása. An lá thar na bharach pósadh iad agus chomhnuidhe siad i gcuideachta a chéile ó sin amach. Nuair a bhí siad seachtamhain pósta dubhairt an fear go gcaithfeadh seisean a dhul chuig a chiud oibre. "Níl a dhath le deánamh agat-sa ach mála na mine a snathadh leis an bhain." Ní rabh fhios aici caidé an rud min agus nuair a d'imthigh an fear thosaigh sise a dh'amharc ar an mhála. Thuit snathad isteach sa mhin uirthi agus thug sí amach í go dtí an t-árd agus chaith sí í. Nuair a fuair sí an tsnathad bhí an mhin ar shiubhal leis an ghaoth.
Nuair a thainig an fear 'na bhaile an oidhche sin dúbhairt sé "Chuir sé sneachta annseo ó shoin", " Ó leóga níor chuir" arsa (sin) sise " an mhin a chaith mise ag cuartughadh snathaidhe a chaill mé innti." "Tchídhim" arsa seisean. "Shíl mé go rabh tú críonna go dtí seo" An lá thar na bharach dubhairt sé go gcaitheadh sí an cál
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:39
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was found on one of the horses' eyelashes.
In the olden days, when there used to be a bank in Drum, a man who had been at a fair ran into the bank, snatched up a sack of gold, and before anyone could stop him he made off down the "Pump Brae" with it. When he found out that he was being pursued he threw the bag of gold into Dr. Moore's field, where the new labourer's cottages have been built, and it has never been found.
In Baragh bog there is a foal's skin full of gold coins, but it has never been found, although some people know where it was buried.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:35
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Garrdha dubh, Pairc Ghlas, Boloigín Paircín, Dairín, sean-pháirc, Garrdha-na-coille, Garrdha-ruadh, páircín-tighe, Paircín - Wilson, Cnocháin-na-h-uan, páirc -na-gcapall, Paírc-Bhán, Garrdha-na-ngamhan, Garrdha-na-bpolannda, poirtín, Gort-A-Mhullaigh.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:32
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Tri la na Riabog, The three first days of April, Theso days are so called bause long ago March with its cold severe weather had nearly killed an old cow and when she was not dead on the 31th of March she borrowed their Day of April to kill her Ever since the 3 first day of April are very cold.
April Fool
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:29
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an attempt made to carry away her mother's husband too but that he would be saved by the cock. Sometime after that the husband was coming home late at night and he went into a field where he saw a number of people playing foot-ball. They kicked the ball before him on the path. He stooped down to catch the ball but what was it but a human skull. He threw it from him and ran home. His wife was in bed before him.When he went to bed he was telling his wife the story and she said she always told him not to be out late at night. Before he had the story finished the cock flew down into the room and he jumped into the bed and began crowing. His wife caught the man as he caught a stick to strike
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:27
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by hunters,
One day a man robbed a weasals nest when he came home he saw a crowd of weasals waiting to scuck his blood.
It is said that if any one can get a pursh made out of a weasals skin.
whooping cough.
If a ass is milked and the milk given to the child.
2 If some body meets a man on a white horse and ask for a cure
Tooth ache. put a frog into your mouth and let him bit your toth it will cure the tooth Ache.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:26
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1 Good Friday is a good day to sow oats.
2 If you sow oats on the day of a full moon you will have a bad crop
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:26
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is bhí culaith an t-seana chaillig aca. Is bhí an baintreach i naonfhacht leó is mhaireadar go sásta as san amach.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:26
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by hunters,
One day a man robbed a weasals nest when he came home he saw a crowd of weasals waiting to scuck his blood.
It is said that if any one can get a pursh made out of a weasals skin.
whooping cough.
If a ass is milked and the milk given to the child.
2 If some body meets a man on a white horse and ask for a cure
Tooth ache. put a frog into your mouth and let himm bit your toth it will cure the tooth Ache.
Special Days
1 Good Friday is a good day to sow oata.
2 If you sow oats on the day of a full moon you will have a bad crop
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:25
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time he called into a house for a drink of water she gave it to him and she asked him "what kind of a man are you" and he said "I am a man from God" Tell me did you see "Sean-na-stocaí" (her husband) She asked him how was he and he said "he was fine" and she asked him how was the white horse and he said "he was never so strong" she said "would it be two much trouble for you to cary a few cakes to him "Seán). He said he would do more than that for him, because he was his best friend So she parcelled up the cakes Lazy Bones was preparing to go and she asked him would it be two much trouble for him to carry a fat pig. he took the pig and went off in a hurry for he was afraid
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:24
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aréir. Dúbhradar gur i dtig an Chailig "agus an raibh an lampa ag lasadh ann". "Bhí " arsa an garsún. "Tá iongantas orm" arsa an feirmeóir "is a rádh nár mhairbh sí sibh". "Tiubharfad mo bheirt ingean díbh" ar seisean "má thugann sibh chúgam an lampa" agus d'imthigheadar ortha is thángadar go dtí an doras tighe an Chailig. Bhuaileadar an tslaitín draoideachta ortha féin is dhéin luichíní dóibh. Do chuadar isteach trí pholl na h-eochrach. Thógadar leó an lampa is é ar lasadh. Bhíodar na ngarsúin anois. D'oscluidear an doras. Is chuadhladh an cailleach iad. Lean sí iad acht bhí sí dá dhalladh ag an lampa. Bhíodar ag an abhainn anois. Chuireadar an lampa ar leathtaoibh is thuit an cailleach isteach san abhainn is báthadh í.
Pósadh iad le beirt ingean an fheirmeóra
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:24
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There are a good deal of stories told about hidden treasure in this locality. One of them is about the Quarry Lake. A crock filled with gold coins is supposed to have been thrown into this lake. It is said that the money was put there to hide it from robbers during one of the wars in Ireland. The only way of securing the money is to get four white horses, without a black hair growing on them, and tie chains around the crock, and it can be taken out. This was tried once and the money was pulled out into the shallow part of the lake, but just then the chains, that were fastened to the crock, broke, and the crock rolled back into the middle of the lake. Afterwards a black hair
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:23
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roof to eat the grass that was growing in it. He asked them what would they give him if he got the cow to eat it. They said they would give him a half-crown and he agreed. He caught a reaping hook and he cut the grass and he broght it down to the cow. When they saw what he had done one of them said to the other "If we thought of that ourselves we could have done it so, they agreed to follow him and they caught him and took him before an arbitrator (because there was no magistrates) He decided he had it earned and left him go Lazy Bones vowed he would not sleep in any bed until he met four people as easily fooled as the people he had passed He went on and coming on dinner
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:19
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to do so).
IV
A man going to Boherbee fair in a horse and cart met a woman at the "Abha na luinge Dáine" near Doon. He asked her into the cart and she went with him to Doon Bridge. She came out there and said that his horse would be dead in the morning and that if he did not give her the drive he himself would be dead. When he got up next morning the horse was dead.
V
A bishop went out one day and met a boy going home with a goat. The boy passed him on the road and the bishop stopping said to him "Do you know me," "I do my lord," said the boy. "Why didn't you lift your cap to me."
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:19
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the bull, how far did you travel. I travelled from an old woman, and an old man, and from a pan and a pot and from a dog and from you if I can "said the cakeen. "Indeed you will cakeen" said the bull. he rolled on and he met a fox. The fox asked him would be let him walk with him. The cakeen said that he would walk with him. They walked on until they came to a river. The cakeen asked the fox how we will get across the river. The fox said "come on my head, and I will carry you" "A no, you would eat me" said the cakeen.
"Come on my back, Ahno, you would eat me" said the cakeen. The fox said, "Come on my tail and I will carry you." "Ah no you would eat me" said the cakeen.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:16
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When:
the crow flies high and falls as if shot it is a sign or rain.
the curlew flies east it is a sign of good weather and when he files west it is a sign of bad weather.
a large number of curlews fly to-gether it is a sign of (rain) frost
the seagull flies around the district it is a sign of rain and storm.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:15
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The names of birds to be found in the district are:
the blackbird, wren, robin, thrush, sparrow, lark, swallow, curlew, green-linnet willie wagtail, crow, jackdaw, chaffinch, magpie, plover, pheasant, wood-cock, grouse, snipe, cuckoo, gabhairín rotha, wild goose, wild duck, hawk, pigeon crane, owl, starling, sea-gull. The swallow, cuckoo and corncrake migrate, and return in April.
The blackbird builds its nest in a white thorn tree, the wen in a mossy fence, the thrush in a fuze bush, the sparrow in the middle of a whit ethorn tree, the robin on the side of a fence, the crow on top of a hight tree and the on top of a chimney,
When the swallow flies very low it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:13
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1. Mise an tinnceír an fheabhas na tíre,
Dheiseocainn pota is chuirfinn air píosa,
Ding, ding, an fheadaró,
Ding, Ding, and fhéaró,
Scilling as an bpúnt,
Do'n dtinncéir aerach.
2.
Corn-creác, mionnan éic,
Fear an arbhair,
'Gol 'gom mharbhadh,
Faoí graínín arbhair,
D'ith mé aréir.
3. An móinfeár; "A chamaire, A chamaire,
ca bhfuil tú a 'dul,
An Abha; Nach cuma dhuit a chul-bhearrtha
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:11
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The wren is said to have betrayed our Saviour.
In this district people believe that birds talk to each other. The yellow - amber is supposed to say A little bit of bread and no cheese," while the wren says "Something to eat."
The thrush says "Come and see, come and see." The pigeon says "Eat more, poor Judy."
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:11
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if the stick cut the animal it would poison him.
Long ago the people thatched houses with spars and reed or straw. They thatched in bays. They usually made bays from 21 to 24 inches wide. The spars were put in a straight line and were called stretchers. They had other spars to drive down through the thatch to hold the stretchrs. They usually put twenty-one lines of spars from top to bottom.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:09
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The people used a spade measure for measuring land. A spade was two steps and a step was usually two and a half feet.
Flax seed was measured by the pottle. Hay seed was measured by the gallon and it was seldom used.
Oats and potatoes were weighed by the firkin.
The robin has a red breast because he tried to pull the nails out of Our Saviours hands and feet when He was dying on the cross a drop of blood fell on his breast and every red breast since that day.
There is a cross on the donkey's back because he was in the stable the night Our Lord was born and because it was on a donkey He always travelled.
You should not beat an animal with a white-thorn stick because
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:03
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and red. The green paint was got from grass which was ground in the mouth. The yellow paint was got from the yoke of an egg. The red paint was got from the yoke of an egg. The red paint was got from blood from the finger. Before St. Brigid's day the old people made crosses with rushes. Six rushes were used and they were platted. These crosses were worn on St. Brigid's day (and placed under the rafters in the thatched cabins. One cross each year).
Lus na mbánta was used for curing warts. It was boiled in goat's milk and it was then rubbed to the warts.
The people used slánlus to stop bleeding. It was ground in the mouth and it was put to the cut.
Names of things for making butter in olden times
The sand-churn: the staff, the lid, the cup. The piggin, the keeler, the skimmel, the firkin, and the cream-tub.
{in the left margin}
St Brigid's Cross.
{drawing of St. Brigid's Cross}
as Mrs Julia O'Connor (76) Farrankeal Knocknagree still makes them.
D. O'M
"Judy" as she is known also hangs a red piece of flanner on the tree outside he house every year on St. Brigid's Eve. forprotection against harm
D. O'M
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 10:00
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three weeks.
The people around this district believe that the fore - cast of the weather can be judged by the behaviour of certain birds For instance, if a curlew is heard crying it is a sign of wet weather Crows flying in large flocks is a sign of rain. When cranes are seen flying around, and squalling, it is a sign of very bad weather. Another belief is that a robin if seen flying into a house is a sign of an approaching storm.
In our district the red breast of the robin is accounted for by the following story. When our Saviour was hanging on the Cross at Calvary the blood flowed from His wounds and splashed on to the robin who was sitting near by. And ever since its descendants have borne the mark of the blood
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:58
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day.
7. Michael Carolan, Brackley, Balla, a great dancer used to dance on the door.
8. Micheal McGowan and his brother Jack, Alt-an-fiad, Bohola, fiddlers, used to go from house to house, and spend three nights in each house, and on the third night, they could have a collection.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:57
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On the wren's day the boys used to dress in coloured rags. They used to go around in numbers. One of them carried a pig's bladder and if any person did not give them money they would hit him on the face with the bladder which they dabbed in mud.
For two days previous to St. John's night the boys gathered furze bushes to see who would have the biggest fire in the parish When they lit the fire they danced around it until it died out.
Before St. Patrick's Day the scholars carried an egg each to the women teachers. They made crosses for them to wear on St. Patricks day. These were made with a gabhlóg. They were painted green-yellow
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:56
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1. Tom Tunney, Carrountleva, Balla, very strong man, used to throw weights and was know to throw a stack of oats with his back.
2. James Gallagher, Brackley, Balla, a very strong man, separated two cows that were fighting, by taking a hold of each of their horns.
3. Pat Lynskey, Knocksaxon, Balla, was a great lifter of weights, he was known to lift a hundred of meal in each hand at the same time.
4. Michael Foy, Bohermore, Balla, was a great bag-racer.
5. Ned Bourke, Tavanagh, Balla, could jump a river.
6. Pat Franey, Carrountleva, Balla, could mow 140 stooks of oats in one
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:53
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They were very thing and worn but the brand was plain. They were made in the sixteenth century. Two Healys lived in Páirch na gCnoc where the remains of houses were dug out. Michael Connell lived there in years later. He also lived in an outhouse in Batt Hickeys yard.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:52
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Patrick Roddy came down the Bracklin road. My father came after him, and Patrick Roddy began to run, and my father began to run after him.
When he came to Wren's gate where he was working he jumped up on it and he fell down on his face on the ground the other side. He said "Oh Lord! save me from the devil". Then he got up and ran home.
On the next day Patrick Roddy met my father on the road and he began to tell him about the ghost that followed him down the road. He said he was near breaking his neck jumping across Wren's gate. My father pretended to wonder at it, but he did not tell him that it was he who was the supposed ghost.
Collected by Celia Dalton (11) from her father Thomas Dalton (50) Farmer, Bracklin, Kilbeggan, W'meath. 29-11-'37
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:52
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gCnoc every Sunday and the old people say that the fifers who played there were the best in Ireland at that time. Batt Hickey also found five pieces of silver when he was ploughing about thirty two years ago and gave some of them to Fr. O'Connor who was curate in the parish and he sent them to the Museum asking £ apiece for them. They were sent bac to him because he had asked too much. Nothing is known about them since. He also rooted up the remains of Pavements, grates and ashes when the remains of the old house were dug out. (See na Fotraca a Chait)
The pieces of silver found were made in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. Some were about the size of a half-crown and others about the size of a shilling.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:49
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One dark night my father was coming up Bracklin line and Patrick Roddy and Patrick Berry were standing on Bracklin bridge. My father pretended to be drunk and they thought he was a ghost, and
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:49
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1. What is full and holds more? A pot full of potatoes when you pour water in
2. One half dead the other half alive and a tail wagging? A dog with his head in a pot.
3. Headed like a thimble tailed like a rat you may guess for ever but you could not guess that? A pipe.
4. Patch upon patch without any stitches riddle me that and Ill but you a pair of breeches?A cabbage.
5. What goes round the wood and round the wood and never gets into the wood? The bark of the tree.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:48
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The Claidhe Ábram runs from Olladh to Nohoval Church-yard. It was made one night by the good people and along that ditch they were to carry the corpses to Nohval. It is running through Daniel O'Connor's land to Sonny Buckley's through Dan Twomey's to Denis Leary's, through Hugh O'Keeffe's to Tom Fitzgeralds, through Batt Hickey's to Den Hickey's, through Andrew Moynihan's to Mick Murphy's, through William Breen's to Pat Breen's, through Den Bradley's to Hugh Twomey's and through Andrew Buckley's to the grave-yard. The Claudhe Ábram is the only straight ditchin Cork and Kerry. It is four miles long, sixen feet high and six feet wide. It was made about one hundred and ten years ago. There was a fine plantation for dancing in Páirc na
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:48
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When the men arrived James Smith saw a ghost as he thought. Lawrence Scally was not a bit afraid. James Smith went back, he was so much afraid. When my uncle got them gone he went back by the same short cut.
When the two men returned my uncle was sitting in the corner pretending to be asleep. He made a jump pretending that it was they who wakened him out of a sleep. He asked them why they came back and they said that they saw a ghost in the pit but he never told them that it was he who was the ghost.
My uncle had to go home with James Smith after. When they were passing the pit my uncle jumped and James Smith caught the tail of his coat with the fright.
Collected by Gretta Dalton (13), from her father Thomas Dalton (50), Bracklin, Kilbeggan, W'meath. Farmer. 29-11-'37
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:45
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James Smith, Grange, used to get a loan of a horse from Lawrence Scally, Grange. He used to go home with it at night. He was afraid to go home in the dark and Lawrence Scally used to go with him. One night when Lawrence Scally was doing jobs my uncle, Thomas Dalton, Grange, came in after Lawrence Scally and James Smith had gone my uncle took a sheet and took a short cut and got to a potato pit where he knew the men would have to pass. He put the sheet over him and stood on his head in the potato pit.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:44
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6. As round as an apple as plump as a ball can climb the church over steeple and all. The sun
7. What always walks with its head down? A nail in your boot.
8. What goes away along the ground and returns under it. A man with sods in his head.
9. Middy Noddy round body three feet and a wooden hat? A pot.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:44
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can verify this story. Seventy-six years afterwards a man named Dennehy, of Doire insulted a descendant of the O'Keeffes who were all this time boycotted and the O'Keeffe's being a tyrannical family. This one of hem went into his house and brought out a shovelful of coals of fire to burn the house of the man who insulted him. Everyone was afraid to stop him except one old women who called him and said:
A Duine uasaíl úo thíos.
Glaodhtar ort Ó Caoimh.
A chuaidh go h-lasdhruim síos.
Cun seasamh chirt Uí Chaoimh
The O'Keeffes were at the battle of Aughrim.
After. Fr. Macgillicuddy had cured the O'Keeffe he ran to Mick Casey's house of Laxie. He said mass there and then ran to the Devil's Glen in Cullen, the O'Keeffes caught and murdered him in a cave.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:41
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Funny Story
One night Mike Quinn and Thomas Egan hid in the hedge by the road-side, and when Joe Bermingham was passing home they started moaning and he got a terrible fright.
So when he passed on a piece of the road he thought that it was someone playing a trick on him. He then took off his boots and ran back. He started firing stones into a hedge as hard as he was able. But it happened that the two men had ran away while he was taking off his boots.
29-11-'37
Obtained by Brigid Egan (13) from her father Thomas Egan (67), Ballycommon, Daingean, Offaly.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:39
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geine (and that it may not work if undeserved).
On the evening of the curse, seven hounds disappeared mysteriously and were never seen or heard until the death of the first of the family. On the night of the wake the hounds were heard coming howling through the air and descended through the chimey. They sat on their haunches and their holwing continued until the corpse was removed for burial. On another occasion on the death of Betty Clarke a Protestant the wife of the eldest of the O'Keeffes a black dog came in those days the person was "waked" on the kitchen table. The dog squatted under the table and the people of the house tried to remove the beast but all in vain. The dog refused to go until the person was coffined. There are old people living to-day who
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:38
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sandy hill were gathered in a heap?
A man riddling oats,
15. As I went up the boreen I met my uncle Noreen, steel toes, Iron nose, and dear knows she would frighten the crows?
A gun.
16. Long legs short thighs, small body little head and no eyes, What is it?
A tongues.
17.
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2021-01-24 09:38
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a man named Patrick Cheerman of Rapp, Tullamore, was going home from a fair in Castlebrack, and on his way home, as he was crossing John Mac Elroys horse park, there were fairies playing football. There were fifteen fairies on one side and sixteen on the other side. They called in Patrick Cheerman to make even numbers.
He had a pearl on his eye and a hump on his back. When the game was over, they took the hump off his back and the pearl off his eye. When he went home no one knew him.
That time twelve months a man named Patrick Wright came the same course. The play was going on at the same hour. The fairies called in Patrick Wright to make even numbers and when the play was over, the hump they took off Patrick Cheerman's back and the pearly of his eye, they put them on Patrick Wright and when he went home his people did not know him.
Obtained by Mary Kinnarney (13) from Mrs. Leavy (83) Wood-of-O, Tullamore
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2021-01-24 09:36
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O'Keeffes - Seven brothers and one sister. The priest of the parish not being very intimate with them some trouble arose between them and the O'Keeffes falsely accused the priest of some crime. The bishop hearing of the occurrence sent for the priest and having satisfied himself that the priest was innocent he told the priest to go back and give them a fortnight to withdraw their accusation. This they would not do and the bishop gave orders to the priest to curse them from the altar. This was the curse:
Ná raibh Art i glaillion
Ná Mánus i nDoire
Ná Cathail i glúl-Clochair
Ná Cóin i dTughe na Cille.
(The curse extended extended to three other brothers and one sister and finished with:
Lagadh na raithincghe glaise na bhFuil beo dó
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:34
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10. Its in the bolster but it is not in the bed Its in the brains but it is not in the head. Its in the marrow but it is not in the bone, Its in the rock but it is not in the stone,
The letter "R"
11. What is louder than thunder
The word of God,
12. Why is a loaf on the top of a steeple like a race horse?
Because it is high bread,
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:33
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Funny Stories
Once upon a time and a very good time it was. It was neither in your time or my time but it happened all the same. There was a fellow one time and he was stealing hay. The man that owned the hay went to catch him. He hid himself in the hay and the rogue came and he said to himself "There is not enough of loose hay, (that he would) cut a bench". He started cutting the bench with the hay knife. The man that was watching fell asleep, so the rogue cut the head off him with the hay knife. The night was very frosty so he settled the head back on the body again and it got frozen on all night. The lad went off with his bundle of hay. When the lad wakened up he went home and sat over the fire. After some time he wanted to clean his nose and threw his head into the fire.
Told by Margaret Scully (12). Received from her grandfather (58), Patrick Gilligan, Kilmurry, Daingean. 26-11-'37
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2021-01-24 09:31
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Poll Sheán Uí Ríoghbharioáin
A man named Sean O'Riordan from Umeraboy was going down one night to a pattern in Duncannon with another man. Sean's father was buried in Nohoval graveyard and they went in to pay. Sean measured himself by lying on the grave to see if he was as long as his father. They then went away. They went for a swim in the Blackwater and Sean got drowned. The place where he was drowned is called Poll Sheán Uí Riógbharoáin
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2021-01-24 09:31
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13. It opens like a barn door It closes like a trap, You may guess for ever but you will not guess that
An umbrealla
14. As I went up Sandy hill sandy hill was shaking and all the birds in
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:30
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Riddles
Laws
F/R/A/N/C/E
In 1864
Explanation of above:-
In 1864 France was divided Monarchy was wiped out. Religion was upside down. Laws were on every side.
Above from K. Coyne (13), Derrygrogan Big, Ballycommon, Daingean. Obtained from her mother (30). 26.11.'37
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:29
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There once lived in Cullen a family of
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2021-01-24 09:28
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Féithloch Amhlaoibh is a swamp in Nohoval bog. It is so called because a man was found dead in it one morning. This swamp can not be seen to day because the bog was drained since he was drowned there. It was somewhere between Francis O'Keeffe's bog and that of Andrew Buckley in Nohoval.
II
Dán Tighe Dhálaigh is that name of a field in Jeremiah Sheehan's land. it is so called because it was owned by a Daly man and it was in front of his house. Nohoval Daly is also called after him.
Do bhailig Tarhog Ó SuilleabhÁubm Nuadhcongbháil, an t-eolas seo ó: I Tadhg Ó lúbhaing, Ruadchongbhéal AGUS Ó II Dhiarmuid Uí Síothcháin, Nuaiócongbháil Uí Dhálaigh, Ráthmhór
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2021-01-24 09:28
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Q. When a man falls, what does he fall again?
A. His will.
Q. The 'sun' hit his father. What did he die from?
A. 'Sun' stroke.
Collected by Sheila Boland (13) from her parents - Wood-of-O, Tullamore. 25.11.'37
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:27
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She trotted round on nature's props
And called it Shank's mare.
A. Her feet
Q. A cutter of hedge, and a leaper of corn.
A nice little brown cow, with two leather horns
A. A hare.
Q. Huckety cruckety where do you steer
Clip bare clip bare every year
If I'm a clip bare I'll grow again, but huckety cruckety never will.
A. A crooked stream going through a meadow.
Q. Rolled up in fine linen tied round with a string.
A. Make any old woman caper and sing
Q. As green as grass, its grass it isn't,
As white as mild, its milk it isn't,
As red as blood, its blood it isn't,
As black as ink, its mil ink it isn't,
A. A sloe.
Collected by Kate Coyne (12), Derrygrogan Big, Ballycommon, Daingean from the district.
25.11.'37
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:24
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Collected by Margaret Scully (12), of Bracklin, Kilbeggan from grandfather Patrick Gilligan (54), Bracklin, Kilbeggan, Farmer.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:23
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Q. Black I am and bare they left me.
Men tired and seeking for me.
They broke my back and cut my face
and put me off my dwelling place.
I comforted many tired horses.
A. Turf.
Q. Long and tall thin and small.
Wears shoes and has none at all.
A. The road.
Q. It is in the rock it's not in the stone,
It is in the marrow but not in bone.
It is in the water but not in the flood.
It's in all kind of timber but not in the wood.
A. The letter "R".
Q. When I was young and in my prime.
They took me from my mother's side.
They took me from the marrow too.
They split my tongue to make me speak.
I died in pity and forgotten. Through hand manure heaped for to rot.
A. A goose's quill made into a writing pen.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:22
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[-]
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:22
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that hole. He lived in the Knocknaseed house.
Gairrí-beag-Morgain. It means Morgan's little garden. A servant of Mr. Duggan's got this garden every year as payment from Henry Duggan.
Poll-na-gCreacaillí is a hole in the Blackwater. It means the hole in the Blackwater. It means the hole of the bog deal stumps.
Poll-na-n-I-asg:- means the hole of the fish. It is a famous hole for pike.
The rock in Michael Reen's land
Farrankeal is supposed to have been a land mark in the time of the Danes. there is another in Gullane, Gneeveguilla, another in Ameraboy and another in Glountán and each is about a field from the road and they are all about three miles apart. They are all in one straight line from Glountán through Umesaboy. Farrankeal and Gullane and in many other places.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:18
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Farrankeal means the battle of the quarries ? or Feorran Cool.?
Áth-na daoine uisle means the ford of the Gentlemen between Farrankeal and Knocknaseed.
Poll Harraoi. It was so called because Henry Duggan, a Landlord in those days, used to bathe in
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 09:16
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of Mountinfant.
Poll an nGarsúin: was so called because a boy was walking the edge of the cliff and he fell over it and was drowned. It is in Richard Long's inch of Scrahan.
Poll na Glór was so called because there is a peculiar noise in it. It is in Danny Murphy's inch of Scrahan.
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2021-01-24 09:14
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Poll Gorm was so called because the water is blue in it. It is in Hugh Keeffe's inch of Mountinfant.
Poll Cascún: was so called because there is a big eel in it. It is in Tom Fitzgerald's inch of Mountinfant.
Poll Coffey was so called because Tom Coffey who was a tinker was drowned in it. It is in Patrick Linchan inch of Mounteain.
Poll Saighoúra was so called because a soldier was drowned in it when fishing. it is in Dan A. Hickey's inch of Mounteain.
Poll An Gadhair Uisge was so called because there are water dogs in it. It is in Danny Murphy's inch of Serahan.
Poll Gobnait was so called because there was a woman living near it called Gobnait and she used wash clothes in it. It is in Tom Fitzgerald's inch
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2021-01-24 09:10
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[-]
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2021-01-24 06:46
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themselves, but if they had a large quantity to grind they took it to the local mill which was worked by water. The hand-mills, by which the people ground their own corn, were called querns. In the smaller ones there was only one handle but in the larger ones there were two handles and they were worked by two men.
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2021-01-24 06:44
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their dinner. They never used new milk with the potatoes but got all the butter they could off it. The butter was packed in ferkins and sold at the market.
They had bread made from oat-meal at the next meal. Instead of tea they had a drink which was made from oat-meal and water. When the oat-meal was a few hours steeping the water was white and this drink was called "sugcan".
The bread was made from oat-meal and water also. They cleaned the hearth-stone and left a leaf of cabbage on it, under the cake. Another leaf was placed over the cake while is was baking. This was called "caca ceslac(?)".
The oat-meal which they used was made from oat, their own oats. Sometimes they ground it
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 06:34
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ers never sell any of their chickens, and sometimes, for a change, they have fowl for the dinner.
They have another meal at five o'clock. In winter-time they have this meal at six o'clock. They have tea, bread made from white flour and butter again. The children have cocoa instead of tea. Some of the people have jam which is sometimes made at home and sometimes bought in the shops.
At nine or ten o'clock they have their supper. They have bread and tea or cocoa for this meal. Some of the people have porridge made from oatmeal and Indian meal.
Long ago the people went out working before they got their breakfast. They had potatoes and butter-milk for this meal. They had the same kind of food for
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 06:30
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The people of this district have four meals in the day. They have their breakfast at about nine o'clock. They eat bread and butter and drink tea in which they put sugar and milk, at this meal.
The bread used is made from white flour. Some of the farmers grow wheat and get it ground at the mills in Ballina. They get some brown flour and some white flour.
At one o'clock they have their dinner. They have potatoes, meat and cabbage or turnip for this meal. Sometimes the meat is boiled with the vegetables, and sometimes it is fried and the gravy is poured on the vegetable. Some of the people have onions and meat fried. the farm-
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2021-01-24 01:05
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Bhí fear ar a' bPolach (Roscathail, Co. na Gaillimhe) tuairim 's trí scor bliadhain o shoin. Seamas Mac Carthaigh nu Cartúir ab ainm dó. Phós sé bean as Lios Uachtar, áit taobh thiar de Uachtarárd. Sé an spré a fuair sé le na mhnaoi gabhar agus caora. Ní raibh cearc ná árus(?) ag Seamas bocht nuair a phós sé ach níor bhain sin an mhisneach de. Nuair a bhí sé féin agus a bhean théis pósadh thug sé léi abhaile í agus ar an mbealach abhaile dóibh thug sé isteach i bpuitín gabhar. Ar an bpoinnte thosuigh sí ag clamhsán faoi an áit - bhí sé ró bhocht - ní raibh teallach ná simléar ann agus boladh láidir na ngabhar i ngach áit ann. Dubhairt Seamas léi go mbfearr é go mór ná an ait a bhí aige féin nach raibh ait ar bith aige. Fuair sé tuagh annsin di agus chuir sé iachall uirthi cleiteacha a ghearradh agus cabán a dhéanamh. Nuair a bhí sé sin deunta aici thug sé laighe di agus dubhairt sé léi scrachacha a bhaint agus iad a chur ar an gcabán. Fuair sé speal di annsin agus dubhairt sé léi cíb a ghearradh. Beigean di é a dhéanamh agus beigean di scolb a bhaint agus díon a chur ar an gcabán. An fhad is bhí sise ag obair bhí Seamas féin ina shuidhe síos ag caitheadh tobac.
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2021-01-24 00:08
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midnight came the traveller took a fire of turf & put it down at the butt of the tree which grew near the bridge. He sat by the fire & after a time grew tired. Then he climbed the tree & sat on a branch. He was not long there when the ghost appeared. "Come down out of that" said the ghost. "Not for you" said he. "I'll soon make you come down," said the ghost. "You won't be here a minute too soon," said the traveller, jumping down on the ground near the fire. The two got into grips & they struggled & fought for some time. When the traveller tried to get a better grip on him the ghost vanished. Then the traveller shouted "God help anyone you'd beat when you did not wait for a second round & now I have it an obligation on you never to interfere with anyone going this way again." The traveller returned the house by the bridge & said to the man of the house "God help anyone that would be afraid of that poor creature. You & everybody else can pass the bridge.
senior member (history)
2021-01-24 00:01
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John Fox, a shoemaker in this locality heard the following stories told at his own fireside by his father & three neighbours who used to come to visit at night to their house.
I
Two brothers were herds on a mountain One brother used to say "I be afraid always when I go out alone to look at the cattle & sheep." The other brother could not understand this & at last got tired listening to it & said "I'll never quit till I find out what makes the people afraid." So one fine day he set off to find out & said he would never return till he had found out. He travelled on & when night fell he called at this house & got lodgings there. In the course of conversation he told the man of the house his errand. "You have not very far now to go," said the man. "No one crosses yonder bridge after nightfall but is beaten & battered." When
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2021-01-23 23:54
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coffin resting his head on the hand. Like lightning the other hand shot out & grabbed a piece of the meat off the plate. He chewed it & then spat it back on the plate. "Damn it," said the traveller, "the bit you put in your mouth why don't you eat it & don't be throwing it back on my plate." He paid no heed to him but out flew the hand again & took another bit. He chewed it again & spat it back on the plate. "Damn it," said the traveller, "you are the meanest man I ever ate a bit with. There is all for you, but I'll have this" seizing a bone off the plate. The two tackled each other for possession of the bone. They struggled & fought up & down the kitchen. The traveller was getting it very tight. He was tired after after his day's walk & he said "let us rest ourselves & we can have another doo of it." "No more," said the ghost. "That settles all. I am a parson & was married in this house. I used to take the tithes
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 23:53
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& keep the bonds till I got them in the double & I'll never get forgiveness till it is all paid back. There are three stacks of gold under the threshold of the door & go to every church & chapel & announce that anyone who has anything against me to come & that you will satisfy them with money & you will have enough for yourself afterwards. Then you can marry my wife." "Oh" said the traveller, "she won't marry me." "She will," said the ghost. Here is a ring & when you show it to her she will marry you." The ghost & coffin then disappeared & the traveller had his meal in peace & went to bed.
Next morning the lady of the mansion & the porter arrived. They found the traveller asleep & both waited till he woke. She asked him how he got over the night. "Well," said he, "it was quiet for a while but when it rough it was damn rough." He then told them all that had happened finished by saying "He told me to marry you"
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2021-01-23 23:47
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bed. When he awoke on the following morning he found himself on the verge of the fort. I got the story to be true and the boy was so nervous that he never went roving afterwards. The following year he emigrated to Australia.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 23:46
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There is a fort in Gneeves in Pat Sullivan's land and it is supposed to be haunted. A number of years ago a young man went conveying a crowd of rovers from his own house and they had to pass the fort. When the boy parted with his friends and was returning home alone he went astray. After walking around for about an hour or so he came to a house as he thought. So he knocked at the door. It was opened by a little man dressed in a green jacket. He was led in and there was a great number of people inside and they were all dancing and singing. The ladies were dressed in bright coloured silks. The men were dressed in many coloured coats. There were pipers playing and there was the grandest eating and drinking After many hours this boy was taken into a lovely bedroom. It was draped with silk curtains The bedclothes were of the finest quality. He went to
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 23:44
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Coffin resting his head on the hand. Like lightning the other hand shot out & grabbed a piece of the meat off the plate. He chewed it & then spat it back on the plate. "Damn it," said the traveller, "the bit you put in your mouth why don't you eat it & don't be throwing it back on my plate." He paid no heed to him but out flew the hand again & took another bit. He chewed it again & spat it back on the plate. "Damn it," said the traveller, "you are the meanest man I ever ate a bit with. There is all for you, but I'll have this" seizing a bone off the plate. The two tackled each other for possession of the bone. They struggled & fought up & down the kitchen. The traveller was getting it very tight. He was tired after after his day's walk & he said "let us rest ourselves & we can have another doo of it." "No more," said the ghost. "That settles all. I am a parson & was married in this house. I used to take the tithes
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 23:40
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eggs for hatching
Burnt saile willow & cross marked on [?] egg. Pinch of salt (tiny) put in milk given away, so that charm could affect milk. No (seed) lent or milk given May eve. Cattle should be well on May day. May fall into break legs etc. May unlucky month
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 23:36
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Signs:- Brown clayey patches on ch = fingers. [?] Hens crowing, [?] crowing late in evening. Crickets [?] loudly. Birds tapping at window. [?] Butterflies around house in winter Clocks stopped in house time of death. Corpse facing to east. No grave opened on Monday. [?] shouldn't be buried in a new grave[?] If corpse doesnt stiffen for a long[?] time after death, more deaths ensue quickly in family. Dead [?] around house (coming for dead person) Bean[?] sidhe, heard sometimes laughing
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 23:27
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Inner bark of elder for burns. Worm-wood for worms ([?]) Sheeps' milk for measles. Egg laid on Good Friday [?] for cures. Applied in poultices & rubbed to wounds. Dandelion leaves & roots for jaundice & liver trouble Ivy grown over running stream or bridge cured swellings (Mac an [?] Abha) herb cured & ripened boils [?] ulcers. Nettles eaten in May for [?] skin. Wood-sorrell (Caillicín coc.) applied with poultice for drawing pus from sores. Should be picked by mother. Like shamrock & grows on rocky soil. Lime-water for child Taken fasting, good for worms. Lees of porter for ripening & drawing ulcer.
Seventh son called the doctor. Youngest child lights Xmas candle.
Seventh son picks thorn, [?], corns etc.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 23:14
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Severe frost and snow of 1891(?)
Needless to say that animals of all sorts suffered severely during that long winter but the birds in particular had a hard time. Their little dead bodies were to be found everywhere.
Only those that came to our doors every day and were lucky enough to get some scraps of food were able to survive. People at that time were not as kind to birds as they are now. Only the little robin was considered a welcome visitor to the door, so that by the end of the cold spell a bird was a rare sight.
I have a clear recollection of the following spring and Summer. No fear we were awakened by the sweet songs of our feathered friends because they weren't there to sing! All the summer long there was practically dead silence in the air as far as the birds were considered. Scarcely one was to be seen anywhere, and those that were there seemed too lonely to sing.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 22:25
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Caidé a dheánfas cloch má chuireann tú ins an uisge í? frg= Éirigheann sí fluich. Rugadh gan anam é, fuair sé bás gan anam, agus bhí anam ann= péist a shlug bád. Rud geal agus hata dearg air agus da fhaide seasann sé, éirigheann sé goirid= coinneál. Ní raibh sé amhlaidh ariamh agus chá bhíonn go deo, sín do lámh agus tchífidh tú é?= Níl do mhéar bheag comh fada le na méara eile. Chuaidh mé amach maidín ceoigh agus chonnaic mé an marbhanach ag iomchur a bheo? frg= fear istoigh i mbád. Sé do bheatha, a athair, ní mise do mhac. frg= inghean. lacha roimhe dhá lacha, lacha indiaidh dhá lacha agus lacha i lár idir dhá lacha. Cé mhéad lacha sin?= Triúir. Bhí triúir dearbhráthair ag suibhal thart ag roilg. Dubhairt fear aca, Caithfidh mé a ghabhail isteach agus paidir a chur le mac mo dhearbhráthair atá marbh. Dubhairt an fear eile caithfidh mise fosta. Dubhairt an trímhadh fear níl féidhm ormh féin ní níl mac dearbhráthair ar bith agam ann. A mac féin a bhí ann. Dá mbéadh builbhín aráin le roinnt idir an píobaire agus a mháthair agus an fidileoir agus a bhean. Cé mhéad cuid a chaithfeá a dheánamh de. Trí chuid. Trup sa choillidh 'gus árd ghlór ann: fear ag baint crann. Téad ar gach taoibh agus téad ar lár tuile na h-abhna agus ar a cuid bruacha. Thig sé anall ar a rása agus théid sé anonn ar a rása agus líonann sé a bholg ar a rása: Iteann an túirne. Fásann sé sa choillidh agus cluinfear sa bhaile mhór é agus cosnochaidh sé an oireadh seo puntaí do na mhaighistir. Fideal. Cé seo chugam anall an gleann acht inghean Bhillí na mbeann, coinnleóir óir ar bhárr a boise agus cúl a coise fríd a ceann. tuath. Caidé an t-am
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 22:22
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awaiting decision
mhóir, ba é an duine beag mac an duine mhóir ach níobh é an duine mór a athair. Cé bhí leis? A mháthair. An té a rinne é char chaith sé é agus an té ar leis é chan fhacaidh sé é? Comhnáir. Caidé an duifir atá idir greusaidhe agus cúipéar. Tá fear aca ag congbháil amuigh an uisge agus an fear eile dhá chongbháil astoigh. Molt dubh idir dhá ghleann, nuair a bhogfas an molt dubh bogfaidh an dá ghleann. Capall agus dhá cuabh air. 1 1/2 scadán ar 1 1/2 P cá mhéad a gheobhfá ar 11D= 11 scadán. Ceann beag, cosa fada agus leasracha cama= maide briste. Ag buaileadh a chéile sa lá agus i gcuideachta a chéile san oidhche= péire cárdaí. Tá sé comh dubh le dubhach, comh bán le páipéar, comh glas le féar, agus chomh dearg le fuil= Sméar dubh. Lán toighe agus lán páirce agus bheirim dubhshlán lán scála bhaint amach as= toit. Caidé an rud nach dtig leis an Rígh snaidhm a chur air?= Gainimh. Caidé a ghlacas sé le péire bróg a dheánadh? = Dhá bhróig. Tá féasóg air agus chan gabhar é; tá bárr air agus chan snathaid é, tá tom bán air agis chan girrfhiadh é= feadhacha. Cad fáth a gcaitheann an rí gealasaí dearga? le na bhrístí a choinneáil suas. Cé'n dá ainmidhe atá linn a luighe i gcomhnuidhe? Dhá cholpa na coise. Má chaitheann tú suas é tiochfaidh sé anuas buidhe?= ubh. Molt dubh a thuit le binn agus ní rabh ann saill= silide dubh. Caidé an duifir atá eadar an talamh agus an fhairrge? Tá ceann aca salach agus tá an ceann eile glan.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 22:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Íce píce ar aghaidh an toighe agus íce píce ar chúl an toighe, ma bhain tusa le íce píce bainfidh íce píce leat= Coll faithche:
Tá rud faoi an leabaidh ag fanacht le cnámh?= Bróg. Foiligeán ná gréine ag teacht anall fríd an t-sáile fear an chóta ghuirm agus snáithe dearg in-a léinidh. Gliomach. Caidé thig le ceirc dhuibh a dheánamh nach dtig le ceirc bháin a dhéanamh= Thig le ceirc dhuibh uibh bhán a bhreith acht cá dtig le ceirc bán uibh dhubha bhreith. Tá sé ar an t-saoghal le míle bliadhain agus níl sé acht mí go fóill= An Ghealach. Cé an taobh de'n chaora is mó a bhfuil olainn air= Taobh amuigh. Cé an áit ar buaileadh an cheúd táirnige= San cheann. Chuaidh trí nó ceathair de sgeadamáin siar go Dún-na-nGall ní rabh súl nó béal nó teangaidh acú agus iad uilig ag cainnt- Trí tonnaí fairrge. Cuirtear é agus ní fhásann sé= Glasdoras. Cé aca an gé dubh nó an gé bán an ganndal= Ní rabh aon gé ariamh ina ganndal. Chuaidh mé suas an cnoc agus tháinig mé anuas an cnoc agus thug mé liom ar mo dhruim é= Dréimre. Cuirtear isteach dubh é agus tigeann sé amach bán= Fód mónadh. Tomhas orm tomhas ort caidé an dealg a chuir Brighid sa bhrat= Bior siocáin. Caidé an rud ná dtig le Dia a dheánamh= Ní thig leis dá chnoc a dheánamh gan lag do bheith eatorra. Chuaidh éan gan cleite isteach i bpoll agus tháinig éan gan béal agus d'ith sé é= Sneachta a chuaidh isteach i bpoll agus tháinig an grian agus léagh sí é. Caidé an rud a tcí tusa nach bhfeiceann Dia= Ní fheiceann Dia fear níos feárr nó é féin acht tcí tusa. Caidé (ann-amhar) an fáth a n-amharcann an capall thar an chnoc?= Mar nach dtig leis dul fríd an chnoc.
Caidé an chuid de'n bhó a theíd isteach sa bhóitheach an cheud uair? An anál. Dhá fhear deág i n-a luighe ar leabhaidh agus gan aon duine aca ar cúl nó ar colbha rotha cáirr. Bhí duine bheag agus duine mór ag suibhal an bhealaigh
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 22:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
not refuse such an offer from so comely a man. The marriage took place, but sad to relate, the good man was sorely disillusioned before even one week had passed by, for on the third day after their marriage she was afraid to fetch a pail of water from the well after nightfall. "Well" said he, "if you do not go I must go myself." With these words on his lips he sallied forth into the inky darkness, and resolved to travel on in search of adventure rather than spend the remainder of his days with a faint-hearted life partner.
Without once resting or casting back a farewell glance towards dear Ballytrasnan he travelled over hill and dale till at daybreak he found himself sitting on a wall opposite a beautiful mansion in Templehouse in the County Sligo. Notwithstanding his energy he felt tired and footsore, for many a weary mile lay between him and his native Ballytrasnan. At eight o'clock he learned from a passer-by that his courage would soon be put to a severe test in Co. Sligo. He was told that the master of the "big house" could get nobody to work for him, as the well in the vicinity was known to be haunted.
Nothing daunted our worthy hero willlingly accepted an offer of employment. That
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 22:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Seo amhrán a chum fear a bainm John Walker a bhí i Ros beith timpeall cheirthe ficid agus ocht bliadhan ó shoin sa bhliaidhn 1846 siní an t-am a bhí an gorta mór in Éirinn. Bhí fear eile ab ainm Máighisitr Rófhinn. Bhí sé ag féachaint ar an taoide gach lá agus í ag déanamh a díoghbháil don talmhan, agus do cheap sé ‘na aigne do dhéanaig dé bonnc chun an taoidhe do choimeád amach, go mbeadh seach nó ocht céad acra talmhan ag muintir Chaoil na Breach. Do thosnuig sé an bonnc do dhéanamh, agus nuair a bhí an bonnc críochnighthe aige, do thánig an taoide oidhche amháin agus do bhris sé an bonnc agus fuair an fear sin ab ainm Rófhinn bás le briseadh croidhe.
Máighistir Rófhinn.
I. Máighistir Rofhinn is mór an reátha, Déarfhaigh a port so dhéanamh; béir stop an gnó so stop go deó ná féidir A Dhuine Náiran ag buile tháin tú; Déirfhaidh stop a chuireadh le h-áit atá fé dríeocht.
II A Dhuine náiri
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 22:01
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rejected
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There was once a man who lived in Ballytrasnan near the town of Boyle. He was a man of amazing energy and dare-devil courage, and early in life made a resolution never to wed unless he met the equal of himself in courage and pluck. After a long period of single blessedness he, at last, met the lady of his dreams, who accepted his proposal of marriage with a willing heart, for she could
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in the very spot in which they had looked.
On that very same sulrty evening when finishing a cock of hay the men beheld, to their dismay, all the cocks rise up into the air and come to the earth very gently and undamaged again. Since then the fort has the reputation of being haunted by fairies.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In the townland of Ballylugnagan about half a mile to the west of the town of Boyle at present stands a "fort" which bears but few signs of the ravages of time. Of the many forts which existed in the precincts of this town, in ancient times this is the most conspicuous.
It is a fort of considerable dimensions, with a large embackment around it and with the remains of a trench surrounding the embankment. In some places this embakment is from twelve to fifteen feet in height, and is all overgrown with furze, bracken,and holly trees. In one place a small opening was made to allow cattle to graze in the interior. A story is told concerning this fort, and is here related.
Some years ago the land surrounding it was owned by a Mr. Stewart who had it as meadow land. While the men were hay-making one very sultry day a strange thing hapened. At dinner time the men to their astonishment found that the lunch-basket which had been desposited convenient to the place was missing. After a vain search for any trace of it another one was sent for. When quitting work that evening the labourers found the basket untouched
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá an t-ainm pearsanta Eoghan go coiteann sa cheanntar so. Tá Cill-Eóghan in aice le droichead na Bandan, Sleabh Eógan in aice leis an gcaipin timcheall cúig míle ó thuaidh
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Éirigh Shinéad
Cuir síos an sciléad
Is gleas a Shuipear do Séan OCaoch.
Ní Éireochaidh mé arsa Síneadh
(Is Ní)
No tá póll ar an Sciléad
Is leigfeadh sí amach suipéar
Séain Uí Chaoich
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
11
Dá bhfeicfeadh sibhse Parthalán
Is na deora leis anuas,
É ag scairtigh,'gol is ag gartha,
A Charlie díol.
Nach mór an truaighe Parthalán
Is gan aige ach bó amháin
A ceithre ghéag in airde
is iad dá gcasgairt leis an tuaidh.
'Séard atá siad ag rá liom
Ach ní chreidfidh mé níos mó iad,
Gur iompair siad na cnámha amach
siar thar an chruaich.
Leoga féin a Pharthaláin,
Is truaighe é mo scéal
Ag fágáil na bó báine
Cé d'iarrfadh orm a luach.
111
Tá mise ag imeacht,
Is feidhm a bheith ag caoi
Thart siar go Cill na mBard
Ag mo ghrá bean an tí
'Sí Eilís bhán an bhean ab fhearr liom
A bhfaca mé faoin Rí.
Tá dúil agam leis an ard dlí
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Amhrán- Bó Pharthaláin Ruaidh
Seo amhrán a rinneadh de dhá bhó a thosaigh ag troid agus mharbh ceann acu an ceann eile.
Parthalán Ó Luodhóg- an fear ar leis an bhó a marbhadh.
Séarlas Ó Siadhail- ba as Mín an Fhia é.
Áit uaigneach atá ann idir Cró na Muc agus na beanna Gorma i bparóiste Chill na mBard.
An lá seo tháinig Séarlas anall leis an bhuin go tarbh Pharthaláin Ruaidh. Ní raibh ag Parthalán ach bó amháin agus bhí sí amuigh sa pháirc ag innilt. Thosaigh bó Mhín an Fhia ag troid léithí agus sa deireadh thug sí adharc di agus mharbh sí í.
Ní raibh bó ar bith ag Parthalán ansin agus b'éigean do Shéarlus bocht a bhó féin a fhágáil aige.Bó dheas bhán a bhí inti agus bhí an-bhrón ar Shéarlas í a fhágáil ag Parthalán
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
in a house belonging to one of those evil-doers. He knew their evil reputation and purposely remained wake all night in order to discover the secret of their power. He said that they commenced the churning at the dead hour of night, turning round every now and then to see if they were being spied on by their noble visitor, whose snores could be heard almost in the next world. So well did he deceive them that in the end they worked away as if there was no stranger in the house. When the work was completed he was horrified to see the old dame of the house cautiously opening an old tin box and extracting from it the pale white bony hand of a dead person with which she commenced to lift the butter. The butter was coming out in such large lumps that the old beggar feared the operation would never cease. When morning dawned the story was soon circulated and the next day a rifled grave was discovered in the neighbouring graveyard.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
there is difficulty in reaching the required temperature of sixty degrees. But if the temperature exceeds this figure, cold water is poured in to lower it.
When churned the butter is lifted out by means of the "joggler". Then it is placed in a wooden basin and thoroughly washed in spring water. It is then well pressed by means of a round wooden cup, and the first water is poured back into the churn. This operation is repeated three or four times till all the buttermilk is extracted. Salt is then mixed through it and it is made into a roll or "prints".
There is a strange story connected with butter-making often told in this district. The old people say that about fifty years ago certain wicked people had the power of taking their neighbours' butter in some majical way. These wicked people were easily identified in the district from the immense quantities of butter they had for sale, week after week, in the market-place. It was believed that they worked their majical spells on their unfortunate neighbours every May Eve. My father once told me a rather gruesome story about this divilish practice. He said that a beggerman once got shelter for the night
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:27
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rejected
awaiting decision
cuirfeadh sé cré os a cionn. D'faghadh sé annsin é go dtí an lá ar na mhaireach agus toigheadh sé é aríst. Cuireadh sé sa teine é airist agus lasadh sé é. Le "gaoth teann bhuilg" d'fheadfad sé teas iongantach maith a goradh agus deir na sean daoine go mba easgaidh don gabhainn faghairt maith a chur ar an iarann le teas móna na le teas guail ar an gcaoi seo.
Bhí na sean gaibhne i riocht laighe a dheunamh a gearrfad cloc - sleaghan a gearrfadh an gcumhas agus pice nach mbrisfeadh. Bhiodar i riocht faobhar a chur ar sgin nú ar mhidach a gearrfad trí leath choroin da dtuitfeadh sé ortha ó airde shlait. Is doice gur thuig na sean gaibhne an chaoi a bfearr cruadhas nu fabhairt a chur ar uirlisí - bhiodh sé cruadh agus bhiodh roinnt beodhchas ann fresin. Leigfeadh sé leis roinnt sul a mbrisfeadh sé . Bhiodar thar cionn ag cur faobair ar oirnéis. Bhodh eolas aca freisin ar thinneas a bhiodh ar capallaibh agus i riocht iad a leigheas. Is minic a chonnaic mé fein maide thios sa bportach suas le sé nu seacht ordlach ar leitheadh agus cuma air go raibh sé gearrtha leis an gceud bhuille de thuagh
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:16
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rejected
awaiting decision
Níl aon ghaba sa bparóisde seo anois (Cill Aininn) cé go raibh beirt ann leath cheud bliadhain o shoin. An t-am sin bhiodh go leor oibre le deunamh ag gabhainn - crúidhte le h-aghaidh capall agus asal - sluaisdí - laigheannta, pící, sleaghain, tuaghanna agus go leor rudaí eile. Rud ar bith a bhí deanta as iarann ba é an gabha a dheanfadh é. Bhiodh meas mór ar na daoinibh ar an ngabhainn. Biodh capalla na bhfeilméara le fáil aige i naisge ag treabhadh agus ag fuirse. Ní bhiodh call dó mhoin a a bhaint mar bhiodh neart le fáil aige i ngaisge. Feilmear ar bith a thagadh le fonnsaí a dhaingniú nu a chur ar rothaibh bhiodh carr móna aige ag teacht agus bhiodh a leath ar a laigheadh fágtha go bhfeadfadh an gabha a thabhairt abhaile leis.
Ní bhiodh gual ag an ngabhainn acht go hannamh. D'feadfadh sé a cuid oibre a dheunamh le móin - le cloc mhoin nu le móin giollaigh (?). Nuair a biodh an mhoin dearg sa teine cuirfeadh an gabha amach é i bpoll mór sa talamh agus
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:16
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rejected
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Mr. Reynolds, a highly-skilled cooper who lives in Mockmayne on the Ballymote road.
We churn four times a week in Summer and twice a week in Winter. It is very heavy work, and we all take a "turn" at the churning. If a stranger happens to call while the work is going on he never fails to lend a hand as there is a local superstitious belief handed down for generations that the "good luck of the cows" is safe-guarded in this way. I have often seen a forgetful neighbour, even in the harvest rush, return apologetically to our house to lend a helping hand.
The churning generally lasts an hour, and is done by hand. The churner does not continually move the dash upwards and downwards. To agitate the milk more and thus expedite the work he also gives the dash a rolling motion from side to side. When the cream is properly ripened the churning is done in a short time.
Some people assume that the cream is churned when the first small particles of butter appear on the lid. This is a great mistake, as the work is not fully completed till these small particles collect together to form larger lumps. Water is occasionally poured in during the process Warm water is poured in if
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:10
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rejected
awaiting decision
Ainmneacha na nGort
An Drom:- Ardán ar an ngort.
Cúisín na gCaorach:- Do chuirtí na caoire isteach ann chun breith ortha.
Poinnte Stíobhna:- Bádhadh fear d'ar b'ainm Stíobhna ann sa tseana- shaoghal.
Gort an sconnaig:-
Godrt an Cíománach:- Bhí file den ainm sin ina chómhnaidhe annso.
Faill na clocha breaca:-
Falla Fóidín:- Tig a bhí tógtha le fóid.
Léim an bhuachalla:- Do léim garsún 16? an claidhe a bhí annso. Tá an claidhe leagatha anois.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Collected by Mark Dwyer, Assylinn
Collected from Mrs Dwyer, Assylinn, Boyle.
Age 62
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:05
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rejected
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We have a dash-churn at home. It is two feet, six inches in height, and eighteen inches in diameter at the top and bottom. The sides are inclined inwards from the top and bottom to the dividing line separating the "peck" or upper portion from the lower portion of the churn. The lower part is about three times the size of the "peck".
Our churn is thirty years old. The wooden handle with a perforated wooden disc attached to the end of it is called the churn's dash. The lid is fitted lightly into the upper part of the "peck". There is a hole in the lid through which the dash passes and the "joggle" which is a circular piece of wood with a hole in it is dropped in over the dash to prevent the cream from dashing upwards over the lid. The churn is kept together by iron hoops, and it was made by
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The wild animals found in this neighbourhood are rabbits, hares, foxes, badgers, deer, squirrels, otters, hedgehogs, weasels, lizards, rats and mice.
Rabbits are very plentiful. They do great damage to crops when they are numerous and they are now being trapped and snared in great numbers. The rabbit's skin is dyed and made into fur coats, collars, gloves etc. The carcass is frozen and kept in cold storage and sold.
Hares are fairly plentiful on the mountains where they cannot be easily hunted by greyhounds. The hare does not make a burrow like the rabbit but makes her nest in long grass in ferns. Hares are not nearly so destructive to crops as rabbits because they are not so plentiful. People snare them and net them and sell them to Coursing Clubs.
The fox makes his den in the woods and glens. Foxes are very destructive when they are plentiful and the farmers do not like to hear that there are foxes around as they are sure to kill geese, ducks, hens and chickens as well as rabbits and young birds.
Foxes visit the farmyards at night in search of food and to make sure that the dogs are not prowling, give a low bark before entering or coming too near. If the dogs are awake and watchful they will answer the foxes back and the fox then slinks away.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 21:02
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rejected
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Foxes are hunted by packs of hounds and harriers during the Winter and early Spring. The hounds are followed by people on horseback who gallop through the fields and jump walls and ditches. Sometimes they kill the fox but he often escapes.
Foxes are very smelly animals and often suffer from mange. Crows hate foxes and will follow one through the field, cawing and swooping down on him and they often thus point out the foxes course to the hunters.
The badger lives in a burrow or den in the woods and fields. He is seldom seen in the daytime as he cannot see very well then. The badger is noted as a great fighter but will not fight until he is interfered with. People put Kerry Blues into the badger's den to draw him out but it is seldom the terrier is able to do so as the badger is very strong.
The badger is a very clean animal and the fox sometimes dirties the badger's den in order to make him leave. The fox then takes up possession and the badger makes a new den. His hair is used to make shaving brushes. He lives on roots and leaves. Some people say he also kills chickens and hens. His fore-paws are very short and strong for digging.
Deer are very plentiful in the woods and mountains around here. They feed at night and visit the farmers' crops, doing a lot of damage. Deer are very agile and can leap and jump over any wall or fence. Deer are captured by digging pits on their run and covering them over with branches and leaves. They are also snared, shot
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 20:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and trapped. It is very hard to get near them as they have a keen sense of smell and sharp ears.
The otter lives in a burrow under the banks of the rivers and streams and are very plentiful on the Nire and Suir. They eat all kinds of fish especially salmon. They can swim very quickly and pursue the salmon until it is exhausted. They then kill it and eat only one bit behind the head, thus they do great damage in salmon rivers. The otter's skin is very valuable and is made into coats. They are very wary and it is very difficult to trap them. They are sometimes called water-dogs as they resemble a dog very much.
The squirrel lives in trees and woods. He makes his nest in the hollow of a tree and lives on nuts and acorns which he stores up for the Winter. He is a lovely little animal covered with brown fur and has a long bushy tail. He can climb trees and jump from branch to branch like a monkey. Squirrels were very plentiful some years ago but are seldom seen now. It is believed that they were ravaged by some disease.
The hedgehog or porcupine lives in ditches and hedges. He is covered by long sharp spikes and when in danger rolls himself into a ball. He sleeps during the Winter. He eats all kinds of slugs and insects and is very useful in a garden. He has a sharp snout
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 20:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tá leanbaí gan baiste a gcur ann annso.
Abha na Cille:- Do bádhadh fear ó Paróiste na cille ann tímcheall 120 bl. ó shoin.
Páirc na Scoile:- Do bhí scoil scairte ann fadó.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 20:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ró-chruaidh. Dubhairt sé ná tabharfadh sé dhi an t-éadach. Do gheall sí go ndéanfadh annsan. Nuair a raghair isteach go tig mo Dhaidí fiafhróchaidh sé díot sé stiúraig tu agus ná bíodh aon eagla agat roimis ach labhair leis go dána. Tháinig triúr ban isteach. B'shin iad na trí lacha. Do chuaidh beirt acu suas sa tseómra agus d'fhan an bhean bhacach sa chistin, b'shin í an té ba sine agus bhíodh sí ag obair sa chistin. D'fhiafhruigh sí cad é an biadh geóbhadh an stróinséar. Arán ruadh agus uisce adubhairt sé. Tháinig sí chuige agus suipéar maith aici dho i gan fhios d'aoinne. D'fhiafhruig sí da Daidí cá gcuirfídhe a chodhladh é. Dubhairt sí go raibh taistil
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 20:07
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rejected
awaiting decision
An Chaora
Má bhíonn na caoigig ag imteacht go bárr an chnuic ta fhios ag na daoine go aimsear maith air. Acht ma bhíonn siad ag tigheacht aníos tig le na daoine a bheith cinnte go bhfuil droch aimsear air.
An Madadh
Nuair a théigeann an madadh amach ar maidin agus féir a othe go h-alpach bíonn fearthainn trom ar fághail.
An Cat
Nuair a bhíos an cat in a luighe agus a dhruim leis an teine sin comhaair droch aimsire. Nuair a bhíos sé ag cur faobhar ar a iongnaibh bíonn stoirm air.
Éanlaith
Nuair a thigeas na faoileán isteach ón bhfairrge deirtear go mbíonn aimsear cruaidh air. Ma bhíonn na h-éanlaith ag eitilt go h-íseal bíonn fearthainn air.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 20:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
11
Dá bhfeicfeadh sibhse Parthalán
Is na deora leis anuas,
É ag scairtigh,'gol is ag gartha,
A Charlie díol.
Nach mór an truaighe Parthalán
Is gan aige ach bó amháin
A ceithre ghéag in airde
is iad dá gcasgairt leis an tuaidh.
'Séard atá siad ag rá liom
Ach ní chreidfidh mé níos mó iad,
Gur iompair siad na cnámha amach
siar thar an chruaich.
Leoga féin a Pharthaláin,
Is truaighe é mo scéal
Ag fágáil na bó báine
Cé d'iarrfadh orm a luach.
111
Tá mise ag imeacht,
Is feidhm a bheith ag caoi
Thart siar go Cill na mBard
Ag mo ghrá bean an tí
'Sí Eilís bhán an bhean ab fhearr liom
A bhfaca mé faoin rí.
Tá dúil agam leis an ard dlí
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 20:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ach caidé a bhí ag an duine bocht le déanamh. Ní raibh airgead ar bith aige le fágáil ar son na bó a marbhadh ar Pharthalán.
Bhí an bhó a d'fhág Séarlas ina dhiaidh i bhfad níos fearr ná an bhó a marbhadh.
Fear an-ghreannmhar a bhí i Séarlas agus bhí sé go han-mhaith ag déanamh amhráin. Shuigh sé síos agus chum sé an t-amhrán seo.
1
An gcluin sibh mise a chairde
Is tabhair éisteacht do mo scéal.
An gcuala tú an t-ármhach a rinne bó Mhín an Fhia
Bhí sí lúfar láidir
Is ba róbheag a ciall
Nuair a bhuail sí an boc báire ar
bhó Pharthaláin Ruaidh.
Leoga féin a Pharthaláin
Is truaighe é mo scéal
Ag fágail na bó báine
Is ag imeacht go Mín an Fhia
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Collected by Mark Dwyer, Assylinn
Collected from Mrs Dwyer, Assyoinn, Boyle.
Age 62
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
bed. There he told the woman that she was eating cockles and that it was that, that was making her sick.
When the two doctors went out the young doctor asked the old doctor how he knew. The old doctor said that he saw the shells under the bed.
On another occasion the young doctor had to go to a sick man. This time the young doctor made sure that he would look under the bed. When he looked under the bed what did he see but a donkey's harness. Then he told the man that he was eating an ass and that, that was causing his sickness.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
with flowing streamers and disguise their faces with blacking. Then, playing flutes and beating on old cans, they go from house seeking money. Now and again they raise their voices in the following wren-song:
The wren; the wren; the King of all birds
On St. Stephen's day he was caught in the furze
Up with the kettle and down with the pan
Give me my answer and let me be gone
If you treat us to the best we hope in heaven your soul shall rest
But if you treat us to the small that will not please the boys at all
They then buy provisions and have a picnic and sing, eat and make merry,
New Year's Day is the most joyous day in the year and like May Day has many superstitions connected with it. People have a great desire to dream on this night, for it is said that whoever dreams three times of a treasure on this and the two succeeding nights, will have its location revealed to him. People also look forward to the arrival of the first person into their house on that day. If it is a fair-haired man it forbodes good luck for the whole of that year, but if it is a dark-haired man or a woman it forbodes quite the opposite.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One holy well is in the parish, in the townland of Garrayadeen, Grenagh. It is in a field owned by Mr. Con. Burns. People visit the well on St. John's Eve. Rounds are performed and prayers said on certain occasions.
St. Laughteen is mentioned in connection with it, and it is known as St. Laughteen's Well.
People have been cured at the well. It is recomedaded for the cure of diseases. Invalids and other people wash with the well water and rub it to the affected part.
There is a fish in the well and who ever sees it is said to be cured. Once the well was in the parish of Donoughmore but the people there disrespected it and it left it and came to the parish of Grenagh.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Nuair a phósfar Paidí bán
Go bhfaighidh mise gráinín páipéar
A dhéanfas mo chroí slán.
Leoga féin a Pharthaláin
Tá brón ar mo chroí
Ag fágáil agat na bó báine
Is gan pardún uaithi choíche.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
11
Dá bhfeicfeadh sibhse Parthalán
Is na deora leis anuas,
É ag scairtigh,'gol is ag gartha,
A Charlie dhil.
Nach mór an truaighe Parthalán
Is gan aige ach bó amháin
A ceithre ghéag in airde
is iad dá gcasgairt leis an tuaidh.
'Séard atá siad ag rá liom
Ach ní chreidfidh mé níos mó iad,
Gur iompair siad na cnámha amach
siar thar an chruaich.
Leoga féin a Pharthaláin,
Is truaighe é mo scéal
Ag fágáil na bó báine
Cé d'iarrfadh orm a luach.
111
Tá mise ag imeacht,
Is feidhm a bheith ag caoi
Thart siar go Cill na mBard
Ag mo ghrá bean an tí
'Sí Eilís bhán an bhean ab fhearr liom
A bhfaca mé faoin rí.
Tá dúil agam leis an ard dlí
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
had a great wedding feast and a long night's feasting and marrymaking.
On the night of the wedding a crowd of clagheraghs came to the house. Those boys had their faces covered so that nobody would know them. The man of the house gave them a drink of porter or money. If they got money they fought to see which one of them would have it. If they did not get porter or porter money they did damage around the house.
In olden times when a boy and girl got married they went to the girl's house and had a big wedding. The girl stayed there for three days or a week. When the husband came for her this was called the "hauling home". When the woman went to her new home there was another big wedding. A pot of potatoes and a pot of bacon and cabbage they had for this wedding. They danced and enjoyed themselves all the night. They had tea in the (before) morning before the people went home.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:48
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rejected
awaiting decision
The old people have stories about the Great Famine of 1846 and 1847. It did not affect the country very much.
In my townland there are only six old ruins left after the famine. The year before the famine there was a wonder full crop of potatoes. The people used to throw them away, and then the famine came.
The potatoe crop failed and they rotted under the ground, and in the pits also. How they used to plant the potatoes was to make a hole in the ground with a machine called a gafain and the people used to put the potatoes down in the holes. A number of people died during the famine.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
na faille é san áit go raibh nead a gheárrcaig. An bhfeiceann tú an loch san thíos ar seisean. Cím adubhairt sé. Nuair a raghair síos annsan chídhfir trí cinn da lachainn ann agus ceann acu bacach. Ealaig anois adubhairt sé agus chídhfir éadach ar an bport agus an t-éadach is sia uait tóg é agus cuir fé'd ascailll é. Do dhein agus bhí sé ag imtheacht agus é aige. Do chonnaic an lacha bhacach é agus d'fhiafhruigh sí dhe cá raibh sé ag imtheacht lé na cuid éadaig. Dubhairt sé ná tabharfadh sé dhi é go ngeallfadh sí go gcuirfeadh sí slán ó thig a Dhaidí é. Dubhairt sí go raibh san
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the night there. In some houses in the morning many footprints clearly defined can be traced on the ashes. If the footprints face inward they denote the coming arrival of an additional member to the family, but if inclined towards the doorway they herald the coming death of some of the members of the household. This is a fact as it happened in the house of my grandfather. On this night some people have a dream, a vision of all the chief events in their career in the succeeding twelve months. Only persons who pray continually on behalf of the "Holy Souls" have this privilege.
The twelve day of Christmas are spent in feasting and merry-making. On the "Twelvth Day" or as it is known, "Little Christmas Day" there is another period of feasting and rejoicing similar to that of Christmas Day and Christmas Eve, but on this occcasion the number of dainties is diminished by half to distinquish the greatness between the two Festivals. On the Trelvth Night" the people of this district light twelve candles in honour of the Twelve Apostles, and while they are burning they kneel down and recite the Rosary.
St. Stepheh's Day is a very enjoyable day for the youth of Boyle. Boys and men often dress up in old rags decorated
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Irish. Her name is Mrs. Sheehan, Ballyvaloon, Grenagh, Co. Cork. The townland is not mentioned in any song of saying.
About two thirds of the land is good the remainder is hilly and boggy.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I live in the townland of Ballyvaloon, Grenagh, Barony of the Barretts. Thirteen families are in the townland and seventy people. The most common name is Walsh. Mostly all the houses are slated except two thatched houses. One old person aged ninety five is living there. She knows Irish and can tell stories in English and
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In olden times there was a special month for getting married. This was called shrove.
People get married at any time of the year now. It is usually on a weeks - day people get married. They say it is not lucky to get married on Sunday.
In olden times it was a custom for the girl and boy who were to be married to walk to the church. A crowd of people who were invited to the wedding walked after them. Then the boy and girl went into the church and the crowd of people stayed in a field jumping and racing until the priest came. When the marriage was over the new husband and wife & the crowd of people to a (pub) puplic - house. The wedding party got a room for them-selves. The bride groom got porter for the men, and wine for the women. The party danced and enjoyed themselves. Then they walked home again. When they were coming they sang joyously on their way. They walked home to the girls house and
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:43
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rejected
awaiting decision
I live in the townland of Rockhill, parish of Grenagh, and the Barony of the Barretts. Eleven families are in the townland, and sixty-five people. Coleman is the most common name in the townland. The houses are slated except one thatched, and one galvanized house. The townland got its name from a hill and a rock which is in the place. One woman is living over seventy years of age in the townland. She knows a little Irish. When she tells stories she tells them in English.
The houses were not so numerous long ago as they are now. Three houses are now in ruins that were inhabited long ago. I know a few verses of poetry in which the townland is mentioned.
"The Blarney boys are very good boys."
"The Grenagh boys are better,"
The Rockhill boys would blacken, there eyes,
And roll them in the gutter.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
go raibh sé sa nid agus gur chaith sé dul ag soláthar dá gheárrcaig. An bhfuil aon tuairisg agat ar Dhiarmuid na Féasóige Deirge sa pharóiste ná fuil ann adubhairt sé leis an seabhac. Ta fios agam cá bhfuil sé, tá sé fé bhun no thighe-se. Tair ar mo dhrom adubhairt an seabhac. Caithfidh mé lón fághailt seacht gcínn do bholacsaí. Bhí an buachaill ar a dhrom aige lé thabhairt treasna. Bhailig sé leis agus ní fada imthig sé nuair a loirg sé ceann de's na bolacsaí. Do loirg sé ceann eile dubhairt sé go raibh ocras air, níor bhfada gur loirg sé ceann eile. Bhí sé ag lorg go dtí go raibh na seacht gcínn ithte aige. Thug sé go bárr
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ach caidé a bhí ag an duine bocht le déanamh. Ní raibh airgead ar bith aige le fágáil ar son na bó a marbhadh ar Pharthalán.
Bhí an bhó a d'fhág Séarlas ina dhiaidh i bhfad níos fearr ná an bhó a marbhadh.
Fear an-ghreannmhar a bhí i Séarlas agus bhí sé go han-mhaith ag déanamh amhráin. Shuigh sé síos agus chum sé an t-amhrán seo.
1
An gcluin sibh mise a chairde
Is tabhair éisteacht do mo scéal.
An gcuala tú an t-árbhach a rinne bó Mhín an Fhia
Bhí sí lúfar láidir
Is ba róbheag a ciall
Nuair a bhuail sí an boch barach ar
bhó Pharthaláin Ruaidh.
Leoga féin a Pharthaláin
Is truaighe é mo scéal
Ag fágail na bó báine
Is ag imeacht go Mín an Fhia
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
When I heard my sentence passing
I begged his honour pardon
I put a shilling in his fist
To show him how it happened
The law you make you cannot break
Your honour will not failt it
You are listed now as well as me
And you are wanted out to Malta
His honour then made no delay
He dressed himself in dramson
And he popped me over one pound one
Saying Paddy you have done me handsome
I counted it before his face
And showed it to the sergeant
Saying this will answer me as well as ye
I'll go home and cut the harvest
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I gave consint so in we went
And shaking hands and parting
When he slipped a shilling in my fist
Saying you pay for what you call for
Although being drunk I knew right well
The schemes of this old sergeant
I put his shilling back again
Saying I'll pay for my own porter
He said young man you are too late
The trumpet sounds to march us
Victoria's cash you have taken in hands
And your wanted out to Malta
So we rose a row about the house
And caused a great alarm
He said your schemes will not avail
For justice I will call for.
He took me before a magistrate
And said that I could march it
We'll drink enough and quench our thirst
With whiskey, beer, and cordial
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Amhrán- Bó Pharthalán Ruaidh
Seo amhrán a rinneadh de dhá bhó a thosaigh ag troid agus mharbh ceann acu an ceann eile.
Parthalán Ó Luodhóg- an fear ar leis an bhó a marbhadh.
Séarlas Ó Siadhail- ba as Mín an Fhia é.
Áit uaigneach atá ann idir Cró na Muc agus na beanna Gorma i bparóiste Chill na mBard.
An lá seo tháinig Séarlas anall leis an bhuin go tarbh Pharthaláin Ruaidh. Ní raibh ag Parthalán ach bó amháin agus bhí sí amuigh sa pháirc ag innilt. Thosaigh bó Mhín an Fhia ag troid léithí agus sa deireadh thug sí adharc di agus mharbh sí í.
Ní raibh bó ar bith ag Parthalán ansin agus b'éigean do Shéarlus bocht a bhó féin a fhágáil aige.Bó dheas bhán a bhí inti agus bhí an-bhrón ar Shéarlas í a fhágáil ag Parthalán
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
tSeascainn ar an charnán sin ó shin agus Loch Charraig an tSeascainn ar an loch.Bíonn diospóireacht go fóill nach é Carraig na hEasgoine an t-ainm ceart, ach cionnus go bhfuil seasgann ann go fóill coinníodh an t-ainm Loch Charraig an tSeascainn.
Fuaireas ó
Máire Bean Ua Bhraonáin,oide scoile nach maireann.Fuair sise ó athair a céile é Proinnseas Uas Braonáin atá marbh ó 1888.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 19:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mhór ramhar dhubh a bhí 'sa' phéist, cár fiacal aici a scanróchadh an domhan mór agus muing uirthi a bhí níos gairbhe agus níos láidre nó muing capaill;dhá shúil thintreach deirg ina ceann agus cluasa in airde uirthi níos airde nó cluasa asail.
Scairt a raibh ar an bhealach suas uaidh leis an Bhaoghlach rith lena shaol nó shíl siad uilig go mbeadh sé slogtha i mbomaite. Amharc amháin a thug an t-eascon air go dtug sí alrába (?) air ach tharraing seisean a chlaidheamh agus bhain giota den eireaball di. Ach gur bé sin bheadh deireadh thart.Thug sí an darna dubh-iarraidh air agus fuair greim ghualainn air. Chonaic an Baoghlach go raibh sé caillte agus bhain sé an bhróg dá chois.Ní luaithe a rinne nó chaith sí í fein ar an eascon agus bhuail leis an chois í fán cheann. Thit sí síos siar socair i mbomaite ach bhí guala an chóta, giota dá charabhat agus guala na léineadh ar fad ina béal. Go hádhúil ní bhfuair sí fhad leis an chraiceann.
Tháinig na daoine uilig anuas, agus chuir siad carn cloch ar an eascon, clocha móra troma agus tugadh Carr an
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 18:38
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awaiting decision
mhór ramhar dhubh a bhí
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 18:18
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awaiting decision
" Caisleán an Mhúrdaig, Caisleán na gCúig gCúinne'
An Caisleán is breágtha in Éirinn! " a deireadh an sean amhrán. Fear a bhí ar leath shúil a deiridís a thóg an caislean. Bhí staighre chloch ag dul suas i gcúinne an chaisleáin istigh sa bhfalla agus bhí radharc áluinn ar Thráig a' Mhúrdhaig ó cheann des na fuinneóga sa staighre. Bhíodh dhá chóiolán(cómh-thionól rinnce) ar an gcaisleán tamall - ceann ar úrlár lice a bhí leath slighe suas agus an ceann ba mó ar bhárr an chaisleáin. Bhí seana thigh Hargain ana gheairid do'n gcaisleán agus bhíodh eagla ar mhuinntir Hargain go dtuitfeadh cuid den gcaisleán ortha nuair a bhíodh oidhche gaoithe muaire ann agus an CD Board a leag é beagán blianta ó shoin.
Níl aon ruaine de'n gcaisleán ann anois. In aimsir an ghorta bhí an bheirt chríona i dtig Hargain ag fághail bháis leis an gCalara. Mo shinn-seana mháthair, Cáit Ní Chatháin, a bhíodh ag dul ar a dtuairisg, níor thóg sí an galar ó thúis deire céad buidheachas le Dia. Bhíodh
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 18:04
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awaiting decision
"Is mé a thug an droch-íde duit," ars' an frog, "ach béidh mé níos fearr duit feasta."
Le sin féin go díreach fágadh an seomra dubh, dorcha, tháinic toirneach agus soillsigh agus ní thiocfadh leat an duine a bhéadh ag do thaoibh a fheiceail. Nuair a ghlan an spéir agus stad an toirneach chonnaic an cailín buachaill óg 'n-a sheasamh ag a taoibh. Chuaidh an bheirt agus pósadh iad agus bhí dóigh mhaith ortha annsin. Buachaill a bhí faoi gheasa a bhí sa frog.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 17:57
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awaiting decision
shéan sé ar an gcaptaen é.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 17:57
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awaiting decision
an tábla agus thoisigh a ithe as pláta an chailín ach ní íosfadh sise níos mó.
Nuair a bhí an dinnear thart dubhairt an frog go raibh codladh uirri agus b'éigean do'n chailín a ghabhail a luighe leithe. Ar maidín nuair a mhuscail an cailín mhothuigh sí an frog ag gabhail síos an staighre, agus bhí lúthghair mhór uirri, nó shaoil sí go raibh an frog ar shiubhal agus nach bpillfeadh sí níos mó.
Lá thar na bharach nuair a bhí sí ag a dinnear tháinic an frog go dtí an doras agus scairt si, "a inghean an ríogh, foscail an doras, agus leig isteach mé." B'éigean dithe an doral a fhoscladh agus í leigint isteach. Shuidh an frog isteach ag an tábla, thoisigh sí a ithe as pláta an chailín. Nuair a bhí a cuid ithte ag an frog, d'iarr sí ar an chailín a ghabhail i luighe leithe, agus b'éigean do'n chailín deanamh mar hiarradh uirri.
Ar maidín nuair a mhuscail an chailín chonnaic sí an frog ag amharc uirri.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 17:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
an tábla agus thoisigh a ithe as pláta an chailín ach ní íosfadh sise níos mó.
Nuair a bhí an dinnear thart dubhairt an frog go raibh codladh uirri agus b'éigean do'n chailín a ghabhail a luighe leithe. Ar maidín nuair a mhuscail an cailín mhothuigh sí an frog ag gabhail síos an staighre, agus bhí lúthghair mhór uirri, nó shaoil sí go raibh an frog ar shiubhal agus nach bpillfeadh sí níos mó.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 17:47
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awaiting decision
"Agus caidé thug an frog go dtí an doras seo?" ars' a hathair leithe.
Annsin d'innis an cailín do go raibh sí ag imirt liathróide anns an pháirc, agus gur thuit an liathróid isteach sa tobar, agus ar sise, "Cuir an frog aníos a ceann as faoi an uisce agus chuir sí ceist orm dá dtabharfaidh sé aníos an liathróid an leigfinn dithe ithe ann mo chuideachta agus luighe ann mo cuideachta. Dubhairt mé leithe go leigfinn ach ní raibh rún ar bith agam an geall a choimhlíonadh. Thug an frog aníos an liathróid agus chaith sí amach ar an talamh thirm í. D'imthigh mise 'n-a bhaile annsin agus níor fhan mé leithe agus sin an rud a thug anneo í."
"Ó," ars' an t-athair, "caithfidh tú congbhailt le do ghealltanas."
B'éigean dithe ghabhail síos go dtí an doras agus an frog a leigint isteach Tháinic an frog aníos agus shuidh sí ag
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 17:39
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awaiting decision
Domnic Raftery was coming from visiting one night and as he turned round John O Donnell's corner he saw a little pup on the road. He bent down to take it up and it grew up as big as a calf and then disappeared.
Thady Moylan was out visiting late at night. It was dark and the people gave him a red coal out of the fire. He put it on a reaping hook to show him light. As he was coming at the section bush he saw a hand grab the hook and he saw the hook and coal go quickly away.
Mrs. Mary Regan, Currasallagh was going to the shop late at night. She had not gone far when a white goose came out on the road and started picking her and when she went a few yards she disappeared.
Andy Rogers had a lime kiln burning and he went out
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 17:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Domnic Raftery was coming from visiting one night and as he turned round John O Donnell's corner he saw a little pup on the road. He bent down to take it up and it grew up as big as a calf and then disappeared.
Thady Moylan was out visiting late at night. It was dark and the people gave him a red coal out of the fire. He put it on a reaping hook to show him light. As he was coming at the section bush he saw a hand grab the hook and he saw the hook and coal go quickly away.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 17:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Domnic Raftery was coming from visiting one night and as he turned round John O Donnell's corner he saw a little pup on the road. He bent down to take it up and it grew up as big as a calf and then disappeared.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 17:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
to see if it wanted it a layer of stone. He got the stones and was at the kiln just as it was twelve o clock. As he got to the kiln a goat was shaving himself by the light of the fire. The man put on the layer and the goat stood there.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 17:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
aníos an liathróid chugat." Dubhairt an cailín go leigfeadh ach ní raibh sí fá choinne sin a dheanamh.
Chuaidh an frog síos anns an tobar agus fá chionn tamailt tháinic sí aníos agus chaith sí an liathróid amach ar an talamh. Thug an cailín leithe an liathróid agus d'imthigh sí ar a sean rása 'n-a bhaile, ach scairt an frog leithe:- "Ní'l mise ábalta siubhal comh gasta sin agus fan liom," ach níor fhan an cailín leithe, bhain sí an baile amach.
Lá thar na bharach, nuair a bhí an cailín ag deanamh a dinneara, bualadh an doras, agus chualaidh sí an glór ag rádh:- "Foscail an doras, a inghean an ríogh agus leig isteach mé." Chuaidh sí síos go dtí an doras agus d'fhoscail sí é. Cé bhí ann ach an frog, agus dhruid an cailín an doras ann a héadán go gasta. Tháinic sí aníos arait chuig a dinnear agus chuir a hathair ceist uirri cé bhí ag an doras. Dubhairt sí gur frog mhór a bhí ann.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 17:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On St Bridget's day people made crosses of two sticks crosswise and tied together with straw taken from the stack. They were about six inches in length and breadth. They were put behind the rafter in the house and preserved there until the following year. in honour of St Bridget. Some people brought straw from the Crib and made crosses likewise which were also placed behind rafters. Some people made one every year and preserved it with the old one.
At Christmas people decorate the house with holly. It is not right to take down the holly or burn it until after the 6th January then it is taken down and burned. On Palm Sunday the people get palm in the church and put it at the head of the bed until the following year. Some people put it up with the old piece and others take down the
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 17:03
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí inghean iongantach dóigheamhail ag rígh agus bainríoghain a mhair i nÉirinn lá de'n t-saoghal. Bhí páirc mhór taobh shíos de'n teach. Lá amháin bhí an cailín ag imirt liathróide anns an pháirc. Bhí poll mór uisce anns an pháirc agus thuit an liathróid isteach ann. Suidh an cailín síos ar an fhéar agus thoisigh sí a chaoineadh. Fá chionn tamaill chuir frog mhór aníos a ceann as faoi an uisce. Chuir sí ceist ar an cailín caidé bhí ag cur chaithte uirri. D'innis an cailín dithe go raibh sí ag imirt liathróide, gur thuit an liathróid i bpoll an uisce agus go muirbhfeadh a hathair í cionnas gur chaill sí an liathróid
Dubhairt an frog leithe annsin:- "Má gheallann tú damh-sa go leigfidh tú damh ithe ann de chuideachta agus luighe ann do chuideachta bheirfidh mé
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 17:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On St Bridget's day people made crosses of two sticks crosswise and tied together with straw taken from the stack. They were about six inches in length and breadth. They were put behind the rafter in the house and preserved there until the following year. in honour of St Bridget.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 16:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On St. Brigid's day people used to make crosses and place them in the rafter of the house. This is done by getting two sticks and placing them crossways. Then straw is got and woven in among those. This when made is about six inches wide and six inches high. Some people bring straw from the crib and preserve it until St. Brigid's feast and then it is made. Some people make one every year in honour of St. Brigid. On Christmas Eve people get holly and decorate the different parts of the house with it. It is believed that it should not be taken down until after the sixth of January.
On Palm Sunday people get palm at the Church and put it up in some part of the house. Sometimes the old piece is taken down and sometimes left there. There is no palm put in the outer buildings. On
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 16:49
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rejected
awaiting decision
On St. Brigid's day people used to make crosses and place them in the rafter of the house. This is done by getting two sticks and placing them crossways. Then straw is got and woven in among those. This when made is about six inches wide and six inches high. Some people bring straw from the crib and preserve it until St. Brigid's feast and then it is made.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 16:48
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rejected
awaiting decision
Wild birds most commonly found in this district.
Hawks
owls
kestrel
grey crows
magpies
crows
starlings
robins
chaffinch
goldfinch
bullfinch
sparrow
wrens
tom tits
green linnet
yellow hammers
larks
blackbirds
thrush
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 16:44
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rejected
awaiting decision
till it is broken and falls off bit by bit. When the house is destroyed the snail is followed comfortably. It is usually from the ash tree that we hear the first Spring song of the chaffinch. All the Winter he has little to say to us but one day in March or April we may hear his song - a few low sweet notes, followed by a downward ripple of music. It can be noticed that he flies with a slight up and down motion, and that his breast glows reddish in the sunshine. Deep in the prickly shelter
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 16:42
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The chaffinch builds her nest in a high thorny ditch. She builds it with moss and she lines it with hair and feathers. She lays about four or five eggs and she hatches on them for about three weeks. The fledglings are about two weeks old before they are able to leave the nest.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 16:35
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rejected
awaiting decision
an talamh. Bhí iongantas an domhain ar Thomás ar fheiceál sin dó, acht ní raibh neart air agus an rud a b'iontaige ar fhad ní raibh tasc na tuairsc le fáil ar an socruid nu ar an triur fear a bhí ag iomcur an chuirp.
Ní call dom a radh go raibh faitchíos agus iongantas ar Thomás, acht d'arduigh sé an clár den cónnra agus bhreathnuigh sé isteach ann. Bhí bean uasal óg istigh sa gconnra. Duine do na Blácaigh do beadh í. Ní raibh sí caillte acht bhí sí na codladh. Thug Tomas abhaile í - chur sé fios ar an sagart agus léigh seisean paidreacha dí. Tamall in a dhiaidh sin thainic biseac chuici agus thainic a ciall agus a reásun chuicí.
Chuaidh Tomás cuig teach athair na mná oige. Bhí torramh ar siubhal annsin. D'innis Tomás an sceul do fhear a' tighe. Níor chreid seisean é ar dtús acht théis tamaill deist sé leis agus thug sé crediunt do.
Ar ordú Thomáis cuireadh síos teine mhór leis an gcorp do bhí san leabaidh marb a dógadh. Nuair a bhí an teine dearg lasad d'eirigh
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 16:30
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rejected
awaiting decision
blood in streams did flow.
Come on he said my loyal men your work in Meelin you have done well
Number twelve said shoot him dead the captain he said no
10
When they reached Maoin Caora they scoured their guns most daring
They gave three cheers for Erin and onwards marched for home.
Our moonlight flag was flying, our boys on every hill along the line
But Badford's dogs we do defy for now we are safe at home.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 16:27
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rejected
awaiting decision
Fadó do bhiodh ollpheist uathbhasach i Loch Coirib. Bhíodh sí na comhnuidhe sa loch, agus ní deirtí go mbiodh sí ag teacht amach ar an talamh tirm cor ar bith. Acht bhiodh sí ag teacht go dtí an reilg (Reilg Chille Chuimin, Uachtarard) i mbelach faoi thalamh ag ithe na gcorp. Lá ar bith a mbiodh socraid ar an reilg taghadh an t-ollpheist an oidhche sin leis an gcorp d'ithe. Bhí an oiread sin d'fhaitchios ar na daoinibh roimpi nach racadh aoinne i n-aice na reilige oidhche sochruide ar ór nu ar airgead.
Bhí fear in a chomnuidhe san nGleann (sé mhile taobh thiar d'Uachtarard) an uair sin agus nuair a cailleadh a mhathair cuireadh í i reilg Chille Chuimin, agus thainic sé fein an oidhche sin ag faire. Bhí claidheamh aige agus chuaidh sé isteach sa sean chill le paidir a radh an fhaid is bheadh sé ag fanact leis an ollpheist. Bhí aisling aige no thainic aingeal chuige agus d'orduigh sé do an cloigeann a bhaint den ollpheist le aon bhuille amhain - gan an tarna buille a tharraing, agus dá dtuitfead fiu is deor amhain d'fhuil na peiste ar a mhéar, nu ar a láimh, nu ar a chos, an ball sin a bhaint de féin laithreach bonn le na claidheamh.
Theís achairin chuala sé an torann ag teacht. Sgear gur shaith an t-ollpheist a cloigeann isteach
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 16:26
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Lá go raibh Ar dTigearna Iosa Criost ag siubhal le Naomh Peadar casad fear leo a bhí ag iarraidh deírce. Bhí a fhios ag Naomh Peadar gur gaduidhe agus dearg scailbhtéire (?) a bhí ann agus rinne sé iongantas go dtug Ar dTighearna déarc dó.
Téis acairin eile doibh ag siubhal casad sean fhear ortha. Bhí an chuid eadaigh stroichthe agus chuile cosamhlacht air go raibh sé i baoghal a bhais le ocras. Diarr sé dearc ar Ar dTighearna acht nior thug Sé do é. Do mheadaigh sé ar iongantas Pheadair.
An lá in a dhiaidh sin, nu tamall in a dhiaidh sin casadh an gadaidhe ortha airíste. Bhí comhluadar fear i n-eindigh leis agus é stártha ar meisge. Bhí sé frasach go leor do chomhluadar leis an meid dighe a bhí aige. Sgearr in a dhiaidh sin go dtáineadar ar an sean fhear agus é min marbh agus réir gach cosamhlachta cailleadh é leis an ocras. Do mheaduig ar iongantas Pheadair airíst.
D'fhiafruigh Peadar dár Slanuigtheóir annsin cen fáth go dtug Sé deirc don gadaidhe agus nar thug Sé rud a bit don
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 16:25
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Bhí gabha in a chomhnaidhe i n-aice le Cnoc an Daingin, in n-aice na Gaillimhe fadó. Tomás Mór O Dorchaigh a b'ainm do. Fear cumasach mór laidir a bhí ann. Oidhche amhain go raibh sé ag obair leis féin sa gceardchainn bhí sé an-dheireannach san oidhche air agus é dhul abhaile 'na aonraic. Bhí slat mór fada iarainn in a láimh aige agus é siubal an bóthar agus thug sé sin misneach dó mar chualaidh sé aríamh nar bhaogal do dhuine go mbeadh iarann 'na laimh aige san oidhche. Siubhal sé leis go mear agus sgearr go dtainic sé suas le socraid. Bhí sluagh mor daoine ann agus gan focal asta. Shiubhal Tomás ar aghaidh go dtainic sé suas chomh fada leis an dream a bhí ag iomchur an connra. Thug sé fa deara go raibh an sluag nu an socruid ag eirge beag agus rud eile nach raibh acht triur fear ag iomchur an chuirp. Shiubhal sé go ndeacha sé isteach faoi an gconnra, agus téis tamaillin d'imthigh fear amhain ón gconnra agus fear eile agus an triú fear agus annsin thuit an connra ar
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 16:23
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rejected
awaiting decision
7
He changed his court and off he went, to find the grabber he was bent.
In a short time he returned and thus to them did say
We are too late he is gone to bed his doors are barred his lights are out
But we'll wake him from his slumber with powder lead and ball.
8
The door they broke to atoms, revolver shots did clatter
Which shook each hill and valley though a barracks it was nigh
Young Brown ran up a ladder the Captain did him follow
And fired a revolver shot which passed through his right thigh.
9
Brown fell on the floor and commenced to bawl and roar
He fired a third revolver shot and
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 16:07
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Caora" those boys you know being strangers
In the midst of bog and water they quickly lost their way.
5
Then doomed for transportation should those boys be prisoners taken.
Far from their friends and parents and exile be their doom.
But the sky illuminated they spied a police station
Full ten yards right in front of them stood Sergeant Hysball Crewe.
6
Then backward they returned until they reached "Maoin Caora",
Those boys being tired and weary on a bank they all sat down
But the captain said to them, cheer up your hearts my loyal men,
Watch and wait and here remain till I'll return again.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 15:56
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rejected
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he heeded not the warning I'll die before I'll part it said the creeping reptile brown.
3
When the Captain heard it "this grabber no man dreaded"
He called his men together and thus to them did say
"In Meelin we are wanted O'Sullivans land is grabbing
We have no time for chatting so go home boys and prepare".
Those boys obeyed his orders each man with his fire arms
Took off his boots and stockings and in a moment were away.
4
They travelled many a weary mile o'er grassy land and mountain side
They crossed the river Alay and the cloggier glash awien.
But when they reached "Maoin
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 15:45
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1
Come all ye Irish Fenians with your guns and sabres gleaming.
Come draw your sword of freedom at Captain Moonlights call.
Their valiant and their daring their axes of the bravest
No man can prove a traitor but proudly hold the field
With air and admiration with joy and exaltation
I'll sing to you a verse or two of what Irishmen can do.
2
It being late one Sunday evening quite close to two policemen
When a raid was made near Meelin and the grabber was shot down
This man was often cautioned,
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:51
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rejected
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I
In Dennie street in sweet Tralee
One day in the month of August
Whom did I meet coming down the street
But a bold recruiting sergeant.
He said young man will you take me on
a march to be your guardian
Its better than to be digginf dykes
Or to be a Spailpin Fanach.
O: kind sir I never could
Contint my mind to obey so many masters
My doom would be to face the blacks
And afterwards to be slaughtered
Id rather reap both sow and mow
And till a fruitful garden
Where I could drink a crown amongst my friends
And still be a Spailpin Fanach
He said come in we'll have a drink
The day is very warm
We'll drink enough and guench our thirst
With whiskey, beer and cordial
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:45
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There was once a boy named Pat. He lived with his mother in a cabin. They were very poor. Pat wanted to be rich.
As he was going home one day he heard a tap-tap-tap. He looked down the field. He saw the leipreachán. He stole down on tip-toe. He caught the leipreachán and asked him for his crock of gold. The leipreachán said that he never heard of such a thing as gold. Pat said.
"Give me out the gold or I'll never again let you go"
"Look behind you" said the leipreachán "your house is on fire". Pat very nearly looked around him, but he stopped just in time.
"Try no more of your tricks on me, you rascal; you might as well make your mind easy that I wont take my eye off you till I know where the crock is", said Pat.
"Come on so then" said the leipreachán "and I'll show you where it is"
So the leipreachán led Pat across the
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:44
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réaltoga bíonn sioc crom le tuitim.
Nuair nach mbíonn siad le feicéal bíonn fearthainn trom le tigheacht.
Na Sgamaill
Ma bhíonn na sgamaill ag gluaiseacht go tapaidh bíonn stoirm air. Nuair a bhíos na sgamaill ag gluauseacht ó thuaidh agus an spéar lán leo bíonn fearthainn ag tigheacht.
Ceo
Má imthigheann an ceo de na cnuic bíonn aimsear fluich air. Ma bhíonn sé ag tigheacht isteach ón bhfairrge bíonn aimsear maith air.
Áird na Gaoithe
Nuair a bhíos an gaoth andeas ann sin comhair báistighe. Má théigheann sé in agaidh na gréine sin comhair go bhfuil fearthainne air.
An bhó
Nuair a bhíos an bhó tirm agus má thoisigheann sí ag crith bíonn fhios againn go bhfuil fearthainn trom le tigheacht.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:42
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We have brave Fr. Ferris too who is true to Ireland's cause
Whose Celtic blood would not submit to Balfour nor his laws.
They marched our priest to prison cell to make our spirits fail
But OBrien shouts back to Balfour "we would rather die in jail
Cheer up my native Erin the day will soon shine bright
When Balfour and his garrison will have to take their flight
From Cork to Belfast city and that you'll plainly see.
We'll have the flag of freedom to float on College Green.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:40
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"The Hills of Coole."
It was on a Sunday evening in the blooming month of June
I rambled through those valleys close by the hills of Coole
I heard a lonely echo from a voice both clear and bright
It was the priest of old Castlelyons demanding Irish right.
Be true to one another stand firmly side by side
And we'll surely beat the grabbers from the valley of the Bride
Our priest he was a patriot sprung from an ancient race
Where noble deeds of chivalry our history can trace.
To put down cruel grabbing it is our hearts desire,
And freedom for our country cried Fr. O Dwyer.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:38
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awaiting decision
keep it from the snow.
That covered Inniscarra and the green hills of Cloghroe.
Look out cried Captain Mackey boys I fear we have been sold
For Corrydon and Massey have been bought by English gold
Macafferty is taken and Colonel Burke also
So hide your pike and seek your life on the green hills of Cloghroe.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:37
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Oh Dermot what's the matter or what makes you in that fright,
Tell me before you go my boy, what news have you to-night.
Are the boys in green preparing for to strike the fatal blow
To drive the cursed proud Saxon from the green hills of Cloghroe.
Yes Dermot we are ready in that little grove of larch
Just down by Inniscarra for this is the fifth of March
This is the day appointed that we promised for to go
To drive the cursed proud Saxon from the green hills of Cloghroe.
They met at Inniscarra where some dead and wounded lay
To raise the proud green flag on high that floated oe'r the way,
Beneath it marched ten thousand men to
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:35
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí fear an uair agus bhí sé ag dul abhaile ón aonach. Chuaidh sé isteach i bpáirc in a raibh tarbh. Nuair a bhí se ag teacht amach thug an tarbh buille dhó agus chuir sé treasna an chlaidhe. Annsin chuaidh an tarbh ar a dhá ghlúin ag réabadh an chlaidhe agus dubhairt an fear leis nach raibh brón ar bith air.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:34
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Singing daddy-dum diddy, O diddy-dum day.
The jolly old thatcher he is gone to his rest.
He laid down his needle, he's one of the blest
He left us a legacy, one that will stay
His daddy-dum-diddy, o diddy-dum-day.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:31
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Bhí fear in a chomhnuidhe in aice áit a raibh ciste óir o bhfolach. Bhí brionglóid aige go raibh pota óir o bhfolach ar Oileán Doire na Maol. Chuaidh sé amach agus dfhéach sé le na fgaghail. Annsin fuair sé spád agus bhain sé cúpla sgraith agus céard a bhfaca sé acht an pota óir.
Nuair a fuair sé é chuaidh sé isteach ar a bhád acht nuair a bhí sé aar an talamh tirm leágh [?] agus dimthigh an fear abhaile. Annsin dinnis sé do na daoine sa mbaile faoi agus dubhairt siad leis gan bacadh le rud mar sin arís.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:31
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Most certainly potatoes are grown on our farm. About an acre and a quarter of ground is under potatoes each year on our farm, and sometimes less. It is Willie Sweeney who prepares the ground. The ground is not manured in any way before turned up except potatoes were in it the previous year. The potatoes on our farm are always sown in drills. In October the soil is ploughed, in February it is harrowed and later on the drills are made about twenty eight inches. A plough is always used to make the drills on our farm and mostly in the district. Wooden ploughs were used in ancient years but there are none of them left now. The spades used in the district are always bought in shops. All the good potatoes are cut and sown as possible on the manure in the drills and fertiliser shaken on them, and they are then closed. The local people do not help one another in sowing the potatoes. In spring the potatoes are sown and artifical manure shaken on them. Then the drills are closed, later on they are bashed to stifle the weeds. When they are up they are up they are risen to. Then they are sprayed with a mixture of bluestone, washing-soda and water. This is done again in about a fortnight to prevent blight. Then they are left grow until the digging in Autumn. Sometimes they are dug out with a digger, other times the drills are picked immediately.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:28
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awaiting decision
1 Cuirricín labhar lóin
2 Bóthar an t-Sagairt
3 Garrdha Árd
4 Garrdha na h-aitinne
5 Garrdha Chléirigh
6 Lug Dubh
7 Lug Glas.
8 Lag na mbád
9 Cloch bhán
10 Bun uigh ghreannaigh
11 Gob a phiocal
12 Gob Cíaráin
13 Mullach a droma
14 Bóthair Priontíos a Cháig
15 Carraig Mháire
16 Gob Mhicheáil
17 Píosa Buidhe
18 Páirc Leachta
19 Pollán
20 Garrdha garbh
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:22
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rejected
awaiting decision
Antoine Ó Dochartaigh (na maireann) a chruinngh na h-abhráin seo am éigin fá 1900. Fuair sé é seo ins na Rosainn
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:21
approved
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awaiting decision
[-]
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:20
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awaiting decision
Ar leanamhaint
Ag cruinneadh as gach ceárn ag comóradh a inghin,
As' nach raibh plánnta ins an gharrdha budh deise na Máire
Gaedhealach nó Gallda-dó raibh ins an tír
Tiocfaidh an lá a mbéidh an saoghal ar a sgánnradh
Agus t-cífidh siad mo Máire i na culaith go fíor
Ag tabhairt moladh dó'n Árd-Rígh a thug ins an áit
'S gur fhulaing Sé an pháis gur fhuasgail Sé í.
Níl aon mhaitheas d'á deárn sí nach deachaidh ins na sgálaí
A's ní bhfuaras aon meadhachan budh taitnighe na
As tá aoibhneas i b-Párrthas nach bhfuil fáth a bheith trácht air
'S nach feárr dí bheith ann sin 'na bheith ar an t-saoghal.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:19
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awaiting decision
About forty years ago in this district there were no candles, lamps, or lamp-oil. The people themselves made rush candles and that was the only source of light they had in their homes.
Out in the fields they got the rushes and peeled the green skin off them: the white which remained was soaked in oil, this oil was got by melting butter or lard.
The white of the rushes was then left to dry outside in the sunshine.
When dry these white "candles" became stiff and
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sé leis an gcainnt a chuala sé ag na daoine a bhí istigh. Fear agus a bhean a bhí istigh agus iad ag argóint agus a clamhsan le ceile. D'eirigh an chainnt go cruaidh eatorra agus thosnuigheadar ag eascanaidhe. D'eist an buacaill leis an gcainnt ar feadh tamaill agus annsin d'imthigh sé abhaile.
Chuaidh sé ag an Aifreann an Domhnach in a dhiaidh sin agus leag sé a chóta ar an gá soluis acht an babhta seo níor choinnigh sé suas é - thuit an cóta ar an t-urlar. Bhí fhios ag an mbuachaill gur gá soluis a bhí ann annsin agus scannruigh sé. Chualaidh an sagart faoi an rud do tharla agus chuir sé fios ar an mbuacaill seo agus d'innis seisean a sgéul dó.
"Rinne tú eagcoir ort féin agus fanacht ag eisteacht le beirt ag argóint agus ag bruighin" ars an sagart "acht teigh abhaile agus ná tar ag Aifreann nios mó. Ní fheillean sé duit theacht i measg na ndaoine. Naomh a bhí ionnat an cheud Domhnach a thainic tú annseo agus fuair tú comhortha o Dhia fanacht i d'aonraic mar bhí tú."
(Fuair mé an sceal seo ó mo mhathair mhóir a cailleadh os cionn 30 bladhain o shoin i n-aois a 87 bladhanna)
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
firm, and when lighted served their purpose just the same do an shop candles of today. The "candlestick" consisted of a sod of turf in which one end of the rush candle was securely fixed. Even to-day children of this district amuse themselves by making rush candles, which they dry in the sun and afterwards burn - just to see how well they can imitate the work o their grandparents.
All the inhabitants of this area now use "shop" candles, and oil-lamps to light up their homes. Some of the poorer and mos told-fashioned people rely on the candles for their light, - they have never thought of purchasing a lamp or lamp oil (except to light the turf or sticks fire) and as we pass by an occasional cabin we see
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ar leanamhaint
Ar theacht damh i lathair, bhín chonóir ar lár ann
Chosgair mo náduir, mo mhisneach, 's mo chroidhe,
Bhí an crónaire Gallda ag cur tuairisg a báis
'S gan a fhis caidé'n fáth, acht ag lionadh an dlighe
Nach tobann an cás tháinic ar inghin Séamuas Andrais
Nuair d;éirigh sí i n-áirde ins an leabaidh na suidhe
Nach dtubhradh an bás leath-uair amháin dí
Go dtáinic sagart na ngrás 's gur fhreasdail sé é.
Nach aoibhinn dó'n phaisde mar chuaidh sí go Párrthas
'S go bhfuil sí ag Máire 'na suidhe le na taoibh
na h-aingle d'a gárdáil 's na rollaibh gach áit ann
Is meunra d'on lanamhain gur oil
siad a inghean
Nach í Maighread a bhí cráidhte nuair c sin gárda
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí fear óg ann fadó 'na chomnaidhe amuigh ar na slíabhta, idir Uachtarárd agus an fhairrge. Maor a bhí ann. Ní dhearna sé aon obair aríámh on a shaoghal acht maoirseacht, agus ní dheachaidh sé in aon ait aríamh acht ar an slíabh i gcomhnuidhe.
Nuair a bhí sé i n-aois bladhain is fiche dubhairt sé Domhnach go rachfadh sé chun an Aifreann. Chuaidh sé ann agus nuair a chuaidh sé isteach san seipéal bhain sé a chota mór de agus chaith sé ar ar gá na gréine a bhí ag soillsiu trid fuinneóig an tseipéil, mar shaoil sé gur matal adhmaid a bhí ann.
Rinne an pobal ar fad iongantas de sin mar bhí a fhios aca san gur gá greíne a bhí ann. Rud eile ní raibh aithne aca ar an bhfear óg. Nuair a bhí an tAifreann thart d'imthigh an buacaill abhaile airíst agus thug sé an chota mór leis. Ar a bhealach abhaile thainic sé go teach ar leiceann an tsleibhe agus chualaidh sé gleo agus fothram istigh ann. Shiubhal sé comh fada leis an doras agus sheas sé annsin agus d'éist
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the dim light of a candle flickering in the window.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 14:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
lying there easy. A bottle of wine.
What goes round the house and round the house and leaves a loaf in every window? The snow.
As I went down the road one day saw three pots boiling and no fire under, what was that? Three spring wells rising up.
I have a little house and it would not hold a mouse, and there are as many windows on it as the kings big house. A thimble.
I sat on my hunkers and looking out through my winkers I saw the dead burying the living. Ashes raking the fire.
What goes round the house and round the house and peeps in every hole
The sun.
Tink, tank, under the bank, ten drawing four? A man milking a cow
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ar bhás Chailín Óig
Bhí mé thíos i Maláin, nuair a chuala mé an gáir seo.
A's thug mé rása, go dtuiginn aniar,
Go dtugainn comhairle dó'n lanamhain an fhoighde a dheánamh
A's go bhfuigheadh siad sásadh i ndeireadh a saoghal
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ar leanamhaint
aici.
'S gur bí chuir maise ar na mná 'lig;
Nár bhfearr dó'n fhile a bheith a'fuireacht
le na sgéim a bhronnadh ae Mháire
Antoine Ó Dóchartaigh (na maireann) a chruinnigh na h-abhráin seo am éigin fá 1900.
Fuair sé é seo ins na Rosainn
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:52
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(Scéul eile)
Bhí bean ann uair amhain agus ní bhiodh sí ag dul ag an Aifreann ró mhinic. Faoi dheire rinne sí suas a h-intean go rachfad sí ag an Aifreann chuile Dhomhnach agus sa gcaoi go mbead eolas aici ar an meid uair a bhí sí ag Aifreann i rith na bliadhna cuirfeadh sí cloichin beag isteach i mbosca chuile Dhomnach go mbiodh sí ag an Aifreann. I ndeire na bliadhna d'fhoscail sí an bosca agus comhraraigh sí an meid a bhí istigh ann. B'furusda é a dheunamh mar ní raibh uiluig ann acht aon chloch amhain. Thainic faitchios ar an mhnaoi bhocht agus chuaidh sí ag an sagart le cómhairle d'fhail uaidh.
"Tá tú ag fáil comhartha o Dhia" ars an sagart "nach mbíonn tú ag freastail an Aifreann mar is cóir. Tabhair nios mo aire do obair Dé do do chuid phaidreaca nuair a bhios tú ag an Aifreann agus beidh a mhalairt de sceúl agat an t-am seo airíst."
(Tá an sceul seo coitchian go leor timceall na h-áite seo)
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ar leanamhaint
As tá na táirnuigh i gcruidhthibh na n-eoch
'S a dhaoine cheannsa nach mór an truaigh mé[?]
Agus nach é an chúis magaigh mé
An té budh gile liom, a's bhí seal d'a luadh liom
Gur fada uaimse a chomhnuigheann sí.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ar leanamhaint
As tá na táirnuigh i gcruidhthibh na n-eoch
'S a dhaoine cheannsa nach mór an truaigh mé[?]
Agus nach é an chúis magaigh mé
An té budh gile liom, a's bhí seal d'a luadh liom
Gur fada uaimse a chomhnuigheann sí.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
What goes through the house and through the house and lies at the back door at night? The broom.
What goes up the ladder with its head down? A nail in a man's boot.
What vegetable should never be taken on a ship? A leek.
A houseful, a roomful, and could not get a spoonful. Smoke.
Londonderry, Cork, Kerry, spell me that without a "K"? That
What is the left side of the cake?
The side left over. That after eating.
Spell the red rogue of the world with three letters. Fox.
Long legs, short thighs, little head, and no eyes. The tongs.
I have a little horse with an iron
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(Sceal eile)
Bhí sagart (seiplíneach) i Mágh Cuillilinn súas le ceud bladhain o shoin anois agus bhí sé ar lóistín ag fear a b'ainm do O Cadhain. Bhiodh an sagart seo tugtha don ól agus d'fanadh sé amuigh deireannach go leor san oidhche go minic. Níor mhaith le Mac Ui Chadain é seo agus is minic a thug sé comhairle don sagart óg acht ní bhiodh aon mhaith ann. An oidhche seo dubhairt sé go n-imreóchadh sé cleas air. Anois bhí leath ndoras idir doras mór an tige agus doras seomra an tsagairt. Chuir fear an tighe glas ar na seacht ndoirsibh agus ar dhoras mhór an tíghe. Chuaidh sé fein ar a leabaidh annsin, thug sé na n'eochra ar fad leis agus thuit sé na chodladh. Ar maidin nuair a dhuisigh sé bhí na doirse ar fad fhoscailte agus bhí an sagart 'na chodladh in a leabaidh in a sheomra féin. D'iarr fear an tighe pardún ar an sagart annsin agus tugadh dó é, acht dubhairt an sagart leis gan a leithead a dheunamh aríste coichde.
(Fuair mé an sgeul seo ó Aindiriú O Concubhair, Polach. Tá sé os cionn 70 bladhain d'aois)
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
throat, as quick as he runs, he eats the rope.
A spinning wheel.
As I went over yon London bridge I met a London boy, he took off his hat and threw off his clothes, what would you call the London boy?
Andrew
There was a man rode down the town, Great Britain was his name, His bridle and saddle "was" girted with Gold, And there it's three times I have told you his name. Was
Blackie and white went up the hill blackie came back and white stayed still.
A black hen going to lay an egg.
Riddle me, riddle, me, "ruitin", how many potatoes in a pot of "bruitin"? None because they are all "Cruitin".
What goes round the house and round dragging its "puddings" after it?
A hen and a flock of chickens.
What walks the ground and never tosses the dew? A shadow.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ar leanamhaint
Acht i n-gleanntáin íseal ar a bhfásann féar
Ann a mbídheann lochain-fiaidain agus bric ar línntibh
Cruithneacht, caordhearg agus coirce bán
Labhrann an chuach gach uair 'san mhí ann;
Tá suairceas aoibhinn ann gan cáinn;
Bídhid na beatha críonna i n-iomtharaidh aoise,
Agus mil dá thaosgadh atá dom' Mhuirnín Bán
'S a rún 's a stóirín anois mo gheobhar liom
beidh toghadh an eolais agam ar éuloghadh leat
Agus nach bhfuil tráthnóna no maidín reoidhte,
nach tú an réalt eolais a beidheadh le m-nais
Ag siubhal na mboithre agus na coillte ró-ghlas,
A's ar mo chroidhe istigh ní bhéadh an brón
Ag dul am' phósadh le bláth na h-óige
Agus mo lámh go modhmharach 'nna brollach bán.
Dá mbéadh fhios agam nach tú bhí i ndán damh
Ní bheidhinn go dána a's ní eulothainn leat
Go bhfuil mo chroidhe 'stigh líonnta de grádh duit
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
In comes two legs, sits upon three legs and a leg in her lap; in comes four legs lifts up one leg, up jumps two legs, lifts up three legs knocks down four legs and gets her own leg back.
A woman and a leg of mutton.
What goes through the wood and through the wood and leaves a white rag in every bush?
Snow.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:26
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About thirty years ago there was a deer in this locality. This der was seen by people living in neighbourhood and some of them remember a great hunt after him. This deer was an object of curiosity and roamed from district to district feeding upon the surrounding lands. He was very tame and used to roam through the fields with the other animals.
This deer remained for a considerable time feeding on the land till at last the Master of the Hunt said he would chase him and kill him. The Master of the Hunt and his dogs set out one morning to kill him, but to their surprise it was harder to kill him than they thought. The deer was chased from where he was feeding on the land in Martinstown to Clonlost.
He climbed every hill and got a good distance in front of them, at last they thought it impossible to kill them. They chased him to Clonlost and at Clonlost there was a pond, and the deer swam across the pond, there they caught him and brought him home and put her in a shed in Martinstown. There she died from the effects of the bites the dogs gave her. His horns are still to be seen in a house in Martinstown.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mo Mhuirnín - Bán
Oidhche fheile Brighde agus mé go h-aoibhinn,
Ag an tóramh shíos ar an Mhullach bhan
Se chonnaicheas an rígh-bhean a chraidhuigh im croidhe mé
Do bhí sí banamhail, deas, áluinn, óg
Bidh gile a mín-crobh 'na sneachta ar taoibh cnuic
No an eala is míne ar linn ag snámh
'S go bhfuil mo chroidhe-sa 'na mile giotaí,
Mar nach bhfaighim cead éuloghadh le mo Mhuirnín bhán
Ní ar an chnoc is áirde a chomhnuigheann mo mhaoin-se
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ar leannmhaint
Antoine Ó Dochartaigh (na maireann) a chruinnigh n ah-abhráin seo am eigin fá 1900. Fuair sé é seo ins na Rosainn
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ar leanamhaint
A Mhailidh na saighead, tá mé réidh le ceileabhar bán óga
Gláir mór do'n Rígh níl mo spéis i n-imirt no i n-ol;
Mo mhallacht go h-éag do'n té a bhain dom mo stór
A d'fhág mé liom féin gach aon oidhche 'sileadh na n-deor.
Nuair a théidhim-sa síos béidh mhile fáilte romham
Nuair a thighim aníos béidh mo croidhe 'stigh lán de brón
Ó dochtúirí an t-saoghal ní bhéidh leigheas agam le fághail,
'S gur eidir a dá cích bhéideadh mo chroidhe 'nna codhladh go sámh
Casadh damh síogaidh síos ag Lios Baile an -Trátg,
D'fiafruigh mé fhéin dí an sgaoilfeadh glais ar bith grádh,
Labhair sí liom go caoimheamhail, mín, macánta tláith
Ma chuaidh sé fán chroidhe, níl sgaoileadh air go lá an bhraith.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 13:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ceitidh an Chúil Dhonn
Nuair a éirigimsé suas bíonn tuaim na muisge 'n mo cheann
Amaircim uam fá thuairisg an baile udaidh thall
Tuiteann mo ghruaig anuas'n na cuille le mo cheann
Ó thug mé grádh buan d'ón stuaidh-bhean, Ceithidh an Chúil donn
Ar maidin Dia Máirt bhí adhbar mór cursa agam féin
Bhí an suig/jug ar an chlár á's é lán ó shin go béal,
le gach cumann 's gach grádh 's gach páirt go raibh eadrainn , ariamh
Mó chúig míle slán an dá láimh a bhí tharam nach m-béidh (m-bíonn)
Nach cuimhin leat an oidhche, bhí mé a's tú ainnir na gcliabh
Ar suidhe ins'n fhraoich's a' saoghal ag dul tarrainn aniar?
Cídh gur milis an fíon is claoidhte bhidheas 'nna dhiaidh
Bhí do theachtaire críonna 's faraor bhí mise gan céill
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
an diabhal go n-imthrochadh sé. Leig Liam amach é agus d;imthigh sé. An ceathramhadh lá thainig diabhal fá na choinne agus chuaidh sé leis. Nuair a bhí an bheirt ag tarraingt ar na geaftaí thoisigh na diabhail eile ag iarraidh gan é a thabhairt isteach. Anois ní leigfidh isteach i n-ifreann é ach chuir said dé phionas air a bheith ag dul thart go dtí an lá deireannach agus a chuid feasóige ar theinidh leis
Fuaras an sgéal seo ó mó mhathair bean Mhic Eahmharcaigh, Caoldruim uachtarach, Gort-a-Choirce, tír Chonaill

Aodh Mac Gabhna Árdaidh bhig, Gort-a-Choirce, Tír Chonaill
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí fear agus bean ag teacht ó teach phobhail lá amháin. Chonnaic an bhean dhá ghé ins an pairc. "An bhfeiceann tú an dá ghé sin?" arsa an bhean. "Ní fheicim dhá ghé acht tchím gé amháin" arsa an fear. "Acht tá dhá ghé ann" arsa'n an bhean. "Muise níl ach gé amháin ann" arsa an fear. "Deirim-se leat-se go bhfuil dhá ghé ann" arsa an bhean. Bhí siad ag cainnt leobhtha mar sin sa deireadh chaith an bhean í féin ar an bhealach mhór agus leig sé uirthi go rabh sí marbh. Bhí an fear bocht i gcruadh-chás agus ní rabh fhios aige goidé dhéanadh sé. Thug sé an corp abhaile. Tháinigh na comharsain isteach chun na faire. Tamall indiaidh sin thug an fear cogar dá mhnaoi éirigh anois agus bí ciall agat. "Bhfuil an dá ghé ann"? ar sise níl ar seisean. Cuireadh isteach sa comhrainn í agus thug an comhrainn go dtí an roilge. Nuair a cuireadh í sgread sí amach a Pháid a Pháid leig amach mé níl ach aon gé ann. Thug seisean amach í nuair a bhí siad ag teacht na bhaile chonnaic siad an dá ghé agus dubhairt seisean tcím gé amháin agus gandal amháin.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cnuasach tómhas a bhailigh daltaí na scoile.
(1) Suid sa chlúdaigh é
agus dhá chéad súl air
"Criathar"
(2) Droicead ar loch
Gan maide gan cloch
"Tuarcheatha," no "oidhreóg"
(3) Níl sé amuigh nó istigh
A's tá sé 'na seasamh i gcomhnuidhe.
"Ursa an Dorais"
(4) Théidh sé anonn ar libide leaibide
Thig sé anall ar libide leaibide
Níl a'n uair dá déid se anonn no anall
Nach mbogann sé a bhfuil de mhaidí se choillidh
Le na dhá libide leaibide.
"Dubhan alla ag Fígheadóireacht"
(5) Théid se anonn ar ící pící
Thig se anall ar ící pící
Is líonann sé a bholg ar ící pící
"Eitean"
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
leis í a fághail uadh gan ceud.
2)An té a shuidhfeadh in a cathaoir nach dtiocfadh leis éirigh gan ceud uadh-san
3) An rud a rachfadh isteach in a sparán nach dtiocfadh leis a theacht amach go dtabhairfeadh seisean cead dó.
Bhí cuid mhór peacaidh deánta ag an ghabha agus lá amhain thainig diabhall fá na choinne. Beir ar an órd seo go gceanglothaigh mise iall mó bhróige agus annsin beidh mé leat" Bheir an diabhall ar an órd ach ní thiocfadh leis í a fhágail uadh. Dubhairt an diabhall le Liam a rádh leis an órd stad agus tuiteam uadh agus nach dtabharfeadh sé lá buadhartha go deó dó. Leig Liam dó'n órd tuitim agus d'imthigh an diabhal. An lá thar na bhárach thainig diabhal eile fá na choinne. Shuidh sé ar an chathaoir le na sgithiste a dheanamh ach ní thiocfadh leis éirigh dithe. "Ó leig damh éirigh" arsa an diabhal "agus imheochaidh mé uait." Leig Liam dó éirigh agus d'imthigh sé. An tríomhadh lá thainig diabhal eile fá na choinne. "Gabh isteach in mó sparán" arsa an gabh" agus rachaidh mé go dtí teach leanna go bhfuighidh mé deoch. Chuirfidh mé i gcéill gur airgead ata ann." Rinne an diabhall mar h-iarradh air ach ar an droch uair ní thiocfadh leis a theacht amach airíst. Annsin dubhairt Liam "Beidh tú annsin anois go dtabhairfidh tú isteach go n-imtheochaidh tú agus nach dtiocfadh tú mó cómhair níos mó." Dubhairt
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Níl an meid céadna lucht siubhail ag dhul thart anois agus mar a bhí fado. Bheireadh na daoine fado loistín dobhtha fosta ach ni bheireann siad loistín anois dobhtha. Corr uair ní thigeann na daoine céadna thart. Bíonn cuid mhór tinncéirí thart fosta agus is iad na daoine sin a mbíonn a gcuideachta chéile. Seo ainmneacha na lucht siubhail a thigeas thart Tom Mór, Sean an toigh Ghlais, agus Padraigh Mac Poll. Bíonn Tom Mór ag díol amhrán agus bíonn na daoine eile ag criunniú airgid. Bíonn cuid acu ag díol rudaí. Seo an cinéal rudaí a bhíonn siad ag díol blathanna agus bhíonn cuid mhór cannaí agus soithigh le na tinncéirí.
Ceannuigheann na daoine cuid de na rudaí uatha ma bhíonn siad a dhiogbhail orta. Bíonn bíadh le cuid acu ach na daoine atá iongantach bocht ní bhíonn biadh ar bith leobhta. Bíonn an cuid is mo acú ag siubhal o áit go háit ach bíonn capaill le cuid acu fosta.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Eithne Ní Cheallaigh
Cáit Ní Bhuidhe
Máighréad Haimlet
Máire Nic Fhionghaile
Éibhlín Ní Cheallaigh
Máire T. Ní Dheorain
Mícheal Ua Frighill
Agus fuair siadsan na Sgealtaí agus an t-eolas atá sa leabhar seo ó
Brighid Nic Phaidin - An Gleann, Cill-mhic-nÉanain
Máighréad Bean Mhic Lochlainn - Carn-na-nGabhar, Cárraig Áirt
Máire Bean Mhic Fhionghaile - Gleann Árd, An Gleann
Cait Bean Uí Bhuidhe - Leargan, An Gleann
Cait Bean Uí Bhuidhe - Glannárd, An Gleann
Nóra Bean Mhic Giolla Eachmhartaigh - Cill, Carraig Airt
Cathal Ua Ceallaigh - Tuaim, An Gleann
Pádraig Ua Buidhe - Gleannárd, An Gleann
Brían Ua Ceallaigh - Leargan, An Gleann
Séamus Ua Frighill - Dún Mór, Carraig Áirt
Séan Ua Frighill - Gleann Tarthach, An Gleann
Séamus Mac Lóchlainn - Cárn-na-nGabhar, Carraig Áirt
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The eve of St. Brigid's Day falls on 31st Jan. On that night many boys and girls go from house to house collecting money for St. Brigid. One boy usually is appointed captain and the other members of the party are expected to obey his orders.
Very often they are treated kindly when they knock at a door. They are allowed admittance and they come in and dance for the people of the house. If they like the behavior they give them money just a few coppers.
Sometimes they are not allowed in nor even kindly received and then they neither dance nor receive money. They very often tramp a long distance before they even have a few shillings. On one occasion 8 Biddies went out and all they could gather was 3/4 and that they spent the following night in a party for themselves.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(Brighid Bean Mhic Eachmharaigh, Caoldruim, Gort-a-Choirce)
Fuaras an sgéal seo ó mó mhathair mhór Caoldruim uachtarach, Gort a' Choirce, Tír Chonaill Aodh Mac Gabhna, Árdaidh Bhig, Gort a Choirce, Tír Chonaill
Liam na Sapóige
Bhí gabh ann fad ó shoin darbh ainm Liam na Sapóige. Fuair sé trí athchuingeacha
1) An té a bheirfeadh ar an órd nach dtiocfadh
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
fá dhéin na ngárdaí. Tháinig siad-san go dtí an cró agus thug leo an cholainn gan cheann 'un na beirice. Chuir said ináirde ar spíce é go bhfeicfidh cé ar leis é. Oidhche amháin dubhairt an stócach leis an tsean-bhean "Cuirfidh mise orm culaith dubh agus cuirfidh (mise) tusa braithlín geal rachfaimuid 'un na beirice fá dhéin na colna. Sílfidh na gárdaí gur an diabhal agus an Mhaighdean Mhuire atá ann". Nuair a thainig siad go dtí an bheiric sgannruigh na peus agus leig siad ar siubhal an cholainn gan cheann. chuaidh an tsean-bhean agus an stócach 'na bhaile agus iad bréagh sásta
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:12
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rejected
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Is a bhuachaillí galánta do thug bárr libh go fairsing.
ó Iarthar gChromáin go port geal na Mainge,
ó Shíobhraí na Tuatha cé gur mhór é a n’ainm,
agus ó Dhómhnall na Díle tá ar lucht draoidheachtaí le fada.
Is a bhuachaillí áilne, is fearr cáil agus teagasc,
ag sagart is ag bráithre agus pápoí, mar mheasaim,
leigidh d'on ál nár ghéill riamh d’aon phaidir,
Ach fág i gCromán iad, ag ithe iascáin is aráin seagail.
Chaitheadar in áirde í, i mbéal báire agus iad marbh lag,
Chun go dtabharfaidís an sway leó le linn dul abhaile,
Bhí ár bfhear-cul-ne ró mhúinte, do thóg sé den talamh í,
Chuir sé sa tsiubhal í, go lúthmhar mear tapaidh.
Bhí an scoláirdeach ináirde, agus a dhá láimh ar leathadh aige,
Á rádh “caith an ball chúgham go dtabharfad abhaile í”.
Chuir sé a dhá sháil sa bhóthar go ceolmhar mear tapaidh,
Agus d’fhágadar sa ceo thiar, lucht na gcaipíní breaca.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:11
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Bhí fear ann uair amháin agus bhí sé ar fastodh. Bhí cliobóg ag an mhaithistir. Lá amháin leig sé amach é agus rith sé ar siubhal agus ní thiocfadh leo breith air.
Lean an fear an cliobóg ar feadh tamaill agus fa dheireadh nuair a bhí sé ag dul thar chlaidhe bheir sé greim ar a chois deiridh agus choinnigh sé é.
Annsin sgairt sé ar a mhaighistir agus choinnigh sé é go dtainig an maighistir.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:10
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rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí fear ann uair amháin agus bhí sé ar fastodh. Bhí cliobóg ag an mhaithistir. Lá amháin leig sé amach é agus rith sé ar siubhal agus ní thiocfadh leo breith air.
Lean an fear an cliobóg ar feadh tamaill agus fa dheireadh nuair a bhí sé ag dul thar chlaidhe bhar sé greim ar a chois deiridh agus choinnigh sé é.
Annsin sgairt sé ar a mhaighistir agus choinnigh sé é go dtainig an maighistir.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:08
approved
rejected
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every day.
My father was one of the swiftest runners in Portumna but now he is stiff. Himself and another man ran a race of two miles in a quarter of an hour. My father won. The race was held in Killimore.
One of the best mowers was Mr. Dalphin and even yet he is the best in Portumna. My Uncle mowed when he was young and was one of the best dancers. He learned it from his father. He got a prize for it.
Mary Whelan was one of the best singers and violinists. She was teaching the violin for some years until her father got sick. My Uncle walked fifty miles with cattle one time about four o'clock in the morning. It was one of the coldest mornings in spring.
Written by:- Patsy Hynes, Dunkellin Terrace, Portumna.
Obtained from:- Nicholas Dooley, " " "
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:06
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Siúd fáistin déanta cúis áthais d'Éirinn
Ag bráthair gaolmhar na saoithe bhfeárr
Fuair órón an méid sin thar sáile bhraonach
Ó Dhómhnaill Eachtach Ó Conaill árd.
Ar stáitse an pléidhthe gan scáth roim éinne
I láthair céadta do bhíodh 'na dháil
A namhaid dob' éigean len áire fhághéilleadh.
'S tá báir 'an lae sin ag ar mbuachaill mbhán
II
Do thógadh é siud 's an tál le céile
I Scaoinse an aeir bhuig go socair samh
Go fíon tamhail féir teamhail síodamhail scléipeamhail
Go h uasal Gaolach maith mór le rádh
Le saill na méith mhaith nár gnáthach aosta
Flúirse 's féile ag gach naon le fághail
Gan ganntar daor phuins 's brannda 'á thaosca
Mar caisí caola nú líon ar bhán

III
Is lúbach staonach iad úbhalla an ghéaga ann
Is iongna caortha ann 's tartha ag fás.
S binn guth éan ann ar ghéagaibh caola
Is níl cuan in Éirinn is glaine tráig
Tighinn uaisle a' gcéin ann ag spórt 'sa pléidhreacht
Inngeas ó'n dtréan mhuir agus [?] bhád
'S gur i míros aosta dílis braonach
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:03
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rejected
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agus annsin rachfamuid soir go dtí muileann an Choraidh-Crioganaidh agus gheobhaidh muid min deánta."D'imthigh siad agus nuair a bhí said san muileann, dubhairt siad le fear an mhuilinn go rabh ceithre chéud coirce leo agus gur mhaith leo min a fhaghail deánta roimhe an tSatharn. Dubhairt an muilteór go mbéadh agus fuair siad min deánta.
Ins an am seo bhí rí 'na chomhnuidhe ins an ceanntar seo. Bhí muc dé chuid an an righ ag teacht isteach gach lá agus bhí sí ag tochailt an urlair. "Bheirfidh mé seans amháin eile duit agus má thig tú isteach lábéidh anlann againne ó sin amach" ars an stócach. Thainig an mhuc isteach an lá thar na bhárach mar an gceudhna. fuair an stócach greim uirthi agus mharbhuigh sé í. Shocruigh an rí plean le fághail amach an rabh an mhuc aca. chuir sé sgéala amach go rabh damhsa le bheith aca. Chuir siad a mathair isteach ins an chórtha agus d'iarr áit i dteach an tsean-lánamhain do'n chórtha. In am luighe d'iarr an stócach ar an tsean bhean giota dé'n muic-fheoil a rósadh, Tabhair aire nó tá mó chroidhe ag inse damh go bhfuil duine éiginteach san chórtha. Bhí an bhean na suidhe agus í ag cuir cluas uirthi féin, Bhí oiread feirge (uirthi) air
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:02
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rejected
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noted for mowing. They were able to mow two acres a day. Both of them lived in Domnick St.
The late Mr. Lea of Portumna used walk to Loughrea and back again to paint every day. The late Capt. Mac Donohue of Willmount, used to jump seven feet high on horse back.
A man by the name of Pat Glynn was noted for being a great step dancer. He was taught by a man named Fleming. Both of them lived in Portumna. William Hackett was noted for singing. He lived in Abbey St.
The late John Williams - baker in Portumna - was a great swimmer. He used to swim a mile from the shore.
Father Porter P.P. was a great stone thrower in his youth. He used
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 12:01
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Lá amháin bhí Fionn Mac Cumhaill agus na Fianna amuigh ag fiadhach. Chaith siad an lá ar ghleann agus ar bheann, ins na coilltibh agus ar na bántaibh agus ní bhfuair siad a dhath ar b'fhiú labhairt air. Ag clapsolas agus iad ag teacht 'n-a bhaile dhúisigh siad eilit mhaol. Do lean siad í eadar fhir agus mhadaidh go dtí go raibh siad uilig tursach, sáruighthe, ach amháin Fionn agus a dhá mhadadh, Bran agus Sceolán.
Do lean siad-san an eilit, agus nuair a bhí siad i lár machaire mór, agus an oidhche ag tuitim ortha, do stad an eilit. Tháinic Bran aghus Sceolán fhad leithe agus i n-áit an eilit a mharbhughadh mar ba' dual dóibh, 'sé an rud a thoisigh siad a dheanamh cuideachta agus a luascair thart 'n-a timcheall. Bhí iongantas an domhain ar Fhionn nuair a chonnaic sé caidé rinn na madaidh; níor mhaith leis cur isteach ortha
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:57
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agus gus thacht sé í
Nuair a thug clann an rígh na bhaile an lá thar na bhárach fuair siad an tsean bhean marbh. Chuir siad sgéala amach go bhfuair sí bás tobann. Bhí an sean-dhuine agus an stóach ar an cheud muinntir a bhí ar an faire. Nuair a cuireadh san chonair í cuireadh dhá chéud punta faoi na ceann.
Chuaidh an sean-dhuine agus an stócach 'un na roilige an oidhche thar na bhárach agus thug said leo an t-airgead. D'iomhchar siad an marbhanach go boitheach na gcaorach an rí. Nuair a chuaidh mac an rí amach ag leigint amach na gcaorach ar maidin an lá thar na bhárach fuair sé a mhathair istigh roimhe. Rith sé (istoigh) isteach agus d'innis dó'n rí é. Nuair a chualaidh ingean an rí seo thoisigh sí a mhairgnigh, "Och! Och!" arsa sise"tá muid náirigh agus tá an baile náirighte." Níor chuir siad ins an roilig í an t-am seo. Chuir siad isteach i gcró í agus chuir siad clais dhomhain agus í lán tárr ins an doras le í dhul i n-eabar ag teacht amach dithi D'imthigh an bheirt go dtí an boitheach an oidhche seo le amharc an rabh airgead ar bith ag taoibh an mharbhanaigh ach ar droch uair cailleadh an sean-dhiune ins an tárr. Ghearr an stócach an ceann dé agus d'imthigh sé na bhaile. Tháinig an rí go dtí an colainn gan cheann an lá thar na bhárach agus chuir sé
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:52
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rejected
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steal a slice of bacon and bury it and the foot will be cured. A poultice of bran and butter-milk is good for a whettle. If you got a prick of a fork burn the prongs and the cut will be healed. If you got[?] a bite of a dog make the dog lick the part affected and you will be cured. Forge-water is good for warts.
One of the most popular cures for a tooth=ache is to smoke a cigarette. When a kettle is boiling get a dry slate and put it before the steam and then place your hand on the slate and it will cure chilblains.
Written by: - Nancy Moylan.
Bridge Rd.
Portumna.
Obtained from.- Michael Moylan.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:51
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rejected
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fear bocht. D'freagair Seisean é mar seo:-
"Cé go mba gadaidhe an ceud duine do bhuail orrainn tugas déarc do mar do bhí sé carthannac agus roinn sé an deárc a fuair sé ar an gcomluadar a bhí i lathair acht maidir leis an seanfhear eile. Sanntacan a bhí ann bhí neart airgid aige - is ar eigin a bhí sé riocht é iomchur, acht bhí oiread sin sainnt i n-airgead air agus gur cailleadh é leis an ocras sul a gcaitheadh sé pigheann ar rud le n-ithe.
Sul ar cuireadh an seanfhear fritheadh go leor airgid in a chuid eadaigh.

(Ta an scéal seo coitchian go leor sa gceanntair seo)
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:48
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ever he told you, would cure it. A fox's tongue was used for taking out a thorn. A toothache was cured by smoking a pipe and letting the smoke through the bad tooth - pepper was also used.
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A well known as "St Kiarans' Well" in Rathcabbin is visited by many people suffering from sore eyes.
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A herb known as the gladam-herb was used as a remedy for the mumps. People used to gather the leaves and sew them together with white thread and prod each leaf well with a needle and then hold them to the fire for a while. Tie them up around the head and the mumps disappeared.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:44
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rejected
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Lá go raibh Ar dTigearna Iosa Criost ag siubhal le Naomh Peadar casad fear leo a bhí ag iarraidh deírce. Bhí a fhios ag Naomh Peadar gur gaduidhe agus dearg scailbhtéire (?) a bhí ann agus rinne sé iongantas go dtug Ar dTighearna déarc dó.
Téis acairin eile doibh ag siubhal casad sean fhear ortha. Bhí an chuid eadaigh stroichthe agus chuile cosamhlacht air go raibh sé i baoghal a bhais le ocras. Diarr sé dearc ar Ar dTighearna acht nior thug Sé do é. Do mheadaigh sé ar iongantas Pheadair.
An lá in a dhiaidh sin, nu tamall in a dhiaidh sin casadh an gadaidhe ortha airíste. Bhí comhluadar fear i n-eindigh leis agus é stártha ar meisge. Bhí sé frasach go leor do chomhluadar leis an meid dighe a bhí aige. Sgeurr (?) in a dhiaidh sin go dtáineadar ar an sean fhear agus é min marbh agus réir gach cosamhlachta cailleadh é leis an ocras. Do mheaduig ar iongantas Pheadair airíst.
D'fhiafruigh Peadar dár Slanuigtheóir annsin cen fáth go dtug Sé deirc don gadaidhe agus nar thug Sé rud a bit don
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:43
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A ferret's leavings was used as a remedy for the whooping cough, also if you asked a man driving a grey horse for a cure for the whooping cough, what
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:42
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rejected
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from every ailment. It was the custom of the old people to walk bare-footed to the holy-well and then to say the stations and take some of the holy-water from the well. Many ailments are known to be cured this way, not immediately, but after a very short time.
Written by:- Ita Keighrey,
Clonfert Ave,
Portumna
Obtained from:- Nurse Glynn,
St. Joseph's Rd.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:40
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Bhí feirmeóir ann uair amháin agus tháinig an bás chuige lá agus dubhairt leis ná raibh na raibh ach bliadhan eile gearrtha amach do agus d'imtig sé an bhóthar arís.
Thuit an lug ar an lag ag an bhfeirmeóir agus cheap sé gur mhaith an rud biadh do sholáthar do féin i gcoir na bliana.
Dimthig sé agus socruigh sé cliathán cnuic chun garraidhe do chur ann, agus níor chuir de chliadhe timcheall air ach scailpeanna go raibh rathineach ag fás ortha agus gan puinn aca ann leis.
D'fás an garraidhe agus d'fhás an rathineach agus bhí iongnadh mór ar na chómharsanaibh go léir cad na thaobh gur claidhe mar sin gan mhaith do chuir an feirimeóir timcheall a' garraidhe agus d'iarr duine acu air cad na thaobh gur chuir se claide mar sin Yerra a mhic ars an feirmeóir deanfaidh an rathineach an gnoth go maith. Tá foithin a dhóithin ag an garraidhe mar atá sé agus nuair ná fuil ach an blian seo agam le maireachtain nach cuma liom cad do deanfaidh an saoghal im dhiaidh
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:40
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rejected
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it. Mrs Madden has the power to re-set broken arms and legs. This power has always been in her family.
A thorn of a goose-berry bush will cure a sty in your eye. You must point the thorn at the sty and say "I lie three times. The sty will then go back. If you have a ring-worm and meet a man with a white horse ask him for a cure for ring-worm and if you carry out his directions you will immediately be cured. A dandelion cures sore eyes. Foxglove is used to cure a weak heart. A Foxs tongue is used for taking out thorns.
The Holy-well situated in Abbey, five miles from Portumna, is visited by people suffering
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:34
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rejected
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Goose-grease was used for a cure for Rheumatism. A nettle was used to cure heart-burn. The black wool of a sheep cured a pain in the ear. If warts are washed in water found in a stone they are cured. A dock-leaf is used to cure the sting of a nettle. Ashes from timber will cure wild-fire.
Miss Welsh, Portumna, has a cure for burns by rubbing special ointment on them. This secret was given to all the Welsh family. Mr. Daniells has a cure for warts by rubbing ointment on them also. If the secret of the ointment is known the power to cure leaves
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:34
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Saidhbhreas na mBúdhlaorach
Tháinig árthach trí gcrann isteach go Cuan Árt na Caithne le h-uain is le h-anaithe. Cheap an captaen go mbeadh foithn is fasgadh ann aige ach d'athruig an ghaoth agus bhí an t-árthach á chaitheamh isteach ar an dTráigh Bháin - ar an mBéal Bán.
Tháinig muinntir na háite go léir tímcheall, ag cabhradh leis na fearaibh ag teacht idtír. B'é'n captaén an fear déanach d'fhág an t-árthach agus fear críona dob'eadh é go raibh a shaoghal go léir caithte aige ar an bhfairrge. Bhí sé chun tabhairt suas i gcionn bliana agus bhí a thuileamh go léir agus ar chruinnig sé i ruith a shaoghail ar bórd aige, ór buidhe 'na shobhairní. Cuir sé isteach i mála beag a raibh aige agus chuir sé ar leabaidh chluimh é agus sgaoil sé isteach le gaoith is le h-uain é fé dhéin na trágha. Nuair a thainig an tochta clúimh isteach ins na tonnaidheacha briste nár iompuigh sé béal fé agus thuit an mailín óir sa bhfairrge. Thug an captaen iarracht ar theacht i dtír annsan agus bhághfaí é ach go raibh capall ag duine des na Búdhlaoraigh ar an dtráigh agus siúd leis fé dhéin an chaptaen. Ráinnig leis teacht lasmuich do'n gcaptaen agus thug sé leis saor é. Go tigh na mBúdhléarach a tugadh an captaen an oidhche sin agus tugadh gach cóir agus aire dá fheabhas do faid a bhí sé ag teacht chuige féin. D'innis sé do'n mBúdhlaorach sgéal an airgid. "Bh'fuil fhios agat,2 ar seisean "cár iompuig an tochta clúimh? Téire ar lag-trágha led'chapall agus má bhuaileann sé leat bíodh leath agat ach tabhair an leath eile dhom-sa agus beidh ár ndóthain ag an mbeirt againn pé fada geairid a mhairfimíd. D'imthig an Búdhlaorach agus do réir gach deáraimh bhuail an mála leis i gan fhios d'aoinne ach
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:24
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rejected
awaiting decision
This song was composed by Mr. P. Felle, after erecting new houses on the divided land of Balligown.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:23
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That fates may be kind,
And luck you may find,
And happiness always enfold you.
II
When dark clouds come, I do not fear,
I know you are in spirit near,
And toiling through the long dark night,
Smiling I greet the Sun's first light.
Ch.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:18
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of the spinning.
Written by Ita Keighrey, Clonfert Ave, Portumna
Obtained from Nurse Glynn, St. Josephs rd., Portumna.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:17
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rejected
awaiting decision
in charge of this section told us that these were supposed to have been responsible for setting fire to the Old Castle.
A blunderbuss gun presented by Major Butler Stoney, which was in perfect order had a bayonet on it which was hidden from view. After firing a shot, if the trigger is again pulled, the bayonet shoots out and can then be used as a spear.
Some very old hand-made linen was given by Mrs. Canning Other interesting items were a wooden horse-brogue, a thatching needle used long ago, a chasuble worked by Lady Ann Burke at her home "Marble Hill" about the year 1815, a helmet used by travellers in the east, and a head huntress hat presented by Rev. Fr. Strange.
Written by: Mary Martin, St. Brendan St. Portumna.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:16
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CAOLACH
Deantar faoi lathair, agus deireadh fadó cléibh as caolach. Maidí nu scolb cabhall agus fuinnseoige a cuirtear ionnta. Is fearr an fhuinnseog na an cabhall - sé sin tá sé níos teagaraigh acht tá clíabh deanta as an bhfuinnseoig an throm ar fad agus dá brigh sin bfearr leis na feilmearaidhe an cabhall mar tá sé eadtrom agus tá sé teagrach go leor.
I dtus baíre caithfidh an feilméar na scoilbh a tharraint. "Ag tarraint" adeirtear acht ní tharrnuigheann siad iad acht gearrtar iad le sgin nu le corrán. Is feidir le caoladoir maith suas le 4000 scolb a tharraint in aon lá amhain - sin má bhionn siad go tiugh. Deanann sé gad annsin, nu scolb mór laidir fada casta agus ceangluigheann sé na scoilb leis. Beart atá aige annsin. Bionn idir 500 agus 600 scolb sa mbeart. Tógann nu iompruigheann an caoladóir an beart abhaile leis ar a dhruim
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:12
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rejected
awaiting decision
But the most valuable and interesting item in this section was the original manuscript of "Eva of the Nation" also her photograph and that of her son. The manuscript was found in her old home, a few miles from Portumna in a rubbish heap, together with some of her music, the words by the Great Mary Downing. There was also a picture of Eva's home.
Nobody came away without seeing a blackthorn stick belonging to Daniel O'Connell, the Emancipator - also a photograph of his trial obtained from Mr. M. C. Strange.
Two bed-warmer's used in olden times were exhibited - they being the more interesting when the man
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:07
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rejected
awaiting decision
Recently in Portumna many of our hidden treasures have been unearthed and under the directions of Mons. Joyce were exhibited at the Portumna Agricultural Show on Sept. 8th 1938.
They included a large spit for roasting pigs before an open hearth fire, supposed to have been used by the Clanrickardes. It was given by my father, W.C. Martin. He also gave a small spit for roasting fowl or small game in the same manner.
Mr. J. Taylor gave an old wooden drinking naggen - round in shape, and used by the people long ago. There was a mould there used for making tallow candles long ago, presented by Mrs. Tierney, Terryglass.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:06
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rejected
awaiting decision
in the field was afterwards found by the Burke's who built a beautiful house and bought "Marble Hill" and lived there until a few years ago.
Written by:- Ita Keighrey
Clonfert Ave.
Portumna
Obtained from:- Nurse Glynn
St. Joseph's Rd.
Portumna
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 11:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Rian an Phósta
Bhí Murchadha Mór Log-na-gCapall ar phósadh agus bhí an tarán á gearradh 'na shlisneóga deasa tanaidhe ag gaige de dhuin' uasal a bhí ann. Níor thaithin an gearra le Murchadha Mór. Thug sé ulfhairt ar fhear na sgeine agus dubhairt sé leis deállramh a bheith leis go raibh an t-arán ró-lag, ró-thanaidhe, ró-liuca dho féin. " Connus a gearrfadh mar sin é?" ars'an duine uasal.
"Gearraig i bhfoirm fóid móna é fairsing flúirseach" arsa Murchadha Mór. Ní fheadar ar dhein nó nár dhein ach nuair a bhí Murchadha Mór ag fágaint tighe an phósta ar maidin chuaidh sé fé dhéin an bhuitsiléara agus dubhairt "Má fhiafruigheann aoinne dhíom cá rabhas, déarfad gur ar phósa bhíos." "'Bhís a lán" a déarfaidh siad, "Tá a lán dá dheáramh ort." Is amhlaidh a gheobhadsa náire dearg agus geobhair-sé níos mó ná san é. B'fhearra duit rian an phósta cuir orm." D'imthigh an baitsiléir agus thug sé leis jug mór fuisgí agus líon sé gloine chuige. Líon sé an darna gloine agus an tríú gloine. Chaith sé siar iad indiaidh a chéile. "Seadh anois" ar seisean "ní beag san. Ní bheidh aon náire orm á rádh gur a pósa bhíos."
15-2-1928
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 10:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fadó do bhiodh ollpheist uathbhasach i Loch Coirib. Bhíodh sí na comhnuidhe sa loch, agus ní deirtí go mbiodh sí ag teacht amach ar an talamh tirm cor ar bith. Acht bhiodh sí ag teacht go dtí an reilg (Reilg Chille Chuimin, Uachtarard) i mbelach faoi thalamh ag ithe na gcorp. Lá ar bith a mbiodh socraid ar an reilg taghadh an t-ollpheist an oidhche sin leis an gcorp d'ithe. Bhí an oiread sin d'fhaitchios ar na daoinibh roimpi nach racadh aoinne i n-aice na reilige oidhche sochruide ar ór nu ar airgead.
Bhí fear in a chomnuidhe san nGleann (sé mhile taobh thiar d'Uachtarard) an uair sin agus nuair a cailleadh a mhathair cuireadh í i reilg Chille Chuimin, agus thainic sé fein an oidhche sin ag faire. Bhí claidheamh aige agus chuaidh sé isteach sa sean chill le paidir a radh an fhaid is bheadh sé ag fanact leis an ollpheist. Bhí aisling aige no thainic aingeal chuige agus d'orduigh sé do an cloigeann a bhaint den ollpheist le aon bhuille amhain - gan an tarna buille a tharraing, agus dá dtuitfead fiu is deor amhain d'fhuil na peiste ar a mhéar, nu ar a láimh, nu ar a chos, an ball sin a bhaint de féin laithreach bonn le na claidheamh.
Theís achairin chuala sé an torann ag teacht. Igcur (?) gur shaith an t-ollpheist a cloigeann isteach
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 10:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ibhfuinneoig na cille. D'arduigh Reámon a chlaidheamh agus tharraing sé buille uirthi gur bhain sé an cloigeann dí den chead iarracht. Thuit deor fola ar a mhéar agus chomh tuisge is do thuit bhain sé an mhear de feín le na chlaidheamh. Labhair an t-ollpheist leis annsin - dubhairt sí go raibh sí i bpein mhóir agus buille eile nu dó a thabhairt di, chun í do mharbhadh 'mach sa 'mach. Acht ní dhearna Reámon é. Theis sgathaimhín d'eag an t-ollpheist agus chuaidh Reámon abhaile.
Tá portach idir Reilig Chille Chuimin agus Loch Coirib, agus deir na sean daoinibh go dtainic daoine a bhí ag baint móna fadó ar an bportach sin - go dtainic siad ar bealach faoi thalamh a bhí ag an ollpheist ón loch go dtí an Reilg.
Tá Reamon curtha i Reilg Cill Chuimin, agus tá leac os a chionn agus cloideamh gearrta uirthí.
MC
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 10:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
agus annsin rachfamuid soir go dtí muileann an Choraidh-Crioganaidh agus gheobhaidh muid min deánta."D'imthigh siad agus nuair a bhí said san muileann, dubhairt siad le fear an mhuilinn go rabh ceithre chéud coirce leo agus gur mhaith leo min a fhaghail deánta roimhe an tSatharn. Dubhairt an muilteór go mbéadh agus fuair siad min deánta.
Ins an am seo bhí rí 'na chomhnuidhe ins an ceanntar seo. Bhí muc dé chuid an an righ ag teacht isteach gach lá agus bhí sí ag tochailt an urlair. "Bheirfidh mé seans amháin eile duit agus má thig tú isteach lábéidh anlann againne ó sin amach" ars an stócach. Thainig an mhuc isteach an lá thar na bhárach mar an gceudhna. fuair an stócach greim uirthi agus mharbhuigh sé í. Shocruigh an rí plean le fághail amach an rabh an mhuc aca. chuir sé sgéala amach go rabh damhsa le bheith aca. Chuir siad a mathair isteach ins an chórtha agus d'iarr áit i dteach an tsean-lánamhain do'n chórtha. In am luighe d'iarr an stócach ar an tsean bhean giota dé'n muic-fheoil a rósadh, Tabhair aire nó tá mó chroidhe ag inse damh go bhfuil duine éiginteach san chórtha. Bhí an bhean na suidhe agus í ag cuir cluas uirthi féin, Bhí oiread feirge s[?]air
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 10:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Fadó do bhiodh ollpheist uathbhasach i Loch Coirib. Bhíodh sí na comhnuidhe sa loch, agus ní deirtí go mbiodh sí ag teacht amach ar an talamh tirm cor ar bith. Acht bhiodh sí ag teacht go dtí an reilg (Reilg Chille Chuimin, Uachtarard) i mbelach faoi thalamh ag ithe na gcorp. Lá ar bith a mbiodh socraid ar an reilg taghadh an t-ollpheist an oidhche sin leis an gcorp d'ithe. Bhí an oiread sin d'fhaitchios ar na daoinibh roimpi nach racadh aoinne i n-aice na reilige oidhche sochruide ar ór nu ar airgead.

Bhí fear in a chomnuidhe san nGleann (sé mhile taobh thiar d'Uachtarard) an uair sin agus nuair a cailleadh a mhathair cuireadh í i reilg Chille Chuimin, agus thainic sé fein an oidhche sin ag faire. Bhí claidheamh aige agus chuaidh sé isteach sa sean chill le paidir a radh an fhaid is bheadh sé ag fanact leis an ollpheist. Bhí aisling aige no thainic aingeal chuige agus d'orduigh sé do an cloigeann a bhaint den ollpheist le aon bhuille amhain - gan an tarna buille a tharraing, agus dá dtuitfead fiu is deor amhain d'fhuil na peiste ar a mhéar, nu ar a láimh, nu ar a chos, an ball sin a bhaint de féin laithreach bonn le na claidheamh.
Theís achairin chuala sé an torann ag teacht. Igcur (?) gur shaith an t-ollpheist a cloigeann isteach
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 10:47
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Is fada an Luan é a Chubháin (Chuain)
Ar uisge fuar gan a bheith foláin
Marach an leac a chuiris ar mo cheann
D'íosfainn a leath agus a dhá oiread ann.

Cáisg 1936: ón Sean- Mhúrdhach (Paddy Moore) 84 bliain d'aois.Tháinig a mháthair ó Chill Chuáin - de Mhuintir Mhuircheartaigh dob'eadh í.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 10:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
People usually eat three meals a day. In former years, the food was very coarse but the people were very healthy. These meals consisted of porridge, oaten bread boxty bread, potatoes and butter-milk. the people used not get new - milk to drink very often.
The people used to get up at five o'clock and got to work before they ate their breakfast. Tables were not commonly used in former years. The people used to put a basket of food in the middle of the floor and eat out of it. Meat was hardly ever eaten by the people only every Christmas or Easter. before cups became into use people used to drink out of noggins.
There is one man in this locality who remembers when the men used to work on the road for three shillings a week or a stone of Indian-Meal.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 10:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a big oval shaped stone at Clonan castle in the middle of the stone is a hollow, which is always full of water. This water is supposed to cure warts. The person who has warts visits the stone and puts the warts into the water and blesses himself three times. This is relied for three days after which the warts will disappear.
senior member (history)
2021-01-23 10:31
approved