Number of records in editorial history: 343798 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 21:56
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After my supper I got ready and went to the pictures. The pictures were very good. When the pictures were over I came home and went to bed, so I enjoyed the "Wren's Day" very much.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 21:54
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On the Wren's Day I got up early to go out with the wren. Mick Joe McKenna and myself got ready to go out. I put on a skirt, an old blouse and a hat and I dressed it all over with ribbons. Then I put on an [?] so that the other boys didn't know me.
We started after first mass and travelled away until we came to the first house. Then we started the "Wren Song"
The wren, the wren, the king of all birds,
St Stephen's Day was caught in the furze.
Up with the kettle and down with the pan,
Give us our answer and let us begone
And if the money is anyway slack
Give us a cut of your barm-brack.
So we travelled all day long, until night fall. When we were finished we had made six and sixpence.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 21:53
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On the Wren's Day I got up early to go out with the wren. Mick Joe Mckenna and myself got ready to go out. I put on a skirt, an old clouse and a hat an I dressed it all over with ribbons. Then I put on an [?] so that the other boys didn't know me.
We started after first mass and travelled away until we came to the first house. Then we started the "Wren Song"
The wren, the wren, the king of all birds,
St Stephen's Day was caught in the furze.
Up with the kettle and down with pan,
Give us our answer and let us begone
And if the money is anyway slack
Give us a cut of your barm-brack.
So we travelled all day long, until night fall. When we were finished we had made six and sixpence.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 20:47
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O Keeffe are buried there and they were people of the 16th century. The 6th By far the oldest is in Drishane.
It is situated on top of a sloping field the wall round it is 4 1/2 feet high, while the graves or ground inside are even higher than the wall, so I take it that its is filled with the dead and the coffins that enclosed them, to the height of over 4 1/2 feet high. There must be thousands of people buried therr, catholics, Protestants, chieftains, Colonels, majors, soldiers and ladies of Irish and English descent, the Mc Carthys that built the castles of Drishane and Kilmeedy in the 14th or 15th century are buried there, The Cotters, Ludgates, Fitxell, O Donells and other names that have for a long time become extinct in our parish can be found on the tombs and head-stones. It was the site of our parish church possibly as far back as the 11th or 12th century. A part of the ruin still remains and it is hard to understand why it was selected as a church for in these times as to-day they were generally built on the cross roads and it is a considerible distance from any road. Our first priest lived surely in the Glebe but had to move from the Protestant Ministers to a place now known as the priest-cross. Both of these places are a considerable distance from Drishane graveyard.
The selecting of the site must be made to accommadate those who lived in Drishane. So the chapel came and went and the dead slept quietly round it until about 1860 when landlordism became most prosperous and tyrannical.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 20:33
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Once more the Summer decks the hills round dear old Millstreet town
The breezes waft the scent from flowers of green Duhallow down
The sunshine chases shadows fleet o'er Muskerrys meadows wide
And light and shade guild every glade by sweet Black water's side
Sweet it is when Clara hill is clad in sunset glow
And happy lovers shily meet in many a vale below
They breathe the balmly Irish air and roam the meadows through
Where Finnow witching waters join the far famed Avondhu
Oh. Avondhu by many a field your shadowed waters glide
Where I have life[s golden hours your restful banks beside
Now scattered afar the comrades all my careless boyhood knew
Alas we'll never meet again beside sweet Avondhu
Some sleep beside that grand old stream in the graveyard on the hill
They closed their eyes in dreamless death while life seemed pleasant still
Light lay the sod upon their clay may heaven's sweetest dew
For ever bless each comrade's grave beside sweet Avondhu
The fairest land on earth art thou Oh Ireland grah ma chree
Your Exiles brave in every land are wrath to make you free
Their dearest hope that yet some day in Freedoms light they'll view
Their Native hills that sleep for aye beside sweet Avondhu
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 20:16
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senior member (history)
2020-03-29 20:16
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and twisted around.
Chairs:
A móinteán scraith about one foot high was got and was called suidheastín[?]
A súgán of straw
was twisted in the shape of a circle until it was about 1 1/2 feet and bind it on top with a hay súgán to form the seat. It was called a suidhste[?]
A bogdeal stick
about seven feet long was made in the form of a plank and put resting on two big stones. This was later improved on by getting blocks of wood instead of stones. This was known as a bench.
People who grew flax were:-
Mick Connell, John Ring, Bath Rahilly, Patsy Hickey, William and Jer Herlihy, Patrick Sheehan, Patrick Guiney, John Connor, Matt Dennehy, Mrs. O'Connor
All the farmers in the district grew flax.
The flax-seed
was sold by the pottle or pint
A pottle was equal to three quarts.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 20:11
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5/2/38
Churning
We have a churn at home. It is an American dark churn. When we are churning first we scald the churn with boiling water. Then we put in the dasher and handle. Then we put in the cream. After that we begin to churn. Sometimes we can churn in half an hour. Here are a few fairy tales concerning churning. One time there lived in a Garbally a fairy woman. There was one man who never had any butter and he had six cows. One day he went out into the field where the cows were and had his gun. The first he saw was a hare. He watched it. The first thing the hare did was he pulled a hair out of each cows tail. Then it sucked one of the paps of each cow. When the hare was starting off they fired at it and hit it on the side. The hare ran off crying like a child. The man ran after the hare. He traced the blood across the fields. On his way he found a little ladder about a half foot long. He kept going and in the woods he came to a little house. He looked in through the window and saw
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 20:08
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flannel or frieze with a hand-loom. He charges two-pence a bandle which is about two feet in length.
Flax:
When the flax is ripe there is a blue flower on it and then it is pulled from the roots and bound into sheaves. It is put into a small stream and covered with big stones where it is left for three weeks. It was next left for nine days to bleach with the binders ripped open in a lever field. Then it is made into sheaves again and pounded with a tuairgín or a flat stone until the hulls are broken. Then it was made into táthíns or plaits. It was cloved with a cloving tongs and hackled it with a hackle and the tow taken out or it. It was spun with a flax wheel into thread. Balls were made of it and it was warped into hanks and token to a weaver who wove in into bandle-cloth.
Rush-lights:-
A strong rush called a bull-rush was peeled with exception of a short piece. It was put into melted tallow
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 20:02
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with washing soda and pour it into tin shapes until it was hard.
Baskets:-
A mointeán scraith about six inches thick and about two feet square was got and the sátáns or strong sticks were stuck in it and the twigs were woven around them. They were well seasoned before being used. The rods were cut in November because they are ripe then.
Spinning and weaving.
The wool was washed and combed with the fingers. It was oiled, carded, made into rolls and spun with a spinning wheel into thread by putting the thread on the top of the spindle and twisting the wheel with the fingers of the left hand and holding the roll with the right. Then wind the thread into big balls and warp it with warping pins by sticking wooden pins into a wall and making hanks of it and wash the oil off them and leave them dry and make it into balls again. Then take it to a weaver and weave it into
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:58
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are, Come here I want you. How much do you want for that old cob, or trot him up there till we have a look at him. Then the cattle fair is held on the third day. The sheep fair is held on the fourth day and the pig fair is held on the fifth day. Then the next big fair is in January. The other fairs are not as important as these.
Written by Jas J.Mulhare who has lived always in locality and told by Tim Mulhare age 74 years.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:56
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Candle-making:-
The fat of a cow or a goat was got and melted into liquid and strained. They would put a mould standing in a sod of turf and put a wick of cotton thread through it and fasten it at the wide end with a nail. They would get a funnel and pour the liquid into it and leave it there until it hardened. Then they would pull it out with the nail and if it was stiff and difficult to pull they would heat it to the fire.
Soap:-
Melt the fat of a cow, mix it
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:53
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from the quarry.
There is a blasting kiln in Knocknaseed between Patrick O'Connor's land now and Dan Leary's. (Knocknaseed is in the Kerry-side of the Blackwater and was owned by Henry Duggan a Middleman - Poll Hannaroi and Ath na mBan Uasal were used by him)
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:50
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Limestone:-
The government opened a quarry in Ballydesmond and they used give it free to the farmers in the Crown lands.
Fire stone
was got at the hills (The Two Paps 6 miles south)
The kiln-makers were -
Charlie Callaghan, Tim MacCarthy, Con Moriarty, Tim Moriarty, John, Tim and Dan Callaghan
Kilns:-
Poor people who could not build stone kilns would make a round hole in a rampart of turf and fill it up with turf and burn it in such a way that it would put a hard crust around it and them limestone was broken very small and burned in it. There were three of these kilns in Tureen.
Blasting Kilns:-
very rich people had blasting kilns. There was an iron grate at the bottom of it and the fire was put at the bottom underneath the grate. The limestone was not broken at all. It was thrown in as it came
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:48
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4/12/37
Local Fairs
There a good number of fairs held in Banagher through-out the year. There is a pig fair held every month and a scales every Saturday. Only one buyer attends these fairs and he buys up all the pigs. His name is Mr. Clarke. Then in September the big fair of Banagher is held. It lasts for about five days. Before the fair starts at all the town is crowded with tinkers and guards and buyers and farmers and gypsies. Its many a fight the tinkers and gypsies and guards have with each other. On the first two days the horse fair is held and the town is always crowded with horses and buyers. Some of the words used by the buyers when buying horses
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:45
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Spades and Sleáns:-
Spades used be made by a smith out of a bar of iron and a half pound of steel used be put in the mouth of it. Sleáns are still shaped in the local forge.
Ploughs:-
Ploughs were made of timber and an iron sock used be put on them. One of these wooden ploughs is still be be seen at Patrick Nolan's, Farrankeal, Knocknagree. It was made in 1872 by James Fitzgerald - James the 'Joiner' - from oak brought from Flesk Castle. Killarney.
Churns:-
[drawing in margin] A cooper would make a standing churn. A lid would be put on top of it with a hold in it to run the staff through and a butter cup was put on top of the lid not to leave the cream spatter.
Keelers:-
[drawing in margin] would be made by a cooper from a bogwood sticks with hoops around it.
Keelers are receptacles for milk and cream.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:43
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go the forge and the blacksmith burns wheat. It is called the oil of wheat and it is supposed to cure wildfire.
Told by Tim Mulhare, Blacksmith, Cloghan, Banagher, Offaly.
AGe 74. Blacksmith
12/6/37
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:42
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gentleman to the blacksmith. I will have a try anyway said the blacksmith. The man went up the town and the blacksmith tried to get the nail out of the horses hoof with a pincers. The nail was too far in and he failed, but raising the other leg he paired a hole in the hoof. Then he fitted a big marble into the hole. The horse was then lame on two legs. After an hour the man came back for the horse. He brought the horse up the town and he was not lame. When he put one foot on the ground it hurt him and he had to put the other foot on the ground. The man sold the horse at a good price and he gave the blacksmith a pound. Then if anyone has wildfire they
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:39
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huge bellows and the fire. Then there is the anvil on which the blacksmith makes the horse shoes and other things. The blacksmith himself is a big strong fellow and he makes a good amount of money shoeing animals and selling them to farmers and making ploughs. The blacksmith who owned the forge before the present blacksmith was a very jolly man though he was a bit of a drunkard. One day during the big fair of Banagher a gentleman came up to the forge with a fine chestnut horse. It was the horse fair day and the horse was lame. He had a nail in his hoof. I will make it worth your while if you are able to fix this horses hoof within an hour said the
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:35
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named Catherine Magan living in Herd's Torlough, and one night her cow happening to stray into the lios she milked her there. Just as
she was about to turn away after milking the cow she heard a faint voice asking for milk. Catherine said to herself that if she knew
who was asking for milk she would gladly give it to them. She was walking across the lios and all of a sudden a hole appeared before
her and a hand came up out of it holding a black saucepan. She filled the saucepan with milk and the hand disappeared again.
Another time a man named Pat Healy was coming out Gallagh avenue, and he met a barrel of fire, rolling out of Herd's fort, into Gallagh wood. The opening in Herd's fort can not be seen now. There are a lot of crab trees, and white-thorn bushes growing around the fort.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:35
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12/6/37
Local Forges
There are two old forges in Banagher. One of them is situated at the end of the town and the other is situated near the Bridge. This is a very old forge with an old thatched roof and to look at it you would think that it was going to fall any minute. There is a big strong door on the forge and on it also there are the traces of where two other doors were. Then it has one little window with the panes of glass all broken. Inside the forge there are huge beams of wood holding up the roof which is black with soot. Then the floor is littered with horse shoes such as files and tools of every sort. In one corner there is the
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:21
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the place in the morning. He couldn't sleep at night with all the ruaille-buaille the "good-people" would have going on round the house.
He would hear pans and kettles and dishes rattling but when he would go into the kitchen although everything would be rattling
and moving round about him he wouldn't see a person stirring them and they all seemed to be moving by themselves. After that he
gave it up and no one ever tried to get the treasure since then.
There is another fort in Lenard's land where there is also supposed to be a treasure and two black cats minding it. There is a fort in
Rattigan's land in Brownsgrove in a field called Páirc na Sídheóg or Bat na Sídheóg and it is supposed to be inhabited by fairies, that being the reason the field is called that name. When Mannion from Glan was going to the fair of Claremorris one dark night with a horse, and it was about midnight when he was passing the lios in Páirc na Sídheogha, he saw a barrel of fire rise from the middle of the lios and float in the air up towards Knockalourra.
There were ghosts supposed to be in Herd's lios too. Long ago there was a woman
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:15
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to him and told him to go back. He went on and that evening he died. At Christmas it is an old custom to decorate the house with holly and on Christmas night there is a big candle in every window. Then on Christmas day the people have a goose or a turkey for the dinner.
As seen by myself in locality and heard from my father who has always lived in it.
Jas. J. Mulhare
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:13
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the sea. These are some of the customs of hallow-Eve. Then on Easter Sunday morning it is the custom of the people to eat a good number of eggs and to get early to see the sun dancing. On Saint Stevens day the young men and boys gather together and go around on the breedogue or on the wren. Those who go around are called breedogues. On Saint Martins Eve a cock is killed and the blood scattered behind the door. It is said that there will be no sickness in that house through- out the year. Then on the feast of the Assumption the fifteenth of August it is the custom not to mow. It is said that on that day a man went out to mow and a lady appeared
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:11
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priest and the person who chooses the ring will be married soon. Then the person who chooses the water will go across the sea and who gets the clay will die soon. Another custom is a tub of water is put in the middle of the floor. Then a shilling is put into it and the people try to get the shilling with their mouths. If one of them succeeds he gets the shilling. Another custom is, lead is melted in a saucepan on the fire. Then it is poured through a key into a cup of cold water. If it comes out in the shape of a ring the person who poured will be married soon. Then if it comes out in the shape of a sword he will be a soldier and if it comes out in the shape of a ship he will go across
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 19:08
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7/5/37
Festival Customs
There are a great number of old customs carried out in this district on Festival days. On hallow-Eve night the people tie an apple out of the roof with a piece of cord. Then a persons hands are tied behind his back and he tries to take a bite out of the apple with his teeth. If he succeeds he gets the apple. This is another custom that we have, four saucers are got and put in a line on the table. Water is put on one saucer, clay on another, a Rosary beads on another and a ring on another. Then a piece of cloth is put over one persons eyes. He then walks to the table and chooses a saucer. The person who chooses the Rosary beads shall be a
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:40
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twine to the latch of the door.
When this was done he got an iron and put it in the fire. When the iron was red he took it out of the fire and put it beside the person's face.
Then the person would jump aside, and the tooth would fall out.
Nowadays when there are dentists there is no need to be going to the Blacksmith.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:38
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until ready made horseshoes were imported from England.
Then they lost their trade and were obliged to give up their forge and work with the farmers.
We find many old traditions, and stories connected with the blacksmith & the forge.
Outside the forge, we see a round flat stone. In the middle of this is a big hole. This stone is known as the wheel-wright, and it is used for putting bands on the wheels of carts.
First the box of the wheel is put into (a) hole in the stone; then the blacksmith brings out the red iron brand, and hammers it down on the wheel.
This work is done outdoors because if it was done inside the forge would be in danger of catching fire.
Long ago when there were no dentists in Ireland people went to the blacksmith when they wanted to get their teeth drawn.
He first tied a long twine to the person's tooth. Then he tied the other end of the
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:36
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spades.
When shoeing a cart wheel the work is done in the open. Long ago the forge was the meeting place of the old people especially old men, The seventh generation of the smith is said to have the power of curing the ricketts. Patrick Smith who was smith at the Creamery some time ago had this power. The smith is looked upon as a very strong man, because it takes a very strong to do the work of the smith. When shoeing a wheel the blacksmith needs the help of another man. First of all the wheel is left in a track for the purpose. He builds a fire over it and lights it. The track for the wheel
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:32
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There are two forges in the parish one in the village of Ballyhaise and the other at the Creamery about half a mile from the village. In the forge at the Creamery the smith is Patrick Cahill and in the village John Brady. John Brady's people before him were smiths. The forge in the village is just beside the road, but the forge at the Creamery is neither near a cross road nor a road-side but it is beside the river Ann-a-lee. The door on either forge is of no special shape.
The bellow's are used to pump wind in to the fire to keep it lit. They are made of felt and are worked by a long wooden handle. Bellows were made locally but are not made now. The instruments which the black smiths uses are the bellows, tongs, hammers and sledges. He has also a drill with which he bores holes in iron. He shoes horses, asses and ponies. He makes no ploughs nor spades but he makes, harrows. He repairs ploughs and
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:26
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Long ago there were four or more forges in this parish. One was situated in the east at the Sweep about six miles from Waterford. In the west at Ross there was another which is still being worked.
Another was situated at Kilmeaden about 8 miles from Waterford.
One of the oldest of them all was situated in the south at Knockaderry.
All kinds of farm implements, and horse shoes were made in this forge.
During the day the blacksmith made horse-shoes, and put them on the horses. In the night-time his work was usually the making of farm implements.
At night the boys and men gathered together in the forge to discuss the news and all other important matters.
The owners of this forge were the Mackey's, and they had been blacksmiths for generations.
This forge was doing a very good trade
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:21
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leaped on said the gentleman. The next day the gentleman set off. When he was gone Jack dressed himself in lovely clothes. He started off on his steed of swiftness when he came to the spot all the people wondered. He had a fierce fight but in the end he cut half the tongue out of him and galloped away he was in his old clothes when his master came back. How did ye get on to-day, great half the tongue gone out of the dragon. Be gob that's great said Jack let me go tomorrow you would be leaped on said the gentleman. The next day when his master was gone Jack set off on his steed. When he came to the spot the people tried to catch him. He had a terrible fight with the dragon but in the end he pierced the dragon in the heart and killed him. He burst away throught the crowd but they took a slipper off him. Jack was into his old clothes when his master came back. How did ye get on said Jack, better than ever said his master the dragon is killed. Who killed himsaid Jack. It is not known said the man. They took the slipper off him and who ever the slipper will fit can marry the princess. Let me try said Jack, not at all said the man. When the people who were fitting the shoe came to the house Jack tried it and it ran in on his foot. He married the princess and lived happy ever after.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:19
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name given to the other players.
Then the "Fish" runs over, and back from each side of the square while the Fisherman tries to catch them as they pass.
If any of the"Fish" are caught inside the small square where the Fisherman is, they will have to help the Fisherman in catching the rest of the "Fish".
When all the fish are caught then the game is finished.
Another game which was played by every child was "Tig".
The girl on which twenty fell was first to have the "Tig".
The she hunted the girls until she tipped one of them.
Whatever part of the girl that is tipped she will have to keep her hand on her until she tips another girl.
This is a very exciting and amusing game.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:14
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A very popular game among children long ago was "Fish".
One of the players who was called the Fisherman stood in the middle of a large square. Inside the large square is made a small one.
It is in this small square that the Fisherman stands and if he goes outside it while trying to catch the "Fish" he is expelled from the game. "Fish" is the
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:14
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The Teampaillín: The old name was Teampaillín na Móna.
In the townland of Kilbolane (Milford, Ráth Luirc) are the remains of a small building called the Teampaillín. The wall & gables still stand in about an acre of ground which is well fenced. It is commonly supposed to have been a Chapel of Ease of the Bowen's & some members of the family appear to have been buried there. People saw coffin's exposed within the walls. There are two skulls under an arch in the building. On some few occasions in former times still-born children were buried there, the last in 1860.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:11
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leave you everything I have. This and that said Jack an he took the head off him. That night he drove home the cows. Anything down there said his master. Be gob no said Jack. The next morning he drove down the cows, he was there a long time and no giant came out. Jack knew ther ewas someone inside he went up and knocked at the hall door. Out came an old hag with two big teeth in the front of her mouth and going down to the ground gor walking sticks. She struck Jack with one and nearly knocked him, but Jack drew his sword spare my life and I'll leave you everything I have. This and that said Jack cutting off her head.
When he went home that night his master told himthat there was a firey draggon to come and try to kill the pricess and whoever could save her could marry her. You ought to let me go sid Jack. A little fellow like you would be leaped on. The next day the gentleman set off. When he was gone Jack dressed himself in grand clothes and off he set. When he came to the spot he saw all the people shouting. Jack galloped through the crowd and out came the dragon. They had a great fight in the end Jack put away the dragon. He galloped away through the crowd and was into his old clothes before the gentleman came home. Jack asked him how did they get on great said the man, let me go tomorrow said Jack. A little lad like you would be
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:09
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Acts the occupying tenant purchased the estate. The Castle was owned by Mr. John P. O'Leary who died a few years ago. Mr John O'Leary is the present owner.
(Castleishon Castle is about two miles from Milford but it is not in this school area.)
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:07
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Castleishon Castle: This was supposed to have been attacked & destroyed by soom of Cromwell's troops. It is still in a fair state of preservation. It belonged to the FitzGerald's of Desmond who subsequently built a mansion near it. The lived @ Castleishon until 1812. They took their title from the place. The last was Sir Jas. Dalton FitzGerald of Castleishon. He lived in England for several years. On the passing of the Land
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:06
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If the fire falls it is a sign that someone is going to come into the house.
If you are the third person to light a cigarette with the same match it is a sign of trouble.
If you see a star fallling wish and you will get your wish.
If a person goes into a house and sits on a cushion chair and when he goes out if the cushion is crushed money will go from that house.
If two knives are crossed it is a sign of a quarrel.
It is unlucky to leave Christmas decorations hanging up after the twelfth night or loss in the family is said will accur before the year is out.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:04
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Castles: The ruins of a fine Anglo-Norman Castle stand on top of Kilbolane hill, about 5 hundred yards from the village of Milford (Ráth Luirc). They are in the Townland of Kilbolane, parish of Milford, Barony of Orrery & Kilmore, Co. Cork. The castle was formerly a seat of the Earls of Desmond who got the castle & estate from the De Cogans who erected the former soon after Strongbow's coming to Ireland. The castle was partially destroyed by Strongbow's soldiers but the ruin is fairly well preserved. The castle was rectangular & had a circular tower @ each angle. Some years after it was destroyed an attractive mansion which overlooks Milford was built & later occupied by the Power's, Bowen's, Barry's & Hannigan's. A member of the latter owns the Castle, mansion & lands now.
It is said that soldier's escaped through an underground passage to the Teampaillin. (Please see next page.) Please see "Hidden Treasure" for the Barry's of Kilbolane.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:03
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If you break a mirror it is a sign of seven years bad luck.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:03
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Birds
Seagulls on land is a sign of a storm on sea.
Crows gathered in trees is a sign of a thunder storm.
If swallows are flying low it is a sign of rain.
If they fly high it is a sign of good weather.
I a robin is on the low branch of a bush it is a sign of rain
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 18:01
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The servant boy was out and saw the thing on the grave and he told Anne. He had to carry her in a white sheet. When he came near the grave the man who was on th grave thought it was the other man coming with the sheep and he asked, "Is she fat or lean." The servant threw her towards the grave saying Here she is for you and see if she is fat or lean.
The servant ran home and he was no longer in until Anne was at home after him. She was no longer lazy
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:59
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will I do at all? I am worn out with travel and now I find that my reward is worthless. How shall I ever make my way home?"
"I pity you", said White, smiling inwardly. "I have a great respect for soldiering and I should like to see it better rewarded. In token of my appreciation of your work I shall give you my own horse to take you to some port where you can find a ship to carry you home to England." "Oh, thank you, thank you," said the soldier, but what can I do for you in return, for I have no money to pay for this horse."
"I need no return", said White, "but if you wish you can give me those papers relating to the island yonder. They are of no use to me, but nevertheless I will accept them in token of our friendship."
"You many have them and welcome", said the soldier, delighted beyond measure, "for I am heartily sick of the sight of them".
Then and there the soldier deeded over the beautiful island of Whiddy to White and both went their way perfectly satisfied.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:58
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Long ago there lived two old Ladies. There names were Mary and Anne. They had lots of money and they kept a servant. Mary was a cripple and she could not walk and Anne got lazy that she would have to be wheeled about in a chair. Mary died and all her blankets and gold were buired with her. There lived two men near the house and they said one day.
"We will dig up Mary Gaffneys grave and get her gold." They went off to do it. One of them went to dig the grave and the other to kill the sheep. He dug the grave and he took out a blanket and put it around him while he waited for the other lad to come back with the sheep.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:58
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There are three graveyards in this school-district - Ballinalkill, in the townland of Kilbolane (Milford, Ráth Luirc), Delliga in the townland of Trienieragh & Cloncrew, in the townland of the same name.
The three are still in use.
Ballinakill is almost round,
Cloncrew is round and
Delliga " square.
There is a "ruin" in Ballinakill - it consists only of the the part of the wall which holds the "Synan Stone" referred to in page 91.
There is another ruin in Cloncrew. (Please see page 109).
Ballinakill slopes to the south-east &
Cloncrew & Delliga are fairly level.
Near the Teampaillín (Please see Page 108) there is a disused graveyard which is almost square. People do not remember any funerals to it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:57
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he got off his steed and he knocked at the door. A gentleman came to him Jack asked for work the man said he would, but that there was a big giant's house nearby and any person that went there was always killed, Jack said he did not mind that. The next morning he drove down the cows, and about twelve oclock Jack said to himself he would drive the cows into the lawn because there was fine grass there. He drove in the cows, he was not long there when out came a huge giant. Ho ho you ittle ruffin will I grind you with my finger or will we have a bout of wrestling. We shall wrestle said Jack. So they began, the giant very ner tumbled Jack then Jack knocked the giant and drew his sword to kill him. The giant said spare my ife and I'll love you all my this and that said Jack cutting off his head.
Jack drove home the cows in the evening. Well anything stirring said his master, be gob no said Jack. Your a great man said his master . Jack drove down the cows the next morning into the lawn, he was not long there until out came a big fat giant. Ho ho you little ruffin how dare you kill my brother will I grind you between my finger and thumb or will we have a bout of wrestling we shall wrestle said Jack. So they began to wrestle Jack soon knocked the giant and drew his sword to kill the giant. Spare my life and I will
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:55
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before.
Hide and go seek.
As many as wish may play this game. A company all gather together. One is chosen to look for the rest. That person goes and hide his face while the others all go and hide also. When they are all settled they call out "cuckoo." Then the seeker goes to find them. The first caught then goes and seeks for the rest as before. If he finds finds no one, he has to seek again while the rest have to change places.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:53
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Once upon a time a soldier returned to England from the wars abroad. As a reward for his services he was granted Whiddy Island in Bantry Bay. He journeyed to Ireland and made his way towards Bantry. He rode and walked alternately and by the time he got to the neighborhood of Bantry he was footsore and weary.
Some distance outside the town, in the neighbourhood of Donemark he met one of the Whites who was riding on horseback. He inquired of White concerning Whiddy Island and soon White was in possession of all the facts relating to the matter. The soldier had in his possession papers to prove his claim to the Island and White soon saw his chance to become owner of the property.
"My poor man", he said, "do you mean to tell me that that is all you got for your services?" "Yes", replied the soldier. "What sort of a place is this island?". "Oh", replied White pityingly, "Do you see that bare rock out there?" pointing to a small bare rock some distance from the shore. "That is Whiddy Island. You have been sadly deceived. The island is worthless." "Oh", said the soldier, "what
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:53
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Hide the Thimble
As many as wish can play this game. One of the company is chosen to hide the thimble. Then the remainder go out side and close all doors while the chosen one hid the thimble. When he has it hid he calls the others in They all start to search for it. The person who finds it, then hides it and the rest of the company go out as
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:51
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There are three graveyards in this school-district - Ballinalkill, in the townland of Kilbolane (Milford, Ráth Luirc), Delliga in the townland of (?) & Cloncrew in the townland of the same name.
The three are still in use.
Ballinakill is almost round,
Cloncrew is round and
Delliga " square.
There is a "ruin" in Ballinakill - it consists only of the the part of the wall which holds the "Synan Stone" referred to in page 91.
There is another ruin in Cloncrew. (Please see page 109).
Ballinakill slopes to the south-east &
Cloncrew & Delliga are fairly level.
Near the Teampaillín (Please see Page 108) there is a disused graveyard which is almost square. People do not remember any funerals to it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:50
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Oh! most Sacred Heart of Jesus I place all my trust in thee.
I adore Thee O Sacred Host living banquet of the Angels.
Let us imitate them who being under the eyes of God did ever for His sake atone.
Oh my God my only Good, the Author of my being and my last end I give thee my heart. Praise honor and glory be to Thee for ever and ever. Amen
Angel of God, my guardian dear.
To whom His love commits here.
Ever this day be at my side.
To light and guard to rule and guide
Amen.
Oh! holy mother pierce me through.
In my heart each word renew,
Of my Saviour crucified.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:46
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May the name of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph be ever praised and glorified.
Heart of Jesus I Implore, That I may love Thee daily more and more.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:45
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and two in the poll go asleep. Jack made a mistake and here is what he did. He played the music but he said two eyes in the forehead and one in the poll go asleep. Three eyes went asleep but one stayed awake and saw everything. She told her stepmother and she planned to kill the bull. The bull told Jack what they were going to do. So he told Jack that when they would come to the gap to jump on his back and get away. So when Jack was coming near the gap he saw the people with hatchets. Jack kept very near the bull and when they came to the gap Jack jumped to his back, away with the two of them. Often times Jack would get down and get a meal out of the bull's back. So one day the bull told Jack that a giant would come out and fight him. The time came and the little red bull won. The next day a big bull twice as big as the last lad came but the red bull won again. The red bull told Jack that he would be killed next day and told him to do certain things. The next day when a bull bigger than any of them came to fight the little red bull was killed. Jack opened the bull and got out a coat of darkness, a steed of swiftness and a sword of light. Jack got up on the steed and galloped on, soon he saw a big house when he came up to the house
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:45
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2.
Má theastuigheann uait bheith go saidhbhir
Eirigh moch agus luigh déanach;
Beagán d'ithe agus mórán do dhéanamh
Déin duit féin nó bí i n-éaghmuis
Abraim leat, gan a bheith lag ná spriodhánta
Ach ar eagla do bheith bocht is maith do bheith coiméadtach.
Fearthainn a chuiníonn gaoth.
Is fearr focal sa chúirte na púnt sa sparán.
Níor bhris focal maith fiacal riamh.
Is fearr mac le h-imirt ná mac le h-ól.
Ní dhéanfadh an saoghal capaill ráis d'asal.
Is dána gach madra ar doras a thighe féin.
Mol an óige agus tiocfaid sí.
Bíonn fios a chúise ag an bpúca.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:43
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First of all they get a potato and make too holes for her eyes.
Then they get four long sticks for her eyes and legs.
The next thing is to put on its clothes on it then all is finished.
Girls make daisy chains. They gather a lot of daisies and split the stems in two and keep at that until you have it finished
Girls sometimes make tops which is a round bit of stick and a sharp point put on one end of it. Then then they get a whip and hit the top with it.
Girls also make a yo-you from a spool and a bit of string tied around it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:41
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"Anna, Máthair Mhuire,
Muire, Máthair Chríost,
Eibhlís deagh oibreacha,
Máthair Naomh Eoghain Baiste -
Cuirim an triúr so 'dir mé agus galar na leaprian,
Cuirim Chrois, na mhbeann 'dir mé agus gach aon spioraid ara ar mo shuidhe. Cuirim an Chrois ar ar ceásadh Chríost idir mé agus an Trom-luighe.
Chuala so ag máthair, i glarraig an lme, Magh Chromrha, Co. Corcaighe.
"And as I lie on my bed to sleep,
To God I give my soul to keep.
If I die before I wake
To God I give my soul to take.
St. Matthew, St. Mark, St. Luke, St. John,
God bless the bed that I lie on.
If any evil spirits come to me
Christ Jesus will deliver me.
There are four corners in my bed,
There are four angels at my head
One to guide me, one to guard me
And two to carry my soul to heaven.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:40
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All small girls make dolls.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:40
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4) Forty acres because there are forty acres in it.
5) Lios because it is long.
6) Moat field because there is a moat in it.
7) Quarry field because there is a Quarry in it.
8) Glen because there is a glen in it
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:38
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1) Twelve acres Because there are twelve acres in it.
2) Bullfield because there was always a bull kept in it.
3) Wellfield because there is a well in it
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:38
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"Anna, Máthair Mhuire,
Muire, Máthair Chríost,
Eibhlís deagh oibreacha,
Máthair Naomh Eoghain Baiste -
Cuirim an triúr so 'dir mé agus galar na leaprian,
Cuirim Chrois, na mhbeann 'dir mé agus gach aon spioraid ara ar mo shuidhe. Cuirim an Chrois ar ar ceásadh Chríost idir mé agus an Trom-luighe.
Chuala so ag máthair, i glarraig an lme, Magh Chromrha, Co. Corcaighe
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:37
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7) St Philomena preserve us from all sickness
8) Jesus, Mary and Joseph may breath forth my soul in peace with you.
Into Thy hands O Lord I commend my spirit
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:36
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Once upon a time, there was a boy named Jack. His mother died and his father married again. His step-mother was a cruel woman. She made Jack mind the cattle every day and all he got was a hard bit of bread for his breakfast, and the same for his supper. Jack got very thin and his step-mother was glad. One evening Jack was driving in the cattle. There was a little red bull among them. All of a sudden he turned and spoke to Jack. Why are you not talking I did not know you were able to talk said Jack. Are you hungry said the bull. O indeed I am said jack, strike my back said the bull Jack did as he was told. The bulls back opened and a fine dinner came out. Jack ate lots this happened every evening and the step-mother noticed Jack getting fat. So one evening she sent out one of her daughters to watch. The bull gave Jack a musical instrument. Jack played it. The girl fell asleep and Jack ate lots. The girl went in and said she saw nothing. The next evening another girl came out. She had three eyes two in her forehead and one in her poll. The bull told Jack to play the music and to say two eyes in the forehead and one in the poll go asleep.Jack did as he was told and the girl went asleep then Jack ate ots. The girl went in and said she saw nothing. The next evening another girl came out she had four eyes two in her forehead and two in her poll. The bull told Jack to play the music and to say two eyes in the forehead
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:36
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1) Gentle Jesus meek and mild,
Look down on me your little child.
2) Oh sacred Heart of Jesus I place all my trust in thee.
3) My good angel guard me,
Mary, my dear Mother, watch over me.
4) Jesus meek and humble of heart make my heart like into Thine.
5) My Jesus, I hope in thee.
Have mercy on me. I love thee
forgive me my sins.
6) Should Jesus bear his cross alone and let the world go free.
No there is a cross for eveyone,
And ther's a cross for me.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:35
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hiding places, until they get a good opportunity of running to tip the den, or lying place, but if they are tipped by the "lying" child before they are at the den the last tipped will have to "lie".
If all the players escape to the den without being tipped the same child will have to "lie" again.
This is a very exciting game especially, especially when it is played in a farmyard as there are so many houses, and hiding places in it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:33
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5) Dear infant Jesus.
Come to root out sin.
And plant thy virtues there.
6) Dear infant Jesus.
I hope in thee have mercy on me
and forgive me my sins.
7) May the sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on me.
8) The immaculate Heart of Mary and the meek heart of St. Joseph be everywhere known and loved.
9) From Gods altar I depart.
With sweet Jesus in my heart.
Help me today to receive thee well
and sweet Jesus always dell.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:30
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Oh Peter, Peter, why does thy not eat.
Oh Lord it is the pain of the tootache
Here is another prayer they used to say when going to bed.
2) Gentle Jesus meek and mild look down on me and pray for me.
3) Oh Angel of God.
My guardian dear.
To whom God's love commits me here,
Ever this day be at my side
To save and rule and guide amen.
4) I lay my body down to sleep.
I pray to God my soul to keep.
If any evil happens me.
Holy Mary waken me.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:29
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40.
An té ná bíonn láidir ní foláir dó bheith glic.
41.
Is mairg a bíonn thíos do'n céad bhuille.
42.
An glór ná thuigeann an ceann, is cuma é ann nó as.
43.
Ní thagann ciall roimh aois.
44.
Dá fhiad é an lá tagann an oidhche.
45.
Mol an óige agus tiocfaidh sí.
46.
Ní h-ionann dul go baile mór agus teacht as.
47.
Taghann an grian i ndiaidh na fearthainne.
48.
A sgéal féin sgéal gach aoinne.
49.
Bíonn an fhírinne searbh acht bíonn sí folláin.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:27
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Long ago the people had several ways for praying especially the old people. Here is one they used to say when there teeth pained them.
1) Peter sat on a marbly stone,
Jesus came and he alone.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:26
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Someone and I.
I list to the soft winds sighing
By river and castle and lea
And the form I loved in the long ago
Comes tenderly back to me.
For we stood by the Shannon together
And watched the sea-birds fly
Ah, many and many a golden time
In the dead past - Someone and I.
I look at the sweet berries growing
At the wild rose, fresh and free
And the face I loved in the long ago
Comes blushingly back to me.
For we roamed thro' the fields together
When sunset flushed the sky.
And we plucked the berries and roses fair
In the dead past - Someone and I.
I list to the music and dancing
Near 'the old cross' by the sea,
And the voice I loved in the long ago
Comes lovingly back to me.
Yet in dreamland we meet together
As in halcyon days gone by
But we search in vain for the roses fair
In the dead past - Someone and I.
By T.B. Naughton Nov 1893
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:26
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If you see a rainbow its the sign of rain.
If your chimney smokes it's a sign of rain.
If soot falls it's a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:26
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not to look up the chimney, but the servant looked up the chimney and got down the gold again she met the cow, she milked her and then she met the horse and she took off the fetters. Then the old woman came to the cow and said ocow omy did you see that maid of mine with the wig with the wag with the big leather bag that stole all the money I ever had, but the cow told her the wrong way. Then she met the horse and said to him ohorse omy did you see that maid of mine with the wig with the wag with the big leather bag that stole all the money I ever had but the horse told her the wrong way and the servant went home with the gold.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:24
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I call this trial over again
I here now can reply
She wants two fathers for her child
That Fr. Tom and I.
Fr. Tom put on his hat, and then began to smile.
He said unto his mother God Brought safe your child
They looked at one another when they heard her perjury
This villain was found guilty.
And His Reverence came home free.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:24
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Once upon a time there was a little house built out in the middle of a big wood.
People said it was haunted. One night a crowd of boys gathered together and said that they would go to the house. They went and when they got there, they saw a ball of fire again and they kept going in and out for an hour. So they said we will come back in a few days.
They did so and they did not come back any more.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:24
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In winter time many games both indoor, and outdoor are played.
The most popular outdoor games in this district are, "Old Mother, Tig, Hunting, Skipping, Beds, Hide-and-go-Seek, and Highgates.
Hide and go Seek is very popular among the country children.
First lots are cast to find out who is to lie, and the rhyme which is usually said is -
"Each, Peach, Pear, Plum
Out goes my very best chum".
This is put around on the children and each word is said on each player.
The child on which the last word falls will have to lie.
Then she goes off, and turns her face to a wall, or ditch so that she cannot see the other players. The other players then go ahide, and after a short time the child who is "lying" goes to look for the others.
The others players remain in their
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:23
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To be brought down by cruel perjury
Fr. Tom he then stood up
"I have no witness here
I call on the almighty
That he may bring me clear.
I never said I'd marry her
Or make her my wife
For I never knew a female
For a man in all my life."
"Now Tom since you wont marry her
The cruel judge did say
I'll give you to understand
Seven years transportation in to some foreign land"
"That is bad but it might be worse"
Then Fr Tom did say
"Our Saviour suffered more than that
When he died on Calvary."
These words were hardly spoken
When a horse as swift as wind.
And on it came a rider saying I was not in time
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:22
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Stole my watch and stole my chain,
Last man's head cut right off.
The last girl going through would be asked which would she rather, a watch or a chain.
If she says a chain she will get behind the girl that is the chain and if she says a watch she will get behind the girl with the watch. Then keep doing that until all the children behind the two girls.
Then they will pull and which ever side falls doesnt win the game and the side that doesnt fall wins the game you can play this game as often as you wish to play it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:20
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will soon be out'. Then he met a man with one eye. he said to him 'One out and the other will soon be out'. The man beat him and told him to say 'Nothing'. Jack went into the shop. The people in the shop asked Jack what did he want he said 'Nothing'. and he went home with nothing.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:20
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He was not long in college.
When the Rev Bishop Brown
Came to examine those collegians.
And viewed them all around.
He said Young man where are you from.
Come tell me your name.
I am from the county of Armagh.
They call me Thomas O Neill
My mother she is a widow.
And of a low degree.
She has done her best endeavours.
To make a priest of me.
Since Thomas O Neill is your name.
The bishop he did say.
Study hard both night and day.
I will soon have you ordained.
To help your tender mother.
Who was so good to thee
I will send you home a credit.
Four country boys to see.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:19
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As many girls as wish can play this game. Two girls catch hold of each other's hands, and hold them up over their heads while the rest of the children march under their hands saying the following words.
Heres the robbers coming through
Waht did the robbers do to you?
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:18
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yard. Well done Jsck says the King there is another job yet and it's to take a sheet off the bed that I am sleeping in tonight.
Off went Jack to the graveyard and dug up a corpse that was not long buried and dressed him.He tied a rope round his body and let him down the chimney of the king's house. When the king heard the noise he was not thinking of Jack and loading his gun rushed down-stairs and having seen the man in the chimney fired. Jack when he heard the shot knew what had happened and gave the rope a jerk it opened and down fell the corpse. The King rushed off to bury him and when he did Jack took the sheet and showed it to the King. Next morning the King gave Jack a fine farm and he lived happily ever after.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:18
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An raibh tú ríamh i Garnabhile,
Nó an bhfacha tú an Garnabhile,
An suairc bean óg i gcrúcha an óir,
Sí Cáít mo stór ó Garnabhile..
(nó) Sí Máire mo stór Ó Cnoc a'Cuillinn.
II
Is gile í ná an eala ar línn
Ná an sneachta ar bharr na craobha crainne
Sí is mílse póg ná an brúach ar rós
Sí Cáit mo stór ó Garnabhille.
III
Is bínne ceol ná an lon's n'a 'n smól
Na [?] ar barr na sallaigh
Mar luing fe seóil sé cún mo stór
Sí Cáit mo stóir ó Garnabhile
IV
Cúghatsa a Chríost a chuirim mo guídhe
Má ta aon bhrígh i guídhe an fhile
Gan brón gan dith gan cían gan cíos
Ar Cáit sa buibhean ó Garnabhile.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:17
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1) The cure for a toothache is to go out through a hole in a tree.
2) The cure for a sty on your eye. Get nine gooseberry thorns and make the sign of the cross on your eye with the thorns.
3) The cure for bleeding nose:- Put a penny to the back of your neck and it will stop bleeding
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:16
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"If everyones house is on fire take care of your own.
"A rolling stone gathers no moss.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:15
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"All the glitters is not gold.
"A wise man would not find a death
"A bird in your hand is worth two in a bush.
"A half burned child dreads the fire.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:14
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"When is a cow not a cow?
When it turns into a field."
"Whats full and holds more?"
A pot full of potatoes when you pour water in."
"Headed llike a thimble, tailed like a rat, you may guess for ever but you can't guess that?"
A pipe."
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:14
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XI
Just then ran past a wounded hare,
And the hounds rushed madly by,
OKeeffe could not rein his steed so fair,
Though his utmost he did try.
XII
And when they had ridden a little space,
The field was left behind,
None, save the two could live the pace,
Far swifter than the wind.
XIII
Nine times the hare did screaming run,
Around the fatal tree,
As mother who bewailed her son,
In hopeless miserie.
XIV
And the peasant saw the wicked pair,
Borne on their fiery steeds,
Gallop through fens like fiends of air,
Nor hake the slender reeds.
XV
The hounds all day as swift as light,
That hare did still pursue,
That huntsman base and cruel knight,
That chase did sorely rue,
XVI
At eve they saw a cottage door,
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:13
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"A Clock."
"What is it that walks with its head down?"
A nail in your boot."
"In all day and out at night?"
The latch of the door."
"What is the stongest thing in the world?"
A snail, because he carries his house."
"What makes a pair of shoes?"
Two."
"My father gave me seeds to sow. The seeds were black the ground was white. Riddle me that and Ill give you a pint?"
A paper."
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:12
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Shall be in a wretched plight."
VI
The chief then cried "Flog Modereen,
As she dares to threaten me,
She should have been hanged on yestereen,
With her son on yonder tree".
VII
The huntsman flogged old Modereen,
Till she was steeped in gore,
And then he followed across the green,
The chief who had ridden before
VIII
A maiden then met him all bathed in tears,
To supplicate the knight,
For love for her brother overcame her fears,
A damsel of beauty bright.
IX
"Oh hear a wretched orphan's prayer,
Thou gallant warrior knight,
For mercy's sake my brother spare,
Thou foremost in the fight".
X
Her brother that maiden can never see,
Her mother is poor and old,
Take her to the castle my lemen to be
And deck her with perals and gold.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:11
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Chin-Cough A cure for the chin-cough is turf - mould strained through a strainer for nine mornings and take three spoonfuls of it on milk each morning.
Burn
The cure for a burn is boiled cabbage and other herbs.
Sprain
The cure for a sprain is to bathe arm or leg in a running stream or to get a string of a weaver's loom.
Thorn
The cure for a thorn is said to be a piece of a foxe's tongue
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:10
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"Round the house and round the house and sleeps in the corner at at night?"
"A brush.
"What sort of a stick dosent grow?"
"A candle.
"A hard working father a wee lazy mother and twelve black children?"
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:10
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It was supposed to consist of jewels and gold which was stolen by an Irishman from an English man while he was in that country.
The Irishman brought the treasure to this country but he was pursued by the man from whom he stole it and in order to save it he dug a deep hole under the holly-bush and buried the treasure in it. Later on he was killed but the Englishman never found the treasure and it is there to this very day and the "good people" or "sideógs" are supposed to be guarding it for fear anyone
would get it except the rightful heirs to it that is the Englishman's people.
Nearby a hundred years ago a man made an attempt at getting the treasure but he failed the reason being that "good people" were
guarding the treasure. He went to the town and bought tools and articles for digging up the treasure but the very night that he bought
them everything in his farm went half-mad.
The cart would turn up-side down and its wheels start whirling around at the rate of a mile a minute out in the street and the cattle that would be tied in the cowhouse at night would be twenty miles away from
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:09
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I
OKeefe set out at morning's dawn,
To chase the hare and roe,
But ere he passed his castle's bawn,
He met the cause of woe.
II
An aged crone him there did meet,
"Oh, grant a widow's prayers,
Give to my son his freedom sweet,
And then go chase the hares.
III
For my son is my chiefest hope and pride,
And to labour and toil is strong,
And cheerful his voice on the steep hillside,
As he drives his team along."
IV
"Had thy son stayed at home old Modereen,
And driven the laboureen steer,
He'd not have been hanged on yestereen,
For chasing my fallow deer." V
"And was my boy, who did thee no wrong,
Hanged by thee cruel knight,
Thyself and thy huntsman before 'tis long,
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:08
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Oh, the days gone by! Oh, the days gone by!
The story of our island home, her martyrs' dying sigh!
My blood was fired to madness and coursed a- through my veins
And I longed to be by Owen's side on Benburb's bloody plains;
And oft, in dreams, when 'hunted down' I've climbed the mountain high
Or vengeance wreaked with Rory, in the days gone by.
Oh! the days gone by - will they ever come again?
The glory of the sunsets and the fields of golden grain.
The music of the songbirds and April's smiles and tears,
The day-dream of a risen land, of clashing pikes and spears?
Ah! never from my heart will fade these memories of joy
When life was like a story in the days gone by.
Written by T.B. Naughton
Words supplied by Mary Naughton
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:04
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I
At the dance in the village thy white foot was fleetest
Thy voice mid, the concert of maidens was sweetest.
The swell of thy white breast made rich lovers follow.
Thy raven hair bound thee
Young Mairead Ní Ceallaigh.
II
Thy neck was lost [?] than the cannibhan whiter
The glow of thy cheek than the morndawn brighter.
But deaths claim has bound thee.
Thy'n eye glazed and hollow.
That shone like the sun burst
Young Mairead Ní Ceallaigh.
III
The moss couch I brought thee to-day from the mountain.
Has drank the last drop of thy young hearts fountain
Till this good [?] beside me struck.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:03
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used to make candles and wax.
An other man lived in Farrell St he used to make baskets and armchairs out of sallies.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:03
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The ins and outs of politics of home and foreign rule,
How nations should be governed how Empires rise and fall
Go into Paddy the blacksmiths forge and there you will hear it all.
Clink, Clank, clink, clank blow bellow blow.
Till the fire is shining bright and the iron in a glow.
Then Paddy with his hammer
Comes ringing fast and free
And he clinches all his arguments with one, two, three.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:02
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The people in this district used to make a lot of things long ago. There was a lot of trade going on in Kells also. There was one man living in Bective Street Kell and his name was W. White he
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:02
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As round as an apple, as plump as a ball, can climb the church over steeple and all.
The Sun.
Long legs needle toes upon my word, it would frighten the crows.
A tongs.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:01
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There are many kinds of toys which you can make such as daisy chains.
You can have as many daisys as you wish to make the chains.
You can make a doll also and paper boats and several kind of paper hats get a lot of coloured papers sew them together and make your hats
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:00
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an ordinary rectangular shape. The bellows are not made locally. The blacksmith shoes horses and donkeys and wheels. He does not make farm implements but he repairs them. The only work done in the open air is the shoeing of wheels. This is done on the street in front of the forge. Forge water is supposed to cure warts and to put a child in and out under the bellows three times is a cure for the chin cough. The local smiths were always looked upon as very strong. The local forge was the centre of story telling and in the evening when all work would be done the people would gather into the forge and comment on all the happenings of the day. This is a verse about the local forge.
"If you like to learn in a chief and cosy school
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 17:00
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The bullfield because long ago a bull used to be keeped in it.
The Pigeons field because long ago the pigeons used to be kept there there was a pigeon house.
The river meadow the river runs through the field.
The Fattening field because it grows great grass.
The Twelve acres there are twelve acres in it.
The well field because many years ago there used to be a little well in it.
The forfield because there are four acres in it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:57
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Ita Boland,
Cloneen,
Strokestown.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:57
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woman at talking Irish. There were many boys and girls left Ireland and went to America in former times. Newtown is not mentioned in song. The land is not very hilly. There is a fox covert at the end of a big field. There is a great lot of big oak and wallnut trees growing in Netown lawn. The Owen river some of the land. There is a fine big pond on the lawn of Netown House. There is a Protestant church just at Netown lawn. In days gone by there was divine service held there. There is a graveyard also in it & there is supposed to be money buried in some part of the law or under some of the headstones in the graveyard or in the graveyard field that Jane Reilly owns.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:54
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There are two forges in the parish of Castle Tara. The smiths of these forges are Patrick Cahill and John Brady. Their people have been smiths for at least one generation. One of the forges is situated on the banks of the Annalee River and the other is situated a short distance outside the village of Ballyhaise. The length of the forges is about thirty feet and the breadth fifteen. Inside the forge door there is a long narrow table where he keeps his tools. The various tools he uses are the hammer the anvil the tongs the sledge the bellaws and the vice. One of the forges has a slated roof and the other a thatched roof. The doors are
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:53
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Dá leigeadh sí strainséoirí isteach mar sin é an ceírd a bhí aige - gaduidheacht.
Níor labhaireadar focal. Acht nuair a d'airigh sí an cuma ar an Maighdean Muire & an leanbh in a baccalin tháinig truaigh in a croidhe do leig sí iad isteach.
Bhí teine breágh ar an teinteán & tar éis tamaill nuair do ........
Nuair a bhí an t-uisge te do líon bean - a tighe é insan dtubán & nochtuighe an leanbh beannnuighthe & do nigheadh É sa uisge. In a dhiaidh sin thóg an Maighdean Muire an leanbh eile in a baccallín. Do nochtuigh sí é & do nigh sí an naoidheán insan dtubán. Miorúilt ! Nuair do bhain sí é as an uisge ní raibh rian an ghalair air, bhí sé chomh slán le Íosa Críost.
Do mhéaduigh súile na mná le ionghnadh. Ní sí indhon focal a labairt.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:53
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My home dictrict is Moynalty.
The name of the townland in former days was called Budy Lough. It is now called Newtown. It was a ranch at that belonging to a gentleman St George Smith the big house was burned to ruins, this lived in it.
Newtown was divided 30 years ago into smaller farms. There are Eleven families are living in it now; all of different names. The houses are mostly slated. The only in Newtown over 70 years of age now, are Jim Mc Gillic and Maria Farrelly Maria is great at telling stories about Dan O Connell Charles Stewat Parnell the great men they were and the people all fought during the time of the Land League. Maria is a great
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:51
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Oh, the days gone by! Oh, the days gone by!
The rosy dimple in the cheek, the mischief in the eye.
The merry mad-cap prancing and the fun when out at play
The 'ructions' and the 'bobberies' in the school yard every day.
And we "kiss'd hands" to the girls when the master wasn't nigh
Oh! my heart was very happy in the days gone by.
Oh the days gone by, when I used to 'slinge' from school
And I loitered by the river and was 'found out' as a rule,
When fairies peopled every glen as in the days of yore
And our happy homes rang lustily with song and dance galore.
No vacant chair was by our hearth- 'tis since the Banshie's cry
Was heard for him who shielded me, in days gone by.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:50
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Dá leigeadh sí strainséoirí isteach mar sin é an ceírd a bhí aige - gaduidheacht.
Níor labhair eadar focal. Act nuair a d'airigh sí an cuma ar an Maighdean Muire & an leanbh in a baccalin tháinig truaigh in a croidhe do leig sí iad isteach.
Nuair a bhí an t-uisge te do líon bean - a tighe é insan dtubán & nochtuighe an leanbh beannnuighthe & do nigheadh É sa uisge. In a dhiaidh sin thóg an Maighdean Muire an leanbh eile in a baccallín. Do nochtuigh sí é & do nigh sí an naoidheán insan dtubán. Miorúilt ! Nuair do bhain sí é as an uisge ní raibh rian an ghalair air, bhí sé chomh slán le Íosa Críost.
Do mhéaduigh súile na mná le ionghnadh. Ní sí indhon focal a labairt.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:50
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all night. When bread was made it was marked with a cross to let out the steam.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:49
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Long ago it was considered that the cure for heart disease could not be done on Sunday or Friday and the cure for the sprain was usually done only on a Monday. Monday was considered the best day for beginning new work such as ploughing or housebuilding and Good Friday and Easter Monday were considered the best days to sew oats. The first three days in April are called the "borrowing days". All oats should be sewed before the cuckoo is heard. Any oats sewed after the first call of the cuckoo is called "cuckoo oats."
New potatoes should not be dug before the 12th of July nor a "pot for the pigs" before the
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:48
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The making of baskets
These are trades that were carried on in this district. These baskets were made in a fine building.
This building is not here now Neither is the ruins of it.
The baskets were made from sallies and straws twisted up together.
Then handles were put on them and painted and put on a heap and sold.
There were about fifty employed in this factory
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:48
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about as high as the "onach" in a bog hemmed in by a big high thick ditch and outside those ditches a deep dyke is usually seen. Those ditches seemed to have been made without any plan at all but just heaps and heaps of clay heaped on top of each other over which the grass grew as time went on. The dykes outside those ditches were supposed to have been filled with water long ago in order to check attackers.
In the fort in Healy's land there is a square hole in the middle of it from which a low, narrow, sandy passage can be seen running in a westward, downward direction. Recently a little gate was placed at this entrance to prevent stock from going in and getting lost and also to imprison some foxes who had made the "cave" (the name given to the entrance) their hiding place. The gate was placed there by Doctor Costelloe of Tuam.
In the west side of the fort there is an old hollybush. It is there as long as any one can remember but now it is old and decayed, fastly dying away. Long ago it was the belief of the people around the place that there was great wealth hidden under the tree.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:45
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15th of August. Everyone should be done digging potatoes at the 12th of November and should have at least half of them dug at Hallow Eve. The potatoes should also be set before the 14th of May.
Wednesday is said to be the best day for getting married
"Monday for health
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for crosses
Friday for losses
And Saturday no day at all."
Friday is said to be the best day for flitting because of the old proverb "Saturday's flitting is a short sitting"
The Cross day of the year is not known in our district.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:40
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Dá leigeadh sí strainséoirí isteach mar sin é an ceírd a bhí aige - gaduidheacht.
Níor labhair eadar focal. Act nuair a d'airigh sí an cuma ar an Maighdean Muire & an leanbh in a baccalin tháinig truaigh in a croidhe do leig sí iad isteach.
Nuair a bhí an t-uisge te do líon bean - a tighe é insan dtubán & nochtuighe an leanbh beannnuighthe & do nigheadh É sa uisge.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:32
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There are several "lioses" or forts (pronounced "forths" by most people) in this district. Lioses or forths are the names usually given to them. Almost every two or three forts are in sight of one another the reason for this being that long ago
when the Danes were in Ireland the people as soon as they would hear that the Danes were in the district they would all go into those forts for safety and every two forts that would be in sight of one another would signal to one another if one of them heard the Danes coming before the other and would help one another out with food or such things.
There are three forts in Queensfort farm all in sight of one another; another in Rottingam's land in Brownsgrove (in Bat na Sídheóg)
is in sight of another fort in Flattery's land in Baile an Phuil (Ballinphuil). Another in Beaugh is in sight of one in Healy's
Torlough (in Auglish) and one in Healy's land in Marley is in sight of another in Keane's land in Marley.
All the forts round this place are round are like elevated pieces of ground
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:19
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candle in her mouth, and this causes roars of laughter from her playmates.
They play another game too which is called Fortune telling.
This game is played by getting a cup of water, some clay, and a ring, then one of the children closes her eyes, and touches one of the things.
If she touches the clay she will die very soon, but if she touches the water she will go to some foreign land, and if she touches the ring she will be married.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:19
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"God bless Friday & Good Friday too - the Friday Our Saviour was crucified by the wicked Jews. His Blessed Mother who was standing by had a sorrowful heart & a mournful cry. (He who says this prayer for me three times by day & three times by night death nor danger he need not fear - nor yet the Seven Deadly Sins - the gates of Hell he ne'er shall enter in.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:17
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A lot of apples are put in a basin of water, and a three penny bit is put in the bottom of the basin.
Each player tries to take the coin from the bottom of the vessel with their teeth. Whoever takes it up gets it, and all the apples too.
A lot of nuts are gathered before Halloween, and the poisonous ones are separated from the eatable ones.
Children delight in burning nuts, and they love to hear them cracking.
They roast the lady-nuts or bread nuts, and they eat them.
The other nuts which are eaten are walnuts, monkey nuts, and Brazil nuts.
Another form of Snap Apple is played by getting two pieces of wood, and putting it in the shape of a cross.
Then a candle is tied on two ends of it, and an apple on the other end.
The cross is swung around, and each child tries to snap the apple with her mouth.
Sometimes she takes a lighting
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:16
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"As I lie on my bed to sleep,
I pray to God my soul to keep.
And if I die before I wake
I pray to God my soul to take.
There are four corners in my bed,
And four angels to guard my head -
Sts. Matthew, Mark, Luke & John.
God bless the bed that I lie on
(On Good Friday the Jews stuck Our Saviour through the heart & side & everyone that says this little prayer, at night, will never see the burning fires of Hell.) Amen.). This prayer is said after going to bed.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:11
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On Hallow Eve night boys dress in disguise, so that nobody could recognize them. They paint their faces, and put old torn clothes on themselves.
They go from house to house singing and dancing, and they often play some instrument.
People generally give them some money in this part of the county Waterford, but in other parts they give alms of other kinds, such as tea, sugar, and bread.
Nowadays they usually keep the money themselves, but long ago it was give to the poor people of the parish.
Indoor games are still practised on this night. Long pieces of cord are tied from the ceiling, and an apple is tied to the end of each cord.
The players snap at the apple, and try to catch them with their teeth.
If they caught one they could take it. This is called "Snap Apple".
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:05
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of a cut. The juice of the Gilcock was believed good for curing pleurisy and rheumatism.
Ionán-na sceice-gile was boiled for 24 hours, and when cool it turned into jelly. If one took 2 or 3 spoonfuls of this it cured them of any pains.
The Garlic was boiled, and the juice was used to cure "black-leg" on cattle.
There is a red spot in the middle of St Patrick's leaf, and it is said that this is a drop of blood from Our Lord's heart. This leaf is a wonderful cure for a toothache, and for healing sores, but the berries which grow on it are deadly poisonous.
The juice of the Hoe-root was good to cure sprains, and the leaf itself was good to heal cuts.
The root of the buttercup was boiled and the juice was good to cure a toothache.
The léisce is a poisonous herb, and if a cow ate it she would swell, and her mild would never be of any good after.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:01
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V: In a trench which extends from Mr. Mackessy's farm
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:01
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In a trench which extends from Mr. Mackessy's farm
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 16:00
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which is said to have been put there by a giant who lived in the big castle which stands near Higgin's in Graigeuchullare. He used to take one big step out as far as the rock and then another from that out to the other side of the river. The stone or rock is about two feet wide, two feet long, and three feet high.
The road from Tuam to Milltown is not there half as long as the road from Tuam to Dunmore. It is only three years since it was tarred.
There is a bridge on the Tuam to Dunmore road at Garrunes, about two miles from Tuam. This bridge is over Garrunes river and the road
runs right through Garrunes turlough and the water is on each side of the road. The bridges that are on by-roads are called "gullets"
if they are only over small streams.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:59
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IV: Near Mrs Sheehan's house (Doona, Milford, Ráth Luirc) there is a field in which soldiers camped. The field is called Moanroe (or Monroe). In it are little hills on which lights were lighted.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:58
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III: During the March to Kinsale, it is believed that "Hugh O'Neill's" soldiers were attacked by the English near the river Deel & that several were buried near the Teampaillín. There is a mound near the latter.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:56
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I: Please see Page 107 - For Cromwell's soldier's supposed attack on Kilbolane Castle. Some believe that the Castle was attacked from a hill in a field which is now owned by Mrs. Slack, Gibbingsgrove, Milford, Ráth Luirc (General local belief).
II In one of Mr. T. Mackessy's fields (Doona, Milford, Ráth Luirc), on the left bank of the river Deel Mr. Jn. Fitzgibbon who now lives in Maiden Hall, Ráth Luirc, dug up human teeth & bones. (Some think these belonged to Cromwellian soldiers & that the Castle was attacked from Doona).
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:54
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and it healed them quickly.
The fothram was boiled, and the juice was used as a cure for sore eyes. The liquid was rubbed on the eyes with a cloth. The leaf was also damped with Easter water, and put on the forehead as a cure for a pain in the head. The "sláineas" was boiled and the juice of it was thought good for cuts.
The "cinn-sealán" was boiled, and the juice which was extracted from it was good to drink for a pain the stomach or the back.
Brown sugar was mixed with the juice, and it turned as stiff as jelly; this was believed to be as good as ointment for healing.
The Fraoc was boiled, and the juice was drunk as a cure for kidney disease. The chicken weed, was boiled, and the juice was put on a burn to cure it.
The dock leaf is good for drawing badness out of a sore, and it is also good to draw a thorn or dirt out
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:52
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VI: In the house which is now occupied by Mrs. J.M. Shanahan, Milford, Ráth Luirc soldiers lived in '98.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:51
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to Mr. Patk. Fitzgibbon's (Doona, Milford, Ráth Luirc) seven guns are supposed to be hidden. They are believed to be in Mr. Fitzgibbon's part of the trench near the Deel.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:49
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I: A fierce bull is supposed to guard, at night, a golden treasure which is believed to be hidden in, or near the Teampaillín (Page 1)
II: (It is said that a man was murdered under the arch of the little bridge which is Mr. J.D. O'Connell's house at Coolatour, Milford. The murderers washed the blood off his body & clothes, took him to "Noonan's Wood" & hanged him from the branch of a tree. Since that time a black dog was supposed to be seen near the bridge (at night.).)
At that time the post was taken Ráth Luirc through Milford to Drumcollogher, on horseback. The murdered man belonged to Milford but had been absent from it for several years. As people believed he was murdered by his own friends no local person "recognised" him. The post-mortem was held in an old house near Mr P. Condrion's at Milford. The murdered man drove cattle through Milford to a fair some few days previously & he visited a friend in Milford. The noise of the postman's horse frightened the murderer's.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:43
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Birmingham road and goes westward for two-and a-half miles before meeting the Tuam to Milltown road.
Brownsgrove road branches off the main road about three and-a-half miles from Tuam and continues westward for two miles then meeting the Tuam to Milltown road. Carrantanlass road branches off the Tuam to Dunmore road about a quarter of a mile from Brownsgrove road and continues eastward for about four miles. Carrarea road branches off the main road about five miles from Tuam and goes eastward for about a mile.
The Tuam to Dunmore road is there as long as anyone can remember. It was there a good while before the famine, but then it was only a
sandy road - now it is tarred. During the famine years the people were employed cutting the hills of this road as an excuse, so that they would have money to buy food. They earned fourpence a day at this work. In some hills they dug down as deep as six feet in the earth.
There is a "cish" or kind of bridge made of a number of stepping stones on either side of a big rock going across Herd's river which runs into Herd's turlough. The big rock which is just in the middle of the river,
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:39
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One of the greatest wind-storms that the people experienced during the last hundred years was experienced on the night of the sixth of January 1839. It cause great destruction throughout the country. The day before was unsettled and rather wild. The storm had abated greatly by the night of the seventh of January. People stood in the doorways to catch the hay or straw blowing past, if the wind blew in that direction. Straw and hay were scattered all over the country, and the roofs of outhouses were carried long distances across the country.
About this time the contractors were putting the roof on Laragh Catholic chapel. Any of the roof they had on was lifted off and the slates were scattered all over the country and smashed. More than
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:38
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When turkeys were a few weeks old boiled nettles were chopped finely and put through the meal.
This made them strong, and put red heads on them.
St. Patricks leaf or by another name the "good leaf" was good to cure sores.
When one had a sore on her hand or leg the leaf was put on the sore and it healed it.
The foxglove or deadly night shade is deadly poisonous, but it is used in the making of ointment.
The juice of it was never used for drinking but it was used for a pain in the chest. The plant was boiled for an hour and the juice was mixed with linseed meal and used in poulticing.
It kept the meal warm for a long time and for this reason they used it often.
The marshmallow was regarded as a wonderful herb long ago. It was boiled and the juice was left for a few hours till it got cold, and as stiff as ointment. Then it was put on cuts, and sores
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:35
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half of "Burrowses Wood" was blown down.
On the first of October 1882 there was another wind storm but it was not as bad as the night of the big wind. Hunreds of trees were being carted out of "Burrowse's Wood" for three months after.
One of the heaviest snow-storms in the memory of the people fell in 1839 after the night of the "Big Wind". The snow was four feet deep, and remained on the ground until the first week of May, causing great hinderance to travel and to the Spring work. It nearly caused a famine.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:32
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roads. Fairs were held beside the Protestant cemetry and Humphries Castle.
The Cavan fair was held on the second tuesday of every month. The fair was held on the "fair green", outside the town. When an animal is sold, money is given to the buyer for luck. This money is known as a luck penny. Sometimes the seller gives the "luck penny" and other times the buyer has to ask for it. If cattle the "luck penny" is about five shillings or maybe seven and sixpence. When a bargain is made people show agreement by spitting on the hand or some times by striking hands. Now a day animals are marked with red paint or some other colour. Long ago they were marked buy cutting a piece of hair of the flank and some times mud on the forehead. The 14th May and 12th November are two of the biggest fairs of the year. The middle market is the day before the fair. Sometimes the ropes or halter for leading the cow is given with
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:21
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the animal for luck. Sometimes if the halter is a valuable one it is not given.
There is no special fair for either sheep horses
They are bought and and sold on the fair day. At Ballincary a few miles from Ballyhaise a fair was held about twenty years ago. The river is beside it and people often sailed up the river to the fair. No fair is held now-a-day.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:21
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There is one steamrolled road and several sandy roads in this parish.The steamrolled road is the main road from Tuam to Dunmore,
and the sandy by-roads are Glann road; Cortoon road; Birmingham road; Brownsgrove road; Carrantanliss road; Marley road; Auglish road and Carrarea road, on this side of the parish; and on the eastern side of the parish (of Cortoon) there is Cuilbeg road and others.
Glann road is a by-road branching off the main road (Tuam to Dunmore road) at Lynotts about three miles from Tuam, and connects the main roads Tuam to Dunmore and Tuam to Milltown. Cortoon road branches off about one hundred yards from Glann road. Cortoon road goes eastward for about three miles until it meets the Cuilbeg road. Birmingham road branches southward from the main road about two-and-a half. It continues southward for over a mile then meeting another by-road - the Tuam to Lavally road.
Marlay road branches off the main road about two miles from Tuam and continues westward for two miles then meeting the Tuam to Milltown road. Auglish road branches off the main road about two hundred yards from
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:10
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Churning
By
Maggie McConnon,
Owery,
Coravalley P.O.
Dundalk.
Churning is the principal means to get butter. First the cream is gathered into crocks, where it remains for sometime to thicken. When the milk is ready it is turned into the churn and then it is churned. During the churning there is water put into the churn to separate the milk from the cream. When the milk is churned, the butter is put into pound rolls.
We have a churn at home. It is a dash churn. It is three feet high and two feet wide. We have our churn four or five years.
In Summer we churn twice a week, but in winter we only churn once a week. In summer
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 15:08
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The weather is warm and the milk thickens more quickly than in winter. It takes one hour to do the churning. My mother churns the milk every week, I also help her.
It was an old saying that if anybody came into the house when you were churning and if they would not help you, they could take the butter of the milk.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 14:54
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Seisg agus luacar agus féara troma dualgas,
Agus noinín druaglais imeasg na gConnta.
Croidhe le mín, croidhe le mín í bó charaduig"
There is a different way for calling all the farm animals, the pig answers to bain, bain, the duck to feene feene, the turkey to tee, tee, and the goose would run away if you said high-hag.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 14:51
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Churning
by
Brigid McConnon,
Owery
Coravalley.P.O.
Dundalk.
Churning is one of the principal means of obtaining butter. Before churning my mother gathers some milk in a crock. At the end of four days the milk is thick and fit for churning.
Our churn is three feet high and two and a half wide. It is twenty years old. The different parts of the churn are the staff, the jog and the lid.
We churn once a week now. In summer the milk does not take long to thicken, so it is ready quicker for churning than in winter. In winter my mother places the milk beside the fire to make it thicken more quickly.
My mother and father do the churning. When my mother begins to
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 14:50
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I have only two cows and one calf at home; the names of the cows are Rose and Purty and the calf's name is dandy. When we are driving cows we say, "how, how, how" or "ush" and when we are calling them we say, "sup, sup, sup. When calling calves we say, "sucke, sucke", or "suckey, suckey", and if you had a bucket of milk they wouldn't be long when they would respond to the call.
We have a very neat, clean cow-house, but very old fashioned as it is covered with thatch. The two cows are tied at the end of the stall with a home-made hempen-rope around the horns. This rope is tied to a stick which is bedded in clay-mortar in the ground and tied above to the roof. We keep no emblems for luck there, we only go in the mercy of God. Long ago people kept a spancel (búarach) in the stall as an emblem of good luck.
The old people had a great habit when milking cows to be singing an old Irish song, and they had a special field for milking the cows, called "The foul field". The song they usually sang when milking was:-
Croidhe le mín, croidhe le mín í bó earaduig,
Áilse fein do bhainne dom,
'S ní púint ná cnagaire, ac a bhfuil dod' bhfailg de,
Geoghfad-sa o thuaidh mar a geobhfad tú fuaireann
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 14:50
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Churn she pours some boiling water into the milk to bring on the butter. In a quarter of an hour, she pours some luke warm water. Then tiny pieces of butter appear on the staff, after a bit they become bigger, then she washes them down the staff with cold water. She leaves the butter a quarter of an hour on the churn before she makes it up. It takes one hour to do the churning.
It is a saying that anyone in the house should not drink water when churning as it keeps the churn from working. Long ago there was an old woman who went in the shape of a hare and took the butter of the milk when the people were not looking. When they began to churn there was no butter on the milk.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 14:31
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member of the present generation works at the trade for the reason that there is no demand for such articles. Churns made of strong tin or iron coated with tin are used by all the farmers in the District at the present day (1938)

There is a ford on the River Aherlow near the residence of this family and it is called "Ath na gCiléirí", "the ford of the 'Keelers' or 'Coolers' ".
During a spell of dry weather the churns, tubs and "coolers" were wont to contract with the heat and to this ford the neighbours used bring them and leave them immersed in the shallow water with large stones in them to keep them from floating away. They were usually left there for a week or so.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 14:25
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A shallow wooden vessel into which fresh or hot milk was put to cool or set and so allow the cream to form in readiness for churning.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 14:25
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last people who lived in it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 14:24
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moved and the live turf put in the centre and surrounded with other turf. On either side of the fire was what was called the hob. A crane was used to hang the pots and pans over the fire. The crane was fastened in the wall by what was called a "bacan". Long ago there was a bed in every kitchen and later on this was replaced by a settle bed. Over the bed in the room was what was called a "teásran"
The floors of the houses were usually made of clay and at the door there was a great flag - stone There were also flags round the hearth stone. The windows were rather small and in most cases there was only one on the room and one on the kitchen. The houses were very low. In the olden times we are told that a house was built in one night. In some places "mud wall cabins" were built in a night. The last of these huts was situated near Corbane hill and there are many people living who remember the
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 14:22
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swift would stand in the four corners of the ground or school yard. They would then try to run from one corner to another. The other boys tried to catch them on the run.
Ducksheen: A stick was put standing in the ground. The boys stood a good distance away from it and tried to get their sticks as near as they could to it. Whatever boy owned the stick farthest away from the standing one had to put his stick standing with his cap on the top of it and allow the others to try to knock his cap off the stick.
Flogging tops, and pegging tops were very common some years ago but they are not seen with the boys for some years past. The only games played by boys are skittles and a game called Cat. The latter game is played somewhat like cricket with the exception that a small ring is made on the ground and used instead of stumps. A small piece of stick is used instead of a ball. The boys use a long piece of a stick for striking the smaller one.

The girls play games like Hide and Seek, Hop-scotch and Jackstones.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 14:14
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Many of the old games that used to be played in this district up to thirty years ago by the children attending Rathwire School are no longer played in the school yard. Chestnuts, Hole and Taw, Ball in the hat, Hunt the hare, and ducksheen down. The inside kernel or seed of a chestnut was bored with a nail. Through the hole was passed a piece of twine or cord. A knot was put at one of the ends of the twine so that the chestnut could not fall from
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 14:03
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Some years ago there was a cooper named Monaghan who lived in Killucan. He made churns, barrels, and tubs.
Perhaps the last of the old keelers to be found in Éire at the present time lived in Raharney. His name is Tom Harris. It is delgihtful to watch this old man at work turning out wooden dishes tubs and churns. He makes stools (round ones called "creepies" and chairs of the strong old kind that one sees in farm houses. They have been in the family for half a century. He also makes ladders and pig troughs. He attends the local fairs and sells the articles he makes to the local farmers. It is a pity that no young lad has learned this craft from Tom Harris for he is a master craftsman.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:57
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When dash churns are used the dash is worked upwards and downwards. People know when butter is made by observing the size of the particles of butter that adhere to the handle of the dash or that force their way out on the lid. The churn stands about 3ft in height 2 ft at bottom and 1ft 8ins at top. Small churns are 23 1/2 inches high 18 1/2 ins at bottom and 16 1/2 at top. Water is poured into the churn about twice during the churning to wash down the lid and dash, and also to help to collect the butter. When the churning is finished the butter is collected with the dash. It is taken out
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:55
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The making of baskes
These are trades that were carried on in this district. These baskets were made in a fine building.
This building is not here now Neither is the ruins of it.
The baskets were made from sallies and straws twisted up together.
Then handles were put on them and painted and put on a heap and sold.
There were about fifty employed in this factory
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:52
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How to make a toy cart
Get a piece of tin and form it into a square. Then get a nail and make two holes to fit the axle.
You get a
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:49
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Once there was an old jolber living near hand. His name was Pat the Boot". One day he was at a fair in Carlanstown about 25 years ago. he met a man with a cow to sell
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:48
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16. When every bodys house is on fire take care of your own.
17. Do not do to another what you would not have done to your self.
18. Happy is the corpse that the rain, rains on, happy is the bride that the sun shines on.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:46
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7. You will not miss the water until the well goes dry.
8. Too may cooks spoils the broth.
9. Hunger is good sauce.
10. It is an ill wind that blows no-body good.
11. It is a long road that there no turn in.
12. He is not a wise man that finds a dead man.
13. For the want of a nail the shoe was lost.
14. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
15. A stitch in time saves nine.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:44
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1) A rolling stone gathers no moss.
2) Rome was not built in one day
3) Thunder frights but lighting stricks.
4) It is a long road there is not a turn in.
5) He is not a wise man that finds a dead man.
6) A green Christmas makes a fat graveyard
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:42
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One night I dreamt a very wicked dream It left me afraid of my life the whole night afterwards. I thought I was in the middle of a big field of wicked cattle & horses. There was no one with me I could not get near a gate way a ditch or a thing. When I wakened I thought I could see them plain fighting & roaring. When I went asleep again I dreamt about them again
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:39
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When the flood comes in that is the time the fishers go up and down fishing. Coming to the end of the year the salmon comes in from the sea to spawn.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:38
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The river Owen Row rises in Co Cavan It flowes along until it reaches Moynalty from that it comes to Mahonstown. When it reaches Carlanstown it is not as wide as it is when reaches the Black Water at Headford. This river is not very long.
A river is very important to the people that live in the district near hand it. In the summer when there is a shortness of water the people get water in it to wash. Only for this river the was land about it would be very swampey.
The nicest thing atall is to walk along the banks of the river and see the fish hop up and down catching flies and other insects.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:35
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silk rillons. I was a very nice box with lovely paper in the inside
I was paked up and sent of on the train down to Cork.
After a week or so a very fine lady came in the shop where I was. She asked for a white straw hat.
The shopkeeper took me down from the shelf where I was. She took me off with her. I was in a very nice press. In a few months a poor woman came to her house and asked for an old hat. The lady went to the press and took me down.
The woman said she would take good care of me. But instead of that she threw me in the hedge and that is where I am still.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:33
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There are weeds growing which do harm to crops. The crowfoot, the fo-sesc or charlock, and the ground ivy choke the crops and prevent them from growing.
Thistles make the land poor because they take all the strengh of it, and they choke the oat crop.
The dandelion leaves were used as medicine long ago. The leaves were boiled and the juice was drunk as a cure for a sore throat. The milk of this weed was good to take away (a) warts.
The dock leaves were boiled and the juice of them was thought good to cure whooping cough.
This leaf was considered good to cure the sting of a(n) nettle.
The month of May was the month in which nettles were eaten frequently long ago. They boiled them thoroughly and they ate them as a vegetable.
They liked them every much because they purified the blood.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:33
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Evictions were also very common in those days and the battering-rams were often put to work throwing down the houses of the poor people. Those people and their families had to take shelter in the workhouses but some of them built little huts of their own on the sides of the roads for there was another type of man called the land-grabber who was watching to butt into their holdings the minute they would leave it, and this encouraged more evictions.
"The land-lord came down like a wolf on the fold,
Ere the bones of poor Norry were stiff with the cold
The soldiers and police kept watch o'er the scene,
And that's how they suffered in loved Gleannachroim
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:31
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I am a very old Hat I am living here along this hedge near the river in the cold and rain, with no one to take care of me. But I was not always like this. Listen and I will tell you my life story. Once I was growing in a field with a lot of other comrades. I was cut down, brought to a big wicked mahine that cut me up into pieces. I was wheaten straw. I was taken to a mill and later on I found my self in a big box with a lot of other owns. I went a very long journey. When my voage was ended, I was taken out and left on a big cold floor. Afterwards I was put into a machine I was knocked about here and there. So I descovered that I was a beautiful white straw hat with lovely blue and white
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:29
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His antecedents must have been in Coolkelure probably since the days of Cromwell as Cromwell's soldiers got all the best land after defeating the Catholics.
There was another local landlord who lived in Milane. His name was Gilman and he was a very bad man. He had a man by the name of (Taghg na Samhna) hanged on a tree in the front of his hall-door and the only crime he had committed was to break into his orchard for a few apples. He was also very cruel on his tenants. They used have to come to do all his work whenever he called on them without fail. There was a tenant who was unable to come to work to him one day. So he got him arrested and tried, and himself being the judge, the sentence he passed on him was to skin him alive. There was five pounds reward for any man who undertook the job so there was a man in the town of Dunmanway who undertook the job and he was there for the hour fixed for the execution and his knives ready. So Gilman asked him was he ready, and he said he was. So he gave him his fiver and told him to go home now and said "it is yourself should be skinned," and bad and all as he was he liberated the poor man.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:27
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corks numbered three and two he will be five up. The next boy gets the corks and if he should know all five corks he will be fifteen. They keep on throwing the corks till one of them wins the game eventually.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:26
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A many as wish may play this game of corks
Draw a wide circle with white chalk and get five corks. Write down the following numbers in the circle - one, two, three, four, and five. Put one and two one side of the ring three and four on the other side and five in the middle. This game can be played for any number thirty or forty. Get three corks and go a distance of six yards from the other corks. Then a boy begins to play and If he knocks
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:23
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St Patrick blessed the well in Carlanstown on his journey from Meath to Cavan. It is situated in a very nice place The water is cold in winter and in Summer. The stones are red. Some people say that it was St Patrick that cried his toe on a stone and it began to bleed.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:21
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"Rome wasn't built in a day."
"You will never miss the water till the well runs dry."
Its never to late to mend."
"Its a long road without a turn."
"Time is a great fortuneteller."
"The devil always finds some mischief for the idle hand to do."
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:21
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The name landlord was a very dreaded name among the peasantry of this country some time ago, as the most of them were very cruel and harsh to their tenants. But there was a local landlocked by the name of Colonel Shouldham who lived in Coolkelure who was a very good man. He had about twenty tenants living in Coolkelure and he gave them all employment and there is scarcely one of them there now. The ruins of their houses can still be seen.
He had a number of tenants in this locality and while he was receiving the rents himself I am told, if a tenant was short a pound or two, he would say it was all-right and give him a clear receipt. He got a land-agent after a time and he was a bad lad. He would forgive them nothing and he has some few people evicted out of their holdings.
This Colonel Shouldham came to Coolkelure a young man. He was born in India, was Colonel over the North Cork Militia, and he spent the best of his lifetime in Coolkelure and employed many hands there and spent lots of money improving the place.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:20
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"Lime without manure makes the farm and the farmer poor"
"A whistling woman and a crowing hen; never was luck in the house they were in."
"A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush."
"A half burned sod is easily kindled"
"The early bird catches the worm"
"A new broom sweeps clean but an old one sweeps the best."
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:16
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horses on the fair, and oftentimes they go there to buy some.
The Delaney's and the O'Conner's are the families which visit the County Waterford most frequently.
The gipsies are another class of people who travel around the country and they live in caravans.
The women sell lace, and the men sell wooden tables, and oilcloth.
They buy these articles in the shops and then they sell them at a profit.
Some of the gipsies pretend to be able to tell fortunes, and they take money for this work.
Poor people travel individually around the country often, and they usually sell small articles such as safety pins, brooches, buttons, and little ornaments.
The depend on what the people give them, and they often get a night's lodging in some farmhouse.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:14
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in the country making roads and fences, but the wages were small. Many men worked for four pence per day, but if a man was able to strike a drill he would get double that pay, and their only food then was yellow-meal stirrabout and cabbage, so people suffered very much for years afterwards.
After this there was a great famine in cattle and sheep in the Spring and early Summer of the year 1855. This was caused by a snow-storm which fell on the night of the 16th February 1855.
When the people arose in the morning the snow was as high as the walls of their houses in some districts. This remained on the ground for some months and on the hillsides until the end of June. Lots of sheep died of hunger buried underneath the snow by the fences and any of them that lived when they were dug out had the skin and earth eaten off the fences. Mostly all died on the hillsides, but they were small loss in comparison with all the poor people who died of starvation.
Mary Teresa Hurley,
Derinacahara.
Date of writing Feb 28th 1938
I got this information from
Mr Patrick Hurley,
Derinacahara,
age fifty years.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:11
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This was caused by the failure of the potato crop in the summer of 1845, as the potatoes were the staple food of the people then.
It was like a visitation from Providence, as the potatoes grew very large the year's before. Farmers were standing in the market places unable to sell them and I am told. "The bags were worth nearly as much as the contents"
The potatoes they had then were called "Black-Minions," and they had such an abundant crop in 1844, that they heaped them up against the fences and didn't seem to realize the value of them and lots of them rotted away. This was the first of the failure, and then they got stricken down by a blight the year after.
I know townlands in this district where there can be seen the ruins of six or eight old houses and traces of the ridges where they set the potatoes and apparently never dug them, so that many must have died of the disease, or run away out of the country.
After a long time the Government came to the aid of the starving people and erected what they called porridge-houses and there was one of them in this townland and poor vagrants had to make towards there houses for food.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:10
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In Ireland families travel around the country together in caravans.
This custom of living is the same as the old Irish clan custom.
The tinkers are one class of people who live in families.
Some of these people are rich because they have army pensions, but still they beg, because it is a habit which they have.
They would take any alms which they would get, such as clothes and food such as bread, tea, sugar and eggs.
They often buy tin, and they make pints, and quarts out of it.
Some of them make straw mats which they sell.
When there is a fair in some village or town they stay in some place convenient to the fair.
Generally they sell donkeys, and
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:09
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"Many hands make work"
"A rolling stone gathers no moss"
"When poverty comes in the door, love flies out the window"
"Dont leave for to morrow what you can do to day"
"A green Christmas makes a fat graveyard"
"A stitch in time saves nine"
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:08
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has farcy it is supposed to be a great cure.
The Airgré Luscair is a great cure for a horse who has kidney disease and it is used in the same way as the Milvár.
The bism or American heath palm are used by cutting them up and mixing them through the oats for a horse who has cancer.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:07
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The local fair is held now in Cavan, but some time ago there was a fair in Ballyhaise. The dates of the old fairs in Ballyhaise were as follows, 11th April, 18th May, 20th June, 13th July, 30 th August. There was no fair in September, 3rd October, 20th November and a week before Christmas.
The fair was held on a hill which was called "The Green. This hill is near the Protestant cemetry, near Drumcrow fort and near Humphries "Castle"
Buyers often transact business at crossroads. Tolls were paid on cattle sold.
There is a house
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:04
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In 1798 the Wexford men cam to Meath 4,000 strong, at the invitation of a Meath man, who told them to come to White Wood, a large wood at a point between Nobber and Kilmainhamwood. He told there were long oak trees suitable for barrels for their cannon and other timber suitable for charcoal for making powder. The Wexford men were commanded by a priest named Father Murphy. They marched till they came to Raffin Hill, where the North Meath yeomanry were lying in wait for them a big battle took place here. The poor Wexford men being badly armed, were heavily defeated and scattered in all directions a large body of men made their way back to Tara where they camped on the hill. The yeomanry
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:04
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knew how to use it, but they say if you pulled it for another that you would die yourself, and the old people say that if a mother pulled it for her child that she would not die. The old people used tie the dog's tail to the cos-dubh and then they would beat the dog and make him pull it for them as they would be afraid to touch it themselves. They would then roast it on the coals and apply it to the sore.
The devils bit is another herb and they say that the main root of it would cure anything, but the devil took good care, he eat the main root out of it.
The wild sage is another herb which if you rub it between your hands, soak it in cold water, and drink the juice of it, it is very good to cure an inward hurt.
There is also an herb for dyeing. It grows on rocks, and it is called moss. It would die every-thing a nice brown colour.
Herbs were used very much in this locality in the olden days as the old people knew how to use them and I have heard that a great many people were cured by them.
There are also herbs growing to cure horses diseases. The Milvár[?] is an herb which if you boil it in water and give it to drink to a horse who
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 13:00
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beside the "Green" and it is called the "Market House". There were two gates leading to the "Green". One from the village and the other from the "Castle."
Cavan fair is held every second Tuesday of the month. The fair is held on the "fair Green. When an animal is sold "luck money" is given this is called a "luck penny." When the buyer pays for an animal the seller gives him an "luck penny".
The animal when bought is clipped on the side wand also by marking on the flank with mud.
The big fairs held in Cavan are 14th May and the 12th November.
Special fairs are held
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:59
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How to make a catapult.
First you get a stick with a fork. Then you get a tongue of a boot, and two stripes of rubber and tie the rubbers from the tongue to the fork.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:58
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the Holy Ghost Church.
O' my God I have sined against thee, thou art so good I will never, sin again pardon me and help me for thy sake.
Jesus meek and humble of heart like unto thine.
Should Jesus bear His cross alone and let the world go free.
No there is a cross for everyone and there is a cross for me.
When you are going to bed at night say. "Heart of Jesus once in agony have pity on they dying.
Jesus, Mary and Joseph save me from blame shame or scandal
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:56
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Some of the most harmful weeds on our farm are thistles, the dock, and the crow foot.
The thistle is harmful because the seeds scatter when it ripens and they multiply very quickly.
The dock is harmful because the roots go away down in the ground and suck away the plant-food.
The crow-foot spreads along the top of the ground, and it is very harmful to turnips and other young plants as it stifles them down.
There are also a great deal of herbs growing on the land and in the water which have medicinal properties in them. The chicken week is used for swellings, and the daisy for sore eyes, both the chicken weed and the daisy are both used by plucking them and rubbing them to the sore.
The penny-leaf or the rib-leaf are both good for cuts, and they are both used in the same way, by mashing them up and by mixing them with cream and then applying them to the cut. The rib-leaf is supposed to be very blessed as the old people say that this leaf was put to Our Lord's wounds when he was dying.
There is an herb growing known as the cos-dubh and I have heard old people say that it would cure any disease if the people only
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:55
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during the week, for pigs and fowl and other animals. The fairs for horses is held on the fair green on a special street. There is no special day for selling sheep.
People show an agreement by clapping hands and by spitting on hands too.
Halters or a rope are sometimes given away with an animal and sometimes retained.
The fairs in Ballyhaise were discontinued because the buyers had too far to send their cattle to the nearest Railway Station, which is three miles away.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:55
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Eternal Father, I offer thee the most presious blood of Jesus Christ in satisfaction for my sins and for the wants of
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:54
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The Moate field.
The Cross road field.
The pasture Field.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:54
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The Well Field.
The Lawn Field.
The House Field.
The black water Field.
The Crocan Bán Field.
The padock Field.
The Forth Field.
The Twelve Acres Field.
The Bull Field
The Pigeon Field
The Blastic Field
The Crocken Field.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:51
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a woman and the other side a man"
"A penny"
"As black as ink, as white as milk, and hops on the road like hailstones"
"A Magpie"
"What is full and holds more"
"A pot full of patotaes when you pour water in"
"What has two eyes and cannot see?
"A scissors"
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:50
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britches"
"A head of cabbage"
"What has three legs and cannot walk"
"A pot"
"What always walks with his head down"
"A nail in your boot"
Hink, hank under bank, ten drawing four?"
"A woman milking a cow"
"A round as apple as flat as a pan, one side
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:47
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"riddle me riddle me ranco my father gave me seed, to sow; the seed was black and the ground was white Riddle me that and I will buy you a pipe"
"A paper"
"Patch upon without and stitches. Riddle me that and I will buy you a pair of
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:47
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"riddle me riddle me ranco my father gave me seed, to sow; the seed was black and the ground was white Riddle me that and I will buy you a pipe"
"A paper"
"Patch upon without and stitches. Riddle me that and I will buy you a pair of
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:45
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awaiting decision
To break a mirror is a sign of seven years bad luck.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:44
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The belief always existed, and does so still, that it was not right to meddle with forts.
One farmer, not far from here, thought he would plough up a fort on his farm, and plant trees there, but ere he had many sods ploughed, his pair of horses took sick and were both dead the following morning.
Another farmer, having planted potatoes in a fort field took away some stones from the fort to fence the field. That night he felt the middle finger of his right hand painful.
It grew more painful and swollen and finally resulted in his death.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:43
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The Kiottach
The Pro
Patoon
Shedddagh
Righto
Red Peter
Hump
The Stoke
Gubbish
Glossy
Socker
Balcoot
Siki
The Cock
Pinkeen
The Shimragh
The Pullet
Gloster
Hadgah
The Kaiser
Black Biddy
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:43
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In olden times a man used to travel around the Country. His name was Mr. Carroll. He used to make shopping baskets. He used to go around in an ass an car. He used to stop in some farmers houses every night. The baskets were made out of little small switches. He used to make sieves too they were for carrying corn. His wife used to go about with him. She used to make artificial flowers and door mats and sell them around the Country. They used to be welcome every where they would go. The children used to love to see them coming. They used to sing songs and tell funny stories. They used be great demand that time for everything they used to be selling.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:43
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The Kiottach
The Pro
Patoon
Shedddagh
Righto
Red Peter
Hump
The Stoke
Gubbish
Glossy
Socker
Balcoot
Siki
The Cock
Pinkeen
The Simragh
The Pullet
Gloster
Hadgah
The Kaiser
Black Biddy
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:41
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with that one he had already. So you see it isn't safe to come near them when they are out of humour.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:40
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There was a man (a hunchback) who was born with a very large hump on his shoulders. At the time of our story, he was about 25 years old. One night he was passing by a fort in the Parish of Desert, Co. Cork and the spirits were singing their song. They forgot the finishing of one verse so the poor Hunchback bawled out the missing words; the fairies roared out that he had finished their song neatly and were so delighted that they took the hump off his back and he walked home straight and firm. Next day the man who got cured of his hump met another man on the road who hardly knew him and he told him how he got cured, the night before. He was so much put out that he said to him, are you sure you are the man that got cured he said, "certain". This other man had a hump also, so on the following night he came along by the fort and the fairies were singing again and were disputing over a verse of their song when the humpy man bawled out a few lines of the song. The fairies roared out that he spoiled their song and for doing so they punished him by placing a larger hump on him along
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:39
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Little Micksheen
The Weapon
Shivers
The Bazzboh
Crippen
Delayo Boy
The Crow
Danneroi
Boalteen
Nip
The Gah
Croose
The Count
Mickey Burlin
The Boxer
The Cailleach
Snigger
The Duck
Griddles
The Pow
The Jew
Mounty
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:38
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Ballinree. When people are marking graves they often find bones of old people. It is not lucky to make a grave on Monday.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:37
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There are three Churchyards in the parish. There is one in Annameadle and another in Ballinree and another in Toomevara. The one in Toomevara is square. Three is a Church near it. A great many old people are buried there. There are a great many crosses and monuments in Annameadle. The Churchyard is often cleaned. There is no Church in Annameadle. Some children who are not baptised are not buried in a Churchyard and others are. The Churchyard in Annameadle is round. There are fancy trees in it which were put there years ago and they are kept cut. There are up to sixty in it. All the trees are the one size they are about six or seven feet high. They stay green all the year round. There are not many people buried in
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:31
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One time there was a man going through a field. It was a very big field and in the middle of the field there was a Mass Rock. In olden times the people used to get Mass said at the Mass Rock. The man was going through the field and he heard a bell. He went and he told his friends what he had heard. So his friends went off to see what he had heard. So when they went to the field they could hear nothing. The next morning they all went off to hear the bell. When they came to this field they heard the bell again. So when they heard it they knew it was a Mass Bell. The man who heard the bell was Mr. Downes of Kilgurtin. People used to come from far places to hear the bell. The field was owned by O'Meara of Kilgurtin.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:31
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Roads on Sundays talking, singing and dancing.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:29
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He then puts the corn into small stooks to dry when it is about a week drying the corn is put in stacks.
Sometimes when the season is dry it is drew in out of the stooks and and put in a big reek.
After a month or two it is threshed a mill comes and two men with it and threshes it.
The farmer has to imploy a couple of men for the threshing.
When the corn is threshed it is
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:27
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Autumn is the first great time the farmers have for cutting the corn.
First the farmers goes out with his men and opens the field of corn then he takes out his reaper and binder and probably a tractor.
A tractor and binder is a very useful accoadation it cuts the corn makes the sheaves and ties it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:27
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The nearest town in which a fair is held is Cavan. About fifty years ago a fair was held in Ballyhaise. Fairs were held on the following dates = 11th April, 18th May, 20th. June, 13th July, 30th August 3rd. October, 6th November, and the 19th December.
A fair was held ion the first or second week in January, February, March. No fair was held in September. The fair was held in the "fair green" outside the village. The stalls where horses were kept are still to be seen in the "market house". At that time tolls were paid on cattle sold. It was usually paid at the "market house". When the fair was first started, it was held on Wednesday. Then it was changed to Friday and in the end no fair was held. The reason was, it was too far for buyers and dealers to bring their animals to the railway station.
People after bought and sold at cross
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:27
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in the townsland of Knockane. It is situated in a field belonging to Mr. O Donoghue. It was built by Kennedy and it was owned by the O'Mearas. It was used by the Irish as a watch tower. There is an under ground passage from Knockane castle to Blean Castle. There is a winding stairs going from the ground to the top of the castle. It is about four hundred years built. The Irish used to get up on the top of the castle to see if the English were coming. There is a lot of other castles around this place.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:22
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mussel, but it will indulge in periwinkle or crab One day when
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:21
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awaiting decision
What the salmon and the trout are to the laird, or even to those of "low degree" who can afford to indulge in the short of catching game fish, the humble rock-fish is to the Aran Islander. Of the many fish that abound in the seas around Aran the rock-fish alone calls forth the shorting instincts of the islanders The bollack runs from six inches to a foot in length. It is reddish brown or light red or speckled, the colour depending on the kind of seaweed that grow in its environment It sticks close to the rocks and its favourite food is the
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:19
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The local fairs are now held in Cavan town but some time ago they were held in the village of Ballyhaise. The fairs were held every month and there was also a market every Monday of the week. The fair was held in the field opposite the Market House now called the Rabbit Hill. It was the fair green. The fairs were discontinued because of the journey to the station from the village. Anybody that had a spite against another would make it up to bring black thorns and beat the person they had the spite against going home from the fair. There used to come such a lot of characters to the fairs that it became a bye-word "Dont make a Ballyhaise of yourself."
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:19
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There is a castle in Emmil. About two hundred years ago it was occupied by the O'Briens and after a while the O Carrolls evicted them and took the castle from them. The O Carrolls were great fighting men and they held the castle for a long time. They also held position of other castles in Offaly and North Tipperary. It is said that the descendants of the O Briens made many attemps to take the castle but failed. The O Carrolls left it to a man named Archer then it fell to the present owner Mr Stoney and he got it repaired and is living in it. There is also a castle in Ballymackey which was destroyed in a battle between the O'Mearas and the O Carrolls. It was never repaired.
There is a very big castle in Knockane. It is with in a half a mile of Toomevara. It is
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:18
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The houses of long ago differed very much from those of nowadays All the houses in the district were thatched. The walls for the most part were made of mud and very few were made of stone and mortar. They were roofed with thatch and mud. The couples were made of good stout black oak, and the thatch was made of straw and some times rushes which the farmer produced on his own farm. The straw was made into little wattles before being put on the house. These wattles were put on by the thatcher who used a little weapon known as a "gablóg." Inside the walls were whitewashed The houses of long ago consisted of a room and kitchen. The fire place was usually in the wall between the room and kitchen. Turf was used in these days and the fire was never allowed to die out. It was raked at night and then in the morning the ashes were
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:18
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Long ago the women and girls manfactured their own wool into yarn and flannels
Each house had it own spinning wheel and the women and girls spun the wool into yarn and knitted the socks and stocking
They had their own dyes and dyed the different colours.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:16
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The pop field, The Meadow field, The House field, The Lawn field, The wheat field, The Black-Water field, The Paddock field, The Fort field, The cross-road field.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:15
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How to make a daisychain get a number of daisies and make a hole in each of them. Put one in another and keep puting them in and out until the chain is complete
All small girsl make dolls. First of all they get a potato and the make too holes for her eyes Then they get four long sticks and put two arms and legs on it The next thing is to put its clothes on when it is finished.
********
Names of Field
The Moat field, The bull field
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:14
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years when he died. He never fought with anybody but he did very heavy work. One day he was coming home from the bog with a load of block stone turf. It was very heavy turf you would see none of that turf now. The wheel fell out from under the car at the top of Moneygall Street and he carried it down to the bottom of the steet. When he went to the bottom of the street he lifted up the horse and cart of turf with one hand and put the wheel in with the other. One Sunday he carried three men from his own house to Moneygall. He used to carrry very heavy weights from one place to another. He carried a big flag with one hand from a house a mile away from his own house.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:13
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was drowned there. The night of the Big Wind occured in the year 1839. On this night the people were up all night praying as they thought it was the end of the world. Hay and flax and all the crops were scattered about the country. Houses were blown down and many people were left homeless. Several lives were lost on this night. There was a heavy snowstorm in this district in the year 1886. This snowstorm lasted for six weeks. The depth of the fall was six feet. There was nothing to feed the animals but hay and the birds were found dead in hundreds around the district with cold and from want of food. Many hares and rabbits were caught during the snowstorm by the hunters. No cars or traffic of any kind was able to travel during the six weeks. Every morning the people
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:10
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16. I lay my body down to sleep and pray to God my soul to keep If and evil happens me. Holy Mary waken me.
17. When you are going to bed at night say,
Heart of Jesus once in agony have pity on the dying.
18. Shold Jesus bear His cross alone and let the world free. Nothere is a cross for everyone and there is a cross for me.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:09
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There was a giant long ago. He was a very big giant. He could carry away horses and cattle and sheep and he killed all the people that he caught. He had a big castle. There was a little farmhouse near the castle. There was a boy named Jack living in it. One morning he went to kill the giant. He got some tools and he dug a big hole near the castle and he covered it with bushes. Then he went up to the castle and knocked at the door. Then the giant came out to see who knocked at the door and he fell into the hole. His head struck against a stone. The people were very glad to hear that he had killed the cruel giant.
There was a big giant named Michael Sweeney at Crimblin Moneygall. He was about seven feet high. He had large hands and feet. He was supposed to be the biggest and the strongest man in the Country. He is dead about eighty years now. He was about sixty
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:07
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10. Saint Philomena preserve us from all sickness.
11. Jesus, Mary, and Joseph I give you my heart and soul.
12. Jesus, Mary, and Joseph assist me in my last agony
13. Jesus, Mary, and Joseph may I breathe forth my soul in peace with you.
14. Lord Jesus, receive my soul.
15. O Mary concived without sin who have recourced to thee.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:04
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5. O Most Sacred Heart of Jesis I place my trust in thee.
6. Thow art so good. I will never sin again. Pardon me and help me for Thy sake
7. When you are going to bed at night say Jesus, Mary and Joesph Guide guard and save me from blame, Shame and scandal.
8. Peter sat on a marble stone Jesus came and he along Oh Lord do'es thou not eat?
Oh Lord it is the pain of the toothach.
9. When you waken in the morning say Sacred Hart of Jesus I place my trust in thee.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:03
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There was a giant by the name of Michael Mc Cormac. He lived in Rathenny years ago he was a very strong man. He was over six feet high. One day he was in Nenagh and there was a faction fight going on. He went into some yard and he brought out the body of an asses car and he made peace. One morning he was going to Templemore fair with a big load of pigs. It froze very hard the night before. The roads were very slippery. He was going up a steep hill and the horse was not able to take it up the hill. He took the horse from under the car and took the load up the hill himself. He was an old man when he died and he was buried in Cullenwain.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 12:00
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Oh holy saint Jude Apostle of mytrs. Great in virtues rich in miracles near kinsman of Jesus Christ. Faithful intercesson of all those who invoke thy special patronage to whom I have recoursed of the death of my heart we will pray.
"Gentle Jesus meek and mil Pity me a little child
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:58
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If you break a mirror you will have seven years bad luck.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:58
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awaiting decision
Connemara.
It was composed by Mr. Ryan of Bansha.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:57
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Though poor I am to-day,
Still God gave and took away,
And left without a home,
Poor Dan O'Hara,
Its here alone I stand,
Once I had a home so grand,
And to night I am left alone.
All broken hearted,
It is thirty years and more,
I had acres by the score,
As good a land as ever,
you ran a plough throught,
Until the Landlord came you know.
And he laid the old house low,
And to night I am left alone, and broken hearted.
Now it is thirty years and more since misfortune crossed my door.
Myself and my wife sure we were parted.
My children starved and died,
And I laid them by her side.
In the little old Churchyard in
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:55
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the little ones in another pit. But in some places the potatoes are dug with spades and boys and girls pick them into bags. They are then put into pits and stored for the winter. These pits are covered with straw and mould to keep them dry and protect them from the frost.
If you meet a red haired woman on the road, you will have bad luck
If you fall in a grave-yard you will be the next that will be buried there
If you hit a person with a elder stick he will never get a bit bigger.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:52
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pay him rent twice a year The rent was very high and the people were very poor and they were not able to pay the rent. Some of them were called cotter tenants. They used to work with him for to pay the rent. He wated to evict them and any of them who was able to pay he would not leave them in it. He put them out and tumbled their houses and they had to go to foreign countries. He was married and he had two sons and two daughters.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:51
approved
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awaiting decision
Potatoes are taken out in the late Autumn.
In most districts the farmers have a potato digging machine, This machine digs them out very quickly and then five or six men pick them off the ground. The big sound potatoes are put into a heap or pit by themself and
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:50
approved
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awaiting decision
measure!" Back he went to get it and then went to the Shoemakers. Here he learned with astonishment from the shoemaker that he might have saved himself the trouble of going back for the measure, for his foot would answer far better.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
live in Ireland because it was too cold and they had to go away to a warm country.
There was a Landlord once in this locality named Captin Cole Bowen He owned 300 acres of his own and had about forty tenants on farms he owned in the district. The place he lived on himself was called Camira Ballymackey. He had no family and in later years when he got old he sold out it all to the Irish Land Commission and went to reside in Cork. He is dead about a hundred years. He was a very hard man on his tenants. He would not allow them to pick a stick on any of his property up to the time he left it.
There was a Landlord in Rathenny his name was Captin Andrews. He had one thousand acres of land. He had tenants living in it. He had about thirty houses in it and he had a tenant in every house with a small farm attached to the house. The tenants used to
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A man who had occasion to provide himself with a pair of new shoes, took the measure of his own foot to a nicety, intending to send a boy to the shoemaker's about three miles, to fetch him the shoes. Something however, occwired to prevent the boy frome going, and resolved to go himself. He accordingly set off on his journey, and was about half-way on his road, when he suddenly stopped short, scratched his head, and muttered to himself; 'Ive forgot the
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:45
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awaiting decision
before night falls.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:45
approved
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awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a man coming from a fair in Mullagh. His name was Pat Martin he was singing as he went. He head a noise among the bushes. He became afraid. A terrible shower came on and it was very dark. He was near to a ruined castle and he went in. Everything was very dark in the old ruins. Suddenly he felt a rustling amongest the leaves on the floor. He searched his pockets for matches but could not find them. At once a tall person dressed all in white rose out of the ground and floated past through the wall. A fainting came over him and after a very long time he came to and got home feeling very shaky. Ever since he mades sure to be past the old castle
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:42
approved
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awaiting decision
have corn both to sow and to keep.
5. A little learning is a dangerous thing. Drink deep, or taste not, the Pierian spring.
6. Rome wasn't built in a day.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:41
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awaiting decision
1. If other houses are on fire take care of your own.
2. Command of hand is grand command.
3. Never leave until to-morrow what you can do to-day.
4. Plough deep while sluggards sleep and you will
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:39
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awaiting decision
Where was Moses when the light went out?"
In the dark."
What goes up the ladder with its head down?"
"A nail in a man's boot.
What is one of the longest words in English language.
Smile because there is a mile between the final and last letters."
"What is the strongest amilal in the world?
A snail, because he carries his house.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:39
approved
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awaiting decision
A Plague broke out in 1832 known as the Cholera. It made a havoc in the district and Carrick suffered severely as no business was done in the town for 9 months. Half of the population died of the disease. On the May fair of that year only one black miley Cow was offered for sale.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a Landlord who lived in Thornvale his name was Tolor[?] R. Garvey. He was a good landlord for the people around. He lived for about sixty years in Thornvale and then he died. His son's were not Landlord's after him. One of his daughters got married to a man named Minchin. Mr. Garvey left the house to her. She left it and she went to India and her family and they never came back. He had all Thornvale and Annameadle and Loughisle and Blean and Ballybeg and Fortwilliam as tenants. It was divided up that time. They used to pay him with money every half year. He never had a fight with anyone because he died it was all divided up again. There is nobody living in the house now since the Minchins went to India. Mr. Minchin was not able to
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:36
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awaiting decision
government, but most of the old people say that the gentry supplied it at their own expense.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:35
approved
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awaiting decision
and placed in a keeler of pure spring water. Then it is salted and the salt worked into it with patters.
It is always considered very unlucky for a stranger or neighbour to go into a house when churning was going on and not give a hand and say God bless the Work. Buttermilk is used for making bread. It is given as a drink to pig, fowl, calves and horses.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:30
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awaiting decision
Horses generally kept loose in a stable. All the shoeing is done by the local blacksmith. The clipping is done by a hand machine in Autumn
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:29
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awaiting decision
never said or heard there was anyone called after him. People go to the well for some of the water for to cure some disease they would have. It is supposed to cure the measles or the whooping cough or sore eyes or warts. There is a Church not very far from the Holy Well. We often went to see that Holy Well. There is no story told about St Odran.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:29
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awaiting decision
they say "Woe there" when calling a calf they say "suck suck". When calling hens they say "tuck tuck". When calling ducks "week week". When calling a pig "hurish hurish". The cow houses are now near all slated but there are still some thatched ones. The cows are tied in a row to the manger by a chain fastened to the manger by a staple.
In some cowsheds the cows are separated by a partition of wood or concrete when this is so the cows chained to an iron bar in the side of the partition. The chains can run up and down this bar when the cow raises or lowers her head. Where a big number of cows are kept the cows are held by means of two bars. The cow's head is placed between the bars and when she is to be liberated one of the bars is so arranged that it will swing apart from the other.
When a person is milking a cow he sings while milking. And when finished he dips the top of his finger into the milk and makes the Sign of the cross on the cow's udder.
A bottle of holy water is generally kept in the shed when an animal is bought it is blessed with the holy water.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:27
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awaiting decision
There was a Saint who lived in Roscrea in years gone by. His name was Saint Cronin. He built monasteries and schools in the parish. He built a monastry in Roscrea and it was a very big monasteries. There is a national school built about two miles outside Dunkerrin. It is called Saint Cronins school and it is called after Saint Cronin. The school is built a long time. It was built when Saint Cronin was alive. There are two teachers teaching in that school now a master and a mistress. He died in Roscrea and he was buried in Roscrea grave yard.
There was a Saint in Latteragh. The name of the Saint was St Odran of Latteragh. He made the well that is in Latteragh. He was a big man people say. He is dead now. It was
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:19
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awaiting decision
The people would buy a piece by the yard and the trimmings. There were other tailors going around they were not able to cut out clothes but they were able to rip faded clothes and mend them. The children used to love to see them coming. They used to be telling stories about the fairy forts. They used to be singing. They were great for telling stories. There was one tailor and all the people in this district used to wait until he would come.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:18
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awaiting decision
People go barefoot in the Summer but they wear boots the rest of the year round. There are boots made around here because there are a lot of shoemakers in the parish. They make boots and mend them for the people. There is a shoemaker living near Ollitrum river his name is Fleraming[?]. He makes our boots when we need them. He made one pair of boots for us last Winter. There is another in Toomevara his name is Galvan. You would see some clogs yet with wooden soles but they are not made around here they are made in other countries. Robert Hayes of Ballyknockane had a pair of clogs but he has them a long time and they are old. When you are getting a pair of boots made sometimes you would have to buy all they would want to make
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:17
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awaiting decision
Nearly all the churning in this district at the present time is done in an end over end churn; very few of the old dash churns are used now-a-days. On farms like Mr Purdon's Lisnabin and Mr Nolan's Derrymore the churn worked by horses are still in use.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:14
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awaiting decision
Children in this locality began to wear boots when they were about two years old. The very poor children did not wear them till they were three or four years old. All the children attending Rathwire School come bare-footed during the summer months. There was an old woman living in the village about thirty years ago and she never wore boots winter or summer. Her name was Moll Mack. She was a fine strong hardy woman. Boots are repaired locally. There are two cobblers in the village. Years ago there was a shoemaker in the village of Rathwire named Dinny Connor. He made and repaired boots and amassed an immense fortune. His people are the biggest and wealthiest cattle-men in the district. We have no shoemake in the village at present for the farmers wear Shop or factory boots.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:11
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awaiting decision
We have a churn. It is two feet long. It is one foot wide at the top and one and a half at the bottom. It is worked by hand. The beaters go around when you turn the handle. They are joined on to the handle. It takes about half an hour to do the churning. Sometimes a cup of hot water is put into the churn if it took a long time to churn. When you would see the butter gathering it would be churned. When it is churned the butter is put into a tub and washed. It is salted and mixed with spades until the butter is made. It is washed again and put on a skimmer. We make bread with the buttermilk. We churn twice a week in the Summer and once a week in the Winter. The churn is thirty years old. My mother makes the butter. We make it now once a week. We make it on Friday. The churn is round.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:06
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awaiting decision
There are three forges in the parish. Two in Rathwire village and one in Killucan. The names of the smiths are James and John Gaynor and James Cooney. The trade has been hand down in the families for years. The forges are situated on the side of the street and are just ordinary sheds. There is only one fireplace in each forge. The bellows is a big wooden one with leather sides and is worked by a pull chain. The smith uses a sledge hammer rasp, tongs, shoeing knife, punch and cutting iron. He also uses a square and compar(?) when making fancy articles. The smiths shoe horses and asses.
James Cooney won prizes for sets of shoes he made. He is also a great gaelic footballer and handballer. He makes gates, harrows, firegrates, drags, and fish spears. The water used for cooling the hot iron was supposed to cure warts on the hands. The smith was always respected and a favourite with the people. All the smiths have a knowledge of horses and farmers consult them about any defects or ailments. The local forge is a great place for news and many old stories are told in it when farmers meet together there. There was a third forge in Rathwire. The smiths name was Tom Lynch. There was another in Thomastown.
The shoeing of cart wheels and barrow wheels
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 11:05
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awaiting decision
We have customs on Novembers Eve People put an apple hanging out of the ceiling. Your hands would be tied behind your back and you would be trying to catch the apple. Whoever would catch it he could keep it. People put an apple or money in a tub of water and they would be trying to get the apple with their hands tied behind their back. They roast nuts in the fire. They have a barn brack and a ring in it. Whoever gets the ring it is said they will be soon married. They eat nuts and apples and oranges and sweets. Some people make a cake themselves and put money in it. Some people put six pence in it. Everybody would be trying to get it. They have a lot of customs on that night.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:58
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used to have to go out with shovels and shovel the snow away from around the doors. No lives were lost during this snowstorm.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:57
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awaiting decision
There was a great windstorm in this district in the year 1887. The storm occured on the 10th of November. There was a lot of seagulls flying around and the people were expecting a storm. The wind arose about ten o'clock and lasted all night till late the next day. Hundreds of trees were knocked down down and there were many of them lying across the road that stopped the traffic. Roofs were stripped of most of the thatched houses and many hay ricks were blown down. There was also a heavy rain that night and the Annalee river at Ballyhaise Bridge was on a level with the road. There was a woman whose name was Mrs. Maguire walking home from Cavan that night and she
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:50
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day often think of the awful black flour they had to eat the time of the great war. A few farmers in this district grew wheat that time and had it ground into flour. It must not have been a success for they still say they will never forget the black bread of those days.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:48
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The schools now adays are not like they were in olden times. Every child goes to school now once he reaches the age of five years but long ago there were no schools and people got little education. Some people never went to school and were never able to read nor write. My
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:48
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awaiting decision
Poll a múrdaigh -
Uaig a slabhach - edible sea weed here.
The curran knowls - where currant bushes grow.
The Roisín - little point.
Skelp a Gamhna - cliff where calves lying out at night find shelter.
Na trí mic ua Gorr - three big stones standing out in sea, beartched Tuatha De Danan.
Skelp a ruagach = cockles plentiful.
Carrick a Lach - wild duck here.
The Fialtas - ?
Leac-leathan - broad rock or flag.
The lochán - sheltered pool where boats rest to shake herring from nets.
Uaidh garbh - rough sea rushing into cave.
The pinnacle - highest spot - good view of point.

Irish is spoken only or rather known by 2 or 3 old age pensioners. Only one of these can tell stories in Irish and another in English. Inhabitants emigrated to America and New Zealand via Derry. There is only one Holy well in the district but devotions of all kinds connected with it have long ceased. It is situated at eastern end of Shanaghan Lough and is called St. Connell's Well. An old monastery was built by same saint near by but all trace of it is gone.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:46
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Cloughboy (Cloch - bhuidhe)
The Skelp - scealp - steep bank.
Poll-a-tarive - where a bull fell into sea.
Lobster-rock -
Port a lán - long narrow strip of bog.
Ard a mhaoirigh - shepherds height.
Cnoc a h-úan - frequented by sheep, sloping bank.
Poll a madaidh-ruaidh - foxes den.
(mín na n-ionghan / mín an iongan) meaning not known.
The Minister's Rock - Protestant minister swept off rock while fishing and drowned.
Oilean machaire - level island
Poll a leathaigh - hole where sea weed is plentiful.
Traigh bán - white strand.
Oweygrania - Grania's cave.
Uaigh na muirrigh / Úg-na-muirrigh - Cave where bent or sea grass grows.
Carrich a duivan - where sea birds rest.
Meádal - rock over submerged and causing sea swell or builg.
Tobar Anna - Anne's well.
Inis bearnog / Inis bearnach - gapped island.
Tobar Ruaidhri - Rory's well.
The Bailtee - high bank of sand on strand.
The Dóirlins - Collection of round stones washed up by tide.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:45
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grandmother went to the town school and was only in second class. My grandfather said that the teachers were paid by the week. He also said that they hold classes in the barns a man come and teach them. The people paid him a certain amount each and that was his salary. He only taught them English reading writing, spelling and arithmetic. Great attention was paid to writing
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:43
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and reading. They had no desk or nice seats to sit upon like the children of this present day. They used quills made as pens for writing and also slates and pencil were (attended) used. Grand father attended Meelick school and was in sixth class the master who taught him was Mr Loftus from Meelick. Long ago all they bays who went to England the returned home for wenter and attended school
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:41
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awaiting decision
Poll a múrdaigh -
Uaig a slabhach - edible sea weed here.
The curran knowls - where currant bushes grow.
The Roisín - little point.
Skelp a Gamhna - cliff where calves lying out at night find shelter.
Na trí mic ua Gorr - three big stones standing out in sea, beartched Tuatha De Danan.
Skelp a ruagach = cockles plentiful.
Carrick a Lach - wild duck here.
The Fialtas - ?
Leac-leathan - broad rock or flag.
The lochán - sheltered pool where boats rest to shake herring from nets.
Usadh garbh - rough sea rushing into cave.
The pinnacle - highest spot - good view of point.

Irish is spoken only or rather known by 2 or 3 old age pensioners. Only one of these can tell stories in Irish and another in English. Inhabitants emigrated to America and New Zealand via Derry. There is only one Holy well in the district but devotions of all kinds connected with it have long ceased. It is situated at eastern end of Shanaghan Lough and is called St. Connell's Well. An old monastery was built by same saint near by but all trace of it is gone.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:38
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far three months this is how they got there education.
The name of my village is Carnacross and about three miles from the town of swineford.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:36
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awaiting decision
We have a churn at home. It is three feet in height and to and a half feet in width. It takes about half an hour to churn the milk.
Before we start to churn we boil water, then the churn is washed and left out by the hedge to dry. When it is dry we bring it
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:34
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in and put the milk into it and churn it.
The old people say that if a person comes into the house while churning is going on it is right to take the churn dash and churn for a few minutes. It is said that it is right to put a pinch of salt into the churn before churning.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:32
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awaiting decision
Market day comes and goes and people do not go to town as they did in former times. People went in crowds to town on market days long ago. Almost the whole day was spent in town buying and selling. The old people enjoyed them selves drinking and chatting. All the
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:30
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awaiting decision
goods were not bought in town. Some of them were purchased in the country shops. A big trade was often done on Sundays and holidays when the old people met and had a good chat over a friendly treat.
Some poor people got their goods on tick. Other times the goods were got in exchange for eggs and potatoes or corn. Often people had to work in return for goods.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:27
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awaiting decision
Young babies are sometimes affected with a rash on their skin. A cure is made for this rash from an herb called glasacoille. The herb is boiled with butter. When it is (rubbed) (on) boiled, the juice of it is rubbed on the skin It is sometimes given to them to drink.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:25
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was bought in the chemists, whiskey was mixed with the poison. The whiskey and poison were rubbed on the skin. The boiled docket leaves were then rubbed on the sores. The sufferers were completely cured by this means.
Bochhalán is a weed with a thick stem. A yellow flower grows in top of it. Neantogs or nettles are weeds which grow on fences. The juice of the boiled nettles in olden times was given to children as a cure for the measles
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:21
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A Bardic son of Drimolague
One morning rid it of the plague
And marched the rats to Ross, from where
Off to the Sea, the tide, did them bear.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:20
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Drimoleague was once infested with a plague of rats. One O'Sullivan, then Bard and Genius of Drimoleague, one morning succeeded in assembling together a large number of these rats who covered half a mile of the road. By means of tunes played on the Ivy Leaf, he enticed them to follow him to Rosscarbery, 14 miles to the South, where the tide washed them out to sea.

It is spacious, clean, inviting and
Beside the Ruagach stream doth stand
And once upon a time, a plague
Of rats infested Drimolague.
They held their own, despite the cats
And through the cemetery made paths
They gnawed the corpse in tomb and grave
And even did the Bulldogs brave.
They bathed in the pans of milk
And tore the linens, tweeds and silk
Meat, butter, meal and flour destroyed
And left the casks of liquor void
(P.T.O.)
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:19
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six inches in ehight and it spreads very rapidly and makes the soil poor.
Bliscán grows about four inches height. It grows in poor land and rich land. When it grows in rich land the roots of it are thick. In olden times the people roasted the roots of the (farrabán) bliscán and they ate them.
Dock grows in poor land. It is also an herb. In olden times it was a cure for cow-pock
The docket leaves were boiled with butter. A special kind of poison
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:15
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There are many kinds of weeds growing on our farm at home. Most of them are harmful to the land because they spread rapidly and make the soil poor.
Áine is a weed with a long white root and broad leaves. This weed grows in hilly ground
Farrabán is a weed that grows (about) in poor ground. It grows about
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:13
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awaiting decision
I heard the following account from Mr. E. Driscoll, Dreenlomane, which was told to him by his mother. During the year, called the black '47, people walked to Ballydehob, where the local depot for Indian meal was.
One day as Mrs Driscoll was returning from town, she was met by a horse, pulling a cart of dead bodies, which were picked up from the wayside. She compared the bodies with "fir scolbs[?]" at sight. They were later cast into a pit at Stuaic graveyard, without distinction.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:12
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used in the schools. The teacher remained about a year in each district.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:12
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awaiting decision
taught all the children. They were taught English, Geography, Arithmetic and Cathechism. Each evening when school hours were over the teacher went home with the pupils and spent one night in each house and he was given his meals. That was the payment he got for the instruction he gave.
The writing was done with pen and pencil and the younger children wrote with slate pencils on slates. Blacks boards were also
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:08
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awaiting decision
A Plague broke out in 1832 known as the Cholera. It made a havoc in the district and Carrick suffered severely as no business was done in the town for 9 months. Half of the population died of the disease. On the May fair of that year only one black miley cow was offered for sale.
Margaret Shankey
Rakeragh
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:07
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During the penal days the people in most parts of Ireland were taught in hedge schools. Hedge schools were not common in this district.
The old people often tell how they got their education. The people of the district went to a house called Brennans in Lisbawn and there they were taught different subjects. One teacher
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:03
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awaiting decision
garlic boiled in milk and the milk given to the cattle to drink.
Toothache
Get a plaster cloth and place it from the ear straight down to the aching tooth.
Headache
Get a potato and wash it well and cut it in two halves, then put it to the forehead and keep it there until the head is as cold as the potato.
Warts
1. Get a shell snail and rub it in the sign of the cross on the wart.
2. Get washing soda and rub it hard into the wart.
Mumps
Put a halter on you and get the mother of seven daughters to drive you to a well and put you on your knees and give you three cups of water and drive you back again.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 10:02
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awaiting decision
out the mounds, or graves of this clan. It was like scarletina fever that came on them. Housed under-ground in damp and cold, scarce food and bad food there were no crops only a barren waste, no fresh air wrought what Cromwell and his officers wished, death to all who would not join England's Reformation. Tullaghnabasta is given to mean burial ground of unbaptised children. There is nothing now, but shrubery and an odd stone on its edge to mark the burial ground of the once famous Clan of the McGraths.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 09:58
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awaiting decision
In the townland of Oram in a place named Tullaghnabasta is a burial ground where the McGrath clan were buried who died in the Penal Days. In Oram, as in many other places were clusters of houses. These are some of the old place-names Pullafeka, Bunduh, Nough, Monafarawaka, Mullac Oram, Ballinnwara, Conoc Ceann, Uid Tarac, and Carrig Sagart or Priests rock where Mass was said in Penal Days when England's laws hunted priests, and people to the bleak hillsides or to caves under ground to hear Mass.
The clan assembled at Carrig Sagart to hear Mass, when Cromwell's soldiers rushed upon them and the most of the men gave their lives to save the priest. The clan went to a cave on the hillside close to Tullaghnabasta where they remained in hiding for six years. A number of small children, close on one hundred, were housed in this tunnel; for at that time close on fifty families lived in Oram, where to day there are about fourteen. These children poorly clad and ill-nourished, were a prey to infections diseases one of which as far as tradition goes wiped out the entire clan. They are all interred in this burial ground which overlooks the Drumleek road where to this, can be traced
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 09:56
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made out of blackberry jam.
Chilblains
Get a basin of hot water and put alm into it and wash your feet in it.
Sore Eyes
To get cold black tea and wash your eyes with it.
Sore Throat
To warm salt on a pot lid and to put it in a stocking and to put it around your throat at night when you're going to bed.
Boils
To mix sugar and soap together well and to put it in a clean cloth and put it on the boils, it used to draw the soreness out of them.
Rheumatism
Wild carrot boiled in water and then the water is drank.
Neuralgia
Marshmallow, it is pounded and put on as a blister on the arm.
Black Leg
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 09:49
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dip it in boiling hot water and drain it out and then sprinkle it over with turpentine and put the piece across the back.
Eczema
To cut the bark off an elm tree and boil the inside of the bark, leave it boiling for a whole day then drink a cup full of water mixed with sugar for a whole year.
Cure for a Toothache
1. To rub pepper on the gums.
2. Put some vinegar on a bit of wool and to put it in the tooth.
Cold
1. Take a good hot lemon drink.
2. To take a hot cup of buttermilk.
Whooping Cough
1. To give a saucer of milk to a ferret and the minute the ferret has touched the milk give it to the person that has the whooping cough.
A Sore Throat
1. To take hot drinks, drinks
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 09:39
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This prayer I learned from a poor travelling woman 50 years ago who often got lodging in a neighbour's house:-

The Star of Heaven that nourished the Lord drove away the plague of death which the first parents of man brought into this world. May this bright star now vouchsafe to extinguish that foul constellation whose battle has slain people with the wound of death. O most pious Star of the Sea preserve us from plague, hear us O Jesus for whom Thy Virgin Mother supplicates Thee.
Pray for us o holy Mother of God.
That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.
God of Mercy, God of pity, God of benign Clemency. Thou who hast had compassion on the affliction of the people say to the Angel striking them
"Stop thy hand for the love of this Glorious Star whose breast Thou didst sweetly drink as antidote for our crimes. Grant the assistance of Thy Grace that we may be safely freed from all pestilence, and unprovided death and mercifully save us from the gulf of eternal perdition through our Lord Jesus Christ, King of Glory who livest and reignest one God world without end.
Amen

S. S. O'Dúnaidhe
Caisleán Aoibhne
Teampoll Mór
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 09:39
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be boiled and strained and then brown sugar and juice of a lemon are to be put into water. They are boiled and the water is to be drank and take half a glass every day.
Whooping Cough
2. Give an ass bread and the crumbs he lets fall, give them to the person that has the whooping cough.
3. Rheumatism
Get a glass of vinegar and a glass of turpentine and a glass of first shot, they are to be put into a bottle and mixed together and then rubber to the place where the pain is.
4. Sprain
Marshmallow and lard fried together and then rubbed to the sprain.
5. Pain in the Back
Get a piece of red flannel
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 09:39
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be boiled and strained and then brown sugar and juice of a lemon are to be put into water. They are boiled and the water is to be drank and take half a glass every day.
Whooping Cough
2. Give an ass bread and the crumbs he lets fall, give them to the person that has the whooping cough.
3. Rheumatism
Get a glass of vinegar and a glass of turpentine and a glass of first shot, they are to be put into a bottle and mixed together and then rubber to the place where the pain is.
4. Sprain
Marshmallow and lard fried together and then rubbed to the sprain.
5. Pain in the Back
Get a piece of red flannel
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 09:39
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be boiled and strained and then brown sugar and juice of a lemon are to be put into water. They are boiled and the water is to be drank and take half a glass every day.
Whooping Cough
2. Give an ass bread and the crumbs he lets fall, give them to the person that has the whooping cough.
3. Rheumatism
Get a glass of vinegar and a glass of turpentine and a glass of first shot, they are to be put into a bottle and mixed together and then rubber to the place where the pain is.
4. Sprain
Marshmallow and lard fried together and then rubbed to the sprain.
5. Pain in the Back
Get a piece of ref flannel
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 09:31
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in a hole. When the potato goes bad the wax will wear away.
Chilblains
1. Walk out in the frost in your bare feet.
2. Rub them with paraffin oil.
3. Get a basin full of hot water, put a handful of washing soda in it and get a cloth and steep your feet.
Flu
1. Get a bottle of lemonade and boil it and drink it as hot as you can.
2. Get some goose grease and rub it on your chest.
Warts
1. Cure burn them with caustic (soda).
2. When you get up in the morning, spit on a flag and rub it on the warts.
Wildfire
Rub wet ashed on it at night.
Cold
1. Get brook-line and dandelion, ground ivy and a few leaves off the white-thorn bush and a bit of hoar hound. They have all to
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 09:19
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He could get two half hundred weights and tie them together and get two more and do the same with them. Then he could get two of them in each hand and beat them together over his head. He was always spoken of as the strongest man in Shinrone.
Written by Martin Landy, Shinrone
got from my Father
Local Cures - Warts
1. When a funeral is passing hide behind a wall and throw a handful of clay after the hearse.
2. Steal a piece of fat bacon and rub the bacon on the warts. Take out the bacon and hide it in a hole.
3. Get nine pieces of stew and rub them on the warts. Then tie the nine pieces of stew up in a parcel and drop them at a cross secretly.
4. Get a potato and cut it in two halves, rub them on the warts. Then bury them
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 09:04
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Prospect next morning.
Written by George Spencer, Shinrone
got from Jack Spencer Shinrone
Local Heroes
About fifty years ago when my grandfather was forty years of age he was able to cut an Irish acre in one day.
He was the best mower in the district. His name was Frank Gunning.
One day a man bet that he would not be able to cut an Irish acre in a day. The next morning he started to cut the Irish acre and was finished at six o' clock that evening.
Written by Paul McLoughlin, Shinrone
got from Mrs McLoughlin, Shinrone
Local Heroes
About sixty years ago a man named Pat Hogan who lived in Kilcommon. He was known to be a great weight thrower.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 08:47
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Local Heroes
In the district of Shinrone there was a man named Michael Kelly who about 20 years ago was the best mower around Shinrone. He could mow an Irish acre of grass in a day with an hour for his dinner and a half an hour for tea.
Written by Anthony Egan
got from my Father
Local Heroes
The best hedge cutter around Shinrone was William Hensey who lived about sixty years ago. He could cut a hundred yards of a ditch in one hour.
Written by Bernard Landy
got from My Father
Local Heroes
About fifty years ago there was supposed to be a famous walker named Mr Webb. He lived in Prospect. He walked from Prospect to Dublin in one day and two hours. He was supposed to be the best walker in the parish of Shinrone. He took his lodgings in Dublin until Friday morning and prepared for prospect again. He started at eight o' clock and landed in
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 00:20
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pictures, calanders, lacings, camphor, Sacred-Heart lamps, cream jugs, pipes, needles, carpets, nice soap and a lot of other articles.
At night time they sleep in camps at the side of the road or down old "boireens".
Sometimes they sleep in cans and often travel about in them.
Some of them have shooting galleries in sports and make a lot of money. A lot of them sit down in houses and tell old stories such as the town work long ago.
The town and country people give the poor people clothing or money to help them on.
They go to mass every Sunday with old shawls thrown over their heads, and are liked by the people and the priests.
The priests give them a bit to eat any time they go into them and also give them money.
They are not very troublesome in the country but are in the towns because they get drunk and fight and curse the shopkeepers.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 00:11
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The travelling folk are mostly known as tinkers.
They visit this district mostly at Christmas. The sell saucepans, cups, saucers, plates, strainers
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 00:02
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But the people should not believe in them because it is a sin against the First Commandment. Those people wear a lot of jewellery.
senior member (history)
2020-03-29 00:00
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plenty wood. They make their camps of canvas and straw or hay for a bed. They also gather twigs on in the wood which they make small tables off.
There are another tribe called Gypsies. Those people go around in families and are to be seen every year at the country fair in Ballinasloe, Athlone and many other towns. They also tell fortunes and get money from the people to get their fortune told and sometimes the fortune might come true.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:55
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Travelling folk are generally found at markets and fairs. Some of those people are very poor and some of them are very rich. They make cans and sauce-pans. They also make flowers of papers and candles. They carry those round in baskets and carts. They also sell delph and pictures and boot and shoe laces and hair-pins and many other useful articles.
Those also camp up near a wood where they have
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:47
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They make their camps of canvas and straw or hay for a bed. They gather twigs and make small tables of them. They tell fortunes and get money.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:46
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Travelling folk are generally to be seen at markets and fairs. Some of those people are very poor and some of them are rich.
They make cans, sauce-pans. They also make artificial flowers with coloured paper and candle greace. They carry those round in baskets and carts. They sell delph, pictures, shoe laces, hair pens and many other useful articles.
Those also camp up near a wood where they have plenty of wood.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:42
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mixing. Butter or fat is put on the pan or bastible and the flat cake is put in. When done on one side it is turned and done on the other.
Bread was baked two or three times a week. Friday was one day on which a fair quantity was baked. Enough cakes used to be baked before Christmas to last until after twelveth day. Cakes were often exchanged at this time.
There is no record of querns having been in use in the memory of any one in this parish. But they were in use at some time as part of one picked up locally is now preserved at the school. Others have been found and were broken. The bottom half that is preserved in this school.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:37
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Paddy O'Brien commonly known as Paddy Mud Fat is one of the Travelling Folk who visits Kilmallock once or twice a year.
When Paddy comes to Kilmallock he dresses up in fancy clothes. He always plays a melodeon. He goes around to the houses gathering pennies. When he goes into a public house he may be fortunate to get a pint of porter for nothing.
In the winter months Paddy goes all around the country begging for food.
When the summer months come he goes to Kilkee and Ballybunion. There he begs a lot of money from the Holidaymakers.
When Paddy comes to Kilmallock he lodges at Mrs. O'Shea Water St., Kilmallock. At this place he pays 9d for his lodgings. He is left the use of the fire to get his meals.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:33
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Travelling people visit this district very often. Travelling folk come to my house every week. Some of them are coming to this district for a long time. Some of them are very poor. The folk with the vans are not poor. Most of the travelling folk sell small articles such as holy pictures and medals and rosary beads. Some of the men sweep chimneys and mend buckets and churns. they remain in a place for a day. Some of them stay in the same place every time they come. The ones that have not vans sleep on bags on the road side. They get food from the people of the district. The alms they ask for are mostly bread and milk and sugar. The ones that singly have a better chance of getting food than the ones that go together. Some of them have a cart and donkey to take their belongings. When there is a fair in the district the travelling folk gather. They get money on a fair day for telling fortunes and acting. The family of the O' Donoghues visit this district very often. They make their living by making saucepans and cans. They play music with bagpipes. They tell stories of the past.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:31
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Travelling people visit this district very often. Travelling folk come to my house every week. Some of them are coming to this district for a long time. Some of them are very poor. The folk with the vans are not poor. Most of the travelling folk sell small articles such as holy pictures and medals and rosary beads. Some of the men sweep chimneys and mend buckets and churns. they remain in a place for a day. Some of them stay in the same place every time they come. The ones that have not vans sleep on bags on the road side. they get food from the people of the district. The alms they ask for are mostly bread and milk and sugar. The ones that singly have a better chance of getting food than the ones that go together. Some of them have a cart and donkey to take their belongings. When there is a fair in the district the travelling folk gather. They get money on a fair day for telling fortunes and acting. the family of the O'Donoghues visit this district very often. They make their living by making saucepans and cans. They play music with bagpipes. They tell stories of the past.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:27
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grey frieze claw-hammer coat that was woven for my grandfather and died by her and died by her. It was made by a local man in the village. His name was Thady Conlon. He has been dead now for thirty years.
Churns were made up to twenty years ago by coopers. There is one house called Mike the Nailers. It has been untenanted now for about 50 years. It is a broken down ruin of a thatched house. Mike's father was a nail maker. A man named Mat Flannery showed me old nails in our old school that he said were hand-made. I have also an old type of fork with three tines that was found in Loona bog. It was evidently used for hay or for spreading turf. No such type of fork has been used within living memory in the district. It is kept carefully in this school.
Burning of lime still goes on. The kiln is circular with a "purheen" on draught opening at the bottom on one side. The other sides are usually graded up to the level of the top of the kiln wall. The height of the kiln varies from 8' to 10'. Two layers of turf sticks etc which must be dry and if turf of very good quality are put at the bottom of the kiln. Then a layer of broken lime stones. After this alternate layers of turf and stone a put in, and this is continued for two days during the burning.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:17
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212
Old Crafts
Candles were made by a family of Mulroes of Drimadoon about a half-mile from Balla
Basket-making was carried out down to the present time. Also cliabh and pardóg making. Theseare made from sally rods. Strong ones are used as supports about which to weave the thin [?]. The cliabh and pardóg are made by first cutting a scraw larger than the size of object required. Strong rods are stuck into this at intervals to form the supports in this fashion the corners being specially strengthened. When the weaving was done the stakes were pulled up from the sod and cut to the required length.
Spades were made locally also. The type called the brogueen being very common. It is like this
hinges of iron
wood
wood
iron
Spinning of woollen and linen thread carried out in this district. Woollen is still done. Linen is not
Dyeing by means of vegetable dyes I remember being done by my grandmother. Some vegetables she used to pluck from moss grown rocks and heather plac used to be boiled in in a big pot. I saw a brown
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:12
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the house there was a wake being held for him. He went up to the window and peeped in. The people ran out (G) by the back door because they thought it was the dead man that had come back to life.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:10
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The name of my parish is Meelick. It is siuated in the barony of Gallen in the Co Mayo about two and a half miles west of Swineford.
There are nine houses in the village. The population is thirty seven.
There are six thatched houses and three slated ones
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:09
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in the village. It gets its name from a fort near, which has a carn in the centre. There are five people over seventy years of age in the village. There are two families of the name Gallagher Mrs Jordan and Mrs Lundy Mrs Brennan. Some of the older people can tell Irish and English stories. There are nine families in my village. There is no song about the village. There are two rivers which meet at Meelick.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:06
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:05
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elastic rock, of dark greenish colour, and was originally most carefully polished, as can be seen from the parts of its surface which have not been exposed to erosion by atmospheric influence.
On the upper and lower side there are two semi-circular cavities, which accentuate the skillful shape of the weapon, and the shaft hole passes right through the centre of these two depressions. The two depressions are both marked by a raised circumference which is ornamental by its deeply raised lines towards the centre portion of the axe itself, as can plainly be seen from the drawing accompanying the report.
The axe had been found some 20 years ago on the very top of that peculiar outcrop of rock which bears the local name of "The White Rock", and which is a well known landmark of the district.
At some other date there was found in close vacinity a stone hammer of oval shape, made of black basalt, a find which corroborated the conclustion to be drawn from the find of the battle-axe, that there must have been some prehistoric inhabitation on that site in the distant past.
The battle-axe is a most beautiful
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:04
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with a tin scraper containing many holes. When the potatoes were scraped they were put into a clean cloth and squeezed until all the water is out of them. Then they were put into a dish and salt, and flour added. Then it was shaped in to a round cake and baked in a pan. When the potato cake was half baked it was taken off the pan and was left in front of the fire standing against a large stone as a support.
An oatmeal cake was
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:03
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Quest., What tree bears the most fruit in town?
Ans., The axle-tree of a cart.
Quest., What is all over the world?
Ans., The sky.
Quest., It hops here, it hops there, it hops all around the world
Ans., Rain.
Quest., If you fell from the round tower what would you fall against?
Ans., Your will.
Quest., On a hill there is a house, in the house there is a cup, in the cup there is a sup and everyone must taste it?
Ans., Death.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:02
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"Long ago there was a different kind of bread made from what is made now. The kind of bread that was made long ago was - potato cake, boxty cake, and a oatmeal cake.
A potatoe cake was made with mashed potatoes, flour, and salt and was baked in a pan. A boxty cake (cake) was made with raw potatoes, the potatoes were scraped.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:01
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There are several fairy forts in this district, and it is locally believed that they were built by the Danes. It has been noticed that from any fort in this neighbourhood, two more are visible. On the border separating the farms of Michael Farrahen and John Raftery there is a fort known as Brian Keane’s fort. (Number one) It is circular in shape and two more forts can be seen from it, one in James Bonnells’ field and the other in Edward Gibbons’ field. (Number two) Near Clooncagh there is another fort in Mrs Feeneys’ field. This is also circular in shape. It is surrounded by hazel trees and aloe-bushes. A bullock was found hanging from one of the trees one morning
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 23:00
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my village.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:59
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name from a man who lived there once called Patrick Philip's. The old house field which gets its name from an old house that is in the field. Cnocanín which gets its name from a hill that is in the field.
There is a field called the "mill field which gets its name from a mill that was there once and was used to grind wheat, barley, and oats. The field is owned now by a man named John Loftus.
There is a big number of hollows and rocks in
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:59
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It is said that if the swallows fly low, it is a sign of wet weather, and if they fly high it is a sign of fine weather.
If a flock of birds is seen flying from east to west, and if they alight half-way, it is said that bad weather may be excepted.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:57
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The commonest birds in our district are: the crow, jackdaw, robin, lark, linnet, blackbird, wren, sparrow and the thrush etc.
The swallow and the cuckoo go away to other countries in the cold weather and return in the spring.
The sparrow builds in the eaves of houses. The swallow builds in the rafters of outhouses. The crow makes its nest on top of a high tree, but the cuckoo seldom builds, only lays in another other bird's nest.
The pigeon lays white eggs, and sits on them for three weeks.
The sparrow lays speckled eggs, and the bird sits on them for nearly three weeks, also.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:57
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Prayers 2/4
When going on a journey
Jesus Mary and Joseph we pray
Be ever with us on our way
Jesus Mary and Joseph we pray
Be ever with us night and day
When you go into bed at night fold your arms in the form of a cross and say "I must die, I do not know when nor where nor how but if I die in mortal sin I am
lost forever. O my Jesus have mercy on me
There was a preyer I saw written out and carried about during the Black and Tan regime. I have no opportunity now of getting it. The belief was that by saying it you could pass unseen through the enemy forces It referred to Judas betraying Our Lord.
When starting work: O most crucified Jesus have mercy us our souls and our bodies we restrain to thee Whose five bleeding wounds were nailed to a tree Most Crucified Jesus have mercy on me
On going to sleep: - On four corners of my bed, four Angels are spread - Matthew, Mark, Luke and John God bless the bed that I lie on And if I die before I wake I pray to God my soul to take: And an evil come to me my Angel Guardian waken me
On going to bed: - Jesus king of the Jews preserve me from a sudden and unprovided death.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:57
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Bronze Age Battle-Axe
Found about 20 years ago on the "White Rock" about 2 miles from Duleek.
Dr. Mahon of the Museum, Dublin, gave the following description of the above axe to a representative of the "Drogheda Independent". The description was published in the edition of 16/2/'35:-
"A beautiful little axe, of large dimensions, with strongly-curved cutting edge, a well-drilled hole for the shaft and a protruding knob at the end, has been deposited in the National Museum, Dublin by Mr. Willian Taaffe, of Newtown, Duleek, Co. Meath.
The object is about 6 inches in length, and is made of a very
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:57
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rejected
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Bronze Age Battle-Axe
Found about 20 years ago on the "White Rock" about 2 miles from Duleek.
Dr. Mahon of the Museum, Dublin, gave the following description of the above axe to a representative of the "Drogheda Independent". The description was published in the edition of 16/2/'35:-
"A beautiful little axe, of large dimensions, with strongly-curved cutting edge, a well-drilled hole for the shaft and a protruding knob at the end, has been deposited in the National Museum, Dublin by Mr. Willian Taaffe, of Newtown, Duleek, Co. Meath.
The object is about 6 inches in length, and is made of a very
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:56
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The village in which I live in is situated on the side of a bye-road about a mile and a half from the town of Swinford.
The names of the fields are - Gan a neadan a field without any bushes growing round it. Párc mhór is a big field of about two acres of land in it. Paddy Philips garden is get's its
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:55
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Currabane is on level ground, and it is near the public road.
The one in Currafarry is on a height and it is a distance from the public road.
There were lights seen in it once, and it is supposed that the fairies are living in it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:53
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as a warning for rain and the seagull flies inland.
The boys are told if they rob a nest the bird forsakes it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:53
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they are not made now. Stockings and socks are still knitted and the thread is spun. There are not many spinning wheels in the district.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:53
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There are two fairy forts in this district, and they are very convenient to the school. One of them is very near the school, but the other one is about a mile away from it.
One of them is about three fields away from it, and it is situated in the townland of Currafarry. The other one is in the townland of Currabane.
They are within view of each other, and it is supposed that the Danes built them. They are circular in shape, and there is a fence of white- thorn trees around them.
There is an entrance in the side of each of them. They were never explored, as the people are afraid that the fairies would harm them if they interfered with them.
A neighbour of mine was coming home from a dance one night, and he heard the sound of churning in the fort in Currabane.
My father was passing by the fort in Currafarry one night, and he heard music in it. The fort in
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:53
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There are six tailors in our district. They have houses in the town and they always keep a supply of cloth in their shops.
The types of cloth they have are tweed calico serge and corduroy.
A tailor used a scissors a needle and a thimble when working.
Shirts were made of flax long ago but
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:53
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The crow, jackdaw, robin, magpie, and the swallow are the most commonly known birds in this district. The swallow leaves this district before winter and goes away to a warm country.
The crow, the jackdaw and the magpie built their nests on the tree-tops and sometimes in the chimneys. The swallows make their nests in the eaves of houses, and the robin makes its nest in the walls. The robin's eggs are grey and their nests are made of moss and feathers.
Jackdaws' and crows' nests are made of sticks and horses hair etc. Swallows nests are made of mortar and feathers. The birds sit on their eggs from three to four weeks.
The weather can be judged by the behaviour of the curlew and seagull etc. The curlew cries
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:52
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199.
Girls' School.
Late Teacher: Miss Griffin, died.
Before her: Miss Wall, died.
Before Miss Wall, Mrs. Fox.
Before Mrs. Fox, Miss Foran.
Before Miss Foran, Miss Quinn, a native of Drogheda to where she returned to teach.
Before Miss Quinn, Miss Catherine Madden, a native of Duleek.
From Mrs. White (70), Duleek Village, to present writer.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:50
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The Duleek School long ago was situated behind the Chapel and big oak and beech trees grew all around it. The marks of the doors of the old school are to be seen in the walls yet.
The school was different long ago from what it is now. You would not have to go to school every day, and you would have to bring 2d every week for coal for the fire. If you did not bring the money, you would be slapped, and put outside the school door. Miss Quinn was the first to slap the children for not bringing the coal money.
There was another school at the Churchyard. It was very low and thatched. It was given up, as everyone stopped going to it over 80 years ago. (Séan O'Concubhair, ó na Séan-Mathair as na Coimíní (70-80 years).
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:50
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when he is leaving the house he says a prayer for you. He is a tall lame man and has red hair. He has a walking stick and carries a bag on his back.
He is a well educated man and is always talking about the bad times in Ireland now. He was in the war and his leg got hurt and ever since he is lame. He talks about the badness of De Valera and he says that there were good times in Ireland before he was seen.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:48
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the wren cried out I am your king I have flown the highest
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:48
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different places. The robin builds in an old wall, and a wren in a ditch with a hole at each side of the ditch so that no one can take the wren. Her nest is made of sticks, moss and lined with wool in the inside. Her eggs are white with a brown speck and she sits there weeks on her eggs. The thrush builds on the top of a tree and the blackbird on a hawthorn bush. Each bird generally sits on their eggs three weeks.
Swallows fly high when fine weather is due. 'Seagulls on land a storm at hand.' When the corncrake is heard it is a sign of fine weather. If the cuckoo comes early in April it is a sign of fine weather.
There are many stories told about the robin and the wren. It is said that once upon a time all the birds of the air thought they would like to have a king. "Let us agree" they said, that the bird who can fly the highest will be our king. When they began the wren hopped on the eagles back. He was so light that the great eagle did not feel him there. When the eagle had gone up as high as he could go, he cried "I am your king none of you can fly as high as I can." Presently the little wren slipped off his back and flew a yards higher. The eagle was too tired to follow him. They they all dropped down to the earth again and
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:46
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The buyers used to meet sellers at the "one tree" and at all the crossroads and try to make a deal with them. Cavan fair is held every second Tuesday of the month. The cattle fair is held on the "fair green" and the horse and pig fair is held on the street. When an animal is sold luck money is given and it is called a "luck penny". When it comes to the last pound or ten shillings they divide it and give the half of it back for a luck penny. They often fall out over the luck penny. When a bargain is made the parties show their agreement by striking hands. The animals are marked when sold by clipping the hair at the side or sometimes a mark of paint is put on their backs. When an animal is sold the halter is given away with
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:40
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Before the schools were built in the place they are now, they used to be situated at the Chapel Corner, and the marks of the doors are still to be seen in the wall. There used to be a very big attendance at school when it was there and there was not room enough.
Long before that the schools were in Daw's Lane and the roof at this time was thatched.
Seamus O'Gormáin, ó Tomás O'Gormáin, na Coimíní, Duleek. (50-60).
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:40
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up in one night and was ready for mowing next day. On the next day the soldiers came looking for Him. There was a robin on a bush in the wheat field, and it saw the soldiers coming. It lay upon every drop of blood that marked Our Saviour's track, and didn't leave a trace of it for the soldiers to follow - which is the reason that from that day to this the robin has a red breast.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:37
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The birds that are most commonly found in our district are the robin, wren, lark, magpie, blackbird, thrush, crow swallow hawk starling cuckoo jackdaw, sparrow curlew, linnet wagtail, snipe and plover. The cuckoo and swallow are the only birds that migrate to other countries. The cuckoo comes in April and goes away in June, and the swallow comes in summer and goes away in the beginning of winter.
Each bird builds its nest in
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2020-03-28 22:37
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198
Boys' School, Duleek.
The late teacher was John Kelly who died 1923. Before him was Mr. John White, who came from Navan. He lived all his time in Duleek with his sister Teresa where James White now lives on the main street. He came from Navan, and a woman called Kitty the Jiffe got all his property, even his watch.
A Mr. Kearney taught for years before Mr. White. The pupils would pay him 3d each a week. There was a hedge-scholar named Tom the Babbler before Mr. Kearney. I often heard my father say he was a good teacher. Whenever the boys met with a difficult spell he would say "Pass it by, you will never want it". This became a proverb in Duleek.
From William White, Duleek (Over 70) who told the present writer.
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2020-03-28 22:36
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198
Boys' School, Duleek.
The late teacher was John Kelly who dies 1923. Before him was Mr. John White, who came from Navan. He lives all his time in Duleek with his sister Teresa where James White now lives on the main street. He came from Navan, and a woman called Kitty the Jiffe got all his property, even his watch.
A Mr. Kearney taught for years before Mrs. White. The pupils would pay him 3d each a week. There was a hedge-scholar named Tom the Babbler before Mr. Kearney. I often heard my father say he was a good teacher. Whenever the boys met with a difficult spell he would say "Pass it by, you will never want it". This became a proverb in Duleek.
From William White, Duleek (Over 70) who told the present writer.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:33
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not steal the butter. Holy water is thrown on the cows on May morning.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:32
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of it. So March borrowed twelve days from April and the old cow died with the hunger. The twelve first days of April are called "Old March".
In olden times no one would eat a dinner from the 1st of November to the 1st of February then they would say Bridget is gone back with a sgiath of potatoes. That is why it is called Bridget's day.
Harvest of the Geese
is on the 1st of September. The geese would be picking up everything they could eat in the cornfield and in the garden. It was the custom to kill a goose on this night.
May Day
Anyone would not like to carry a coal of fire from a house or to carry milk and, if the people of the house would give it, they would throw a pinch of salt in it. If a person went into a house and if the people of the house were churning that person should turn the churn so that the person could
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:26
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Unlucky days.:
It is unlucky to go into a new house on Monday. It is unlucky to send an child to school for it's first time on Monday. It is unlucky to begin work on Saturday or if it is begun it will never be finished.
Lucky days:
It is lucky to move into a new house or to go into situation on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday. It is lucky to marry on Tuesday.
Curing Days :
To cure a sore. a Good Friday egg (one laid on Good Friday) was rubbed to it.
Days for planting:
Anything that will be planted on Good Friday will never fail.
Days of the old cow:
There was an old cow who had a very severe Winter and when March was over she started joking it that she lived in spite
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:19
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As a boy we were fond of playing "Here's my daughter for you. Six or seven or more boys sat around the fire and the first took a lighting splinter from the fire saying to No. 2 on the line "Here's my daughter for you". No 2 asked "What fortune have you for her." No 1 said "If my daughter dies between your hands let all the weight be on you." Then No 2 took the lighting splinter and repeated (above) with No 3. And so on through the line until some poor fellow got caught (when the light died) and then he had to submit to al the weight described on Page 68. - pots, pans, Kettles, books, chairs etc etc. were used.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:14
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to take all the buttons.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:13
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would stand on each stone. Then a fellow would stand in the middle and the other four would run from stone to stone and the fellow in the middle would try to stand on one of the stones while they ran. When he succeeds the other fellow would be in the middle.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:12
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Tee-total was a game played by children. It was played by getting a piece of timber, the sides of which were flattened and one of the ends was pointed. The sides were marked P. T. N. A. Buttons were played. The timber was spun around and if P turned up the boy would have to put down a button. T, to take up one button. N, to take nothing and A
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 22:00
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Boils: They used bath them with hot water and put dog leaf on them or linseed meal.
Tootache: To rub soda or salt or whiskey to the tooth.
Colds: To drink plenty whey, milk and medicine.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:56
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the glens and forests which covered their territory they proceeded to wage a grim guerilla warfare on the passing yeomanry and cavalry - a type of warfare whose deadly effects the foreigners quickly learned to their cost.
Of the year 1649 when the last spark of Gaelic resistance seemed to have been completely crushed by utter defeat of Rebellion(1642), a find the Four Masters writing - "The lowing of a cow on the voice of a ploughman could scarcely be heard from Dunqueen in the [?] of Kenny ot Cashel".
then it was that the light armed kins of Clan MaCartaig - one of the few, still unconquered clans -sallied forth to strike a decisive blow for Ireland. Rapidly marching westward through the hills they swooped down on the little village of Oldchapel - then a military outpost to the prosperous town of Bandon. Taking the garrison by complete surprise they rapidly seized the place. Then, having looted the building
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:48
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Downdaniel Caslte was built in the year 1476 by one of the famous "Barry Oges" - a sept(which) whose Norman ancestors won by the sword "Barryroe", the ancient territory of the "O Cowhegs" and who gradually extended their territory to embrace that of the O' Mahony's of "Castle Mahon". in the year 1600 the Barry Oges ruled the territory surrounding "the Glashlinn" (now the Bandon River), as far west as Dunmanway and south to the little fortress of Finally in the year 1648, after the great rebellion, the clan having shown sympathy with the rebels, and the Crown presented them to McCarthy Reagh of Kilbrittan, at that time feigning royalty.
But clan McCarty soon threw off their mask of royalty showing themselves a fierce warring clan prepared to go to any length to strike a blow against the foreigner, and from the steadfastness of
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:40
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by a group of starers looked up significantly at the row of spiked heads and chuckling cried while a malignant smile lighted up his sinister features.
Ah, ah there are some of my soldiers up there, drawn up in a row and it's the proper place for the vagabonds.
Malachy Duggan lived for a great number of years on his farm and died in bed.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:37
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informer to extremes and was even seen in public walking arm in arm with the doubly in famous Duggan and on various occasion openly pantiomised[?] the wretch in a most familiar manner. The execrable Duggan himself had apparently no qualms of conscience for the part which he had played in this sanguinary drama. He returned to his farm near Macroom after his comrades had been executed and he appeared in public with careless indifference to what was though about him. the first day on which he should showed himself in Macroom was a crowded market day and the ruffian was a prominent object of curiosity. The fellow while surrounded
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:36
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About two hundred years ago, when Beamish took over the lands of Dooniskey there lived there a man who had accumulated a lot of gold and whose interest in the land when Beamish took it over, erased. He secured his gold in a well secured box.
It was customary at the time, as it is up to the present, to hold dances or "patterns" at the cross roads.Tradition tells us, that a well attended pattern was held on summer evenings at Beamishes gate as has been often held there since. One evening, when the man of the gold attended this pattern he noticed a handkerchief protruding from a girls pocket which was quite similar to one he had in his "gold" box. He went home, and searched the box thinking it was his own handkerchief he saw in the possession of the girl but he was mistaken there. To remove all further fears and doubts from his mind, he placed the gold in a crock and hid it along side a white thorn briar in the boundary fence between Shine's and Murphy's farms. The white thorn briar is to be seen at present day growing on the fence.
In later year's, it is said, that a man living in the neighbourhood dreamt that gold was hidden under the briar. At a late hour one night, he went in search of the gold and in digging up the place where it was, the noise of the bar attracted the attention of some "sguraidhtears who were returning home from a neighbour's house. Becoming
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:31
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the gang was discovered near Killarney, and he was tried and also executed. Thus out of the fourteen who attacked the house of Colonel Hutchinson nine were capitally punished and two escaped by turning informers.; the remaining three got off to America.
Malachy Duggan, obtained about three hundred pounds for having delivered up his companions and for generations yet to come his name will be in famous in the neighbourhood where he lived and died.
So anxious was the magistrate to obtain information against Colonel Hutchinson's murderers that Malachy Duggan was treated with great concideration by some of them. One of the magistrates Mr S carried his partiality for the
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:26
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diultugadh. Cuireadh ar shiubhail é annsin. Annsin cuireadh sgéal chuig an ghasúr eile theacht agus pósadh é agus an cailín saidhbhir.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:25
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Bhí fear ann fad ó shoin agus is fada ó bhí. Fear an saidhbhir a bhí ann bhí sé comh saidhbhir agus nach rabh fhios aige caidé a shaidhbhris. Bhí a bhean marbh le seal tamall roimhe sin. Ní rabh aige acht sé fhéin agus nighean amháin.
Lá amháin tháinig buachaill óg go dtí an teach ar lorg an cailín le pósadh. Tháinig fearg mhór ar an athair annsin cionnus go dtáinig an buachall seo ar lorg a nhighean agus dubhairt sé go dtabharfadh sé don diabhal í níos luaithe no thabharfadh sé dó san í. D’imthigh an buachaill óg leis go h-an cráidhte cionnus nach bhfuair sé an cailín saidhbhir le pósadh.
Lá amháin seal tamall na dhiaidh tháinig gasúr eile go dtí an teach ar lorg an cailín le pósadh. Bhí culaith air a bfhíor deise dá bhfacthas súil ariamh. Agus d’iarr sé an cailín le pósadh. Dubhairt an t-athair go bhfuigheadh agus míle fáilte. Do pósadh iad tamall na dhiaidh sin agus bhí siad na chomhnuidhe le chéile.
Níor bhfada gur tugadh fa dear go rabh cos ádhmuid air. Tamall na dhiaidh sin thgadh fa dear go rabh súil gloinne aige.
Annsin cuireadh fá dhein an t-fagart tháinig sé agus d’innis sé don t-athair gurab é an diabhal a bhí ann agus nar cheart do an ghasúr a tháinig roimhe sin a
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:23
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saidhbhir na dhiaidh sin.
Lá amháin tamall na dhiaidh sin bhí Tomás amuigh ag buachailleacht na ba nuair a tháinig coileóg mór agus thoisigh a troid le Tomás. Rinne Tomás ndicheall leis é féin a chosaint acht sa deireadh marbh an coileóg é agus cuireadh é i gcúl an toighe, agus bhí buaidhreadh mór ar na comharsannaí uilig in a dhiaidh.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:23
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deireadh déirigh sé an thuirseach agus luigh sé istigh i gcruaich – fhéin a bhí ar taobh an bhealaigh Mhóir. Tháinig fear an toighe amach agus thug isteach an bacall céadna de fhéin a raibh Tomás na luighe ann. Thug sé an fhéin dó na ba. An céad áit a bhfuair Tomás é féin nuair a musgail sé. Fuair sé é féin (isteach) astoigh i mbéal bó Toisigh an bhó a casactaigh agus chait sé Tomás amach as a bhéal.
Rith Tomás amach as an bhoitheach agus níor stad sé go raibh sé ag dorás a h-athara. Bhí an mháthair agus an t-athair ag gabháil a luighe nuair a chualaidh siad an glór beag íseal a radh.
Leig isteach mé.
Leig isteach mé.
Dfhosgail an t’athair an dorás agus bhí Tomás na seasamh annsin roimhe. Thug sé isteach é agus thug a [shcúth?] dó le h-ithe. Annsin dinnis Tomás don t-athair san bocsa mór lán d’oir is de airgid. Chuaidh an beirt acu ann agus chuaidh Tomás isteach ar an pholl eochrach agus dfhosgail sé an dorás. Annsin chuaidh an t-athair isteach agus thug leis an bocsa mór agus annsin chuaidh an tathair agus Tomás abhaile agus bhí siad an
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:21
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Ó gheobhaidh cinnte arsa glór beag íseal as a cionn. Tá mise annseo i gcomhnuidhe. Damharc siad suas agus chonnaic siad Tomás suas (na) ar chrann. Diarr siad air a theacht anuas. Tháinig. Thug siad briscánaí agus milseán dó agus chuir a luighe ar an fhéur é. Thuit sé in a chodladh acht ní raibh sé i bhfad in a luighe nuair a mhusgail na gaduidhe é Dinnis siad dó go raibh siad a gabhail go dtí teach a bhí i lár an bhaile agus go gcaithfidhe seisean a gabhail isteach ar poll an eochrach. Siubhail siad leo annsin go dtí an teach. Thóg siad Tomás na h-ordóige suas agus chuir isteach ar pholl na h-ochrach é. Diarr siad air an doras a fhosgladh.
Siubhail Tomás frid na seomraí uilig agus sa deireadh chonnaic sé bocsa mór lán d’óir is de airgid. Nuair a chonnaic sé seo rith sé isteach i bpoll a bhí ar taobh na fuinneóige agus thoisigh a sgairtigh
“Gaduidhe taobh amuigh”
“Gaduidhe taobh amuigh”
Cualaidh fear an toighe é agus déirigh sé ag sgaoil sé leis na gaduidhe agus annsin chuir sé isteach i bpríosún iad. Nuair fuair Tomás gach rud ciúin tháinig sé amach ar an pholl agus rith amach ar an poll eochrach agus suas an t-sráid. Sa
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:20
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Chuaidh an t-athair na bhaile agus dinnis dó a bhean an sgéal o tús go deireadh. Bhí brón mór ar an mháthair nuair a chualaidh sí gur díoadh Tomás na h-ordóige acht ní raibh gár ann anois bhí an margadh deánta.
Siubhail Tomás agus na gaduidhe leo ar feabh tamall maith nó go dtí sa deireadh gur éirge Tomás an tuirseach ar fad. Chuir ceann de na gaduidhe é ar a hata agus diamchur é píosa maith. I gchionn tamall eile dubhairt Tomáis gur bfhearr leis a bheith ag siubhaill. Thóg an gaduidhe anuas ar an talamh é. Shiubhail siad píosa maith eile. Sa deireadh chonnaic Tomás giota mór d’adhmuid ar taobh an bhealaigh mhóir agus é pollta uilig leis na luchágaibh móra. Rith Tomás isteach i ceann de na puill seo i nganfios dó na gaduidhe. Sa deireadh damharc na gaduidhe thart agus ní raibh Tomás le feiceail aca áit ar bith. Bhí buaidhreadh mór ortha cionnus gur chaill siad Tomás na h-ordóige nó bhí siad le gabháil a sladadh teach an oidhche sin. Shiubhail siad leo no go raibh siad fá cupla ceád slat san bhailemhóir. Luigh siad i bfholach annsin nó go mbeadh an meadhon oidhche ann. Toisigh siad ag cainnt ar Tomás na h-ordóige.
Ní bhfuighfidhe é go beo arsa fear acu.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:20
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it. The big fairs if the year are the May fair and the November fair.
Special fairs are held every fourth Tuesday of the month for the sale of bonhams but there are no special fairs held for the sale of sheep or horses.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:19
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weapons knocked the two wretches down. They were bound and secured and taken prisoner to Cork where they were tried and received the same fate as their companions. There heads also sat upon spikes and in order to mark the gamekeeper, McCarthy with singal posthumous infamy it was resolved to affix his right hand with his skull, in order that all might know even after death, the head of the gamekeeper, who shot his master.
Been the servant who pleaded deafness was transported on the ground of his having a guilty knowledge of the meditated at tack. The evidence against him was not very strong but his deafness was though a mear pretence.
Not long after and then of
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:18
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deireadh gur léim sgaifte gaduidhe amach ar na crann agus rith indiaidh an trucaill. Sa deireadh tháinig siad suas leis an trucall agus ní raibh duinne ar bith le (feiceacáil) feiceáil acu acht chualaidh siad an glór beag [?]real a rabh na focla céadna.
“Siubhail leat ar sin”
“Siubhail leat ar sin”.
Lean siad an trucall go dtí go dtáinig raibh fhad leis an t-athair. Annsin chuaidh na gaduidhe i bhfolach i gcúl an trucaill. Nuair a tháinig an capall suas go dtí an t-athair stad sé. Tóg an t-athair Tomás amach ar chluais an chapaill agus d’fhág síos ar an talamh le. Tháinig na gaduidhe amach as cúl an trucaill nuair a chonnaic siad seo agus dubhairt go mbéadh an gasúr beag sin an uaireadach aca ar fad nó go dtéigeadh sé isteach ar an poll eochrach agus go bhfosgladh sé an dorás ar an taobh astoigh daobhtha.
Annsin dubhairt siad go dtabhairfeadh siad cúig míle punta dó ar Tomás na h-ordhaige. Níor mhaith leis an t-athair seo a deánamh acht bhí an t-airgead mór agus ba é an deireadh a bhí air go dtearn sé margadh agus d’imthigh na gaduidhe agus Tomás leo
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:17
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Bhí fear ann aon uair amháin agus bhi siad an bhocht. Ní raibh acu acht aon mac amháin agus ní raibh seisean acht comh le h-ordóig a mháthara. Ba é an t-ainm a bhí ag na daoine air Tomás na h-ordóige. Lá amháin chuaidh an t-athair un choill a gearrabh crann acht ní raibh fhios aige caidé mar geobhadh sé an capall agus an trucall annsin roimh an oidhche leis na crann a thabhairt abhaile. Dubhairt Tomás go dtabhairfeadh seisean an capall chuige. Maith go leór arsan mháthair, cuirfidh mise an trucall ar an capall agus cuirfidh mise ar siubhail é.
Maith go leór arsan t-athair agus dimthigh sé leis.
Nuair a tháinig am dinnire chuir an mháthair an trucall air agus chuir sí Tomás na suidhe istuigh i gcluais an capall. Chuaidh Tomás agus an capall ar siubhail leo agus Tomás ag sgairtig.
“Gabh ar siubhail ar sin”.
“Gabh ar siubhail ar sin”.
Siubhail siad tamall maith go dtí sa
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:13
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pursuit night and day after the fugitive the game-keeper and his brother who was hunted like wild deer of the hill. Driven from place to place they took refuge at last in the wild region of Glenpark halfway between Killarney and Macroom. Some country people pretending friendship prepared food for them one evening and invited them to supper. The miserable wretched were then ravenous like famished wolves. With fear and trembling they stealthily ventured near a cottage but would not walk inside for they feared to be caught in a house. The food was given to them and sitting down they voraciously devoured it.
The peasants suddenly sprung upon them and seized their
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:12
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If the people refused to pay the landlord with soldiers would take it by force. If the people had money, which they seldom had, they would pay the rent or tithes with money. If they had not money they had to pay with corn or potatoes or cattle. If potatoes they had to give one ridge in every ten and if corn one stack in every ten. There are several stories connected with the landlord and his tenants. At that time a Catholic family were living in one of the landlord's houses.
The owed some rent, but after some time it was paid. As soon as the landlord laid hands on the rent, he gave the man a notice to quit. He gave no reason but some time after a Protestant family came to live in the house. Battles were not fought at the gathering of the rent but in case there was trouble expected, the police and soldiers would accompany the landlord or his agent.
It is said that the last Landlord died a very poor man in the streets of London .
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:06
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It is said that before the castle was built the Newburgs lived in a large house in the townland of Lisagoan. Only the walls of the house are now to be seen as the place was burned some time ago. Humphrey's Castle was built of bullocks blood and bricks. Humphrey during this time threw his wife down the stairs and broke her neck. From that time
From that time her ghost was to be seen every night about the time she was killed.
The Protestant minister was brought but the more he read prayers the worse the ghost got. In the end they had to send for the priest. As he entered the room he saw the ghost on the mantlepiece. She spat down nut he banished her.
The doors and windows were filled in and were never opened.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 21:06
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And quite dispels our sorrow
It was here that for centuries after the introduction of Christianity the bards on second order of the Pagan priesthood held their assemblies.
The surrounding district contains many ruined strongholds of Lords of Muskerry. There is good salmon and trout fishing in the Lee, Sullane and Foherish. The town which is lighted by electricity, contains about 2000 inhabitants has some good shops, hotels, banks, schools and churches. the Catholic Church is a spacious structure, with an embattled belfry, erected in the 18th century. the people pf this part of the country are remarkable for their physical as well as for their intellectual attainments.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:59
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in the rebellion of 1641. the huge square keep once covered with the most beautiful variegated ivy, is all that remains of the original structure. Admiral Sir William Penn father of the founder of Pennsylvania was born there. Dean Swift, in his visit to the South of Ireland, was much pleased with the place and its surroundings, Macroom, the centre of the sporting gentry of Muskerry for which this baronry was always famous, can also boast of a band of poets racy of the soil.
In 1774, the poems of John Connolly, a Macroom man, were published in Cork. He thus celebrates the praises of his native town.
Whoever means to shake off gloom
let him repair to sweet Macroom
For here his cares he will entomb
And think no more of sorrow.
Let Mallow yield to gay Macroom
For here we know not care nor gloom
Here Nature weans perpetual bloom
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:59
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the churn.
The milk that comes from the creamery's is called creamery-milk. It is good for making bread and it is also good for pigs. Sometimes the churn swells and this is caused by the churn being full, and not having air. People think that when this happens that the churn is bewitched. People say that long churning makes bad butter.
The can that the milk is brought to the creamery in is called a creamery can. The creamery can has to be kept very clean as the milk might get sour if it were not.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:55
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There are four tailors in this district. Their names are Philip Kelly, Mac.Breen, Boyle, and Hannon. They work at their homes, and do not travel as formerly from house to house.
Mr. Hannon stocks cloth, but the other tailors don't. Cloth is not spun and woven locally. Serges
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:51
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About six years ago, a Danish captain passing up the river and pointing at Beigh Castle said if he had a map with him he could indicate the exact place where the treasure is hidden in a field beside the castle.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:50
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Yet, tho' this castle kingly stands
For years of grimly daring
The spoilers' conquering merciless hands
Its hardest rocks are wearing
And when its ruins will strew the side
Of noble Shannon's river
The mighty, grand, unerring tide
Will roll as fresh as ever.
But, oh! who rules the punctual tide
That oft so madly rages,
That has the hands of time defied
Throughout the countless ages?
Tis He who made earth, sea and sky
And stirs and calms the ocean
Tis He who governs from on high
And guides each ordered motion.

Written by Mr James Moran, deceased.
Words supplied by Muriel Fitzgerald (great grand-daughter) Ballinvoher
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:50
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A pot of gold, according to a fortune teller, is hidden in a fort in the farm of Patrick Somers, Issane, and a little red hen guards it. She is to be seen once a year in the neighbourhood, generally on November 1st. John holland, Ballinvoher, and John Connolly Ballyaglish are reputed to have seen her. The Danes are supposed to have placed the treasure in the fort in 1014. No one had even searched for it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:48
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Mahony, who, with their united armies and including 1,500 Danish auxiliaries w[?] after a fierce and sanguinary fight, defeated by the superior numbers of Brien.
Before entering Macroom, the railway crosses the Sullane and Lany. These rivers form another beautiful meeting of the waters. The landscape here is very beautiful. Facing the Railway Station are the Mushera Mountains (highest 2,116 feet), at the foot of which,embosomed in its groves of oak and fir trees, is Mount Massey once the seat of W. Hutchinson Massey, Esq. now an old ruin since the Irish Volunteers in 1920.
(There) The Town of Macroom-is chiefly famous for its Castle formerly the residence of the late earl of Bantry, and once of the Country seats of Lady Ardilaun now an old ruin since 1922. It was built by the Careuis[?] in the time of King John, shortly after the conquest. it was subsequently in the possession of the MacCarthy's. It was burned
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:46
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Nut cracking is played in Autumn time when the nuts are fully ripe. A party of boys collect and get nuts in a wood or elsewhere. They put a hole in the centre, and pass a cord through. One person holds out his nut and lets his friends 'crack' at it with theirs, wishing to split it. If one fails to strike it, he has to hold his own to the others and they continue like this until every nut is split.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:44
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is killed and his blood sprinkled in the four corners of the house.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:44
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Six or seven squares are drawn on the ground. Then one girl gets a piece of a slate and throws it on to the first square. She hops on one leg through every one of the squares and back again. When she is coming back she picks up the slate without putting down the second foot and she may rest on
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:43
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'My Pot's Boiling" is played by a number of children sitting on the ground about a foot apart. Then a person gets a handkerchief and runs round them repeating these words 'My pot's boiling, my hen's laying,
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:42
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Top spinning is commonly played in the early months of Spring. A few boys must collect to play the game, and if they have not already a top they buy one for two-pence in some village. They then get a thick, strong cord and neatly fold it around the top, holding the end of the cord between the two smallest fingers and holding the spear with
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:38
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"The fort of the Water", here the railway crosses for the first time the river Lee. On the left is a lovely view of Coolcower Bridge, with "the meeting of the waters". On passing over Sullane Bridge, on the right, a good view is obtained of Mushanglass Castle (my old fastners), founded by the McSwineys. The Lany and Sullane unite a little further up yielding up their names and falling into the Lee. The low meadow ground between the Sullane and Lany is memorable as the field of battle fought in 978, by the immortal Brian Boru, then King of Munster against the O' Donovan and his ally O'
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:36
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An Evening by the Shannon
The sun has halv'd his daily track
Neath screens of thickening vapour;
The fruitful last was hung with black
which cast a gloom on Nature;
The winds rushed wildly from their caves,
That made e'en rocks to shiver,
As on I went to see the waves
Which graced the Shannon River.
Its waters lashed with sounding force
The steeps which there opposed it;
Each wave rushed back with murmurs hoarse
In spray which then composed it.
Here Beigh's great castle proudly looks
Upon those waters waging,
And, wig crowned, it frowning mocks
At all their useless raging.
They seem to howl revengeful spite
For days of human slaughter
When this black home sent thieves at night
To pirate o'er the water.
But many a wave, in frothing rage
And many a frightful storm
Have warr'd with it at every stage
And done but little harm
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:31
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lakes, a miniature Killarney, on which are hundreds of swans and wild foul. The plantations, gardens, etc are laid out with great taste and magnificence. it is occasionally, in summer weather, visited by citizens of Cork, by the permission of its owner.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:29
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Once celebrated for its cider, large orchard being cultivated there. It was the estate of the Early Clancarthy, who lost it in the rebellion of 1641, when it came into the possession of the Crook family. Outside the station, and a little to the left, stands the castle of Cloghdha;the stone building of David, founded by Diarmuid Oge, one of the McCarthys, now the property of the Earl of Bandon, who renovated it, and uses it as a fishing and shooting lodge. To the right is Lissarda Castle, built by the Baldwin family, now a fine ivy-mantled ruin. Further on, on the left, we get a glimpse of Warren's Court, the beautiful residence of Sir Augustus Warren. He is a series of three
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:24
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the beautiful and romantic ruins of Castlemore Caisleán Mór, the great Castle built by the MacSweeneys, in the 15th century.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:23
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the beautiful and romantic ruins of Castlemore Caisleán Mór, the great Castle built by the MacSweeneys, in nthe 15th century.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:19
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suspicious of what the digging meant, they carefully routed the expectant gold finder with stones and set to work themselves and succeeded in finding the crock of gold which the other man had dreamt about. The gold fell into the hands of a family called Cronins, who instead of prospering in it fell into misfortune. Tradition states , that it was on account of the wrong way they got the gold that they became so unlucky.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:15
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About two hundred years ago, when Beamish took over the lands of Dooniskey there lived there a man who had accumulated a lot of gold and whose interest in the land when Beamish took it over, erased. He secured his gold in a well secured box.
It was customary at the time, as it is up to the present, to hold dances or "patterns" at the cross roads.Tradition tells us, that a well attended pattern was held on summer evenings at Beamishes gate as has been often held there since. One evening, when the man of the gold attended this pattern he noticed a handkerchief protruding from a girls pocket which was quite similar to one he had in his "gold" box. He went home, and searched the box thinking it was his own handkerchief he saw in the possession of the girl but he was mistaken there. To remove all further fears and doubts from his mind, he placed the gold in a crock and hid it along side a white thorn briar in the boundary fence between Shine's and Murphy's farms. The white thorn briar is to be seen at present day growing on the fence.
In later year's, it is said, that a man living in the neighbourhood dreamt that gold was hidden under the briar. At a late hour one night, he went in search of the gold and in digging up the place where it was, the noise of the bar attracted the attention of some "sruraidhreans[?]" who were returning home from a neighbour's house. Becoming
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:06
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In the cold dark winter night
When the hearth-stone was swept so clean and neat
And the big turf fire was bright.
Ah! tell me about the road to the Quay
Are there many changes there?
In fancy now I can plainly see
The distant hills of Clare
I can see every twist in the old green lane
That led to the Shannon shore,
Oh! would I could visit those scenes again
I loved in the days of yore.
Written by Mr Patrick Moran (now residing in Miltown)
Words supplied by Jack Hayes, Ballysteen Post Office.
Also by Muriel Fitzgerald, Ballinvoher (grand-neice)
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:02
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in England but the change of diet from the potatoes and the Indian meal (and stirabout)
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:00
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Murphy "Rahy"
Another famous runner who lived near Kilmichael in more remote times was Murphy "Rahy" so called. Toisc go raib an rit com maith aige. This "Rahy" was the grandfather of the present William "Rahy" the Engine man. This Murphy was such a noted runner in his time that he was taken by some English gentlemen who were visiting the country to compete in England. At first he had a series of sucesses
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 20:00
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Kilmichael
Noted Men
Kilmichael can boast of having produced some great runners from time to time but the runner of whom we hear the most is Pat Warren who was the eldest son of the famous Gaelic singer Dannie Warren of Mountmusic. When the G.A.A. was established in 1884 by Michael Cusack and Dr Croke it was in Kilmichael - in Maurice Dromey's lawn- the first sports meeting in Ireland under the new Rules was held. It was at that meeting " Paddy" Warren ran his first race and a competitor against him on that day was another runner who afterwards became famous namely O Mahony the "Steam Engine" from Roscarbery ( so called because he beat the train in a half mile race). Warren after his debut at Kilmichael won at sports after sports until he became one of the best 1' mile runners in Ireland.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 19:27
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Memories of Ballysteen - An Exiles Enquiries
(Supposed to have been spoken by an exile on meeting a fresh emigrant from the locality)
And this is you from Ireland, Jack,
Alannah, ah, give me your hand.
For memories now come crowded back
Of that dear, old sweet old land.
I can see the 'Cross' and Naughton's hill,
And Kenerks little field so green,
And every bush, and bank and sill,
In dear old Ballysteen.
Is the whitethorn bush at the corner yet?
Ah, many and many a day
I was told by whom, and when it was set
Sure she's now 'neath the cold, cold clay.
Tis 'Mommy' I mean. She often said
"Boys don't abuse that tree,
You'll all meet here when I am dead
And I know you'll pray for me."
I'm told the thatched house is gone from the scene,
That the walls are all fallen and bare.
Twill not be at all like Ballysteen
If the old thatched house isn't there.
Twas often I sat in the corner seat
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 18:41
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Long long ago, there lived a rich old king who was getting a castle built for his daughter, to get married. At this time there lived a giant and his three sons near by and every night they came and knocked down all that was built in the day and killed a sheep and ate it.
The king was very troubled and put a reward in the paper that anyone who'd guard it would get £5 every night. Well Q. was a poor widow's son who lived near by and he was anxious to earn the money. So this morning when Q. came in his mother had porridge made for him and it was that thin that if it got out on a plank it would run a mile. Now it was covered all over with 1,000 flies. He killed every one of them, and then made up his mind that that this might help him to earn the money.
He got a rusty sword and wrote on it that he took a 1,000 lives to-day.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 18:23
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Reamh-Rádh
Chuala mé an sgéal seo on sean-fhear Pádraig Mac Cormac a fuair bás bliadhanta o shion.
Sgéal
Nuair a bhí an Naomh Iosaf, an Mhaighdean Mhuire & Íosa Críost ag teitheadh on fhearg an Herod bhí turas fada le déanamh acu sul a shroisfidis Egypt.
Aimsear fuar, seacamhail do bhí ann & tar éis an lae bhíodar caithte tnáithte, Ní raibh teach nó bóthán le feiceáil & bhíodar i gcruaidh cás.
Thosuigheadar ag guidhe & tar éis tamaill eile d'airigeadar solus beag i bhfad uatha.
Do dhruideadar fé dhéin an soluis sin & chonnaiceadar teach beag. Do chnagadar ar an ndoras & tháinig bean amac. Ní raibh le feiceáil istigh ach cliabhán.
D'fhiafruigheadar dí an dtiubhradh sí lóistín dóibh ar feadh na h-oidhche.
Ghabh uamhan ar an mnaoi. Bhí fhios aici go maith go mbeadh fearg an domhain ar a chéile.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 18:17
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The noggins were used for holding porridge. Oaten porridge was the supper of the people in these days. There are very few noggins in this part of the country now.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 18:12
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The milk that was used was sweet milk butter milk and "bull milk". At dinner time the potatoes were teemed out on a basket which was left sitting on a pot on the middle of the floor. The family would get seated around the bucket and eat their dinner. When the dinner was finished the basket was hung up on a peg outside the door.
The kind of bread used was 'boxty' and oaten bread. On feasts like Hallow - Eve and Shrove Tuesday the people made "champ" and pancakes. Tea was first used in small quantities in the district about sixty years ago. Before cups were known of in the district porringers and noggins were used. These noggins were little round wooden vessels with a handle raised above the rim as shown in margin.
(Drawing in margin)
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 18:11
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The milk that was used was sweet milk butter milk and "bull milk". At dinner time the potatoes were teemed out on a basket which was left sitting on a pot on the middle of the floor. The family would get seated around the bucket and eat their dinner. When the dinner was finished the basket was hung up on a peg outside the door.
The kind of bread used was 'boxty' and oaten bread. On feasts like Hallow - Eve and Shrove Tuesday the people made "champ" and pancakes. Tea was first used in small quantities in the district about sixty years ago. Before cups were known of in the district porringers and noggins were used. These noggins were little round wooden vessels with a handle raised above the rim as shown in margin.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:52
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The townland is Normanstown and the parish Mullaghea in the barony of Lower Kells. The population is about one hunred. The most common name in Normanstown is Smyth.
Most of houses are slated. There are about seven people over 70. The oldest woman in Normanstown is Mrs Smith and Michael Smith is the oldest man.
There are about a hundred families in the parish of Mullaghea. The people were not very numerous in olden times. There are no ruins.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:48
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finally I became lovely hat.
I heard the people talking about the lovely hat they saw
I was packed in a very nice box and sent on the train to Dublin.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:47
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I am a old hat. Here I lie in this old ditch for the past three years.
I was once on a sheep back
I had a fine time looking at the beautiful scenery around me.
One day I was in a field with my copanions when I saw a man coming down the field towards us with a shears he started and cut of the wool of my back and put it in a pag and brought it of with him
I was then sent of to a fatory where I was pulled and shaved and washed until
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:47
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When butter was made at home long ago, the milk was skimmed with a skimmer. Then the cream was put in a wooden vessel for a few days.
When they had the quantity they required they made the butter.
The cream was put in the barrel and the barrel was kept turning by twisting the handles. About half an hour it took to make it.
A plug which was in the side of the barrel was taken out, and then the buttermilk came out, and it was kept for certain uses.
The buttermilk was thought healthy to drink, and they used it in making bread.
Cold water was put in with a funnel and the churn was twisted around, and they gave the butter three washings.
Then it was taken out and put into a tub, and salted, and washed again.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:45
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The boy was conveyed safely to the States where he secured a position and never again returned to his native land.
The younger Ambrose boy was taken to the house of Mr Michael Ranahan, then a boy of nine at Ballycanana. For safety he was put in a cave by the shore where food was conveyed to him daily by Michael. The latter was warned not to salute or speak to a woman on his way to and fro. After a time, the refugee was arrested and brought before Mr Waller, Castletown house, then a Magistrate. Mr Waller asked the Sergeant in charge what the boy had done and was told that he was a Fenian. On hearing this the Magistrate said 'God help Ireland if it is lads like this are to fight for it and he gave the boy five shillings and sent him home. Later the boy went to College and was ordained a priest. Towards the end of his life he was appointed parish priest of Glenroe, Co Limerick and while there he paid a visit to Ranahan's house and the cave where he had taken refuge in '67.
P'ina Holland
Gurthnagranaher
From James Culhane 87
Mitchelstown
and
Owen Hayes 47
Ballysteen Post Office
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:41
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One night I had a very adventures dream. I dreamt that I was going to some friend out a broad and that if I went there I would meet with something to my advantage.
Next morning I woke up and called my
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:40
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to heal cuts, and bruises.
The blood is very good for sores too, and it often heals them.
Long ago, when one had the measles, the fat of the sheep was rendered into dripping, and then drank as a cure for this ailment.
There was an old superstition that when a child was delicate she was brought to the forge, and the smith would lift the sledge over her three times.
By doing this it was believed that she would get strong and healthy.
In this parish there lives a gentleman whose name is -
Mr. R. Gamble
Cullinagh
Kilmeaden
Co. Waterford
and he is able to cure ringworm and wildfire. This cure has been in his family for generations. First he gets three little kippins, and puts them in the fire. When they are red he takes them out one by one and holds it over the ringworm, while doing this he says some words in his mind. Then when the words are said he takes up the second stick, and repeats the same words. When this is done he takes up the third stick likewise. The person who is affected must visit him three times before he is cured.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:39
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mother to the bedroom noticed that I was very delighted looking she asked me if I saw anything during the night and I said I had not.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:37
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For the want of a nail the shoe was lost.
A stitch in time saves nine.
When another man's house is on fire take care of your one.
The last straw breaks the camels back
Never look at a half finished job.
Don't leave until morrow what you can do today.
Second thoughts are generally best.
One man's word is as good as anothers.
Doctors differ and patients die.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:35
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When is a soldier not a soldier.
Ans. When he is in quarters.
Why is a vain young lady like a drunkred.
Ans. Because they are both fond of the glass.
How many peas are there in a pint.
Ans One.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:33
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As white as milk and milk it is not.
As green as grass and grass it is not.
As red as blood and blood it is not.
As black as ink and ink it is not.
Ans. A Blackberry
What part of a cow goes out a gap first.
Her Breath.
Why does a hen pick a pot.
Ans Because she can't lick it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:32
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frightened, and they began to scream. They ran as fast as they could. Each woman dropped her basket and ran away without it.
Next morning the man who had adopted the plan came to the fort. The baskets were in the spot where the women had left them. He hid the baskets and never again was a sod of turf taken from the fort.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:32
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Some people say that you should have your crop in the ground before you hear the first voice of the cuckoo.
Some people say if you go to a New house on a Saturday that you would have no luck in that house.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:31
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It is supposed that in olden days some people had certain day for being to work. Some people belived that if you went to a new house any day except Friday you would have no luck.
More say that you should begin work on a Monday and if not your crop will not grow as well as well as you put it in on a Monday
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:30
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Once there lived a man called Chas OSullivan in Gneeves. He had a rick of turf and a rick of limestone upon a fort in which there was a lime kiln. There was a large number of poor people in the neighbourhood. These people came every night, and stole some of the turf. The man was in a very bad way. As they were poor people he said nothing to them. He asked his brother what he should do. The brother said that he would stop the stealing. Next night he got his violin, and he and four of five other men went to the fort.
They waited in the fort until they heard the people coming, seven women each carrying a basket. When they came into the field in which the fort stood, the men in the fort lighted their torches. The violinist began to play and the others danced and sang.
The women on seeing what was in the fort were grealy
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:30
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During the Fenian Rising 1867 Ardagh barrock (sic) was raided and two Ambrose brothers were among the attackers. All the police were driven upstairs and they fired down on the raiders. The elder Ambrose boy got wounded. He and (his) brother were sent to Ballysteen to the house of a relative, Mr James Moran P.J. The Milltown police got wind of this, and one of them warned Mr Moran to get rid of them before night, because his house was to be raided for them and if they were found with him, he would lose his post. Then he sent the elder boy to Mr James Culhane, Mitchelstown now deceased. Mr Bill Hammon, whose family lived in the neighourhood was the captain of a ship called the 'Generall (sic) O Neill'. An appointment was made with him, and he was asked to convey the boy to America. He said that he was anchored on the Shannon and he had his load of timber sold but it should be delivered. He said he would be back again in six days and would give a signal to have the boy brought on board. When the appointed time came, the 'Generall O'Neill' cast anchor off Ballinvoher point and the boy was brought out to the ship. The Government cutters in Foynes heard of his being on board and followed the boat but could not catch up with it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:29
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This forge was a great big one. Its output consected of about a hundred things made every day. There was also a limekiln in Newtown. The people mad a lot of lime in it. There is the remains of an old limekiln in the field called the limekiln Field but this limekile has not been worked for about a hundred years. And that was a long time.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:28
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to heal cuts, and bruises.
The blood is very good for sores too, and it often heals them.
Long ago, when one had the measles, the fat of the sheep was rendered into dripping, and then drank as a cure for this ailment.
There was an old superstition that when a child was delicate she was brought to the forge, and the smith would lift the sledge over her three times.
By doing this it was believed that she would get strong and healthy.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:28
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About the year 1890 in the Spring-time of the year a great epidemic visited this district. In most houses all the inmates were in bed as they were too weak to be about and there was no one to look after those who were sick. In some cases all the inmates of a house died and not one of them was left. Persons suffered from weakness, cold and shivering, great perspiration and a severe cough. It was called the "Hen" which is a contraction of influenza. It lasted for about three months and very many old people died of it. The local doctors were visiting houses all day and night. Persons who had "The Hen" were very weak, for a long time after it and were unable to work.
The clergy of most parishes compelled the people afterwards to remove dung-pits and cess-pools from near the doors of their dwelling
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:28
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houses, for at that time it was customary to have the dung heap of farmyard manure in front of the door. It was thought that the evil smells from these pits caused the plague. The plague called "The Hen" was the talk of the people for many years afterwards. There was no second visitation of it till after The Great War of 1914 and then it occurred again and in a far worse form than in 1890. Hundreds of people young and old died in this district from the plague after the Great War.
Information was obtained from:
John Hetherton
Ballydurrow
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:27
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There are many toys which girls do make.
They make a flower necklace with daisies. They stars making the Necklace with one daisy. They split the stem and put another dasy into it and keep on until you have the Necklace made.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:25
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told it to me, and she said she knew those men.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:25
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Is first of all you get a piece of cloth and make a head. Put two holes for two eyes and others for the nose and mouth. You can colour the cloth if you like. Make a body next and if you have any legs of another doll sew them on to it. Then make a dress and put it on it. Girls are very fond of making dolls.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:25
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did this and when they touched the light they were pushed into the palace by it.
It was a beautiful palace of gold. The windows were paved with gold gems. On one of the windows was a clock. One of the men looked at it and saw that it was twelve o' clock. They were then taken into a beautiful hall where lovely ladies were sitting on arm chairs. One of the ladies had a blackbird in her hand. When the man who had struck the bird in the fort entered the hall, the bird flew from the lady and pecked the man, extracting one of his eyes. The light left the palace about one o' clock, the palace vanished, but they saw the light entering Keelnahulla Fort and dying out.
These boys never again, hunted birds either in the fort or in the fields. This story is a true one, but it happened a very long time ago. It was an old woman
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:23
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Long ago before Newtone got its name there were some industryies in the district. There was iron making such as spades, ploughs, forks, shovels. This iron was got in a place down in a rampart. There was a great big forge in it.
The wood was got in a wood that was near it.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:23
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i Lathair i mhéingit. Agus neidh tú io n-éin feacht liom sínte ar chlár. Cuir fios ar shagart sula n-éigfidh agus déan achruig gheár le Rí na nGrást. Beidh tú i barrrhas i measg na Naomh Cyr suas dó'n tsaoghal seo agus dó na mná.
5
Níl agam acht sé pighne go airgid an tsaoghail. Agus a dhia dhaolais
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:21
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The Cherry field
Got its name from a few cherrys has got its name from cherrys trees that are in it
The White Acres field
got its name from because it grows white grass.
The Sand field
got its because there was a sand pit in it.
The Bush field
got its name because there is a long tree growing in the centre of it
The High Field
got it was higher than any other field around it
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:20
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is fearr an faoi chóta Chrí. Soúd mar bhím i measc mó namhaid. Ag glaodhach mó chárta agus ag ól mug díg. Beirim go deimhin dhuit má fhágham an tsláinte. Gur fada ón áit seo a bhéas mise aríst.
3.
Cúile a bheirim se dhuit má bhí, i nÉirinn. Ó Luighe na gréine g h-innse fáigh. Go dtabhairfeadh me sumans duit
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:18
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The Pigeon Field. It has got its name from the Peigon House that is in it. Every summer pigeon come to this pigeon-house.
There is another field I know; it is called the Well Field, because there is a well in the field and so it is called the well field
There is a field called the Limekiln. It has got its name form a limekiln that is in the same field
Walshes Corner
got its name from an old ruins that was there some time ago.
The Bullskillin field
has got its name from a crab ditch that is in the field
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:18
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Long ago there was a light seen very often going for Keenahulla Fort to Islandave Fort and across to the fort in Gneeves. One night a company of young men went out torching. They went into the fort in Gneeves. They searched the bushes of the fort for birds, but in vain. As they were about to leave, a blackbird flew out of the biggest bush in the fort. One of the men struck the bird and immediately it turned into a jolly little man who was playing a violin, and the nicest music that was ever heard. Struck with fear they began to run but a dazzling light entered the fort. The men could not go any further because they were dazzled. They turned away their faces from the light, and they saw that the large bush was a grand palace. They were more frightened than ever, and they said that they would run through the light. They
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:17
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tinn lág i mo chnáimhe ag sním an mhála atá os cionn mo chroidhe. Leag thuise le d'ais é agus taraigh i Láthair. Gogleann aoibhinn áluinn mar a bhfuil gach éan.
2.
Cuirim suas duit-se a gaduidh ghrándha. Agus tabgair dhom spás nó go ceann trí mhí. Go dtéighid go Baile Chruaich mar bhfuil ó harra. An fear
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:15
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Father into Thy Hands I commend my spirit
Woman behold Thy son.
Son behold Thy Mother.
Amen I say to thee
This day thou shall be with me in Paradise.
O Mary who on earth
Did'st conquer by thy prayers
Regard us as thy children now
And through the eternal years.
Glory to God on high
To Father and Son
And Holy Spirit Lord of life
Eternal three in One.
Hail holy mission, hail
Sent to us from above
When Jesus with his cross
Comes to win back our love
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:15
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bhí cruaidh agus cuirfeadh sé rath agus as óg léim as an chruaich. Chat róise cat róisw cat róise ní Chuinn a cheapadh an t-éan sa spéir ós a chíonn.
4. Ar bgóthar Luimnighe a casadh ar bás lion an gaduidh gránda agus a chúl le claidhe. Rith sé i mo aircis agus chraith sé lámh. Agus d'iarfaidh go Pháidric go cé mar bhí. "Tá mé
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:13
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St Ultan today is an outstanding hero of the "Buidhe Chonnail", or the yellow plague, a dread visitation which ravaged the land about the seventh century. This mysterious pestilence made its first appearance in this country in the middle of the sixth century. It lasted about ten years and was proceeded by famine and followed by leprosy.
The name Yellow Plague implies a sickness which produced yellowness of the skin, resembling the colour of withered stalks of corn.
The second visitation of the plague occured again in the year 656 being more deadly in the Autumn and Winter than at any other time of the year.
The population of Ireland had become so dense that food enough could not be produced for their support. The rulers invited clergy to meet together and pray that the lower class
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:12
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O kind, O loving one
O sweet Jesus. Mary Son.
O Holy Joachim.
Spouse of Saint Anne
Father of the Blessed Virgin
Betow on they servants here help and salvation
(Said during the day.)
Mary sorrowing mother of all Christians pray for us
(Said when you are in trouble)
Good Saint Anne mother of her who is our hope and our life, pray to her for us and obtain our request
(Said morning and night.)
We adore Thee O Christ and we bless Thee
Because of the Holy Cross
Thou hast redeemed the world.
My God. My God why hast Thou forsaken me.
senior member (history)
2020-03-28 17:12
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alltuigh ariamh go fóill é. Ba chóir a chur thar fairrge ná chrochadh leis an ropa. Is da bhaínn-se go raibh sé leadromach is gur chuir sé dúil sa bhlasrú na cinn thuigheadh breith na barastar ar téiseadh Bhaile an Róba.
3. Chuir mise mó phisín go oilean ar chuairt. Thaínig sé agam agus é cunáilte fuar. Thug mé dó glaoine dó n stuf a