Number of records in editorial history: 282905 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 04:40
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Col. T. Ryan had a most interesting career in the British Army. He joined as a Private and made good right along the line.
He was in Command of a Batallion in Palestine in the World War.
He came of humbleworking parents and the old lime place in Newtown where he was born is still standing
He retired from the Brit Army just about the time of the Truce in this Country. He was given an important post in the National Army to clear up the "Irregulars." When he had his task complete - he took up Farming at a place called Mertin near Macmine Station.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 04:13
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hero, in doublet + hose. He was not only big in stature, but big in soul + mind.
His memory will I'm sure survive for many a long day and it is fitting to think that he get a mention in these pages - that his name be placed on our local Roll of Honour. He has left his mark on many a farm and homestead and to seek a monument to him is but "to look around you" - for standing here there and everywhere in the Parish are the houses, he has planned + built - the creamery he has established etc. etc.
He was a man of many parts and every part a good one.
A very suitable and well deserved tribute and appreciation appeared in a local paper - the Echo
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 04:08
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two feet high at its entrance. People went down into it in times of war.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 04:05
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two feet high at its entrance. People went down into it in times of war.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 04:04
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There is a fort near our house. It is called a Ring. There is a embankment of earth around it. A man is supposed to have seen blood coming from a tree there, when cutting it
There is a fairy fort in Killalee. It is said by old people that this fort was built by the Dains. It is built under the ground. There is a passage down into it which is
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 04:03
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Some Noted people of the Past, that not too distant past that the present can just barely stretch to, and touch, and who once strutted the stage and left their mark in the memories of us that still are.
"Big Paddy"
Such a one is, or was a great man that died only eight years ago. His name was Paddy Dempsey or better and universally known as "Big Paddy" - a native of Ballygarron, Kilmuckridge. He lived in a small thatched house at the Crosses on Mr Cousin's land.
Big Paddy was big no doubt he stalked about just like a giant and always dressed in Knee breeches - moving about like a figure from a past age that reminded one of an Elizabethan
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 04:01
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Forte are plentiful around here It is not known who made them They are all circular in shale and fenced in by white thorn trees no-body ever enterfers with them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 03:59
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Killalloreen is situated on the Moate Road about half a mile out-side the town. It is called a fort and opposite it is another fort. They are circular in shale and there is an under ground passage from the [?] to them. There was a Church founded by St. Looreen on the top of Killaloreen fort.
There is also a fort in Rahugh and it is said that some man cut down the trees which surrounded while cutting them he cut his finger and died.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 03:58
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Killallreen is situated on the Moate Road about half a mile out-side the town. It is called a fort and opposite it is another fort. They are circular in shale and there is an under ground passage from the [?] to them. There was a Church founded by St. Looreen on the top of Killaloreen fort.
There is also a fort in Rahugh and it is said that some man cut down the trees which surrounded while cutting them he cut his finger and died.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 03:52
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A man named Perry owned the mills of Ballinagore, he was a Protestant and he did not alow the workers near Mass on Sunday. Fr. Fox was the Parish Priest in bastletown and every time Mr. Perry saw him coming he would say “here is the Fox keep in the Geese.” One day Fr. Fox told him his mill would never work again and it never worked since.
There was a big house named Rockfield house, near Streamstown. The Martain family—the owners—were gone to Races in England and the night before they came home. The house went on fire. When they came back
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 03:40
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There is a Mass Rock on a hill in Ballinderry. It is not called so but is known as the “Druid Stone” but old people say that the mass was offered there also in the penal days. There is a pass way through here to Kilgarven Past a way called the Guttrey Gap to Kiblaloreen. The old bog road leads from the long barn and back through Ballymacmorris.
There was another pass way through Shureen and out on the Moate Road.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 03:37
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the late Dr. Kate Maguire. She once lived in Belmont.
Soon we arrive in the town again viewing the Relic on our right side. We could take another short cut back to Belmont from the lane east of the Catholic Church. Through Fordress where in the Civil War and the Black and Tan trouble many an attack was engineered and planned by Sinn Feineners on the run.
“Grange Boreen”, another old road is an interesting round about way to travel. Past boola mills where Perrys (Priest hunters) lived, we also can see the Hill of Comagh on our left. Mass was offered here too in the place [era?]. This is a narrow winding boreen which leads back to the town from the boola Bridge to the Lr. main St. Another old pass way leads from the Moate Road to the Clara Road.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 03:26
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Priest. they had to call in one to get rid of the demon. He ordered them to get a black cat and whilst he (the Priest) prayed he ordered them to throw the cat at the devil. They did so, and he disapproved cat and all into the fire.
On to the main road and back towards the town, we pass the road leading to Rostella, once owned by Lord Congelton. It was here that one day about a century ago a strange sight was seen, of a flock of crows which formed themselves into a tower and by their roaring attracted a huge crowd. Then they formed themselves into the shape of a large Cross and disappointed. No one could explain what was the reason for this strange sight.
On of the first doctors in Ireland to help at the first successful operation on the Appendix was
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 03:18
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There was once a Monastery near the Glebe and we little dream that the most notorious of the Priest-hunters once lived here. Finowles were their names but although their house has disappeared, their ill-famed memory will never be forgotten. They had two dogs trained to hound down the “good soggart”. It is commonly held too that they were in league with “Old Nick”.
An old woman (Mrs Delany) told me she often heard that the “ould boy” did actually come when they were at a meeting place called “hell fire-club” (also in this locality). It is also told that they were dancing around a fire canting and calling on the devil when they saw a stranger coming near, and young Finowle saw the cloven foot. Much as they hated the
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:49
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were all burned together. It was also here that these holy monks toiled and served their Creator in these far off days. Truly a hallowed spot. On past the graveyard we come to Barley Hill where in a nook near the river bank Mass was offered in the penal day’s.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:46
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west and from which it is easy to “short cut” from one place to another without necessarily going by the main thoroughfare. From the East end of the budge which spans the river Brosna it is easy to get to the Tullamore road and back to the town again.
It is about a mile around although the town itself is but a furlong in length. This road is called the “bircular road”. It is about the most popular one here from a historical point of view. It is easy to see through the clump of beeches the ancient Church which is in the posession of the Protestants since it was confiscated by them in the penal days. It is on the left hand side on a hill.
Formely on the site where it stands St. Beccan founded his church when he came here in the sixth century close by is the “Relic” where the “rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep” whilst somewhere near too is the Croppies grave where the men who were shot in the rebellion of 1798.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:43
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There were singers in my village long ago. A man named Paddy Mc Gowan was able to sing many songs. People heard him singing, God save Ireland in Irish, and St. Patrick's Day, and also An Sean bhean bhocht, when going for his pension.
He was eighty years of age when he died. He is buried in Toomore graveyard. There was another named Bridget Ruane. She sang many songs also, an Sean bhean bhocht, and others besides these.
She was eighty years of age when she died. In Toomore graveyard she is buried also.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:38
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the neurotic or paralytic person. Parsley although we hardly call it a herb was used to relieve the kidneys. Chicken-weed another herb was used as a cure for skin-irritation also young nettles were cooked to prevent scurvy. Sparamint was taken to the house in bunches to rid it of fleas.
Burn-the-house used for burns. Ivy leaves are boiled for use as cleansers for navy-cloth. Dandelion was used as a rub to swollen joints, the onion is used as a blood purifier as a poultice also for corns and bunions.
There is a good part of the land around here under grass. The land is suitable for dairy cows, goats are let loose with the herd because they are useful for devouring all the all the herbs good and bad which abounds on a grazing farm. Where buttercups grow is considered extra good for milking cows.
Around this locality there are many old roads which lead north, south, east and
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:33
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There are animals living on my farm at home. My father keeps two cows, five calfes, a horse, two asses, three pigs, and a goat. The domestic animals are the dog and cat.
All these animals has names. If the cow is black she is called the black cow, and so on. When the cows are going in damage “hersh is said. When driving them into the barn, “Priggie, priggie is said. Suck, suck is said when calling calves. When calling pigs Hurrais! hurrais! is said, or beoch, beoch. The cowhouse is called the cows' barn, because no animal sleeps in it, but the cows, and calves. Nowadays, animals are tied only by the neck, with roaps or chain.
In former times this was not so, because there were no polly cows and all the cows were tied by the horns. The[re]
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:32
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senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:32
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There are many harmful weeds growing on my father's farm. These are, the nettle, thistle, the capóg, the buchallán, the farbán, the dandyline, and the crádán. They are harmful, because they smother the crops, and take away the food from them.
There are some herbs, which grow only in good land, such as, the nettle, the thistle, the capóg, the buachallán, and the crádán. In poor land the farbán grows.
The nettle is a cure for measles. They are boiled, sugar is added, and the juice is drank by the person who has the disease. If a person got a burn from a nettle, by rubbing the capóg of it, it would cure it. The crádán is used as a cure for a rash. They are boiled and the juice is drank. The dandyline is a cure for heart trouble.
The ass eats the thistle for food, and the copógs, and fuarán, are boiled for pigs.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:29
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Old people knew the value of herbs to relieve bodily ills. Doctors were held in low esteem in the days when our great grandparents lived.
There were certain families where these herbal cures were handed on from generation to generation, and the secret of blending these herbs guarded jealously. Nowadays we seldom hear of the herbalist although it is really from herbs the ordinary dose given by doctors is concokked.
Our grandmothers could brew a poultice from marshmallows for an ulcerated leg that would put the many perfumed ointments of to-day in the shade. Robin - run - the - hedge, monkshead or night-shade were used to relieve heart-attacks. Belladona another herb has not changed in name as a sleeping draugh although the old people knew of it too and brewed it to serve “the - lie - awake - all - night”.
Crows’ foot another herb or weed helped
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:21
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is a picture of Saint Brigid, or of Saint Benedict always hung in the stable for luck.
Psiew! is said when calling the cat, and when putting him out, we say, scut! scut! Also there are foul on my farm, such as, hens, ducks, geese, and a turkey. Chuch! chuch! is said when calling hens. When calling ducks we say, Fuueet! Fuueet!, and when driving them away we say slac! slac! When calling the turkey, biadh! biadh! is said. When calling the goat we say miney! miney!
A pencil mark or a bit of polish is always put on the hatching eggs for luck.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:19
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in Cloonamurikeen, the most of them were forced to leave in the time of the famine.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:18
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There is a Mass path leading from Kilgarvin to Killalloreen. It was used in ancient times but is not used at present. There is also one leading from Cloonamurikeen to Horseleah which passes through Meldrum and Coolough. On this pass there is a style which is known as ([Anruabhac?]) Owenreevuch which got its name from the man who erected it. Old people say this man had the gift of prophecy. When he had the style erected he said “When that style begins to crumble so will the British Empire The style is to be seen still and is in good repair but it is not used now a days. When it was first erected there were thirty four families living
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:15
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There are animals living on my farm at home. My father keeps two cows, five calfes, a horse, two asses, three pigs, and a goat. The domestic animals are the dog and cat.
All these animals has names. If the cow is black she is called the black cow, and so on. When the cows are going in damage “hersh is said. When driving them into the barn, “Priggie, priggie is said. Suck, suck is said when calling calves. When calling pigs Hurrais! hurrais! is said, or beoch, beoch. The cowhouse is called the cows' barn, because no animal sleeps in it, but the cows, and calves. Nowadays, animals are tied only by the neck, with roaps or chain.
In former times this was not so, because there were no polly cows and all the cows were tied by the horns. The
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 02:09
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Long ago the Irish people were put out of their farms, and were given to the English. The priests were forbidden to say mass at that time, because of the penal laws.
Priests had to say mass on the mountain side hiding from the English soldiers. Mass was said in my village in a place called Carraig Na Mbroc.
Any priests that was caught saying mass were put to death in some way. These solders were called Priest hunters. Any person that gave food or shelter to priests were put to death also. In olden times houses were built in places where people thought they would not be caught.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:39
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In my district that is Callow, certain articles are hung in position in honour of saints. These saints are saint Brigid, and saint Patrick. Crosses are made of straw or rushes in honour of these saints. Most people make them of rushes.
To make these crosses two sticks are got, which are about four inches each, and they are made in the form of a cross. A long bit of straw, or a long rush is got. It is tied with a bit of thread on to one of the sticks, and it is brought from that stick to the next and so on until the cross is finished.
It is usually hung over the fire place. Saint Brigid's cross is made on saint Brigid's Day and saint Patrick's cross is made on st Patrick's Day.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:35
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There were not as many shops in olden times, as there are at the present day. People had to go to the nearest town to buy what they wanted. Buying, and selling were carried on after mass, if there was a shop near the church.
Bread, tea, and sugar were the most that were sold. In former times people used to get goods and instead of paying for them, people used to to work. The markets were held in the towns in former times, and they are still. Pedlars came round asking rags, and feathers. They give needles, and other things in return. There were five penny bits, and ten penny bits, and other gold coins used long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:32
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were built.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:31
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Old people of my district still remember the great Famine period of 1846. The usuall food people lived on then was potatoes.
This year a fever came on the crop called the blight. Some people say this came from the sea. Then the potato-crop failed. People had nothing to eat then but what was growing wild on the land.
They used to eat leaves of trees and grass, and nettles just like animals. These had to be eaten or else die. Many a person died at the ditch with the hunger. They died in great numbers. The people of the house carried the coffin to the grave on their backs.
Some people went out begging. They got oats that was not ground. Out of this they made cakes. Others got a crook of yellow meal or three potatoes for charity. The government sent the people yellow meal.
During the Famine years people say the main road was made. The year after the Famine Callow schools
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:26
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pans and bowls were used. People used to get a leaf of cabbage, and put oaten-meal in it, and put another leaf over it and leave it baking.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:25
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In olden times people had three meals a day. These were the breakfast, dinner and supper. They ate the breakfast in the morning, the dinner at about twelve oclock and the supper at night. People worked two hours before eating in the morning.
For their breakfast they had potatoes and gruel; for their dinner they had potatoes and butter-milk and for their supper they had stirabout.
There were a few kinds of bread eaten such as boxty bread, potato bread and oaten-meal bread. Sometimes meat was eaten fresh and salt. Veal, mutton, beef and pork were the meats they used. There were many kinds of vegetables also used. These were onions, carrots, turnips, cabbage and lettuce.
People did not eat late at night. Eggeating was the custom on Easter Sunday. About one hundred years ago tea was first used in the district. Before cups became common noggins, sauce-
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:20
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There was a great weight-thrower in Cashil. His name was John Collins. He threw a six hundred weight forty yards long.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:19
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Kill Gallon mowed an acre and a half of hay in a day. He lived in Clooneygowan long years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:17
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In olden times there lived a woman in Lismoran named Nancy Noone. She used to carry three stooks of oats on her back from the field to the house. She had a loud voice too, people could hear her two miles away.
Another man lived in Lismorane named Luke Higgans. He walked over thirty Irish miles to Lousborrow to a fair, and home again. Another man lived in Cashel named Sandy McDonnell. He swam from one end of the lake to the other in a quarter of an hour.l
There were sports in Callow once. It was a man named Rafter who set them it. Men went into a big turf bag and went a long distance in it. Whoever won the race got a half a quarter of tobacco. Much fun was taken out of the game. It was a teacher named Cunningham who won it.
There were also great mowers in my district. A man named Eddie
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:12
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senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:12
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There are ruins of an old chapel in Croghan. It is situated in the north of Killasser, in the townland of Croghan, in the parish of Killasser, in the barony of Gallen, and in the county of Mayo. It is about five centuries old. The remains of the ruins are there yet.
There is a graveyard inside the ruins. Long ago infants were burried here but very few are burried nowadays. There are no tomb-stones in this graveyard but stones standing up to mark the graves. This was a very small chapel. There is no story, or tradition connected with this graveyard nor with these ruins. It was not attacked at any time. It is in the land of Mr. John Padden and was always. These ruins stand on a height beside the main road. A man named Seisnéan built it and so it got its name, Cill Seisnéan.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:07
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fire. Where this bed was placed was placed was called an ould-chat. The old people usually slept here.
The fire-place was always along the gable wall. The chimney was made of mortar and stones. My father told me that he never saw, the fire in the centre of the floor. Half-doors are not so common nowadays, but this was not so long ago. In every house there was a half-door to keep out the fowl, and to keep in the young children. Turf, and bog-deal was used for fire. Rushes, and candles were used for giving light at night. Candles were not made locally. The bottom of the house was used for cattle. An ass or a calf was tied at each door.
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:02
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Old houses in my district were small. There was one room and a kitchen in each house. The floors were made from flags, and sometimes from mortar or clay. There was no chimney like there is nowadays, but a hole in the roof in place of a chimney to draw out the smoke.
There were two little windows in each house, one in the kitchen and one in the room. There were two panes in each window. When these windows got broken a board, or a bag was put in its place to keep out the rain and the wind. There was a door in each house also.
Old houses were thatched with straw, or rushes, or heath. The straw was got from the land. The rushes grew in wet land, and the heath was got in the bogs. In every house there was a bed in the kitchen. This bed was along the side-wall near the
senior member (history)
2019-06-20 00:00
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About twenty years ago in the centre of Rathdowney there was was a flourishing Flour Mill, owned by Mr Atkinson who resided where the Convent is at present. To this Mill the people of all the surrounding districts brought their wheat to be ground. There was another Flour Mill in Coolkerry (owned my a Mr Turney) of which the ruins are still to be seen at the back of the Golf Links. This showed that milling was a very prosperous industry here, About fifty years ago there was a Flour Mill in Eglish owned by a man named Mr Pratt. At one time this mill was of great
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:58
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dash is moved upwards and downwards. The butter comes upon the lid and it appears like little grains of oats.
My mother takes the butter from the churn. She takes it out with her hands. She washes her hands with water and soap. Then she washes them with oat-meal. She also dips the tops of her fingers several times into boiling water so as to make them very clean. The butter is put into a wooden dish. It is washed three times with water so as to take away the butter-milk. (is used for making). It is then salted. It is made into rolls or prints. Then it is kept in a cool place with a muslin cloth on top. The butter-milk is used for making bread. In summer the butter-milk is given to pigs, and other aniamals.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:56
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Mrs Leahy was a great hand at "Quilting". A large wooden frame the size of the quilt would be set up and the quilting done on it. It would then be sent to Tommy Weavers (who lived in Moore Street) to be pressed. All those articles would last a lifetime.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:54
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I have a churn at home. It is ten years old. My mother bought it in Swinford. It is three foot in height. The top of the churn is one foot three inches in breadth and the bottom of the churn is one foot six inches in breadth. The sides are round like a circle. The various parts of the [ ] are the caisín and the lid and the bottom. There is a mark on top of the churn so as to set the lid on when churning.
Butter is made in it twice a week in summer and once a week in winter. My mother and I do the churning in our house. Any stranger who comes in during churning must strike a few blows for fear they would bring the butter. The churning is made in an hour. It is done by hand. The churn-
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:54
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have no button but two tapes which were fastened to the shirt collar knotted in a bow which looked very neat.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:53
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Mrs Leahy's mother also spun flax which made shirts and sheets. The shirt fronts would
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:52
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Mrs Leahy aged eighty seven the Square Rathdowney told me the following. I remember well how my mother often sent me after coming from school to collect wool from run-holes where sheep would be going from one field to another. Some of their wool would get entangled in briars and bushes. She would then have to wash and card it. Then she would spin it on a spinning wheel.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:50
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She was about eighty years old. This woman lived in Moore St, Rathdowney. She had a spinning wheel and used to weave her own wool, and her own clothes. She also used to weave for other people who paid her well for her work. Mrs Fogarty Tullavolty, used to spin wool into cloth. This was used for the making of suits. The spinning wheel was made of wood and set into a table with four wooden legs. Mrs Maher who lived in Moore St, Rathdowney had a spinning wheel. She used to spin and weave wool for several people.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:50
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removed. Then they were bruised and oaten-meal was added and later when flour was in use it was added with them. This was spread on a table and cut in four parts each part called a “farl.” This was baked on a griddle. It was eaten hot or cold with butter.
Every Saturday night a large supply of bread was made for a week. The sign of the cross was cut on every cake to bless them. The sign of the cross was cut on the potato-cake also, thus the potato-cake was cut in four parts.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:47
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to make the nicest boxty. They are cleaned well and skin is removed. Then they are scraped. After that the potatoes are squeezed and boiled cold potatoes are mixed through when kneading. Long ago it was baked on griddle or on a hot flag. It was eaten hot with butter or bacon gravy.
Oaten-meal bread was commonly used by the natives of my district long ago. This was made of oaten-meal and boiling water. It was usually made flat and left a while standing before baked. It was baked on a stand before a bright fire. When the stand was not in use it was hung over the fire to prevent rusting. These stands were to be found in the local forge.
There was another form of bread used by the people of this district. It was called potato-cake. This was made of potatoes. The potatoes were boiled. The skin was
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:46
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Most people in the parish of Galmoy possessed a spinning wheel. They carded the wool and afterwards spun it into cloth.Flax was also grown. After being cut it was left in a bog or very swampy ground. For coarse material the cloth and flax were taken to Brophys who resided in the house now occupied by Mr Pat Malone, Rathdowney. Here the necessary process was gone through. There is a form or long stool a relic of the spinning days. at my uncle's home. There was an old woman named Kitty O'Toole
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:43
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In olden times bread was used as part of the food for the people in my district. It was not bread like we use now because white flour was not in use and then there was no white bread made. There were many different kinds of bread made such as Potato-cake, Boxty-bread and Oaten-meal bread.
There was no wheat grown in my district long ago neither was corn. People grew oats and got it ground into meal. There was a mill in Oulogue owned by a man named Rooney. People of the surrounding districts brought their oats there and got it ground into meal. They made cakes of this meal.
Boxty-bread was commonly used by the natives of this district long ago. It was made of big potatoes and those that were beginning to get bad were supposed
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:41
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Every Saturday morning Tim Horan was to be seen bringing home a load of sallies out of which he made the baskets. He made up to twenty a week. He sold them in town and also at the fairs. He used to charge three shillings for one basket and he often made three pounds in one day. Mr John Cullen of Beggar's Inn, Galmoy, still makes baskets of sally rods, he is 70 years of age. He sells them in the shops, and to the farmers of the district, He gets most call for his goods at the potato-picking season. His grandsons have learned the trade, and the old man himself is crippled for years past.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:26
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He tried to go to a few more but the same thing happened.
On going to another there was nothing to stop him.
When he got to the threshold he found that it was hos own house.
There were a few old men in it reading the papers.
When he told them what had happened they told him that he must have stood on a Foidín Mairbh.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:23
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The potatoes are sprayed when the stalks are about six inches above the soil.
First the farmer nearly fills a barrel which holds 40 gallons. Then he dissolves 8 pounds of blue stones in it/
While that is dissolving he dissolving 10 pounds of washing soda in another vessel.
When the two are mixed together they become a light blue colour.
One barrel will spray about one rood. Then he fills a spraying machine with it, and he starts spraying the stalks.
They should be sprayed twice or three times every year.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:20
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The woman would know when the churning was made by the size of the little bits of butter on the lid.
She then "took out" the butter, washed it, and salted it. It was then "packed" in a "firkin", and each successive roll or meascain was placed in the firkin until it was filled. This took about 6 or 8 weeks in summer.
The firkin was a little barrel made of oak, bound with sally rod hoops and held from 6 to 7 stones of butter.
The butter was then taken to market & sold. Before it was bought it was augered & the butter graded. If it was uniform in colour & sweet of taste, it was marked 1st quality. If not 2nd or 3rd quality. I frequently took butter to the butter market in Sligo for sale, and was always glad when I got 1st grade.
The churns & firkins were made by a cooper. There is a cooper a neighbour of mine, he makes churns still, but very few firkins. But firkins were in common use here until about 30 years ago.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:12
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dun, and ring.
Some people see lights, going from one fort to another, and some others hear music in the forts.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:11
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Percival asked him to beg his life, but Centie shouted, "No never", "fire away you blind thief". Percival took steady aim and shot him through the heart.
A cairn of stones marks the place where he fell.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 23:01
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With heroes who sleep on the hillside
He lies neath the shamrock and sun.
Tho' bowed with the weight of her sorrow,
His mother is proud of her son.
The "gunmen" done in " in the "scrapping"
May be to a moment's pain wed.
But the mothers, wives, sisters and sweetheart's
Must live with the ghosts of the dead.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:58
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He went forth with the "column" for Ireland.
His feelings [?] cause deeply stirred
But paused by his mother awhile for
A last kiss and comforting word.
He held the high hopes and ambitions,
That youth is so eager to frame,
Was proud of his short service rifle,
And honour of being "in the game".
We came from the scene of the "ambush",
The March evening air coldly stung.
The hills and the valleys were silent,
The Column-boys hearts were grief - [?]
He was wrapped in the flag of Erin,
The "Rebels" own green, white, and gold,
When laid by his loved faithful comrades,
Away in his burial mould.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:51
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is the one with the earth he will die first.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:46
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Although she was little, her honour was great,
Rise up, landlady, and give us a treat.
Sometimes they get as much as a pound, which they divide among themselves at the close of the day.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:45
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On St. Stephen's Day many boys chase the wren. When the wren is caught the boys go around from house to house saying : Give us a penny to bury the wren". When they have the money collected they divide it with one another.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:43
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St. Stephen's Day is a great feast day. The people gather together to hunt the wren. They go in groups of four or five. They get a little holly bush, and decorate it with coloured paper. The people dress themselves up, so that they would not be known.
One plays music, another holds the
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:41
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tubs of water, and then they have great fun dipping their heads in the water, trying to take out an apple or a sixpence with their teeth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:40
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On the vigil of All Saints' Day, which is called "Halloween", it is customary for young men to dress themselves in gay clothes and to paint their faces. Then they visit all the houses in the neighbourhood, where they play music and sing songs and dance. After the dance they play funny games, as ducking for apples, nuts, and money in a bath of water, or in a dish of flour.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:37
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A very common custom among Irish people is following the wren on St. Stephen's Day. They dress up and go around from house singing the wren song. The words are
The wren, the wren, the kings of all birds
St. Stpehen's Day, she was caught in the furze
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:33
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The bells of your barns,
When will you pay me?
I do not know,
Says the great bell of Bow,
Hear comes a candle,
To light you to bed,
And here comes a chopper to chop off your head.
8) How many miles to Dublin.
Three score and ten.
Will I be there by candle light
Yes and back again.
Open the gates and let me through.
Not 'till you show me your black and blue.
There is my black and (there)
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:30
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here is my blue.
And here are the gates to go through.
9) High ho.
Tippely toe.
Turn the ship and away we go
Mary Jane dressed in black
Silver buttons behind her back.
10) Sally go' round the moon.
Sally go' round the the star
Sally go' round the the chimney stock
On the Sunday after noon.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:28
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11) Frog in the pan, catch all you can.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:28
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There was a person who had sheep grazing at Youngs of Raheen one year. This night he went to see the sheep at about twelve oclock in the night. When he was in the field where the sheep were he began to light his lamp to see if the sheep were all right. He struck a match and he put it to his light but the match went out. He began striking and striking the matches but still it would not light so he left it so for a while. He sat down in the ditch for
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:24
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a while and in a few moments a light came near him and after a while it went down along the ditch and came back the same way again.
When it had passed He lit his lamp and it lit allright for him this time.
A person told him that he should not go down to see his until before twelve o clock or after it because some thing always happens at that time.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:19
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A person cut sticks out of a rath one day. He was going for sticks one day and he felt himself going all around the field and in a moment he was in a beautiful palace.
He saw the most beautiful things and every thing that could be mentioned. He got home about morning and they wondered where he was. He told them. He was going out to bring in the cows and there was a bit of (wood) a stick that was cut out of the rath. He hit the cow a lick of it
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:16
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stomach and he fell dead. After that jack was known as Jack the giant-killer.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:14
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To cure a sty: Get a thorn off a Gooseberry bush and prick the sty with it three times every morning and say a prayer, the sty will soon be cured.
Sore throat: Heat salt on a pan and put it on a cloth and put it as a poultice around the throat on going to bed.
Chilblains:- may be cured by applying or rubbing them with pieces of raw potatoes. The potato is cut in two - and the chilblain rubbed with each part.
Whooping Cough:-If you happen to meet a "God's Horse" (i.e. a small insect of the Caterpillar type - brown with black hairs) on the road, without looking for it. Rub the insect to the neck of the affected person and it will cure him or her.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:09
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This nine years long I followed the wren
My shoes are woren, and my clothes are toren.
Up with the kettle and down with the pan,
A penny or twopence to bury the Wren"
New years day is the first day of the year and it is the eight day after Christmas. It is known as "little Christmas", and is nearly as important as Christmas day. Candles are lighted in some places as on Christmas eve. On the twelth day twelve candles are lighted and every one gets a candle. It is believed that the person that has the candle that burned out first will die first.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 22:05
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Tormenting care with galling spleen
My mental place invaded.
The sun for me now shines in vain,
Dejection is prevailing.
Yet 'tis unmanly to complain
When plans are inavailing.
'Tis true I loved my country dear,
Oppression base I hated,
The voice of freedom still I hear
Although I'm isolated.
Oh, Erin, may your sons be free
And tyranny suspended,
High and exalted may you be
When my career is ended.
And now I'll bid a long farewell
To every glade and fountain,
To every lonely silent dell,
To every vale and mountain.
To those green paths and purling streams,
Bright scenes of my first rambles,
Where warbling birds their joy proclaims
Amid green leaves and brambles."
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 21:57
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Ye fertile valley, fruitful and serene -
Fields of my father's, for ever fresh and green,
I'll take of you one sad and lonesome view,
And with a sigh for ever bid adieu."
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 21:54
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"Soft blow the mild sweet morning gale,
Reviving and perfuming;
Fresh daisies deck the verdant vale,
And every shade is blooming.
The lark through boundless fields of air
Proclaims the agent moving,
The village swain, exempt from care,
Exulting hears the warning.
Oh, once those rural joys were mine,
When health and youth conveyed me.
Through sloping groves of vernal pine
Where love, fond love, delayed me.
With heart elate I roamed the plain
Where wood and glade were pleasing,
Affection led me to my Jane
O'er hills where herds were grazing.
But frowning fate soon changed the scene
And all the pleasures faded,
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 21:49
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No milk-maid singing in the vacant vale,
No playful children in the street I saw -
All was silent, solitude and awe.
The naked walls were sable, black and bare,
And desolation reigned with terror there;
Sheep and oxen through the gardens grazed
Without restraint and wandered where they pleased'
No dog to bark, no cheerful cock to crow,
No sound to heal the dismal cloud of woe
which hung impending o'er my native place
Where once I lived in tranquil bliss and peace;
Where once I saw a tender mother's smile,
Who cherished virtue and detested guile,
And just father, generous, bold and brave,
Who spurned the tyrant and the willing slave,
Many a joyful, happy, festive night
Beneath their roof my heart leapt light
A small village ever dear to me,
I love you still, your beauty yet I see;
Haunts of my childhood, fair, unfading bowed,
Where fancy led me in my happy hours;
Green path of love innocence and truth,
Where fond affection brought me in my youth.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 21:32
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left out in a field to provide for themselves. Turkeys are very delicate and hard to rear. When they are very young the food that they generally get is scrambled egg, and chopped nettles, after a week or fortnight. When they are a month or six weeks old they get oatmeal boiled and some greens. When the get strong, then they get grains and other food mixtures, such as bran, pollard, etc.
The chief tradition connected with fowl in this locality is, that a third descendant of a March cock gives a warning when danger is near. If he stands at the door and crows facing in it is a sign of ill luck, and if he stands at the door and crows outward it denotes good luck. The March cock, is supposed to crow at four, and six o'clock in the morning, and long ago when people had no clocks or watches to tell the time, they used to keep him behind the door up on a perch, and when he would crow in the morning, they would know the time.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 21:21
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chest where the tools were. Now she said you’ll have to lean in for it yourself. He bent in for the tool and when she got him in half way over the box she pushed him in and said you’ll stop there until my husband and his father return.
The news was sent back to England and at that moment the two of them were let home. When they went in home they let out the messenger and that is how Goban and his son came safe from being killed.
The man that told me this story is Michael Howley
Cloughroake
Ardrahan
Co. Galway
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 21:15
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chest where the tools were. Now she said you’ll have to lean in for it yourself. He bent in for the tool and when she got him in half way over the box she pushed him in and said you’ll stop there until my husband and his father return.
The news was sent back to England and at that moment the two of them were let home. When they went in home they let out the messenger and that is how Goban and his son came safe from being killed.
The man that told me this story is Michael Howley
Cloughroake
Ardrahan
Co. Galway
Mary Howley
Cloughroake
Ardrahan
Co. Galway
22nd.. 3.. 1938
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 21:14
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Fowl should be kept in a well ventilated, airy, warm, clean house. The perches and roosts should be kept clean, and they should be often be put out in the air and washed with paraffin oil, or some other disenfectant spirit, to keep the insects from the perches. The walls of the houses should also be white-washed for to keep them fresh and clean.
The number of hen-eggs which are usually put down to be hatched is thirteen as it is supposed to be a lucky number. Hen-eggs take three weeks to be hatched, duck-eggs four weeks and geese and turkeys four weeks. The food given to chickens when they are only a few days old is, bread crumbs and hard boiled eggs. When they are a month old, or six weeks, they get meal or oats, and the same treatment applies to ducks. Geese are generally
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 21:11
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have to go home for it.
The people would not let him home because he would never return again. They sent a messenger home instead of Goban for the tool.
Goban told him the name of the tool and this is the name he gave it. crucked against [?] crucked and straight against straight.
The messenger went home and when he came to Gobans house he told the girl he had come for the tool named crucked against crucked and straight against straight.
The moment she heard those words she knew something was up. She told him where the tool was and she brought him up to a big
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 21:07
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when he told his father he told him that he’d have to marry that girl. He was pleased at what his father told him and somwas the girl.
They both got married and they had seven weeks wedding and they were very happy.
A few weeks after that Goban and his son were over in England building a big manshion for a rich person. When it would be finished Goban and his son were to be killed so that no other such house should be build
When it was nearly done Goban said he had to give it a little finishing finishing touch but that the tool was home in Ireland and he’d
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 21:02
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 21:01
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her horns to her legs or sometimes they put a "pookeen" on her. A piece of a bucket is tied across her eyes to prevent her from seeing. The tyings are made of rope or a piece of a bag. Some of them are home made. They are called by various names such as a spancel and "curnask". In olden times the people used keep their cows inside "May night", for it was supposed they would be milked by people having power of witch-craft in the form of a hair, and there used be no produce in their milk for the year.
In the stable there is a manger for holding the horses hay and a small box for holding (the horses) oats or mangolds.
The horses are clipped once a year but some people clip them twice. Any horse that will go on a gourney once they will know the road forever.
Once a man went to Macroom and bought a horse from a man in Kerry. At that time he did not know where the man was from or his name. He brought home the horse and next morning she was gone. He could not find trace of him until twelve months after when he found out the horse had gone back to Kerry.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 21:00
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it. He went home and Goban was pleased at what he done.
Next day he sent off telling him to be going on until he see water going up a hill.
Off he went until he came to a river and there he saw the girl again and she watering cattle.
They both spoke to each other and the girl asked him where he was going. He said that his father sent him on until he see water going up the hill.
You needn’t go any farther now look at the water going up the cows throat isn’t that going up the hill.
The boy went home and
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:51
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Off he went with sheep skin thinking of how he could bring the sheep skin and the price of it home.
When he reached the town he went arownd shouting my father told me to bring home this sheep skin and the price of it. The people were only laughing at him but after a while he met the girl and she asked him what brought him to town to-day. He said that his father had sent him with the sheep skin to sell bring itself and the price of it home.
The girl opened her bag and picked off the wool and then gave him the skin and the price of
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:44
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There are several animals in the farm such as cows, calves, sheep, horses, pigs, and goats.
Every cow in the farm has a name, such as Rosy, Star, Strawberry, Bawny, Cuby, Speckle and others. When I drive the cow I say "how how". When I drive the calves I say "suck suck" and to the horse I say "hup".
The cow house or stall is a large building. It is divided into two or three parts. Some cows are tied by the neck with a chain, but where there are a lot of cows they are stalled in between two stakes which are driven on a thick stick which are driven on a thick stick that is nailed on the ground, and the stakes are tied on the top with a hasp. If there is a cross cow in the farm there is a rope tied from
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:41
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all daughters when he was married and there was a neighboring woman living near him who had all sons. One day the women exchanged a boy for a girl and the fathers knew nothing about this.
They both grew up to be a big boy and girl. The girl was very smart and brilliant but the boy grew up very stupid.
Goban was wondering who the boy was so stupid besides the rest of his family.
One day his father sent him off to the market with a sheep skin and wool on it and he told him to bring home the skin and the price of it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:40
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all daughters when he was married and there was a neighboring woman living near him who had all sons. One day the women exchanged a boy for a girl and the fathers knew nothing about this.
They both grew up to be a big boy and girl. The girl was very smart and brilliant but the boy grew up very stupid.
Yoban was wondering who the boy was so stupid besides the rest of his family.
One day his father sent him off to the market with a sheep skin and wool on it and he told him to bring home the skin and the price of it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:36
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A Story 10.. 2.. 1938
There was once a man named Goban Saor and he had
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:35
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a door the leader of the band chants the following words,
"The wren, the wren the king of all birds,
St. Stephen's Day he was caught in the furze.
We chased him up, and we chased him down.
And one of wren-boys knocked him down,
Up with the kettle and down with the pan.
Give us our answer and let us be gone".
21/11/38.
They visit all the houses in the
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:35
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"God be merficul to all the souls of the faithfull departed", piously responed the whole group.
"I have me doubts, too, of Miss Geraldine being O'Kennedy's daughter, either," said the first speaker after a pause. "I don't know", returned Hal, "but this I know she's a most beautiful girl and I could never be tired looking at her; Keevan Connors would give his two living eyes for a sight of her, and he's everyday making raumashes[?] of songs about her, talking of gods and goddesses and such like haythenish names".
"He was very near getting too much of her today," said the old man.
"Hirrah! but it would be a pity to have them drowned, anyhow, Tom".
"Troth it would," said Hal, "but be me sowkins, I'd venture a drowning and a hanging to boot, to have the purty crathur's white arms twined around my neck, for all the world like a spancel of driven snow."
There was a laugh at the comparison of the spancel, and the old man clapped Hal on the back & said; "Well done! that was as clever as Keevan Connors himself would do it with all his high larning."
"Arrah! but his a mighty grate scholard, that same Keevan", said Tom.
"Murthy Quinlan, the horse-jockey, and O'Brien O'Brien were great cronies about 22 years ago", said the old man.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:32
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Winter time in order to make them lay. To call the hens we say "tuk tuk tuk". To call the ducks we say "Fínn Fínn". To call the geese we say "bad bad bad". It is the nature of ducks to be in water and often in marshy places they go wild and do not go back to the farmyard any more.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:31
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by doing that he would have a better crop.
John Tarpey
Ballyglass
Ardrahan
Co Galway 20th.. 12th.. 1937
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:30
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St John’s Night falls on the twenty third of June. The people of this part of the country have a very queer custom in that night. All the people of the village gather together and they make a very big fire in the side of the road. Some one of them brings a musical instrument with them and then they have great sport dancing and after a long time the people quench the big fire and then every one brings a coal from the big fire and put’s it in his own garden and he believes
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:26
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on so as to keep shelter to the horse.
Goats go wild if they are not tied down and looked after. They like to up on the high grounds. Pigs like to root when they are left free, to prevent this they are ringed. To call the pigs we say "Bon bon bon bon", and to call a sow we say "hurish, hurish, hurish", and to call a sheep we say "shuain, shuain, shuain".
The domestic animals which we have at home are the cat and the dog. The dog's house is called a "kennel". The name of our dog is "Shep". When we are calling him we whistle to him or call him by his name. He is a sheepdog and is very useful for driving the cows. The cat which we have is a great pet of mine. His name is Puss. He has no special box or house but he sleeps with the horses or cows.
The fowl which we have at home are the hens, ducks, geese and turkeys. These need a great deal of care especially in the
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:24
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On St Stephen's Day, all the boys of this village join in a band and around the parish gathering money "to bury the wren".
They disguise themselves by wearing old clothes, and masks over their faces. They do not hunt or kill a wren nor have they any special way of dressing themselves. One of them takes all the money and divides it in equal shares for all in the evening. It is spent in any way. When they come to
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:22
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When it is said aloud that the lady was Geraldine O'Brien the strange man became very pale.
"Hal," said one of the fishermen, "I think the young chap was no more a son of ould Phelim Connors than I be".
"I never heard to the contrary, Tom". answered the other.
"But I'm certain he's not", continued the first speaker, "for Nelly Connors tould Kate Murray, the night before she died, that she was as sorry for leaving the gossoon as if he was her own flesh and blood - and if he was either kith or kin of hers would she go out of the world with a lie on her lips?"
A very old man now joined in the discourse, saying he "well remembered the first day he saw the boy Keevan in Nelly Connor's arms: he was a fine lump of a child and very nately dressed, but howsomedever or another she would never give an honest answer to any kwestions about him. One time she'd say he was her own son, and ax me wasn't he very like Phelim; and another time she'd say he was a nephew of an uncle of hers from Knockshegown; but that all belonging to him except herself was dead. God be merciful to their souls."
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:18
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Monksfield big house 26.. 1.. 1938
One night three men went up to the big house looking for shoots for their houses.
The Joyces in Ardrahan were living in the big house at this time and there was one of them sick.
The people were very great with the Joyces and when the three men were coming home it was about twelve o’clock and they looked in the window of the big house and they saw a fairy man sitting by the fire and he warming himself and the very minute they looked in he disappeared. The
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:17
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Joyces were gone to bed and the men got very afraid and they ran for their lives and they never went in it since.
The man that told me the story is Michael Howley
Cloughroake
Ardrahan
Co Galway
27.. 1.. 1938
Bridie Howley
Lavally Connor
Ardrahan
Co Galway
27.. 1.. 1938
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:14
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Monksfield big house 26.. 1.. 1938
One night three men went up to the big house looking for shoots for their houses.
The Joyces in Ardrahan were living in the big house at this time and there was one of them sick.
The people were very great with the Joyces and when the three men were coming home it was about twelve o’clock and they looked in the window ofmthe big house and they saw a fairy man sitting by the fire and he warming himself and the very minute they looked in he disappeared. The
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:13
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that the cows head cannot come out without one stick being unloosed. If the cows kick when they are being milked the two back legs of the cow are tied with a spancel so that they cannot kick. On other occasions they are tied from the horns to the legs so as to prevent them from tresspassing. The tying is generally rope but sometimes they are made of straw by the people themselves. In olden days they were all made at home.
A branch of "sally" or "furze" blossoms is hung in the cowhouse the first morning in May. It is supposed to bring luck on the stock.
The custom connected with milking is to sing to the cow while milking her and she would give the milk freely. A horse is clipped in the fall of the year to prevent under sweating which often causes them to get colds. Some people believe in clipping all the horses body but others believe is clipping only the lower part of the horse. The upper hair is generally left
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:08
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Scarcely had he given the child to his nurse when one of his retainers tapped at his door. He handed a purse of gold, silver crucifix & a letter in O'Kennedy's hand. He had got them in the basket.
The contents of the letter were:-
"O'Kennedy, thou art childless. To thy care an unfortunate wanderer consigns the orphan daughter of his heart's affections. Train her up as thy own; and as thou doest unto her may God do unto you. Perhaps in happier hours she may be claimed at thy hands by her illfated father."
From that moment O'Kennedy loved the little maid. He christened her Geraldine. Sixteen years had passed and the young maiden knew nought of her birth. One May day a small boat was seen shining on Lough Derg between Dromineer and Islandmore. In the boat were two women and a man.
As the neared the Island the younger lady's glove fell into the water, and while endeavouring to get it she too fell into the lake. The man jumped in after her and seized her. Now, the boat drifted with the current & he could not catch it. He then swam toward the shore. A pilgrim, who heard the shrieks of the other women came to the rescue in his boat. He took them ashore.
The people now learned the man in the 1st boat was a Kevin O'Connor & the young lady was Geraldine.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:08
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wren the king of all birds on Stephen’s day he was caught in the furze up with the kettle and down with pan give us a shilling or two to bury the wren
from rock to rock we followed him into a public shop we dipped his beak in a barrel of beer I wish you all a happy new year.
Then the people pay the, and they go around to every house they can during the day.
Bridie Howley
Lavally Connor
Ardrahan
Co Galway
26.. 1.. 1938
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:07
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and thinking of how she’d hide the gold.
At last she said to herself I will bring my gold up to the lios at the top of the village and she got up and she took her box of gold with her and when she reached the lios she hid the gold with the shade of the moon and she looked at at the moon and she said I will come back again to-morrow night to see the gold and I’ll know where I left it when I look at the shade of the moon.
She came back again to the lios next night to get her gold but the shade of the moon
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:06
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wasn’t in the same part of the sky and she was up all night looking for the gold but she didn’t succeed in getting it and it is supposed that the gold is in the lios yet.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:04
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St Stephen’s day falls on the 26th day of December every year.
The people have an awful custom on that day every year.
They dress themselves up in old clothes and they put masks on their faces and they go around to every house they can and they go dancing and singing and they gather alot of money.
They have a rhyme and they say it in every house and this is it. The wren the
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 20:02
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of potatoes and turnips or else sprats, also a basin of sour milk between two men. When taking their meals, the family sat round a table placed in the centre of the floor. If any of the potatoes were left over they were roasted later on, in the ashes of the furze. They used to call them "Roasters". Stirabout made from Indian Meal was sometimes taken with the salt sprats.
The men used to thresh the corn with a flail and they should have so much threshed in order to earn four pence a day.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 19:59
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The animals which we have on this farm as cows, horse, pigs and calves. The names of the cows are "Funnel", "Bawny", "Cuddy", "Bully-heck", "Polly-cow", "Kerry cow", "crab", "Turgin" and "Fairín". The common call which we have for driving the cows is "How, how hets". When we are calling the calves we say "Suck suck suck". In olden days to call horses they used to say "Phrit, phrit, phrit, phrit, phrit".
Our cowhouse is fitted with "stalls" for each individual cow. When the are being turned in the driver says "stall up" and each cow knows its own stall. The cows are tied so
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 19:58
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In olden times people had potatoes either roasted or boiled and milk for breakfast. They were very glad after their hard day's work to get another meal. This consisted chiefly
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 19:57
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Kinsale towering like a gigantic umbrella to the sky. But some thoughtless parties began to hack off limbs and bark. The sap dried it became an ugly skeleton.
Nothing now remains but a withered stump.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 19:56
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for prophecies appealed to town dwellers as well as to their country cousins. Needless to say the story of Scott's sappling was after told. To the credit of these old people it must be said that they showed more veneration for the Tobar Mhuire than do their descendants. Voluntairly they took their turns in cleaning it and would not allow any rubbish to lie near it. They treated it as a holy well. But in our own time came traps who had no respect for this blessed spring, and, following their bad example of dipping dirty vessels into it others also became careless.
As for the tree, up to twenty five years ago it could be seen from any of the heights around
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 19:48
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“Ní Cathaoir mo chathaoir agus ní Cába mo Chába
Tá mé mo shuidhe ar m’ainm agus tá mo shlainneadh fá mo Nhiuineál”
(Cathaoir Mac Cúba a b’ainm dó)
Anna ní Cheallachan
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 18:53
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Bhí fear darbh ainm dó Seán Mhichíl ag dul go dtí an margadh i nDúngarbhán isteach is amach le seasca bliain ó shoin. Chuir comharsa air an páipéar nuachta Waterford News do thabhairt chuige. Bhí Seán toilteanach.
Nuiar a chuimhnigh sé ar an dteachtaireacht theip ar glan cuimhneamh ar ainm an pháipéir. Bhí an fear bocht ina dteannta. Bhuail sé isteach go tigh na bpáipéar agus d'inis a scéal - go raibh páipéar nuachta uaidh do comharsan leis; ná faghadh sé an t-ainm do thabhairt leis as Béarla ach ní raibh fhios aige as Gaeilge é.
Dúirt an té bhí ag caint leis ainm an páipéir a rá as Gaeilge agus b'fhéidir go dtuigfeadh sé an ceann a bhí uaidh. "Sé an páipéar atá uaim " arsa Seán "ach @Cuinncín Phortlairge' - Waterford Nose - (Noos).
Curtar an páipéar sin fós fé chló i gCathair Portlairge.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 18:42
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voice saying "Build no house here". The man was afraid and he went away and he never asked to build it again.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 18:41
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There is a rath in Kilmore, surrounded by a hedge of blackthorn bushes.
Outside the bushes there is a ditch full of water, and it about six feet wide with a wooden bridge across it.
There is about three feet of water in it. On the top of the rath there is a hollow about three feet wide, and it is supposed that it was an entrance once to the rath.The hole is now closed up, because it was dangerous to animals.
The late Patrick Fagan Kilmore, Kilcock said that he often saw fairies, on the rath of Kilmore on Halloween night.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 18:38
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There is a fort in Galtrim. Long ago the late Mrs. Barry of Arodstown had a dream that gold was there, and that if she dug a sod she would get a pot of gold. She went there accompanied by her son. When she had dug the first sod a black dog jumped up and bit the boy's leg. The woman got the pot of gold but the boy's leg never healed and he died soon afterwards.
There is another hollow called the "Ratheen" between my father's land and Mr. Parson's land. Long ago a man was beginning to build a house when he heard a
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 18:31
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In old days there were no schools as they are now. There were no special teachers for any particular place. They were paid no salary as they are now, from any Board or Government. They taught the children in out- houses, or in the open air, near a ditch, or hedge in the Summer- time. That is how the schools got the name of "Hedge schools." The teachers were paid something by the parents of the children whom they taught. They also got their support free. The poor children got very little teaching then when they were not able to pay or help the teachers in any way. Irish was taught more than English. There were no pens or paper only slates and pencils. The children had no seats only blocks or stones. No teacher spent his life- time in one place.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 18:05
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Trí fichid bliain ó shoin do shuí Johnny Barron ó Lag na Fothrach isteach chun praisig na maidne do caitheamh díreach roimh teacht a chuid fear chun na gnótha ceudna.
Níor chuimhnig Johnny ar thriail do baint as an bpraiseach ach shlog sé siar bolgum de i d'urchar. Tháinigh na deoracha as a shúilibh ach shocraig sé a aghaidh comh mear agus d'féid sé agus labhair leis na fearaibh mar ba ghnáth leis.
D'fair sé iad go rabhdar ar tí an bhreacfast do chur isteach agus ansan labhair le na mhnaoi agus an cailín aimsire go mín, réidh, mall "Is mairg díbh nár théighbhir é seo dúinn".
Dar ndóigh thig na fir gur fuair a bhí an praiseach agus siúd go dána fé na dhéin iad ach dhíoladar go dóighte as a ndámidheacht agus níor éirigh le Johnny teacht saor, mar fuair sé steall den phraiseach treasna a uchta.
"Seadh" arsa fear acu nuair a tháinigh a caint chuige "ní thagann an cleasaidhe saor i gcónaí".
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:53
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Is dócha go bhfuil triochad bliain anois ó innseadh so dom. Is ag dul abhaile ón scoil do bhíos féin nuair do chonacas fear ar thaobh an bhóthair agus é ag deisiú rothar.
Stadas is bheannuigheas dó. Is é do bhí go cráidte. Dúirt sé liom gurab é sin an t-octú babhta aige an lá san ag stopadh poill san mboinn. Chuir a scéal iontas orm agus dúbhras san leis. "Bhuel", arsa sé "ní chuireann sé iontas ormsa". "Dé chúis é sin?" arsa mise. "Mar nuair do bhíos ag bogadh chun bóthair ar maidin is ar éigin a bhíos socair ar an ndiollaid nuair treasna an bhóthair romham amach le bean agus a cuid gruaige rua buí an imeacht le gaoith".
"Dá gcuimhneóchainn orm féin in am, chasfainn abhaile, ach bhí sé de mí-ádh orm dul chun cinn. Tá fhios agam anois cad ba bhun leis - an ceann rus sin a bhuail treasna orm ar maidin. Má bhuaileann a leithéid arís fúm, ní bheidh orm ach casadh abhaile dhom féin".
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:53
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Is dócha go bhfuil triochad bliain anois ó innseadh so dom. Is ag dul abhaile ón scoil do bhíos féin nuair do chonacas fear ar thaobh an bhóthair agus é ag deisiú rothar.
Stadas is bheannuigheas dó. Is é do bhí go cráidte. Dúirt sé liom gurab é sin an t-octú babhta aige an lá san ag stopadh poill san mboinn. Chuir a scéal iontas orm agus dúbhras san leis. "Bhuel", arsa sé "ní chuireann sé iontas ormsa". "Dé chúis é sin?" arsa mise. "Mar nuair do bhíos ag bogadh chun bóthair ar maidin is ar éigin a bhíos socair ar an ndiollaid nuair treasna an bhóthair romham amach le bean agus a cuid gruaige rua buí an imeacht le gaoith".
"Dá gcuimhneóchainn orm féin in am, chasfainn abhaile, ach bhí sé de mí-ádh orm dul chun cinn. Tá fhios agam anois cad ba bhun leis - an ceann rus sin a bhuail treasna orm ar maidin. Má bhuaileann a leithéid arís fúm, ní bheidh orm ach casadh abhaile dhom féin".
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:48
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"Sal Óg Rua" (-)
"Róisín Dubh) (-)
"Bárr an tSléibhe" (Séamus 'ac Oscair)
"Moll Dubh an Ghleanna" (-)
"Róisín Dubh an Ghleanna" (Fionán MacCárrthaigh)
"Túirne Mháire" (-)
"Máire Ní Eidhin (an Reachtabhrach)
"Micheál Bhrighid Ní Chraimhsgin"
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:47
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As black as coal and as white as snow and it hops on the road like hailstone. A magpie
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:45
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never guess that. A briar
A houseful and a roomful and you couldn’t catch a spoonful. The air
Twenty four white horses standing on a stall up comesmthe red one and licks them all. your tongue and teeth
A head like a thimble and a tail like a rat and if you were guessing for ever you would never guess that. A pipe
Black and white and read all over. A news paper
Bridie Howley
Lavally Connor
Ardrahan 23.. 1-1938
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:43
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"Na Buachaillí Bána" (A. Ó Reachtabhra)
"Eoghan Cóir" (Riocárd Baireid)
"Oidhche na Gaoithe Móire" (Micheál a Búrca)
"Anach Cuain" ( A. Ó Reachtabhra)
"Oileán Éadaigh" (-)
"Magaidh Láidir" (Seán Ó Neachtain)
"Amhrán an Tae" (Colm a Bhailis)
"Bárr an tSléibhe" (Séamus Mac Oscair)
"Donnchadh Bán" (-)
"Coinnleach Glas an Fhoghmhair" (-)

"Sean-bhó Mhághnuis" (Micheál MagCraith, Ceathrú na gCloch, Ceathrú-Thaidhg

"Máibhle Sheimh Ní Cheallaigh" (an Cearbhallanach)
"Muirnín na Gruaige Báine" (-)
"Cáit an Chúil Bháin"
"Cath Annraoí Luing (-)
"A Ógánaigh" (-)
"Teanga Bhinn Ár Máthar" (Séamus Ó Maoildia)
"Aisling" (Liam Pléimeann)
"Amhrán an Phúca" (Micheal Mac Suibhne)
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:41
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Humpy dumty sat on the wall humpy dumty got a great fall and all the kings horses and all the kings men wouldn’t put humpy dumty together again. An egg
Twenty sheep went out a gap twenty more went after that the shepherd and his dog how many feet is that. Two feet
Twenty (sick) six sheep went out a gap one died and how many came back. Nineteen
As round as a rainbow and has teeth like a cat and if you were guessing forever you would
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:40
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Tá thar trí fithid bliain ó thit sé amach agus fear ó Cheapach Chuinn do bhí i gceist. Risteárd Collender a ainm baiste ach 'crutchi' a ghlaotaí air mar do bhí ainimh mhór coisc ag goilleamhaint air agus dá bhrí sin bhíodh croisín agus bata mar thacaí aige agus níor bhféidir do siúl ná seasamh gan iad mar bhí an chos sin 'marbh' agus ar liubarnaig leis i gcónaí.
Chuireadh sé an-spéis i 'main' na gcoileach 'game' agus is mó bub a bhuail sé ar na 'bobbies' ina dtaobh. Bhíodh sé i gcónaí 'ah tabhairt amach' agus ag tógaint sicíní game.
Chuir sé fé chirc ghoir líon ubh ach tar éis leath na h-aimsire á ngorrughadh aici thit sí cortha den obair agus thréig sí a nead. Bhí 'cruchi' bocht i dtannta agus cuireadh teachtairí anseo agus ansúd agus deithneas an t-saol ortha ag tnúth go dtiocfaidhe suas le circ ghoir ach, mo creach, n raibh ceann le fáil ar ór ná ar airdead. Bhí an fear bocht cráite ceart agus tar éis a mharana do dhéanadh ar an gceist siúd leis fé dhéin na n-ubh. Chuir sé isteach ina leaba féin iad agus siúd isteach leis féin ina dhiaidh agus d'fhan ann ar feadh deich lá agus d'éirigh leis an t-ál do thabhairt amach. Rángadh go raibh cearc le fáil ansan agus gurb é toil Dé gur thóg sí leo.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:26
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met my Aunty Noreen and she had silver toes and an iron nose and on my oath she would frighten the crows. A gun
I went up the boreen and I came down the boreen and I carried the boreen on my back. A ladder
Spell knocked wall in three letters. A gap
Long legs crooked thighs small head and no eyes. A tongs
Riddle me riddle and what is that over your head and under your hat. The hair of your head
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:23
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oileán bhí cómhgarach dó agus tá an t-ainm "Oileán an Chapaill" ar an oileán ó shoin.

Pádhraich De Búrca,
Port an Chlumaigh,
Ceathrú Thaidhg
a scriobh
Tomás De Búrca a d'innis
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:22
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Bhí fear ann fadó agus lá amháin d'éirigh sé g h-an-mhoch agus chonnaic sé an fhairrge tirm ar feadh na mhílte. Annsin fuair sé a chapall agus d'imthigh leis síos go dtí an tráigh agus amach leis. Ar deireadh thainic sí chomh fada le coill mhór agus bhí éadaigh síoda ar na crainn. Shíl sé cuid diobh a ghoid acht chonnaic na daoiní é agus gháir síád amach
"Tá fear ó tír na mbeo ag goid an óir ó tír na marbh".
Agus sgaoil siad an fhairrge ina dhiaidh. Rith an fear agus an capall acht rith an fhairrge níos gasta agus bhí an fhairrge chomh luath leis nuair a léim an capall isteach ar
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:21
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riddle me that and I’ll give you a fiddle — — A haw
Four stick standers four belly landers two tucky tucks and a wheel about. A cow
As I went out a gullery gap I met my uncle Teddy I cut off his head and drank his blood and left his body easy a Bottle of wine
I have a little house and a mouse wouldn’t fit in it and all the men in Derry wouldn’t count all the windows in it. A thimble
As I went up the boreen I
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:08
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Tá trí clocha móra ar thaobh an Dúna gar do Phort an Chlumhaig agus glaoidhtear Trí Cailleachaí an Dúna ortha.
Tá pictiuir mná amuigh ins an Rinn Bhán ins an alt agus deir daoine gur naomh a bhí ina comhnuidhe amuigh annsin, agus roimh a bhfuair sí bás, rinne sí pictiuir ann.
Tá cloch mhór thuas ar an gcnoc ag Claidhe an Ghairtéil, áit a bhfuair fear bás ann leis an ocras, agus é ag teacht ó'n aonach, agus nuair a chualaidh a mhuinntir é chuir siad an chloch ann le tine purgadóra a lagadh air. Nuair a chaitheann siad an chloch abruigheann siad:
"Go bhfosclaidh Dia le d'anam"

Micheál Mac Dhomhnaill,
Ceathrú-Thaidgh
a scríobh
A mháthair (Bean Mhic Dhomhnaill) a d'iinnis
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 17:00
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uair amháin agus nár chuimhnigh siad an brat do chur amach. Nuair a bhí siad ag ithe a suipéir le dul a chodladh, thainic torann beag ag an doras. Chuaidh an bhean síos gur oscail sí é. Thainic Naomhm Brighid isteach agus d'fhiafruigh sí díobhtha tuige nár chur siad an brat amach. Nuair a bhí siad le freagra a thabhairt bhí sí imthighthe. Chuaid an bhean amach leis an mbrat, ach ní raibh Brigid le feiceáil.

Pádraig Ó Gallchobhair
Corrán Buidhe
a d'innis
Brighid Ní Ghallchobhair a scríobh.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 16:56
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Tugann na daoine go leor "onóir" do Naomh Brighid. Nuair a thigeanns Oidhche 'le Brighid déanann siad crosóga de chochan agus de ádhmad i n-onóir dí. Crochann siad an chrosóg in áirde ar tháirne agus fágann siad annsin í go ceann blliadhna.
Cuireann na daoine cóta amach ar thaobh an tighe ar feadh an lae uilig. Tugann siad Brat Bhrighde ar an mbrat seo.
Deirtear go raibh lánamhain ann
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 15:52
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Long ago, the children wouldn't get shoes until they would be sixteen years of age. It is said that after a boy would be able to mow he would get a pair, even though they were cheap at the time. We are told that there lived a man in this townland who never wore shoes in his life. He lived till he was eighty years, and never suffered from colds or sore feet.
In the middle of winter the boys and men of this parish used to be working on roads barefooted. They did not feel a bit cold, though the ground was often covered with snow and ice. Sometimes they would wrap pieces of bags or goats skin around their feet, and this was done but seldom. Old people say that the best wash for the feet is water that potatoes were boiled in. If one chanced to get burned ''Hemlock'' was got and mixed with butter. This was applied as soon as possible. For coins, the fat of bacon was supposed to be a cure and for sprains the person suffering went to a curer. He would tie a flaxen thread on the part injured and when this thread was lost, the sprain the sprain was cured.
There were more shoemakers long ago than there are now, but they used to make ''clogs''. These shoes are not made at present. The shoemakers used to go from house to house with his ''kit''
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 15:51
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For time enough my heart will break
And time enough and soon
When fortune far away I see
Far from the Spa and Doon
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 15:49
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I have collected the following verses from my grandfather. This song was composed by the late Mr Jasper Tully of Boyle.
Oh, Mary when your winning smiles
Like all those waters blue
Lough Key and all its wooded isles
Are vanished from my view
And when I leave my native home
I crave no other boon
Than once again Lough Key to roam
And climb the Rock of Doon
And when I climb its dizzy heights
Proud Rockingham I see
And the Plains of Boyle so bright
That stretch beyond Lough Key
Come, piper, play up a merry air
The merriest one you know
And for a while you'll chase dull care
And let your spirits flow
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 15:49
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I have collected the following verses from my grandfather. This son was composed by the late Mr Jasper Tully of Boyle.
Oh, Mary when your winning smiles
Like all those waters blue
Lough Key and all its wooded isles
Are vanished from my view
And when I leave my native home
I crave no other boon
Than once again Lough Key to roam
And climb the Rock of Doon
And when I climb its dizzy heights
Proud Rockingham I see
And the Plains of Boyle so bright
That stretch beyond Lough Key
Come, piper, play up a merry air
The merriest one you know
And for a while you'll chase dull care
And let your spirits flow
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 15:47
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rejected
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In Newhall about two miles from Killerk, there is gold supposed to be hidden, under a stepping stone, but no one ever ventured to this either!
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 15:29
approved
rejected
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went in to hairys mouth. your stocking
Tis under the fire and ‘tis over the fire and it never touches the fire. A cake in an oven
A little red man with a little red nose and the more you pull him the more he goes — — A cigarette
The king of Morocco sent a present home as bottomless pit with blood flesh and bones. a ring in your finger
A little red man standing on a bush a stick in his hand and a stone in his middle
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 15:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Riddles 17.. 1.. 1938
Four little bottles standing on a hill and they ae turned upside down and they can’t spill. Cows tits teats
As round as an Apple and as deep as a cup and if you were pulling for ever you would never pull it up. A well
Hairy in hairy out hairy
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 15:08
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rejected
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wasn’t in the same part of the sky and she was up all night looking for the gold but she didn’t succeed in getting it and it is supposed that the gold is in the [Uos?] yet.
Maureen Dooley
Moneen
Ardrahan
Co Galway
I got this story from
Thomas Coy
Moneen
Ardrahan
Co Galway
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 15:08
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rejected
awaiting decision
In Killerk, near Reighfa bross there is supposed to be gold hidden, near a wall with a weasel minding it.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 15:06
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
and thinking of how she’d hide the gold.
At last she said to herself I will bring my gold up to the [Uos?] at the top of the village and she got up and she took her box of gold with her and when she reached the [Uos?] she hid the gold with the shade of the moon and she looked at at the moon and she said I will come back again to-morrow night to see the gold and I’ll know where I left it when I look at the shade of the moon.
She came back again to the [Uos?] next night to get her gold but the shade of the moon
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 14:33
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rejected
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Chuaidh sé síos ag an gcladach san áit a raibh an t-sean chailleach.
Dubhairt sé léithe ubhall a cheannacht acht dubhairt sise nach gceannochaidh. "Blas de seo go bfeicfidh ú chomh milis is tá sé ar seisean. Thóg sí ceann agus bhlas sí dhe. Ar an noimead thuit sí sa gcladach le meadhcan an dá adairc a bhí uirthí. Leig as seo mé agus tuibhraidh mé céad míle púnt dhuit. "As sin ní corruigheochaidh tú go dtuibhraidh tú croidhe mo éinín dhom arsa Seán. Níor mhaith leíthe é thabhairt dhó acht bhí dá plucadh agus thug sí dhó acht i leigint as. Nuair a fuair sé croidhe an éinín d'fág sé annsin í agus chuaidh sé go dtí an caisleán. Chuaidh sé suad an caisleán agus thug sé ceann de na h-ubhla glasa dá mhnaoi a raibh a cloigeann amach ar an bfuinneoíg agus thuit an dá adairc dhí agus cuadar síos san talamh agus rinne siad dá phier geata ar aghaidh dorais an caisleáin.
Chruinnigh sé sgata fear agus chaith siad an t-sean chailleach amach sa bfairrge agus mhair sé féin agus a bhean saidbhir sasta in a dhiaidh sin.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 14:10
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rejected
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aca agus ar an bpoinnte, thuit an dá adhairc dhe agus bhí sé chomh maith is a bhí sé riamh.
Chuimnigh sé ar seift annsin, agus thosuigh sé ag baint slat agus rinne sé dá chiseán dheas agus leig sé do'n fheasoig fás air féin. Líon sé an dá chisean le na h-ubhla agus nuair a bhí sin déanta aige, chuir sé an caipín ar a chloigeann agus dubhairt sé leis an gcaipín é fhágail ag an gcaislean in a raibh a bhean i mblá cliath, agus ar an bpoinnte boise bhí sé ann.
Leig sé ar féin go raibh sé bacach agus chuaidh go doras an chaisleáin. D'fiafruigh sé de na searbontaí an gceannochaidh siad ubhla acht dubhairt siad nach gceannochaidh. "Seo tabhair suas an ubhall seo ag an mnaoi óig beidir go dtaithneochaidh sé léithe." Thug an searbhonta an t-ubhall chuig an mnaoi óig. Chuir sí amach a cloigeann ar an bfuinneóig go bfeicfheadh sí an fear a raibh na h-ubhla aige. Nuair a bhí a cloigeann amuigh aicí, bhain sí greim as an ubhall. Tháinig dá adhairc uirthí a bhí deic míle ar fad agus níor fhead sí dul isteach no amach. "Leig as seo mé agus tuibhraidh mé airgead ar bith sa domhan duit," ar sise. "Cá bfuil do mháthair," arsa Seán. "Tá sí thíos ag an bfairrge ag tógáil áer," ar sise.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 13:11
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rejected
awaiting decision
the fields and as she was going along the path she met a candlestick and a candle in it and it lighting and every four or five yards she went after that she met a candle and a candlestick and she put them in her apron and the last one she met was very small and she kept it in her hand and when she reached the house where her son was dead all the candlesticks and candles vanished and none none of them remained but the last one she found.
When she went into the house where her son was dead she filled the little candlestick with
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 13:10
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rejected
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about them. How Lisnagranchy got its name is the people thought long ago that there were forts and fairy-trees in it because it means the fort of the fairy-tree.
Delia Whelan
Lisnagranchy
Ardrahan
The Potato Crop
We sow potatoes in our farm every year. There is about an mere and a half sown under potatoes and the amount seldom varies.
The farmer and his son prepares the ground. The land is not manured before it is turned up. The potatoes are sown
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 11:44
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A man named Thomas Dwyer of Ballyshane, Innistioge, was returning home after (cuirdíchad) cuirtuigheacht about 10 years ago when he heard the beansidhe crying, and mistook the wailing for that of cats at first. A neighbor Jack McGrath died about that night, so the bean-sidhe was following his family. But the old families are dying out, there is nobody that name in Ballyshane at the present time.
So if the old families all die out, probably the beansidhe will depart from amongst us also.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 11:38
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to find out about the weather the weather the birds acted as weather prophets. When they heard the blackbird whistling in the evening they knew frost was coming.
The sea-gulls on land are a sign of a storm. Crows clustering together on tree tops portend a storm. When the crows fly with their heads downwards we expect rain.
When one magpie comes out alone to look for food in spring we expect cold weather.
When two come out we look forward to a fine spell. When we see the swallows flying high in the air we expect fine weather.
If they fly low we do not expect fine weather.
If they fly low we do not expect fine days. The plovers piping in the fields remind us of snow. When we hear the curlew calling we provide for the rainy days. To see pigeons flying into the ever-green trees is the sign of cold wet weather.
The first time you hear the cuckoo, if you lift your right foot and if there is a brown hair under your foot you will not live
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 11:35
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One day Eoghan Ruadh was at a country ''Station''. He was then a young lad and a poor servant boy. Every time Eoghan made an attempt to go to confession he was pushed back by the priest and first preferance given to the more well-to-do people present. After a time Eoghan went + sat on a heap of turf at the end of the kitchen. When the Priest had finished all the confessions he beckoned to Eoghan. Then Eoghan answered in verse-
Ní hí an bhochtaineacht is othlaibh liom
Beidh síos go deo
Ach an tareasnae a leanann í
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 11:33
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rejected
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stealing the gold. A man went looking for the gold round the trench and a fairy took him in and he was never heard of since and neither were the fairies. Lyons' fort is in the townland of Newtown.
Gold and silver ornaments are hidden in Killone abbey and they are hidden in charge of a black cat. These belongedto the Augustinians. Fifty yards from the Killone church is a crock of gold. It is supposed to be guarded by the good people.
A similar story is told of the Augustinian church in Clare-abbey when the Cromwellian soldiers hunted the friars from the abbey. They threw the chalices into the river Fergus. Mrs. Cole Clare-Commons tells that a man named White and a man named McInerney dived to get the treasurs but were driven off by a serpent.
Thomas Slattery
Buncraggy
Tiermaclane. Co. Clare
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 11:29
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rejected
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Local Landlords.
Long ago Ireland had been divided into large ranches. Those were generally the property of Protestants, so that many of the landlords were hostile to catholic tenants.
John Headach was the landlord of Johnston district. The Headach family have been settled in the district since about a hundred and fifty years ago.
The Headach (family have been settled in) estate consisted of about six hundred acres. Claree, Peterfield, and Urra were once part of the Johnstown Estate.
John Headach was a fairly good landlord.
There are several ruins of houses on the estate. This shows that evictions must have taken place.
The evicted people went to Connaught or up on the mountains. The Headach family got the Johnstown ranch (after) after the Cromwellians plantations.
After a few years John died and his son became landlord. (him) He
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 11:22
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“Geal Peadair geal Ph. Cár chodluigh tú ‘réir?”
“Chodluigh mise mar chodlóchainn ag Mac Dílis Dhé.
“Cá gcodlothaid tú ‘nocht?”
“Faoi chosa na mbocht”
“Ca gcodlochaidh tú i mbharach?”
“Faoi cosa Phádhraig”.
“Cé sin do diaidh?”
“A na nainigle”
“Ce sin romhat?”
“O na heasbuic”
“Goide sin in do láimh dheis”
Trí deora d’(teise) uisce an Domhnaigh.
A chur Muire liom (on) leis an
Eolas a dheanamh.
Brigidh is a brat. Micheal agus a sgiath,
Da láimh geala de fá m’anam”
Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 11:16
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rejected
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mantained. This is a great advantage to people who live in remote places as they conveniently purchase necessaries.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 11:14
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of sprats at the Chapel gate to the people as they came out and also apples. This would be about forty years ago. Money was not always given for goods in olden days nor even at the present day. Farmers bring potatoes, oats etc to shopkeepers to whom they owe money in payment for goods. Farmers too give labourers perquisites instead of money, such as garden, grass of sheep milk etc. People who cannot well afford for what the purchase, sometimes pay it back in work. The huxters in this locality are Mr Healy of Carrigathow and Mr Sisk of Dripsey. These collect eggs only except when at Christmas Mr Healy purchases turkeys and exports them. Mr T Moynaghan and Jerry Murphy are the only fowl dealers. Other fowl dealers and merchants come from Cork and Macroom and go through the district to purchase home made butter, eggs, chickens etc. They bring with them provisions of all kinds to their customers and thus a system of barter is still
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:49
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In olden times shops were not so numerous as they are at the present day. Shops were very scarce through the country. People had to go to the nearest town or village to make purchases and often drew heavy loads on their backs a very long distance.
On Sunday after Mas a certain man in this district sold a car load
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:37
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Potato Crop 23 Jan 1938
There are potatoes grown at home on my farm every year. There is an English acre sown under potatoes nearly always, and the same amount is sown each year. The ground is not manured before being turned up, but when the drills are opened there is manure spread in them.
The potatoes are sown in drills in the field but when the potatoes are sown in the garden they are sown in ridges. The field is ploughed with a plough but the gardens are dug with a spade. In olden times the first plough the
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:37
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Two Irishmen and Two Englishmen were playing cards. The two Irishmen were partners and one used to say to the other "Ar bhfuil agat? Ta." and the other Irishman used say "Ta" when he had good cards. The two Englishmen were losing and in the end they stood up from the table and said that they would never play the game of "Ar bhfuil agat? Ta."
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:36
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In olden times the old people used to make candles in this way. Reisin, Fresh Butter and a little pitch were put into the Cam or Cruiscin which is a pot. Then they put it on a fire and boiled it for three and a half hours. When it was boiled they got a thread of soft cotton and hung it across a Cleek and dipped it into the Cruiscin again and again until the candle was thick enough. They hung it on the wall until it became thick. They kept this up until they had all that was in the Cruiscin finished. When the candles were made the Cruiscin had to be applied again.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-19 10:36
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The fregair was variously collected.
Part I-II Tadhg Bradley Barntick Clarecastle
Aged 15 labourer native of Milltown Malbay
but lived above from his youth.
Cannot remember from whom he heard the accounts.
III-IV-V Peter Falvey Darragh Ennis
aged 86 farmer
VI William Roughan Bregaunahilla
aged 58
N.B. The area from which the pupils in this school are drawn consists of the village of Blarecastle Lissane Buncraggy Ballaghafadda Newtown and all townlands close together. Killoo and Barntick are two others further away.
I The village is remarkable for its floating population. There are two old families left: McNamaras and Slatterys. The younger members only are alive to-day-
II Similar remnants apply to the farms. I only know one or two that go back to a second generation.
III The children found it had to get folklore of the native suggested on his account.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:35
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''Mac Shamhradháin go neart
Ar Teallach Eachaidh Oirdhearc.''
''McGovern, the mainstay of strength,
Rules over noble Tullyhaw.''
Arms of the Clann :-
Argent. Oak of a mount vert an oak tree proper on a chief azure., a crescent between two mullets argent. Crest. An oak tree proper.
Explanation :-
The oak tree is considered the emblem of virtue and strength.
The Romans made their civic crowns of its branches and gave it to such as had saved the life of a citizen.
The McGovern Pedigree
--------------------------------
The clann is said to be descended from Eochaidh Muigh Meadhoin,
the 124th Monarch of Ireland.
I. Royal house of O'Neill Monarchs of Ireland and Kings of Ulster.
86 Eochaidh Muigh Meadhoin (Eochy Moyrane) was the 124th Monarch of Ireland and in the eighth year of his reign he died a natural death at Tara A.D. 366.
II. Royal house of O'Connor, King of Connaught
87 Brian; eldest son of the king of Connaught.
88 Duach Galach: his youngest son; first Christian King of Ireland.
89 Eoghan Searbh: His son.
90 Muireadach: His son.
91 Fergus: his son, king of Breffney.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:34
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Local Landlords.
Long ago Ireland had been divided into large ranches. Those were generally the property of Protestants, so that many of the landlords were hostile to catholic tenants.
John Headach was the landlord of Johnston district. The Headach family have been settled in the district since about a hundred and fifty years ago.
The Headach (family have been settled in)
estate consisted of about six hundred acres.
Claree, Peterfield, and (...?) were once part of the Johnstown Estate.
John Headach was a fairly good landlord.
There are several ruins of houses on the estate.
This shows that evictions must have taken place.
The evicted people went to Connaught or up on the mountains. The Headach family got the Johnstown ranch (after) after the Cromwellians plantations.
After a few years John died and his son became landlord. (him) He
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:33
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rejected
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''Aistriú an Luain ó thuaidh nó aistriú an Aoine ó dheas, muna mbeadh agat ach pocán gabhair ní dócha go rithfeadh leat.''
Dá mbeadh duine ag imeacht ó bhaile agus gur ó thuaidh a bheadh a thuras ní léighfeadh na sean daoine dó imtheacht Dé Luain. Mar an gcéadaoin í leigfidís dó dul ó thuaidh dia h-Aoine. Deirtear na beadh aon phioc den ádh ag an duine sin.
Nós atá ag a lán daoine gan mhuc do mharbhú Dia Luain. Deirtear ná bheadh aon rath ar an gcuid eile ded' mhuca.
Deirtear leis nach ceart do dhuine a chuid gruaige so bhearradh Dia Luain.
Nuair a thagann duine isteach i dtig agus go mbíonn cuigeann á dhéanamh ann, bíonn air buille do bhuaileadh leis an loingthe nó an bairle do chasadh mar bheadh amhras ar na daoine gur leo an cuigean go mbéarfadh an cuairteóir an t-ím leis.
Má bhíonn dhá dhoras i dtig, is ceart do cuairteoirí teacht isteach ags dul amach an doras céadhna.
Aon áit go mbíonn lios ní ceart dul suas air, brosna do bhailiú as, bláthanna do
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:31
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O'Grady and Mr McElligott. A Jew visits this district occasionly and exchanges mattresses for old feather ticks and sometimes pays money for feathers. Some of the various coins referred to are a "bob" which (attends) stands for a shilling a "tanner" for a sixpence, a "lop" for a penny and a "make" for a half-penny. Some coins now gone out of use are four-penny pieces, five-shilling-pieces and the guinea.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:30
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a large ring. On goes inside in the centre and closes her eyes. Those in the ring say, "Frog in the middle, jump up, jump up
The Frog jumps up and catches someone. She must guess her name and if she guesses right the others is the frog. If not, she has to be frog again.
Another of our favourite games is "here is the gipsy's rider". One person act as a gipsy. The others join hand and stand in a line. The rider approaches them say:- Here is the gipsy's rider, rider, rider,
Here is the gipsy's rider and the y.o.u"
The others say-
"What are you riding here for, here for, here for. What are you riding her for and the y.o.u
"Riding to get married, get married, get married,
Riding to get married, and the Y.O.U"!
Each one says:-
"Will you marry me, sir, me, sir, me, sir.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:29
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'Spy'
On Spy Wednesday we play 'spy'. One remains in the den and the rest run off to hide. The remain hidden until the person sees them and calls 'spy'.
'Skittles,'
When we cannot go out on a wet day we play 'skittles' indoors. We get seven short sticks and one fairly long one. The numbers one to seven are put on the seven sticks or skittles. Each person throws the other sticks and whoever knocks the greatest number of sticks wins the game. 'Skip'.
Many of our girls skip during recess.
Two persons take an end of the rope each and turn it. Someone else jumps in and skips. The others say:-
tinker, tailor, soldier, sailor, richman, poorman farmer's son or boots, shoes, buttoncosts, clogs or hat, cap, bonet, wreath- and- veil, or wheelbarrow, ear cart, carriage and
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:22
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make up the difference in the value of the animal.
There was a weekly market held (every yea) in Coachford every Thursday for a few years, this was discontinued about fourteen years ago. Fowl, butter and eggs were the chief commodities bought and sold and sometimes cabbage and vegetables. About twenty years ago a man now deceased named Mr Forde a native of Dripsey used gather eggs in this district and about thirty years previous to that a family named Connells carried on the business.
Their descendants still carry on the business. At present Mr Healy from Carrigathou does a large trade in the egg business he is a direct shipper across the channell (across) to England. In olden times pedlars visited the district on fair-days and did a great business with the local people in the dealing of second hand and new clothes. Pedlars of this kind still come to the homes of the people, namely Mr
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:22
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awaiting decision
at one time a number of Saints were going from Tobar na Naomh to Ballyvourney. The mountain path being so steep and narrow they could only walk one behind the other. When the first arrived at Ballyvourney he found he had forgotten something at the well. He told the one next to him and so the word was passed from one to the other and the last was just leaving the the well when the word reached him so that he was able to bring the forgotten object to its owner. This object was said to be a pair of glasses. Whether glasses were know in Ireland in the days of the Saints I do not know.
Dromnaharuich is the name of a townland about midway between Loo-bridge and Headford. I once heard that this also was a place for paying ''rounds'' long ago and that it was for this it got its name- drom na h-Aithrighe.
It was an old custom for the people of Glenflesk to go to ''the City'' on May day to do ''rounds'. The ''City'' was in Rathmore and the Glenflesk people crossed the hill on foot to get there. A pattern andd amusements accompanied the doing of ''rounds at 'the city'''; this was not the case with the doing of ''rounds'' at ''Tobar na Naomh'' probably because, as far as I remember, they were not done on any special day of the year.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:21
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field Each person playing gets a stone. One person leaves his stone, "a duck" on the granny. The others throw their ducks at the granny. If the duck on the granny was knocked; the person minding the granny had to put it up again. If he could catch anyone before he got back to the man that person had to mind the granny.
'Den'
When the cold days of winter come we [?] to warm ourselves. We make a den and all gather into the den. Then one finds out who will follow the rest.
She says "one, two, sky blue
All out but you
The person she points to 'lies'. She follows the rest.
Sometimes we say:-
"Ittle ottle, blue-bottle
'Ittle ottle, out:"
or "abben ababben, a baby's knee
Wholesome fulesome, sacred tea
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:20
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There is an old ruin called Ballinadrimna castle, it is situated not more than one quarter of a mile from the village of Shangarry, and it is in the Parish of Tynagh. Along side this ruin there lived a man named John Billet. When he was young nothing would make him afraid. Before his parents died they told him not to stay out late at night. Paying no heed to what he was told, he came in his field at about 10 o' clock at night and he heard a horse gallop around
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:20
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in a circle. One goes in the middle of the ring and stands there. The others sing:-
"Poor Widow, poor widow, she is left all alone
She has nobody to marry at home,
You said the East, you said the West,
You say the very one you love best."
The person inside calls out the name of any person in the ring. They both stand in the centre of the ring.
Those with there hands joined say:-
"Those poor couple are married together,
We wish them a great many joys
But that does not do, three hundred and two
They kiss and say good-bye."
'Colours'
When we play colours one person becomes an angel and another a devil. They go to a wall and stand apart. The others all get a colour. Then the angel and the devil call out colours and the person whose
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:19
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Churning
There are several types of churns. The turn we know best are the dash churn and the end - over-end churn. Before people churn the cream they scald the churn, skimmer and butter hands with boiling water.
The churn is left to cool. When it is cold enough the cream is put in. The lid is fixed lightly and then the act of churning begins. A person turns the churn-handle until the glass in the lid is clear.
Then the buttermilk is drained out off the butter. The butter is placed in a small tub. Then it is washed with spring water. The water is drained off the butter. Then salt is sprinkled on the butter. It is mixed with the butter with the skimmer.
Then the butter is placed on a flat board.
It is made onto rolls and shaped with the scotch-hands. The rolls are wrapped
anonymous contributor
2019-06-19 10:18
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awaiting decision
stealing the gold. A man went looking for the gold round the trench and a fairy took him in and he was never heard of since and neither were the fairies. Lyons' fort is in the townland of Newtown.
Gold and silver ornaments are hidden in Killone abbey and they are hidden in charge of a black cat. These belongedto the augustinians. Fifty yards from the Killone church is a crock of gold. It is supposed to be guarded by the good people.
A similar story is told of the augustinian church in Blare-abbey when the bromwellian soldiers hunted the friars from the abbey. They threw the chalices into the river Fergus. Mrs. Bole Blare-Bommons tells that a man named White and a man named McInerney dived to get the treasurs but were driven off by a serpent.
Thomas Slattery
Buncraggy
Tiermaclane. Co. Clare
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:17
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Beannacht ó dhia orainn féin agus ar an mbeathadh seo thug sé dúinn. An té do thug an beathadh seo dhúinn-ne go dtugfaidh sé trócaire agus beatha ríoraidhe dár n-ainmneachaibh tré Íosa Críost ár dTiarna. Amen.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:16
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One day Eoghan Ruadh was at a country ''Station''. He was then a young lad and a poor servant boy. Every time Eoghan made an attempt to go to confession he was pushed back by the priest and first preferance given to the more well-to-do people present. After a time Eoghan went + sat on a heap of turf at the end of the kitchen. When the Priest had finished all the confessions he beckoned to Eoghan. Then Eoghan answered in verse-
Ní hí an bhochtaineacht is othlaibh liom
Beidh fíor go deo
Ach an (?) a leanann í
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:14
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Gold is supposed to be hidden in this fort. One night a man went to the fort intending to dig for the gold. But when he reached the fort a big black dog dashed out. The man tried to shoot it, but as it was a ghost he could not do so. After that nobody interfered with the fort.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:14
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Round the open shafts of the abandoned Duhallow coal-mines near Droma Castle were heaps of coal-dust. The poor people of the neighbourhood used to mix clay with this dust and work it up into a dough-like substance. It was then made into balls, and allowed to dry. Then it was stored and used for winter fires. The balls glowed red, gave out great heat and lasted for a very long time, but there was no flame.
In many of the farm houses an iron grater was set in the open fire-places and a passage communicated under-ground with a small fan bellows at the side of the fire-place. A coal and turf fire was set on the iron grating and fanned into flame by the bellows at the side. In some houses a two chamber baking oven was set under the fire-place and used for baking bread, joints of meat etc. A passage was sunk at the side of the fire-place by means of which access could be had to the oven.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:13
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senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:13
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to find out about the weather the weather the birds acted as weather prophets. When they heard the blackbird whistling in the evening they knew frost was coming.
The sea-gulls on land are a sign of a storm. Crows clustering together on tree tops portend a storm. When the crows fly with their heads downwards we expect rain.
When one magpie comes out alone to look for food in spring we expect cold weather.
When two come out we look forward to a fine spell. When we see the swallows flying high in the air we expect fine weather.
If they fly low we do not expect fine weather.
If they fly low we do not expect fine days. The plovers (piping?) in the fields remind us of snow. When we hear the (?) calling we proivde for the rainy days. To see pigeons flying into the ever-green trees us the sign of cold wet weather.
The first time you hear the cuckoo, if you lift your right foot and if there is a brown hair under your foot you will not live
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:12
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cuckoo makes no nest.
The pigeon says "take two, Teddy, take two". One day a boy went to steal apples from an orchard. A pigeon was on the top of a tree. The boy took one apple and the pigeon cried out, "Take two, Teddy, take two
If we frighten a crow we hear him say "baw, baw". He asks us where he is to go in Irish too, Cá Cá.
Each bird has its own kind of nest. Some nest in the trees, some in house-tops and others in grass. The robin builds her nest on shady bank. It is made of sticks and lined with hay. The skylark's nest is got amongst the grass.
The wren builds her small nest in an ivy tree, thus we have the verse:
'The wren builds in an ivied (tree) thorn
Or old and ruined wall,
The mossy nest so covered in,
You scarce can see at all.'
The martin builds his nest of clay in rows
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:12
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senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:12
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gold in a well in Lord Langford's demesne. When Lynch heard the girl had given away the secrets, he became furious, and stuck a sword through her. Ever since, it is believed that the servant safeguards the well in which the gold is placed.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:10
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In Summerhill where I live a castle is owned by Lord Langford. Close by, people named Lynch lived, in another castle, during the Cromwellian period. A servant of this household gave away some secrets of the Irish soldiers, and in reward, received gold. She placed the
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:10
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seisean. Trí chéad púnt ar sise. Ghnothuigh sí an cluithche agus thug sé trí chead púnt di. Tar annseo imbharach agus imreochaidh muid cluithche eile. Bhí sé ann lár na bharach agus sé chead púnt a bhí ar an gcluithche agus gnpthuigh sí é. Tar annseo aríst imbharach ar sise. Tháinig agus naoi gcead púnt a bhí ar an gcluithce agus gnothuigh sí é.
Nuair a bhí gnothuighthe aici dubhairt sí, níl aon chabhair agat bheith ag imirt liom-sa, ní fhágann bó na stábla agat. "Dá mbeitheá ag imirt liom-sa go ceann céad bliadhain ní bhocht mé ar seisean. D'innis sé dhí an bealach bhí sé ag fághail an t-airgead. Ní raibh aon sásamh uirthí go bpósadh sé í agus phósadar.
Bhí máthair na mná óige seo sa domhan thoir agus bhí draodhta mór aicí. Nuair a chuala sí faoi an bhfear a bhí pósta ag a hinghean tháinig sí abhaile. Nuair a bhí sí sa mbaile, bhí sí an deas agus mór le Seán. Lá amháin thug sí amach sa gcóisde é ag teasbaint na trí dhó agus tháinigheadar abhaile tráthnona chuig an gcaisleán. Nuair a bhí sé ag dul amach as an gcoisde, thug sí dorn dhó idir bos shlinneáin agus chuir sí croidhe an éinín amach as a bhéal ar an mbóthar. Thóg sí suas é agus chuir sí isteach in naipcín é agus dhibir sí Seán agus dubhairt leis gan
anonymous contributor
2019-06-19 10:09
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servant buried the gold. When the gold was burried he shot the servant. Searchers were cleared by bees.
James McNamara saw three pots of gold on the wall near bommanes bull paddock gate in Ballymacooda. His horse got frightened at the sight and he lost sight of the gold.
Mick Moroney who lived fifty years and his brother Mick Falvey of Kilkee and John Malone of Baornageeha and Moroney's brother dreamt of the hole in which he gold is buried between Galvins and Bahills hill.
Mr. William Roughan Blareclastle tells that there is gold hidden in John Lyons' fort the fairies were minding it at twelve o'clock midnight and they had lights round it so that the fairies could see if any-one were
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:08
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used leave home after the first crow of the cock in the morning and return at night laden with provisions.
Money was not always given in exchange fro goods, sometimes labour was given instead. Othertimes when the farmers hired labour, money was not always given to those employed, milk and potatoes were given to those employed, milk and potatoes were given or else prepared ground was given for the sowing of the potato crop.Goods were sometimes exchanged in the district, such as fowl were given of potatoes or other crops. The words connected with buying and selling were "tick and boot". Tick stood for goods got on credit for a certain time until the buyer had the money to pay. The term "boot" was used more in olden times than at the present times. If two persons were exchanging animals and one of the animals was not as valuable as the other, the person with the inferior animal paid to the other what was called "boot" to
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:06
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in the back.
A cure for sore eyes is to bathe them the first thing in the morning with cold tea.
Collected by the following:-
Margaret Starr,
Lisquillabeen,
Coolbawn.
Sally Darcy, Rockview, Puckane.
Maisie Cleary, Kildangan, Puckane.
Lizzie Starr, Lisquillabeen, Coolbawn.
Maura Collins, Claree, Puckane.
Sara Hogan, Larkin's Hills, Puckane.
Mickie Hogan,
Rita Morrisey, Prospect, Puckane.
Obtained from,
Mrs O'Meara, Rockview, Puckane. Age 85 years
Mrs Kennedy, Claree, Puckane. Age about 60.
Mrs Cleary, Kildangan, Puckane, Nenagh,
Mr John Cleary, Armagh, Puckane, Nenagh.
Mrs Hogan, Larkin's Hill, Puckane.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:06
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About fifty years ago a large part of the lands of Moynalty parish in Co. Meath belonged to a landlord named Farrell. His land extended from Mullagh Bridge - the boundary between Cavan and Meath eastwards to Carlanstown Bridge - a distance of five miles. His demesne included the village of Moynalty. The Farrells were brewers in Drogheda originally and they came and took over these lands. The present Lord Gormanstown is a relative. In the old days they acted as magistrates and it is said that they kept the people on the estate in deadly fear of them. Before the landlords time Moynalty was more thickly populated. There are the remains of several houses to be found here and there about the locality. As the landlord acquired a fresh holding of land from a tenant he immediately had the dwelling house on the little farm demolished. He knocked down as many houses
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:04
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There was once a woman who had four sons. Each of them had a physical defect. Once had only one leg, but he could run as fast as a hare. Another had only one eye, but he could see a thing miles away. Another had no teeth but he could eat iron and stones with his gums. The last fellow had one arm but he could knock down the strongest wall in the world.
The king one day asked them to come with him to hunt a fox. The five of them were on their horses when they came to this wall which they could not jump. The king asked the fellow with the one arm to knock down the wall but he refused and said his mother would not be pleased.
The king promised to give him as much gold as he could carry and so he knocked down the wall.
When they went into the next field the fellow with one eye saw a man being drowned. He told the fellow with one leg, and he ran and saved him.
He then saw the fox going into a hole.
They came up to the rock and the fellow with no teeth ate way the rock until they came to the fox and they killed him.
Told by Mrs. John Ms Jaque (80yrs)
Lower Annagh
Dowra, Co. Leithim
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:04
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There was once a woman who had four sons. Each of them had a physical defect. Once had only one leg, but he could run as fast as a hare. Another had only one eye, but he could see a thing miles away. Another had no teeth but he could eat iron and stones with his gums. The last fellow had one arm but he could knock down the strongest wall in the world.
The king one day asked them to come with him to hunt a fox. The five of them were on their horses when they came to this wall which they could not jump. Th eking asked the fellow with the one arm to knock down the wall but he refused and said his mother would not be pleased.
The king promised to give him as much gold as he could carry and so he knocked down the wall.
When they went into the next field the fellow with one eye saw a man being drowned. He told the fellow with one leg, and he ran and saved him.
He then saw the fox going into a hole.
They came up to the rock and the fellow with no teeth ate way the rock until they came to the fox and they killed him.
Told by Mrs. John Ms Jaque (80yrs)
Lower Annagh
Dowra, Co. Leithim
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:03
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Shan Barna was a well known rapparree. He was one of the men who was driven from his home by the English soldiers. He lived in the Sliabh Beigh mountains Co. Fermanagh. His chief activities were carried out on the Clogher road which runs through the sliabh Beigh mountains and into Clones
He had many caves into which he put the horses that he stole. There is a long tunnel into them and at the mouth of this tunnel there is a big flat stone. This stone is part of the rock and is not noticeable to any passer by.
Some rich men gave him tax because they were afraid of him stealing their property. One night as he and his brother John went to lift the tax they were captured. The persuers shot his brother. Shan went back to take him with him for he didn't want them to get the money for
anonymous contributor
2019-06-19 10:03
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Tadhg Bradley informed me that there was gold hidden in a cave about two hundred yards from the main Ennis-Killadysert road. He stated that antiquarians searched for it but could not pass a large greyhound that seemed to be in charge. The hidden treasure is supposed to be hidden by augustinian fathers during the penal days for safety. He also told me that Thomas Gleeson Blarecastle found silver pennies in a quarry in Mr Lyons' land Barntick in the year 1937 A.D.
According to an old story about the townland of Ballymacooda Lord Blare is supposed to have burried gold in the townland of Ballymacooda. He was accompanied by one of his servants and he held a halfpenny candle whilst the
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:02
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it into a poultice. Then you should put it on the swelling.
When you have erysipelous if you put hot dried flour on the place affected it will cure it.
A drop of the blood of children of parents whose parents have the same names will cure "wildfire". To keep wildfire from spreading you should rub a piece of gold to. A real black-cats' blood will also cure it.
A child born after the death of it's father is supposed to be able to cure certain diseases
A boy is supposed to able to cure "yellow jaundice" and a girl "sore-eyes."
If a person happened to take poison accidently, mix soot and salt together and take it. This will prevent the (poison) poison from doing the person any harm.
If a person's nose is bleeding put a cold iron or a door-key down his back and the bleeding will stop. Turpentine and red flannel is an old cure for a pain
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 10:01
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For a burn oil should be thrown on the sore part. Roasted laurel leaves and hard or wet bread-soda are also used as cures for a burn. There is a weed called 'black-foot' and when mixed with lard it is supposed to cure a burn.
Dock-leaves when wet, or bread-soda will stop the pain of a sting of a nettle.
There is an old rhyme about the sting of a nettled:-
If you gently catch a nettle,
It will sting you for your
pains,
Grasp it like a lad of metal,
And it like silk remains,
Blue or ink will cure the sting of a wasp or bee.
Roasted onions put into the ear cure ear-ache
Salty water is a cure for a sore throat. Dried salt in your stocking and roll it round your is also very good for a sore throat.
When you have a swelling you should get the marshmallow weed and pound
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:57
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Kilboght Abbey is situated in the parish of Kilrickle. It is said that it was founded by a man named Wall. Tradition has handed it down, that it was he who built Wallscourt Castle which is situated a half mile west of the village of Kilrickle.
It is believed that the bishop of Clonfert by the name of Dr Mc Rea, is buried within the ruins of the old abbey, under an old flat stone with no inscription except a beautiful cross of a very old design. It's supposed that in the time of Cromwell the Corps of Priests and Bishops had to be hidden from Cromwells hirlings, it's further recorded that the Sacred Vessels were buried with him.
It is believed that there were so many Franciscians there long ago that they could easily hand the key of the Tabernacle from one to the other until they reached to Kilmeen. It is also believed that Patrick Sarsfield slept there one night on his retreat from Aughrim
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:57
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dinnéar thart, bhí an inghean ag suibhal thríd an teach. Dhearc sí isteach thrí pholl na heocrach san seomra a raibh an bheirt agus chonnaic sí iad ag cur an t-or ins na boscaí. Rith sí ar ais go dtí an rígh agus an duine uasal. agus dubhairt go raibh robala sa teach. Dubhairt an duine uasal nach raibh acht beirt bhuachaill gheanamhail a bhí ann le bliadhain agus go raibh seacht gcinn de sheomraí tóghta aca. Thug an duine uasal os comhair an ríogh iad go bfuighidh sé amach cá rabhadar ag fághail an tór agus an t-airgead. D'innis Seán an chaoi raibh an pota óir agus airgead faoi na gcloigne gach maidin.
Ní raibh aon sásamh ar rígh na Spáinne go bpósfadh duine aca a inghean agus chuir Seán iallach ar Sheámus í phósadh, agus thug sé lán na seacht seomraí de ór agus de airgead dhó agus líon sé an dá bhád ba mhó dá raibh ag an ríogh. Nuair a bhí bainis seacht oidhche agus seacht lá caithte, chuaidh Seámus abhaile chuig an Spáinn le na bhean agus d'fán Seán i mblá cliath. Lá amháin suibhal sé amach ag caitheamh an ama agus cadadh bean óg leis, agus d'fiafruigh sí dhe an an imreochaidh sé cluithche cárta agus dubhairt sé go n-imreochaidh. Ce'n méid a bhéas air ar
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:57
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Bhí cat uaibreach ann ins an t-séan aimsir agus diarr sé ag bhénus béan óg a déanamh de rinne. Bhí an cat anois agus na cailín óg áluinn agus ba gearr gur phós sé fear saidbhir. An lá a pósadh é agus bainfheis dá caiteamh dearch sé amach ar an bfuinneóig, agus ceard a d'fheicfead sé ag rith trasna na sraide síos uaidh agus ach luchóg. Rinne sé dearmad glan nár cat a bhí ann anois. Grigheann sé de. léim agus síos leis le breit ar an lucóig ach mó léan gear casta cráidthe. Briseadh a mhuinéal ar na leacracha nuair a leim sé ón teach bairr a raibh an bainfeis dá caiteamh ann. Briseann an dúthchas tríd súile an cait. Ní déanfad an saoghal capall rása dasal.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:54
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in this way he got the nickname "Jack the Leveller" There was nothing left for the evicted tenants but emigration. Several of them went to America to seek a livelhood.
Even thought he landlord levelled many dwellings he made many improvements. He caused the village of Moynalty to be built. As can be seen this eighteenth century village has a rather quaint style of Architecture. The houses were built for the workers on the estate and for failing to keep each and every one of them tidy. It is said that if the landlord were out walking and happened to see a straw or piece of paper or any other refuse in front of, or near a house, he immediately ordered the people of that house to have it removed. Moynalty was supposed to be one of the prettiest villages in Ireland during his time.
As time went on the tenants
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:53
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IN the olden times shops were not as numerous as they are nowadays. About sixty years ago people were obliged to walk long distances to the nearest towns to make their purchases. In those times the only means of conveyance was a horse or a donkey and cart and the majority of the poorer classes had no donkeys. There is an account of a woman from the north of this district who used walk to Cork with her industrial produce fortnightly, which was mainly butter and eggs and sometimes wool. She
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:50
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Irish:- He said “Ran na raithnighe ortha suid.”
When Morty shot Puxley the wife was with him and Harrington said “Leagfá sé nuair leagais an gandal” and Morty said he would never shoot a woman.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:47
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agitated and much of the land was acquired by the Land Commission and divided amongst the tenants. The tyranny of the landlord is a subject for discussion up to the present day. The following true story shows how bitter, proud, and jealous he could be.
About forty years ago there or there abouts Father "Kit" Mullen (God rest his soul) was Parish priest of Moynalty. The Presbytery or Priest's house which is on the opposite side of the road to Farrells house. was a one storey house with basement at the time. The Priests house is lower down than Farrells.
Fr. Mullen decided to have an additional Storey added to his house but the Landlord John E. Farrell would not allow him to do so. He held that if an additional storey were added then those in the Priests house could see over his demesne wall from the top-windows. Nothing daunted Father Mullen found a way out. He enlisted the aid of his parishioners and they dug away
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:46
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were many coins used by the people long ago which are now gone out of date such as a crown a four shilling piece a half sovereign a sovereign and a fourpenny bit.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:45
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D'fiafruigh sé do na sgolairi uilig an dtuibhradh siad abhaile iad go ceann cúpla oidhche, agus loistin a thabhairt doibh agus rud le nithe. Ní thuibhradh aon sgolaire leo iad acht mach baintreaígh a bhí an bhocht. Dubhairt sé nach raibh aon bheatha mhaith aige dhóibh acht chomh maith is a bhí sí aige féin go mbeadh sí acu san. Nuair a chuaidh siad abhaile an tráthnona sin, bhí fáilte ag an mbeantreach rompa agus thug béile chomh maith is a bhí sa teach aici dhóibh, agus chuadhar a chodhladh. Déirigh siad ar maidin agus chuaidh siad chuig an sgoil le mac na bantreaigh.
Nuair a tháinig siad abhaile tráthnona bhí beile maith reidh dóibh agus seacht gcineal feóla ar an mbord. D'fan siad annsin leis an mbaintreach, agus ag feabhsu a bhí an teach le ithe agus ól chuile lá. D'fanadar ann go ceann lá 'gus bliadhain. Nuair a bhí an lá gus bliadhain thuas, dubhairt siad go raibh siad saitheadh fada leis an mbaintreach, agus go gcaithfeadh siad imtheacht, agus dubhairt sise leo gan imtheacht act fanacht go deo, acht ní fhanadh siad ar rud ar bith. Anois adeir an bhaintreach tharla go bhfuil sibh ag imtheacht, tá sé chomh mhaith agam-sa innseacht díbh nach bhfuil
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:43
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every Monday selling clothes. The people were not obliged to give them the price of the clothes all at once some of them paid six pence weekly or in other instalments instead. In former times people also visited our district gathering rags. These people did not give money in exchange for the rags but they gave needles and pins and thread. People also came to buy feathers and some of them come from Cork still to buy them. A better price is given for feathers at present than in former times for they are not so plentiful now. There is a man staying in the district who goes around the (district) country every day selling clothes. He makes his living in this way. His name is Mr Grady. There is also a man living in Coachford named Paddy Houlihan who collects jam jars and scrap iron and sells them to the people who come out from the city to collect them. He obtains a good price for them. There
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:41
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Head was blown off. The soldiers thought that he was Morty Óg. After that they caught Morty above in his own house. Then the soldiers brought him down to Feora. There was an old horse feeding on the banks of the river and they threw him across the horse and the horse brought him to Castletown to the pier. They tied Morty on to a ship and dragged him to Cork. Then they cut off his head and spiked it on the gates of the Cork jail. He had a son and his name was Morty na n-ínse, he was going to Cork once and he’s the Kenmare he asked for lodgings and he got them. When he got up the next morning three robbers came to the door. He had a revolver with him and they had nothing. He told them put up their hands or that he would shoot them. Then he tied their hands and he marched them up to Cork ahead of him
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:40
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the earth from around the basement of the house and took it away in carts. The result is the neat-looking Parish Priest's residence of to-day. That too explains why the priests House seems to have been built in such a hollow.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:40
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Morty Óg lived in Eyeries beag. It was Morty Óg that shot Puxley near the gates of Dunboy. He was lighting in the battle of bulloden. He was not married at all. But there was a man living in the house with him. His sur-name was Harrington. When he shot Puxley there was a man with him. Puxley was on horseback when amortize shot him. Out through an old window of an old cabhlac he shot him. Puxley was passing on the horse when he shot him; the soldiers heard that morty shot Puxley and they came the next day across the hill and down to his house. Harrington was in the house when the soldiers surrounded them, he ran out the back door and down across a field. He jumped across the river and the next moment his
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:39
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There is a Cillíneach in Coulagh. It is said that there was a church there and a priest. It was not a big church but a small low one. It is said that it was a stone altar that was in it. There were big stones one on top of the other. There were not many windows in it. The king of windows that were in it were holes in the walls. Some of the seats were made of timber and some of stones thrown on top of each other.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:38
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There are many pishogues about May Day. In the morning before the sun rises green branches are brought into the hose to show the beginning of Summer.
Put out a white handkerchief before day and bring it in afterwards and if anybody is sick, rub it to them and it will cure them.
If a cow should calf on a May Day they say that the cow and the calf would die.
It was also a practice not to put outside the door any red fire or ashes.
They say every one should make a churn on May Eve and not on May Day.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:38
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aon mhaidin ó tháinig sibh isteach sa teach nach bfuair mé póta ór fa cheann duine agaibh, agus póta airgead fa cheann an duine eile, agus tá an seomra líonta le airgeadh, agus tabhair libh má's fíor é sin adeir Seán, ní teastochaidh sé uainn acht luach cáirr go blá cliath. D'fág siad slán agus beannacht ag an mbaintreach agus d'imthigheadhar ar aghaidh blá cliath. Thógadar cárr a thug i bfoisgeacht trí mhíle go blá cliath iad. Anois adeir Seán le Seámuis codhlaidh muidh san ngarrdha seo thuas anocht agus béas againn cé againn bhéas an pota airgead faoi, agus cé againn bhéas an pota óir óir faoi. Nuair a dhuisigh siad ar maidin bhí an t-ór faoi chloigeann Sheáin agus an t-airgead faoi chloigeann Sheamuis. Is docha adeir Seán ó dith mé croidhe an éinín go bhfuil an t-ór faoi mo chloigeann, agus ó dith tusa na sgathmhoga go bhfuil an t-airgead faoi do chloigeann chuile lá ó shoin.
Chuadhar go blá cliath agus thógadar seacht gcinn de sheomra i dteach mór ann. Sé an obhair a bhíodh aca chuile lá ag déanamh boscaí agus ag cuir an airgead isteach ionnta agus d'fán annsin go ceann bliadhna. Lá amháin tháinig rí na Spáinne agus a inghean ar cuairt chuig an bfhear seo. Nuair a bhí an
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:37
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Long ago the people used rushes as candles. They used to gather the strong rushes and peel them. They used to leave one little strip on it and leave them dry. Then they used to melt tallow in a box and rub the rush along the melted tallow, and leave it there until it dry. They used to put the rush into a piece of timber used as a candle stick.
They used to make candles out of tallow also. They had a mound or sligire for making them. They used to melt tallow and they used I double a sting and put it into the mould. They used to put a nail in the end of the string in order hat they would pull the candle out of the mould. When the tallow would be melted they used to put it into the mould, and leave it there until it gets hard. Then
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:36
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Long ago the people used to make candles themselves. First they used melt lard or tallow. When it was melted, they poured it into the dipping pan. These pans were called mounds (sligire) Then they got rushes and peeled them and left a strip of the green in to keep it firm. Then they dipped one of the rushes into the dipping pan. Then they let it stand there until it get hard. They made them about fourteen inches long. They did not last long because they were very soft. They used them as lanterns going to see the cattle, and when going to many other places.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:36
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There is scarcely an herb on the surface of the earth which has not a cure for something, and my grandfather who studied those herbs closely and carefully, and cured many people of various ailments, in fact he took one person practically from consumption. The recipe he used runs as follows:- 120 grams Marshmallow Root, 240 grms Licorice Root, 240 grms Linseed, 240 grms Iceland moss, 120 grms Golden Seal, 120 grms Life Root, 120 grms Pleurisy Root. I am not aware of the processes he put these ingredients through, but it was not very long till the person was cured.
Then there are many other herbs which cure certain diseases, for instance the Lily of the Valley, which is an herb we see every day is a splendid medicine for the heart and generally for dropsical conditions. Then there is yarrow an herb which grows chiefly on poor ground is most useful in colds, obstructed perspiration and the commencement of fevers. A good way to cure a cold is to take a handful of yarrow, pour over it a pint of boiling water add two tea-
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:33
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My warm, social, sweet consoling friend.
When landlord threatened and when rents wer due,
And process-servers through the village flew,
And tax-collectors came to seize a pledge,
And skulking bailiffs eyed me through the hedge;
When all these cares assailed my yielding breast.
And my affairs in sable garb were drest,
Dear pipe, in you sweet contentment I have found,
When friendship lagged and stern oppressors frowned
You levelled down the mountains of my mind
And bid me give my troubles to the wind."
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:30
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than money to them for they were thoroughly paid for their work by this means. The words connected with selling are !tick" and "boot". When people get goods from the shopkeepers without money it is called "tick". If two people were exchanging animals, sometimes one of the animals would be better than the other, and he that had the inferior animal should give some money with the animal to the man who had the better animal. This was called "boot". In former times the local markets were held at Coachford and Rooves Bridge, these markets are discontinued now. The names of the huxters or egg men in this district in olden times Mrs Connell Mr Tom Forde Mr Mick Healy and Mr Tade Hallern. The names of the huxters in the district at present are Mrs Moynahan and Mr Healy. In former times two jew men named Isack Jackson and James Spiro visited our district frequently
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:29
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A giant was once supposed to live near Loughatalia. He was able to throw large rocks about half-a-mile away.
One time another giant wanted to fight him and he was called Tiachail. They met and they had a great fight. The first giant put the second one Tiachail on flight, and he was supposed to jump from Loughatalia to Renmore. That was know afterwards as the Giants Leap. Also this lake is so called because the sea-water comes into the sea-lake Loughatalia sometimes and that is the reason why it is given that name.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:28
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James Tevlin was born at Farnadooney near Moynalty in County Meath in 1798 and died in April 1873. He was the son of humble, but respectable parents of the middle class of farmers. He was a Catholic, and followed his father's occupation - farming. He lived at "Glenview" in the house now occupied by Mr. Brogan. He is interred in Newtown graveyard, where also his mother rests. (She was one of the Duffys of Rasteen and she died in 1766) He kept very few records of his poems and any to be had now are those from memory as handed down from generation to generation - orally. The following are some of his poems:-
The Poet Summoned
On one occasion a goat, the property of the poet, was found by a policeman wandering on the public road. A summons was issued where upon the poet wrote the following lines to Mr. Farrell of Moynalty, one of the magistrates for the district:-
"Honoured Sir: The police saw and found
My goat trespassing on forbidden ground,
Then to my door immediately they came
and with a pencil soon took down my name;
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:25
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D'fiafruigh sé do na sgolairi uilig an dtuibradh siad abhaile iad go ceann cúpla oidhche, agus loistin a thabhairt doibh agus rud le nithe. Ní thuibhradh aon sgolaire leo iad acht mach baintreaígh a bhí an bhocht. Dubhairt sé nach raibh aon bheatha mhaith aige dhóibh acht chomh maith is a bhí sí aige féin go mbeadh sí acu san. Nuair a chuaidh siad abhaile an tráthnóna sin, bhí fáilte ag an mbeantreach rompa, agus thug béile chomh maith is a bhí sa teach aici dhóibh, agus chuadar a chodhladh. Déirigh siad ar maidin agus chuaidh siad chuig an sgoil le mac na bantreaigh.
Nuair a tháinig siad abhaile tráthnona bhí beile maith reidh dóibh agus seacht gcineal feóla ar an mbord. D'fan siad annsin leis an mbaintreach agus ag feabhsu a bhí an teach le ithe agus ól chuile lá. D'fanadar ann go ceann lá 'gus bliadhain. Nuair a bhí an lá gus bliadhain thuas, dubhairt siad go raibh siad saitheadh fada leis an mbaintreach agus go gcaithfeadh siad imtheacht, agus dubhairt sise leo gan imtheacht act fanacht go leo, acht ní fhanadh siad ar rud ar bith. Anois adeir an bhaintreach tharla go bhfuil sibh ag imtheacht, tá sé chomh mhaith agam-sa innseacht díbh nach bhfuil
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:22
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the finish
Of St Trush and Persimmon now dead
How that gallant young son of Persimmon
Beat St Trush at the post by a head.
V
He'll tell you bygones
Of Punchestown, Fairyhouse and the Strand
Baldoyle Phoenix Park and the Curragh.
Where he always stood close to the stand.
VI
He'll tell you of Foran and Archer
And Ascot who brought Cloister home
With thirteen stone three in the saddle
In the Grand Stockton(?) Chase so well known.
VII
Then they'll turn on football
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:20
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A man named Thomas Dwyei of Ballyshane, Innistioge, was returning home after (cuirdíchad) cuirtuigheacht about 10 years ago when he heard the beansidhe crying, and mistook the wailing for that of cats at first. A neighbor Jack McGrath died about that night, so the bean-sidhe was following his family. But the old families are dying out, there is nobody that name in Ballyshane at the present time.
So if the old families all die out, probably the beansidhe will depart from amongst us also.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:19
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But, ah, dear sir, here I assent and say
A heavy fine I am unfit to pay;
And for this reason I appeal to you
Because one word from you will do,
And because I know your princely , noble mind,
Was and is to generous deeds inclined;
And take my word if I this time get free,
My goat no longer on the road shall be;
I'll tie it to an English iron pin
Far from the path of craft policemen."
The case came up for hearing at Moynalty Petty Sessions Mr Farrell read out in court the poetic appeal, and the magistrates dismissed the case.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:19
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There's a neat little cottage in Bellbrook
Jack Johnstons you know it I'm sure
And anyone round it feels weary
They're sure to go there for the cure.
II
There's a right jolly crowd there at night time
And many a tale they'll unfold.
Of racing, football, and hurling
Their history your sure to be told.
III
In racing sure Jack has no equal
He'll tell of races of yore.
How Loates won the Derby on Isinglass
Such a victory was ne'er seen before.
IV
How loating Jack watched for
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:18
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house on fire he did not return, but continued to cut down the sceach. He went home when this work was finished, and found his house burned to the ground.
Another farmer was ploughing a field of his own containing a ráth in with the field. He left this done and went home to dinner: a strange woman carrying a basket of apples called at his door, and offered him an apple to eat. He refused it, and she offered him a nicer-looking apple to eat, and on his refusal she said: "You destroyed my house today, and if you don't settle it before night, something bad will happen to you.
On returning to his work he gladly turned back the sods which he had ploughed, and so averted the misfortune which would certainly overtake him.
Had he taken the apple and eaten it something worse would happen him: the fairies could then take him: he would seem to die, but they would take him and leave something with his appearance
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:14
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"With deep regret one evening I walked through
The village where first my breath I drew;
To me, alas, to was a doleful scene -
The doors were closed, the lonely street was green.
Sad and forlorn there I stood alone,
Heart sick with grief, unheeded and unknown;
No hoary sage to tell a pleasing tale,
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:12
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A long time ago a number of men were reaping corn in a field near Mullagh Lake.(Mullagh is on the border's of Meath and Cavan) One of the girls that was tieing the corn struck a frog with a pin. After a time a lady came up to the field and wanted the girl to go with her. When the girl refused to go the lady said "here is a keepsake" and she gave her a tie and told her to wear it. She was going to do so when an old man told her not to wear it, and she laughed at him. He told her to go over and tie it to a tree and see what would happen. She did so and after a while the tree fell into the lake. She, was glad she took the old man's advice.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:12
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Fairies are believed to exist in Ráths. A ráth or rath is a portion of a field. It consists of a round circular grassy spot surrounded by sceach bushes and inhabited by fairies and kept sacred for them: no one would dare to violate a ráth by cutting down bushes or ploughing up the ground. If they did any of these things some dire misfortunes would occur to them: But cattle may graze and the sceachs may be trimmed.
Many stories are told of the people who were fool-hardy enough to interfort with these fairy abodes.
A farmer one day took a hatchet with him to cut down a sceach bush in a ráth which he wanted for fencing with.
He commenced the work, but when looking towards his house he saw it on fire. He ran home immediately to extinguish the fire, and found it wasn't really burning and again saw his house on fire, and again he went home to extinguish it, and found it wasn't on fire.
But the third time he saw this
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:05
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On the lands of James Kehoe Killincooley there is what is regarded locally as a Fairy Fort. Patrick Whelan who is now nearly sixty years of age and resides in the townland tells this story. In the townland of Tinnaberna there lived a family named Ryan. One of the family is Colonel Thomas Ryan who resides at the Rahenaskea Oulart. He is now advanced in the sixties and this happened when he was aged eleven or twelve years and my informant about six. Mrs. Whelan sent Patrick to Mrs. Ryan on a message. On arrival Mrs. Ryan inquired if he saw Tom and he said he did not. She went outside to look around and said, "There he is hurling on the Raheen" "Don't you see his red shirt and six or seven more lads hurling. The mother shouted to the son to attract his attention so that she could beckon him to return home, but the lad took no notice. The mother being angry said she would follow
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:05
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If a person's boots or shoes creak it is a sign that they are not paid for.
If a moth flies around a candle or other light at night it is a sign of receiving a letter next morning.
If a person puts a bit of a plough under a churn, it will keep the fairies from taking the butter.
If a black cat strays into your house it is a sign of good luck.
If a person meets a magpie on the road it is a sign of bad luck.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:03
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heard a fox screeching near the raheen. He started off to run and he was afraid to look round because he though that the fairies were after him. When that man met his companions the next night he told them of the terrible noise he heard on Cullen's raheen. But one of the men that was in the party took a fox out of the trap the previous morning, and told his companions about it. They took it for granted that it was the fox he heard.
There is another raheen on Mr. Murphy's land of Tinnock in the middle of a field. There is a trench all round this raheen and a horse fell into this and got hurt. The Murphys then tried to fill in the dyke but then all the horses died.
Another raheen is situated on Mr. Martain Brien's land of Inch. It was believed to be built by the Danes.
I heard that the Danes employed Irishmen to help in the building of those raheens. I heard that they got the stuff to build them in the gravel-holes of the district. There was left an entrance hold and whenever the Danes were defeated in battle they retreated into the hole. Around the Moat in Tinnock there was a trench full of water. But as the was dangerous to animals the old Murphys let off the water but they darent touch the trench. Several people told me that there was never an unatural light seen on a raheen and if ever a light was seen on one
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 09:02
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"On Monday morning ere the clock struck nine,
A tax-collector sought this cot of mine;
My faithful dog assailed him at the door
And stayed a while the perserving boor;
But he advanced and slyly entered in,
And showed his law book and his
Scribbling pen;
On his grim face I saw a threatening frown:
I bade him rest but he wouldn't sit down;
Oppressions agent wouldn't make so free;
The sullen booby had no smile for me.
His brow was narrow, stern and severe,
Beneath a shade of withered, lank straight hair;
His eyes were fixed in th' end of his long face
And seemed contending for each other's place.
His purple blue, almost inhuman nose,
Amazed his friends and terrified his foes,
Gross at one end and level in the middle,
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 08:59
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There is a raheen in Mr. Paddy Cullen's land of Inch. I heard that there was a man coming home from Blackwater one night by this raheen and he
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 08:59
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came out of the ground and the man never recovered the shock and the horses had shivers ever after.
An old ratheen is situated on the farm of Aiden Dempsey of Ballyvoodock Blackwater near the dwelling. Blue lights are seen there. One Sunday morning while the household were at mass a witch came to the door and told the maid if Aiden Dempsey's grandfather who was then alive could put a back-door in the house he would never be in water. One day he tried it but when the hole was made thunder and lighting came and it had to be closed up. Soon after the house was burned and when rebuilding it Jack Murphy the mason put one in but it was behind the [?] and there was a draught and it had to be closed up again and I was told that Aiden Dempsey is not a rich man. At present no one is allowed to take even a bush off it for fear of the witch.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 08:53
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One very dark night a banshee was heard crying near McEntee's house. The small children of the family were in bed and the wife +husband were in the kitchen when they heard the crying. Then they heard a tiny rap at the door. The wife went to the door, opened it + saw a small woman standing there. The woman immediately disappeared. Next evening word came that the son of the house was dead. McEntee's is near Lionaskee.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 08:04
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the car and they put in the dog also and Seán held the robber and when they arrived home Seán sent the neighbours for the and the robber got a long term of imprisonment and ever afterwards they were very fond of their big dog Dog. My father told me this story.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 08:00
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A long time ago there lived a giant near the banks of the Shannon. He had only one eye. He was known as the giant with the one eye. He had a man-servant that used always attend to him. There was another wealthy man who used often come to visit him. All the valuables that he possessed were enchanted. They would do what he wanted them to do at his will. He had a beautiful
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 07:56
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There are many poets in our district. One was James Carmody Ennismore. Usually when he was at work he used make these poems. James Carmody died in the year 1936 and was a poet since he was young. He was a farmer and is buried at Listowel. The people liked him very well and he was welcomed everywhere he went. He was also a great story teller. These poems were written in English as the poet himself did not know any Irish.
These poems or songs were written down but they were never sung locally. There was also a very good poet from Banmore who worked in this district named Patrick O Connor. He wrote many songs one of which is in memory of George Hewson. There are some of his songs sung yet.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 07:51
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There are many fairy forts in our school district. One is to be found in the townland of Gurtacrissane and two more in the townland of Ballyhorgan. The fort in Gurtacrissane is surrounded by a ditch and one of the other is surrounded by the same. The other is made of stone about three feet in height. In the center of the field there is a hole and a flag covering it. No one has ever went down there.
One day a man went digging the fort in Ballyhorgan. When he was about to dig it he was chased out of the fort by a bull. It can be also seen from one another
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 07:43
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Many tinkers visit our district. They usually come around before the races and before big fairs. They stay at the end of the footpath in Greenville or at a cross-road.
There are different tribes of them there:- The O Briens, the Carthys and the Donoghues. They usually travel around in caravans. They often go round from house to house begging for food to feed themselves. They get flour, milk, potatoes.
They also go round selling holy pictures, brooches, combs, and flowers made from coloured paper. They also buy tin and they make gallons and saucepans out of it. They go round and sell them to the people.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 07:38
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keep doing that until the chain would be the required length.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 07:37
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The children long ago used make hats of rushes. This is the way they used make them. First they used get five long rushes to make the band. Then they got long rushes and wove them round the band attaching them to the others until they came to the end. Then they were all tied together on the top to finish the hat.
They used also make dolls out of potatoes. They cut out the doll's face on the potatoe. Then they got four sticks, two to make the hands and the others to make the legs of the doll. This custom is in our district yet.
They also string daisies together. You put a hole in the end of the stem with your nail and then you would put in the stem of another daisy through the hole and then pull. You would
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 07:31
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The blacksmith told Jack to fit the boot on him and Jack said he would. The next morning Jack went to girl's house and the girl gave the boot to see would it fit him. Jack put his leg into the boot and it fitted quietly. The girl took off his hat and she knew him and she told her father that this was the boy that killed the big man and saved her life. Her father gave her permission to marry him. So the next day he married her. He gave the blacksmith a pile of gold. They lived happy together.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 07:27
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was to be eaten and told her to stop the crying. The sea got very rough and Jack went down near the sea and the people told him to keep back and Jack would not keep back. In a couple of minutes a big man came out of the sea and Jack put up a good fight with the big man. At last Jack killed the big man. The girl was delighted. While Jack was going amongst the crowd he lost one of his shoes. He went up on the horse's back and went to the castle and carried the horse into the stable. He went into the castle himself. The girl carried the boot home. Hundreds of people went to the girl to fit the boot on and the boot would fit none of them.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 07:21
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Down Jack went and hit the witch with the tail and never killed her. She begged of him for mercy that she would give him the keys of the castle. So Jack took the keys and opened the door of the castle and went into one room and it was full of gold. Jack saw a sword handing on the wall. Jack took the sword and went out and killed the witch. He carried the cows home that night and the next morning there was a girl to be eaten by a big man coming out of the sea. About twelve o'clock Jack dressed himself up and went out and went up on the horse's back and away he went and landed there for eleven o'clock. He went over beside the girl
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 07:16
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in their milk. So the next morning he drove the cows up and drove them inside the wall and went up the tree again and the same thing happened. He saw another giant coming out and this giant told Jack to come down that he would pull the head off him for killing my brother. Jack said nothing again only took the tail off and down he went and killed the second giant. He carried the cows home that night and the blacksmith said to Jack that he was great for minding cows. The next morning Jack drove up the cows and drove them inside the wall and went up the tree again. It was not long till Jack saw a witch and she told Jack "come down till I tear the head of you".
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 07:10
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blacksmith said you are the boy I want for minding cows and the piece of land that the blacksmith owned was bounding a giant's castle and the blacksmith told Jack to be very careful that if the cows went inside the wall that the giant would kill all the cows and when Jack drove the cows up he drove them inside the walland wemt up a tree. It was not long till a big giant came out. He said to Jack come down until I pull the head of you. Jack said nothing only took off the tail and went down and hit the giant with it and killed him. Jack carried the cows that night and the blacksmith said that the cows had an increase
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 04:24
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"Oh, John," she said, "where is the pot of money" "Well," said John. "Andy Whelan and myself dug and dug until we reached the pot. With great delight we lifted it up, but instead of money, what do you think was in it, a pot full of rubbish. I was never as much disheartened in all my life." "Oh, you poor old "amadán". said his wife. "I told you never to believe in dreams. So you now see the result."
From that day until the day of his death about 56 years ago, John never went by any other name, but "Whang the Miller", and he never found out the trick the boys of the townland played on him.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 04:14
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will lift the pot," John was highly delighted. They lifted up the pot, but when John looked in, he saw that it was only rubbish was on the top. "Throw that off the top," said John. But when Andy threw the rubbish off the to it was the same underneath. John caught the pot and turned it upside down, and to his surprise, it was not money was in the pot but rubbish.
"Well," said John, I'll never believe in dreams again. "But," said Andy, "the pot was there all the same". "Well," said John," it must be some of the "good people" forgot bringing it with them when they were changing from one rath to the other," Poor John went home very down-hearted. His wife, who was aware of his dreams met him at the door, with a pleasant smile on her face
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 04:03
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They set off with the pot and buried it about four feet from the surface, during the night when all the people were in bed. They put sods over the spot and it looked as if it never had been meddled with. When this was done they told the secret to Andy Whelan. Andy and John Howlett set off at night, armed with a spade and pick. They commenced digging, Down they dug until they reached the spot. "Here it is," shouted John. "I'll be made up for life". "Well." said Andy, "I expect some of it, if not, I won't dig any more or help you".
"To be sure," said John, "you must have your share". "What will you give me?" said Andy. Of course Andy knew it was only rubbish was in the pot. "A quarter of the money in the pot," said John. "Well done," said Andy, come on now and we
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 03:49
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reels, hornpipes, four-hand reel, doubles, jigs, etc. In this way many a Sunday and Holiday passed by. The boys also had hurling, football, handball. skittles, and bowling.
There were some "raths" adjacent to Gurrawn. One man named John Howlett dreamt of a crock of gold being hidden in one of the raths, three nights in succession. He consulted with some of the other men in the townland as to what he should do. Andy Whelan, the local smith prepared to go with John on a certain night. He got 100 yds of woollen thread to put around the spot where the money was supposed to be hidden.
Some of the boys became aware of John's dream, and they consulted together that they would go to this rath and bury a pot full of rubbish just where John dreamt that the money was.
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 03:32
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or trappers, etc. needed there now, so the houses they occupied are let to others, who need them for a yearly rent.
Very few of the English blood remain at the present time in Gurrawn on that account.
Even though times were hard in the latter part of the eighteenth century in Gurawn, the people had many amusements amongst themselves.
They held dances on the crossroads, and the young boys and girls of the townland congregated together there.
The old blind piper, Dolbins, with his bagpipes played up the music.
The partners got out at the dance, and when that was finished, another party got out, and so on, so that no one was tired. After each dance old Dolbins got money in his hat which he placed near by where he sat. Then came the step-dancing ,
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 03:23
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These were compelled to sail away with their families to America.
At the present time in the townland there are only six farmers' houses, and tow labourers' cottages. All the inhabitants are Catholics, with the exception of one family, named Deacon. The members of this family are Protestants.
Lord Carew's descendents resided in Castleboro until it was burned by the Irish Republican Army in 1922, not to let the Free State Soldiers occupy it.
After that Lord Carew resided in England until his death. The property, Castle in ruins, and demense were sold, and bought by Mr. Cullen who resides in one of the houses in the farmyard as the Castle is unfit for habitation.
He has most of the pasture and tillage land let yearly to farmers from different places.
There are no Stewards, gamekeepers
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 03:03
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Somers tried to take away the trees out of the rath, and bring them home.
He could not stir the trees, try as well as he was able, so he left them as they were. They are to be still seen in the rath as they fell.
Lights are to be seen in this rath, and noise heard like the chopping of sticks.
There is an ancient rath in the townland of Gurrawn, with three rings around it. It belonged to Mr. Dier who lived there at that time, about 100 years ago. Mr. Dier went to level the rath. When he had a part of the outside ring knocked down his eldest child died, and he lost some of the farm animals, so he stopped work.
It is still to be seen where he levelled part of it. This rath is supposed to have been built long before the advent of the Danes, and lights are often seen
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 02:48
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the time after midnight, they found him on the outside ring of the "rath" and he dazed. They brought him home. He could scarcely speak with fright. He was put to bed, and in the morning when he arose he could not straighten himself, so up to the time of his death he had a hump on his back.
Several people in Grange tell this story, as he told it himself to people.
There is another story told about this rath. Some people heard of gold being hidden there. The went one night with a spade and pick.
There were two hawthorn trees growing near the spot, and while they were digging, the two trees fell and got entwined in each other. The men dug away for a time but could find no gold, so they returned home without it.
Sometime afterwards Mr. Thomas
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 02:38
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district about the raths.
There is a rath in Grange on the land belonging to Mr. Patrick Somers. His father, who died about twenty years ago at the age of 75, was coming home from Enniscorthy one night. It was rather dark. Going down a "boreen" which leads to his home, and passes by the rath, the horse suddenly stopped.
He was bringing home a load of goods from the town. Thomas, was his name.
He was lifted out of the car, and brought into the rath. He saw a most beautiful sight. All the fairies were singing and dancing, and the brightness of the whole rath was wonderful.
They did not speak to him. The horse went home, and his children were greatly frightened when they did not see their father coming. Getting light they made a search every place, and after a couple of hours, which brought
senior member (history)
2019-06-19 02:26
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around each constructed of earth, and the spaces between them, whenever possible, were filled with water, as a means of protection against attack.
These frail houses are long since gone and sounds of revelry within them are hushed, but the mounds which surrounded them may still be seen in this district, and in many parts of the country, and here, it is said, when the shades of night fall, the fairies hold high revel and the ghosts of the departed are seen. It is supposed the De Dananns, who were said to be magicians, took the form of fairies, and are still living in the mounds which surround the raths." Even still it is considered dangerous to destroy or injure in any way any of those mounds.
The fairies punish the culprit in some way.
There are several stories told in this
anonymous contributor
2019-06-19 01:18
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The Famine Period.
That part of the barony of Slievardagh which stretches from Mardyke on the West to The Commons in the East and which embraces the townlands of Tullaquain, Lickfin, Knockanure, Glengoole South, Earlshill, Ballyphilip Kelliheen, Springfield Ballinastick, Curraheenduff, Knockalonga, Lisnamrock, Gurteen Upper, Coalbrook, Clashduff, Bouleakeale, The Commons, Kyle and Williamstown, suffered less from the failure of the potato crop than many districts in Ireland, owing to the existence of large deposits of anthracite in the area, which were at that period being mined extensively.
In 1824 the mining rights were acquired by the Mining Company of Ireland and by 1846 four hundred men were employed in the area mining coal. At least two hundred others found employment carting the coal and culm to Callan, Tipperary Cashel & Thurles and to the various lime kilns which were then very numerous in the county.
As the company found a market for its products during the period, they were able
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:59
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tear isteach go dtí an cloch aríst. Deirtear na paidreacha céadhna ann agus iartar aon rud(?) ag taisteáil uatha. Cuirtear sean giobal nó táirne crochadh ar sgeach atá inaice an cloch agus teidhtear amach go dtí an tobair aríst. Óltar deoch eile agus bíonn an stáisiún críochnuighthe aca annsin.
Tá nós aca annsin go mbíonn Naomh Cormac ag tabhairt aire dhíobhta ar feadh an bhliain.

Tomás Ó Dhubhláine
Coithcianta
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:54
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Tá go léor tobair tabhachtach in Eanach Cuain mar tobair Cormaic, tobair Braonán agus tobair Bríga ach sí tobair Chormaic an ceann is tabhachtaigh.
Deirtear go raibh sórt seipéal annsin fadó ag Naomh Chormaic nuair a bhí na péin dlighthe faoi réim sa tír agus go mbíodh sé ag rádh Aifrinn faoi cheilt ann. Connachtas sagairt annsin ag rádh Aifrinn timcheall 's céad bliain o shoin agus bhí buachaill beag ag friotáil.
Tá sé ráidhte go raibh bean ag guidhe in aice leis an tobair sin fadó agus go bfaca sí an cáilís. Thóg sí in a naprún í. Dimthigh sé as amharc aríst ach chonnaic sí dhá úaire in dhiaidh sin é.
Tá cloch taobh istigh de'n tobair agus tá dhá phoill ann. Deirtear gurb sin é an áít a mbíodh Naomh Cormaic ag guidhe agus gur iad sin riain a ghlúine.
Déanann na daoine thart timcheall na háite seo stáisiún ag an tobair sin gach bliain ón cúigeadh lá déag do Lúghnasa go dtí an tochtmhadh lá do Mheadhán Fhóghmhair. Teidhtear ann trí úaire. Teidhtear isteach go dtí an cloch ar dtús agus deirtear An Paidir, Sé-do-beatha agus Glór Do'n Athair cúíg úaire ann agus "Naomh Cormaic guidh orainn". Annsin teidhtear thart timcheall an tobair seacht núáire agus deirtear "Na Dolours" Dolour amháin gach úair. Nuair atá sin déanta aca óltar trí deochannae uisge tobair agus teidh-
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:54
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Spital Bridge
About half a mile from Kilmallock on the main road from Kilmallock to Charleville there is a bridge called "Spital Bridge", which is called after "Spital" or "Hospital" which was situated at the bridge. About 20 years ago the land in which the hospital was situated was owned by a man named "Jeremiah O Donnell." One day they were making drains in the field and when they had the work half-done, bones were found which were afterwards recognised to be human. This also adds to the proof that there was an hospital in this particular field.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:52
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My Home District Taghart
My native district is Taghart in the parish of Enniskeen and the Barony of Clonkee. There are eleven families living in it and approximately 60 people. Boylans is the most common name. There are only two thatched houses and eight slated ones. Houses were more numerous many years ago but there are four in ruins, Larkins, Mc Hughs, Greens, Markeys. Their people died years ago and left no descendants after them. This town land is not mentioned in any song or saying except for a stream that rises in this mountain and flows into Belfast Lough and nobody seems to know its name. The land is hilly and whinny and there are a couple of bogs
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:46
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Much like the neck of an old speechless fiddle.
His crooked mouth reached to his ear one side,
And to his deep mouth two double chins were tied;
These hanging lips embraced the sun and wind,
But never felt the embrace of a woman kind.
Oh, no, the gripping, tax-collecting pest,
Love has no place in his ungrateful breast,
Except a sordid passion to obtain
Low murky Mammon and ill-gotten gain.
At last he died and when the knave was dead
The book of rates was placed beneath his head"
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:43
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"It grieves me much, dear pipe, to see that you broke;
I mourn your loss in the absence of your smoke;
I mourn your loss and your untimely end-
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:41
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If a hare crossed the road before some people when going to a fair they would turn back home for fear they would have bad luck at the fair.
It is a sign of good news to hear a number of magpies chattering around a house.
If people met a barefooted red-haired woman as they were going to a fair they would turn back.
If a cock crows during the night it is an unlucky sign.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:41
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The Goban Saor 19-11-'37
The Goban Saor was a great man for building castles. Himself and his son went to England to build a castle for a rich man. When the castle was nearly finished the rich man asked the Goban Saor was it finished. He said he had a tool at home that he needed to finish the castle.
The rich man would not allow him to come for it because he meant to kill him. He sent his son to Ireland but he was kept a prisoner there until the Goban Saor and his son returned. Then he was left home to England.
Written by -- Patrick O'Neill, Old Mill N. C.(?)W.
Told by my grandfather. Aged 96 yrs
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:39
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You should not look in a mirror after dark or you would see the devil.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:35
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The houses in this district in former times had walls of mud and a roof of thatch. The thatch was got from the oats and other grain crops which the people grew on the land. In some of the old houses there was a bed in the kitchen. It was placed beside the wall and it was called a settle bed.
The fireplace was always at the gable end. In some houses the front of the chimney was made of mortar and stones and in others it was made of wood.
The people never heard of houses having no chimney or of the fire being on the floor in the centre of the house.
Some floors were made of mud and others were made of stones called cobble stones. Half doors are common in this district.
Turf was usually used as firing as coal was very dear and there were a lot of bogs in the country and the turf was cheap.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:32
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said to Tom if you don't eat as much as me I will kill you. Tom got a cow's skin and he put it around himself. The two of them started to eat and Tom put all the food inside the skin. At last the giant had enough eaten but Tom had more eaten than him. Then Tom said to him that he could let it all out again. So he got a big knife and he cut the skin and all the food fell out again. Then the giant tried the same thing and he cut his stomach and he fell dead, and then Tom got the reward.
Written by: Mortimer Ahern, Rooska, N.C.(?)W.
Told by: My Mother. Aged 52 years.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:30
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the beginning of Winter.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:28
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There was once a kennel man living in the great castle of Lynch at Summerhill.
One day he forgot to feed the hounds and the next day when he came to feed them they turned on him and ate him savagely. This happened on the first day of November.
So on this date every year the man can be heard screeching. He is called "The Squalling Shaun".
The hounds did not eat his boots or leggings and as two women were gathering sticks in Langford's Wood they saw the "Boots and Leggings" at a distance [?]
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:25
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lived happy.
Written by: Peggie Keane, Ballyine N.E.(?)W.
Told by: My father
An Old Story 22-11-'37
Long ago a wicked giant lived in Ireland with his mother. All the people were afraid of him. A reward was offered to who ever would kill him. One time a boy came to his house and his name was Tom. He stopped there for a long time. One day the old woman sent the giant and Tom to the forest for timber for the fire.
The two of them went to the forest with two ropes for the timber. The giant picked up a big bundle of timber and put it on his back. Tom tied all the trees together with his rope. The giant said to him if you carried all of it home, the old woman would burn it all too soon, so Tom went home without anything.
When they went home the old woman had a big dinner ready for them. The giant
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:24
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and were very frightened. It was supposed that they were the man's boots and leggings.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:23
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his crowbar would be found.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:23
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The "Vanna" well is situated in the townland of Ginnetts. It is two fields from the road. The fields belong to Mrs. Farrell. It was built in the year 738.
Drawing of the "Vanna" Well.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:21
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[/]
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:21
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Drawing of castle and crest
This Norman castle belonged to a man named Peter Lynch. It was destroyed by Cromwell and his followers and the owner was shot in a wood nearby. A girl is supposed to appear every night in white robes at a well near the castle in which she hid a crock of gold and later was killed by the English.
Peter Lynch was a Roman Catholic and had a chapel fron for himself and his household. It was also destroyed.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:18
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Bad scam to you
Go to pot
Oh Lawney
Oh my, Oh my.
Go and smother yourself.
The devil thank you.
I bet
Be dad
Gracious me
Honestly
By Jove
Be all the holy books in Rome.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:17
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Oh Dear! but the boys are the boys.
Oh Boys, Oh Boys
Man a'live
Oh Dear, Oh Dear
Bad cess to you
Bad luck from you
Be hell
Be gad
Be gorrow
Be my song
Be danbad
Word of honour
Be jingo7Man dear
Oh Laws
Oh Janie
Oh glory
Entrath
Janie Mac
Glory honour
I declare to man
Be the holy farmer
Be the living Spider.
Be the hoky poky
Be the mouse
Oh man a day
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:14
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An Old Story 22-11-'37
There was once a poor old man that lived in an old thatched house, with his wife. Their names were Bridget and Paddy Lane. They had two cows and one night the two of them were talking where would they get money to pay the rent because the Land Lord would evict them from their place.
Paddy said that he would sell one of the cows. He set out very early next morning because they had no clock to know the time. He was walking away along the road until he came to a fort and a little man came out of the fort and he had an old wheel in his hand, and he said to Paddy will you sell the cow, and Paddy said what will you give me for her, and the little man said I will give you this wheel and when you go home tell your wife spread a clean white cloth on the table and say "Do your duty."
When he went home he got all things ready and he laid the wheel upon the table. He said "Do your duty" and at once all kinds of fruit came upon the table, and another time he said to the wheel the same thing and money came and Paddy paid the Land Lord and ever afterwards the two of them
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:13
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Oh Laws
Begorra
Oh Boys, Oh Boys
Jingo
Oh Man Alive
Oh Gawny
Glory
Janey
Be dambut
Dear, Oh Dear
Laws a day
Bas cess to you
A Go.
Oh Stop
ha ha
Oh my, Oh my
Gosh
Go to pot
Pooh
What!
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:11
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You never miss the water till the well goes dry.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:10
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There is a hill on the outskirts of Dangan and it is known as the Hill of the Gold. There is a (hill) room under the hill and a door leading into it and this room is said full of gold. But if anyone went to dig for it a spirit would be seen and the person who saw it would die. Therefore nobody ever tried to get the gold.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:08
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There is a line of small hills called "The Shinakeens" between Dangan and Umberstown and it is told that there was a man who was searching for treasure in an old rockhouse. He was using a crowbar because it was all rocks but after a while when he had dug a bit out of the rock his crowbar slipped and then he heard it making a noise as if it had struck the floor of an under-passage. So then he gave up working. He then said if that passage was ever opened.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:02
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every day.
At last this man asked Gore why he was standing every day in the same place and Gore up and told him his funny dream. After hearing it the man laughed and told (Gold) Gore about a dream he had.
He dreamed that if he went to Co. Kilkenny in Ireland, In a place called Newbridge there was a field where three large skeoughs or hawthorns grew, close close to the roots of one of those about three feet deep was a very crock of gold.
Gore knew then that this was on his own land so he quickly returned home and there sure enough he found the very large treasure with which he built himself a great fine house and bought more lands. He also built a great newbridge over the River Barrow so thus
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 23:00
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reathaidh thart air.
Nuair a bhíos an teine laguithe anuas téigheann siad ag cur gualach (gual na gcrompán dóighte) ar a chéile agus bíonn an-spóirt acú. Nuair a bhíonn siad ag dul abhaile tugann gach duine crompán leis a bhíons gar do bheith dóighte agus caitheann sé isteach ins na fataí é. *

Éaomonn Ó Muireadhaigh
Corrán Buidhe
a scríobh
A athair (Mártan) a d'innis.

* Caithtear na crompáin leath-dhóighte seo isteach ins na gais agus ins an choirce.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 22:56
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A story.
Once upon a time their lived a man and he went hunting. This day the man was walking in a bog and he found a hare. He fired on the hare with his gun but did not kill her. The hare ran to a house in the bog and went in. The man followed her and when he went in, it was an old woman that was in it. The man went home and he never shot a hare since. The woman was sitting on a pot when the man went in.
John Rowland
I got this story from John Reilly, Bofeenaun aged twenty years.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 22:54
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agus téigheann siad ag baint giumhaise. Nuair a bhíonns sé sin déanta tarraingeann siad é in aon crap amháin le triomughadh. Téigeann siad annsin ins na biollaí gainimhe ag tarraingt cáirseáin. Nuair a bhíons cúig nó sé de shaic tarrainte acu iomchrann siad é comh fada leis an gcnap giúise.
Nuair a thigeann and oidhche fághann siad ualach mónadh. Annsin cuireann siad na crompáin giúise uilig 'na seasamh agus cuireann siad an mhóin taobh istigh de na crompáin, agus fágann siad cúpla aithneacha, agus cnámh, agus braon ola. Cuireann siad na h-aithneachaí taobh istigh de'n mhóin, agus caitheann siad an ola anuas ar na h-aithneachaí agus nuair a bhíonn sé lasta caitheann siad rud beag cairseáin isteach ar an teine. Deánann sé teine mhór annsin agus caitheann siad an cairseán isteach uilig air, agus toisigheann siad ag
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 21:55
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d'fheall dá stealladh amach ach ráingbhig ná raibh sa seomra ceadna ach má seadh féin ní scaoilfeadh sé leis an 'mbearra'.
Chuir sé isteach a cheann agus dúirt mar leanas :-
Mairg ná cruinnigheann ciall
Is ná cuireann srian le na guth
Má ithtear an bradán ia an bhfiadh
Nach maith an bia an caora dhubh.
Gan dabht b'fhearr leis an gceud fear go gcuirfear sé 'srian lena ghuth'.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 21:49
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Tá an tobar seo ar thaobh an bhóthair gairid do shéipéil Baile an Phuill.
Ar an 28adh lá de Mí Lúnasa a bhíonn an Féile. Leantaidhe des na turasanna ar feadh na n-Ocht Lá.
Tá tigh le h-ais an tobair agus na Chonchúbhairig an dream do chónaigh ann leis na ciantaibh agus is iad a bhíonn cónaí ann acu ar an lá inniú.
An t-am seo atáim ag cur síos ar - seasca bliain ó shoin ann - bhí duine den dream seo agus bhí sé go lag-inntinneach. Chuir a mháthair go dtí an tobar é fé dhéin galún nó crúsca uisce, ach tháinigh sé ar ais gan é.
Cheistigh a mháthair é ach sé an rud amháin a dúirt Patcheen ach 'there's legs there'.
Chuadar amach agus fuaireadar bean báite sa tobar. bhí sí tar éis turas do thabhairt agus ansan bheir sí ar chupán chun deoch d'fháil as an tobar. Nuair do chrom sí sí síos thit sí isteach ar mhullach a cinn agus níor fhéid sí teacht as.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 21:37
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An capall : Ó d'inis tú dhamsa mo shagart uadhachta
Ní raghad ar sceulaideacht ná ag déanadh buaidheatha
Ach tabharfad mo mhallacht don té bhain uaim iad
Agus do chuir ag tarraingt an ghuail mé.
Ach dá bhfaighinn aoinne a scaoilfeadh na cruadh-ghaid
Raghann abhaile mar a bhfuiginn mór-chuid
Prátaí agus brean agus bainne anuas air
Is do gheibheadh Nóra tuighe nó luachair
A bhogfadh me leaba is do léigfeadh chun suain mé
Is dá fhiosróchadh an máistir ansan dá bhuachaill
Maisteach ní fheadar a dhéarfadh an buachaill
Stailceach salach agus rian an ghuail air
Is ní mise an capall is measa fuaireadh
Mar níor dheineadh mé ghoid ná fuaideacht
Ach mar don láir bhán mór úd
A bhí ag sin-sean mháthar Sheáin Uí Chuanaigh.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 21:28
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Nuair do bhí an capall so thar obair do dhéanamh chuir Seán 'set' cruidhte fé agus scaoil leis ar bhóithre an t-saoil chun bás d'fháil nó maireachtaine do dhéanamh de réir mar a thitfeadh.
Chonaic an gabha an capall ar thaobh an bhóthair lá. Ghaibh sé fé trucaill é agus away leis go dtí an baile mór fé dhéin ualaigh ghuail.
Tar éis casadh don ngabha bhain sé na cruidhte den gcapall agus chuir gadraí fé na chosa agus scaoil leis ar farú.
Bhuail Seán Ó Chuanaigh leis an gcapall lá nó dhó ina dhiaidh sin agus d'aithn. Labhair sé mar seo leis an gcapall :-
An fé gur tú capaillín Seán Uí Chuanaigh?
An capall : Is mé cheana is nach mórán trua mé.
Seán : Ní fherim do cruidhte fút nó a dtuairisc
Is dá mbeadh fhios agam cé bhain díot iad
Do dhéanfainn aor do do scriosfadh an ghruaig de
Mar tá sé scriobhta síos fé bhun do chluaise
Gurb é an fiach dubh do shagart uadhachta
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 21:17
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Tigeann Oidhch 'l tSin Seáin ar an tríomhadh lá fichead de Mheitheamh. Timcheall trí seachtmhainí roimhe sin tagann na páistí an bhaile uilig le chéile
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 21:06
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awaiting decision
steeple and all? Ans. The sky.
120. Hairy in and hairy out into Mary's mouth. Ans. A man putting on his stocking.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 21:04
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awaiting decision
115. Where does a boy or a girl go on his tenth birthday Ans. into his eleventh year.
116. Why does a donkey eat thistles?
Ans. Because he is an ass.
117. What is the strongest race in the world? Ans. The human race.
118. Patches upon patches and no stitches.
Ans. A head of cabbage.
119. As round as an apple as plump as a ball, as high as the market house
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 21:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The cure of the wart, Is to get a stone with a hole in it in which there is water and ip the wart in it for ten mornings and on the eleventh morning the wart will be gone.
The cure of the burn, Is to get some ink or soda or soap and it is supposed to kill the pain of the burn.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 20:52
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awaiting decision
Poem 12:7:1937
Up the heathery mountain,
Down the rushy glen,
We daren't go a-hunting
For fear of little men:
Wee folk, good folk,
Trooping all together,
Green jacket, red cap,
And white owl's feather.
Up the heathery mountain,
Down the rushy glen,
We daren't go a-hunting
For fear of little men;
Wee folk, good folk,
Trooping all together,
Green jacket, red cap,
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 20:49
approved
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awaiting decision
28:9:1937
But this was one of those persuasive days that come in the early summer, and sorely try the poor boy who is caged in a drowsy school; a shaft of sunshine, which you study rather than your slate, falls temptingly across the clay floor. And a wanton breath of wind, losing its way, comes in off the opened little sash, and giving the well-torn map of Ireland a taunting rustle, sweeps out again. A bee strays in, buzzing as noisily as if it were he that made the world go round, and after a minute, finding it is no place for him, buzzes out, and away for the meadows. Then you hear cheery voices calling in
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 20:44
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awaiting decision
people had were wooden ploughs. These were the first ploughs that took the place of the spade. There are not any of these left now.
The spades that the people use are bought in a shop. The spades that the people used long ago were made in the forge. The ways that the ground is prepared are, first the ground is ploughed then the field is ploughed secondly and after a while it is harrowed and the drills are opened with a plough and manure is spread in them. Then the the slits are spread in them and they are closed. There are all kinds of potatoes sown in this district
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 20:40
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Potaot Crop 23 Jan 1938
There are potatoes grown at home on my farm every year. There is an English acre sown under potatoes nearly always, and the same amount is sown each year. The ground is not manured before being turned up, but when the drills are opened there is manure spread in them.
The potatoes are sown in drills in the field but when the potatoes are sown in the garden they are sown in ridges. The field is ploughed with a plough but the gardens are dug with a spade. In olden times the first plough the
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 20:25
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awaiting decision
Two Irishmen and Two Englishmen were playing cards. The two Irishmen were partners and one used to say to the other "Ar bfuil agat? Ta." and the other Irishman used say "Ta" when he had good cards. The two Englishmen were losing and in the end they stood up from the table and said that they would never play the game of "Ar bfuil agat? Ta."
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 20:24
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awaiting decision
there. O'Reilly listened to his story and when Madders pointed out to him that the soldiers were at the far side of the river said "I do not wish to harm you and now I will give you a chance of escape. - I will allow you to run from here and you can go to your friends provided my men do not overtake and arrest you again.
"My grandfather said he was willing to take the risk" said Mr. Madders. "and he raced away taking a short cut by what is now known as the "Coomie Lane" "Poll a Chalaidh". "My father" said the American "believed Mr. Madders got safely across and told me to visit the place and made enqiries if I ever visited Ireland. This was his first visit to Ireland and he said he determined to carry out his father's wish.
His story surprised me very
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 20:17
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a cure was to break up a SNAIL and rub the broken parts to the blister.
Poison -: If a child or a big person took poison, the only cure was to drink SOOT. That was the cure for it because it would make the person vomit the poison again.
Toothache -: Any person having toothache they put FROG JELLY on the tooth and it stopped the pain.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 20:14
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awaiting decision
Boils -: MARSH MALLOW was put in a poultice and put up to them to break them and to draw them. PENNY LEAVES were also used for the same purpose.
Consumption -: CAMIMILE was pulled and put into the person's stockings under his shoes. It was said to be a good cure.
Cancer -: The ROOTS OF DANDELION boiled and the water drank is a cure for that.
Thrush -: A child that would have Thrush the old cure was, a child whose father was dead before he was born to breathe on the child's mouth each morning for three mornings
Burn -: A cure for a burn was to catch an EASCÚLÚARACRA[?] and lick his belly, and then lick your burn, that was often done and they considered it a great cure.
Road blisters -: Anyone having road blisters
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 20:11
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In olden times the old people used to make candles in this way. Reisin, Fresh Butter and a little pitch were put into the Cam or Cruiscin which is a pot. Then they put it on a fire and boiled it for three and a half hours. When it was boiled they got a thread of soft cotton and hung it across a Cleek and dipped it into the Cruiscin again and again until the candle was thick enough. They hung it on the wall until it became thick. They kept this up until they had all that was in the Cruiscin finished. When the candles were made the Cruiscin had to be applied again.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 20:06
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awaiting decision
would come out of them would cure thrush or a sore throat.
Whooping cough:- Cut off the roots off BURD-DOCKS and to boil the roots and to drink the liquid that would come out of them
Burns:- Rub the oil that would come out of a SKATE to the burns
Warts:- Rub the white milky stuff that would come out of the STEM OF THE BANNACKAIEN to the warts, and it would drive them away
Boils and corns:- Search for the PENNY LEAVES that grow in the side of a fence, heat them to the fire, and then place them against the boil or the corn, and it would prevent them from spreading.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 20:02
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Pains or broken ribs:- Boil WILD SAGE and DANDELION and to drink the juice that would come out of them
Thrush or a sore throat:- They say that SNAILS were to be got fastened, to the walls of the Lahorn castle, and if you picked them with a pin the sticky stuff that
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 20:00
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awaiting decision
boat and went down to where he had last seen the hand, but when he reached the spot the hand the was gone. He shouted for help but as there was no one in sight he came into the town and told Guard Mc Auley. A few of the guards and Mr. Mc. Gowan went down the river in the boat and found the body in the sand pit.
Mr. Mc. Gowan lifted up the body and wrapped his coat around it. When they reached the shore there was a car awaiting them. They rolled a sheet around the body and laid it on straw in the back of the car.
It was a very sad scene when the car was going up the Street. All blinds were drawn and all doors were closed. There was a large crowd around Mc. Gowan's door.
Marie Thérése Boland,
Main Street, Belturbet
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:56
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A very sad accident occurred here last August. A young boy named Sean Mac Gowan was drowned while bathing in the River Erne. His cousin- Sean Brady- accompanied him to the River but he did not bathe. There was a great flood in the River that day. It was very deep and there was a swift current and not many went to bathe.
Sean jumped from the side of the boat into the river.
After a while his cousin asked him how he was getting on but he got no answer. He asked again but still there was no answer. So he came out from behind a bush where he had been reading and just caught a glimpse of Sean's hand waving above the water.
Sean got into the
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:49
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The old houses in this district were much different from the houses of now-a -days. All the houses of long ago were thatched or built with sticks and scraws. The houses that are being built now are all slated. When the people were building the houses they built them with stones and sand. The walls used be very rough. When they had the walls built the put up the rafters. They put scraws on top of those. When they had that done they had to get oaten straw and hazel sticks which were called scollops.
Then they thatched the house. Every eight or nine years they had to thatch the house.
Some of the old houses have a bed in the kitchen. It is long and fairly wide. In the day time it could be folded up and used as a seat. This bed is called a "settle- bed".
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:28
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In the north of Kerry, a castle stands on a lovely spot on the banks of the River Shannon. Its walls and towers are now in ruins, indeed, and covered with clinging ivy, while wild flowers grow about it. There stood near the place a great big rock, about which a strange story is told.
On this rock there lived a wicked witch named Grauna. Every evening she lit a large candle and placed it outside her dwelling on the rock.
The people living around dreaded her. It was said that whoever passing by the rock looked for even one second at the candle died at once.
One day a great Irish hero name O'Regan climbed up the rock and threw the candle off and that was the end of Grauna.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:23
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Many towns and villages in Ireland have got their name from some famous person or other. Amongst those is Goresbridge a small town in Co. Kilkenny. The person who gave the name to Goresbridge was that soldier of fortune Sir Ralph Gore a prominent figure in this district during the sixteenth century.
It seems Gore when a young was none to wealthy, but at last he dreamed three nights in succession that if he went and stood on London Bridge for the space of three day he would find his fortune. So off to London he went and stood on the Bridge where he saw a certain man pass
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:13
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and the stick flew up and hit his eye and he had to go away and get out his eye.
They say it is unlucky to cut sticks out of a rath.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:11
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so high high high
And dear little sister has a very bright eye.
A Star,
As I was going to the fair of Athy
I met seven men and their wives,
Each wife had a child
Each child had a cat
How many were going to the fair of Athy.
One.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:10
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I have a little sister,
She sits in the ditch.
and if you go near her,
She will give you the itch.
A thistle.
The man that made it did not want it,
The man that bought it did not use it,
The man that wore it did not see it,
A coffin.
I had a little sister and they called her Peep Peep,
She waded the water so deep deep deep,
She climbed up the hill
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:07
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visit this well and pay rounds there as it is believed that anyone washing their eyes in the waters of this well will benefit by it. A man having very sore tender eyes went to this well and washed them three times in its waters and in a short time they were perfect. A large stone is still visible to mark the place where the well is believed to have been.
Close to this graveyard is to be seen the ruins of a house blown up during the "Black and Tan terror". There was an ambush close to this house, some of the military were wounded and early next morning the "Black and Tans" arrived ordered out the two brother Boddies and blew up their home as a reprisal. It is also remarkable that at this very spot two men lost their lives afterwards. John Buckley of Mallow in a motor bicycle.
Our Lady's Blessed Well is situated in the townland of Castleharrison beside a little grove. It is a beautiful well
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:07
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mackerel fishing to Arklow in early summer and the sharing of the seasons takings took place (a special sharing system being employed). These boats then were equipped with a "train" of herring nets, and also proceeded to Howth, Douglas or Ardglass so that about 80 large boats in all took part int he herring fishing (eight men on each and a boy).
Os the herrings failed in Howth or Ardglass the boats went round the coast of Antrim and Derry on to Donegal. In Donegal they fished chiefly round Lough Swilly, Buncranna, Killybegs, and Burtonport. Some boats continued on from coast to coast, down by Mayo, Galway, Clare, etc. returning home by south of Ireland.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:06
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A farmer in Fethard had a brother a farmer in Clonmel but the farmer in Clonmel had no brother how could that be.
The farmer in Fethard was his sister.
Put it in (wet) dry, take it out (dry) wet,
The longer you leave it
The stronger it gets
Tea.
As black as ink, as white as snow and hops on the ground like hailstones.
A magpie
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:02
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awaiting decision
As I went up one hill and down another hill and looked over another hill I saw a little fellow cheuring his caudy caudy
A rabbit cheuring cabbage
Round the wood and round and round the wood
It left a pile at every bush and whitewashed every man
Snow.
What has a head and a foot and four legs but never walks
A bed.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:00
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named Wrixon who lived there in a Castle and that is how it has its name of Castlewrixon. The castle still stands in perfect order and is now owned by a Mr. McDermott who has bred valuable horses "Castlewrixon Wire" and "Castlewrixon Bell".
There was a poet who lived in Castlewrixon one time Jack Connell by name who composed fine old songs. There was a beautiful spring well in Castlewrixon but owing to some trouble with neighbours the owner closed it up and there now remains a small drain to mark the spot where it was. This well was known as Port-a-Heen.

Imphrick is another townland of Ballyhea that has its history also. There is a beautiful blessed well near Imphrick graveyard. It is known as St. Declan's well. This well is supposed to have been at the other side of the road but through somebody disrespecting the place the well removed. People
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 19:00
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A pot racks
Hairy in and hairy out hairy is to hairys mouth
A man putting on his stockings.
Headed like a thimble
Tailed like a rat
You can guess forever
But you could not guess that?
A pipe.
Under the water and over the water but never touched the water?
An egg in a duck.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:58
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Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall.
Humpty Dumpty got a great fall.
And all the Kings horses and all the Kings men.
Could not put Humpty Dumpty
Together again?
(A broken egg.)
Chink Chank under the bank.
Ten drawind four?
A woman, milking a cow.
What is it that hangs bears, but never blossoms?
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:56
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These were drift nets - and were hawled and set by hand. The herring nets were only 17 fathoms long. Each boat was equipped with a hand winch which was used to hawl up or awaken, or is have the springback a name given to a large rope which stretches from end to end of the train of nets when set, and wich was attached here and there is the nets) apparently to strengthen them and as it was winched back it facility stated the hawling of the nets.
About 20 of the large boats at the same time oyear followed heaving fishing. They used about the same number of nets (but of a smaller mesh, and usually began the spring fishign in Dunmore, Co. Waterford. As the summer approached they came home shared the proceeds and west fishing for herrings in Howth, Isle of Man (Douglas) or CWDglass, Co. Dqwn.
The large boats returned from the
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:55
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drank his blood
And left him lying easy?
A bottle of wine.
Which is a white hen or black hen the better?
A black hen, because a black hen lays a white egg but a white hen cannot lay a black egg.
A houseful a roomful
But you could not catch a spoonful?
Smoke.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:54
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The seed was black,
Ans the ground was white
Riddle me that.
And I ll five you a pipe?
Writing with a pen and white paper.
What is it that is round and sound and would not weigh two ounces?
A half sovereign.
As I was going out in a guttery gap.
I met my Uncle Davy.
I cut off his head and
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:53
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awaiting decision
Ard-Skeigh is situated north east of the Parish. There is a very ancient burying ground in this townland. There has been nobody buried in this graveyard for years. All its walls are broken down and the only thing to mark its existence is a little Abbey which has been repaired a few years ago. Close to this place is a cross named the cross of Ard-na-Crúad. Legends say the last battle to be fought in Ireland will be finished at this cross.

Sorrel is also historic. Overlooking this townland is famous "Gallows Hill" where the remains of four fir trees still stand to mark the place where people were hanged in olden times.

Debbie Quinn got all that is written up to this from her father Patrick Quinn Ballinadrideen Ballyhea Charleville

Copied by Kitty O'Connor Newtown Ballyhea Charleville.
Patrick Quinn is over 60 years.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:52
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How is a sailor like an auctioneer?
Because one sails over the seas and the other sees over the sales.
The beginning of eternity
The end of time and space.
The beginning of every end.
And the end of every place?
The letter E (e)
Riddle me, riddle me, randy o
My father gave me seed to sow.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:47
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In the townland of Ballinadrideen is the graveyard of Aglish. This is the burying place of the Harrisons of Castleharrison. Even at present but formerly use by several families as there are many tombstones to be seen there.
There is a beautiful building in Miltown. It is known as Miltown Castle. It was built by a Major Bruce. It is entered by an avenue and a beautiful lodge. The man who erected the lodge and entrance gate was ordered to carve the bust of Cromwell broker(?) outside the lodge door. When he had finished he thought of Cromwell's tyranny to the Irish. He turned round and smashed the faces with a hammer. To this day the figures can be seen with the nose broken off. Although Bruce offered him a large sum of money to replace the figure but his Irish blood would not let him. There are also to be seen two large eagles on the entrance gate.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:39
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(Tobar Laictín)
visited by many people who spend a long time praying there. Not far from Ballyhea Cemetery is a spring well Tubber-Lock-Deen. This well has been never known to run dry although during the Summer months a lot of people draw water from this well. Ballyhea Cemetery is beautiful. It has many fine head-stones erected there. There is an old abbey in the centre of the Church. There is a beautiful Monument in this Church erected by O'Shaughnessy. This man lived in Ballyhea years ago and he owned a mill at the eastern side of the railway crossing. That place now is still called the Mill Road.

In the townland of Cooline there is an ancient churchyard where there is also an Abbey. In the townland of Ballynoran Baile-an-Fhuaráin there is a spring well. "Tubber-na-Griolla. It is situated in a corner of four farms and a large drain or Strután is known as the Pola-Buídhe.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:36
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there. O'Reilly listened to his story and when Madders pointed out to him that the soldiers were at the far side of the river said "I do not wish to harm you and now I will give you a chance of escape. I will allow you to run from here and you can go to your friends provided my men do not overtake and arrest you again.
"My grandfather said he was willing to take the risk" said Mr. madders. "and he raced away taking a short cut by what is now known as the "Coomie Lane" "Poll a [1]. "My father" said the american "believed Mr. Madders got safely across and told me to vist the place and made enqired if I ever visited Ireland. This was his first visit to Ireland and he said he determent to carry out his father's wish.
His story surprised me very
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:30
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time do you intend to be back".
The agent had his plans well laid and rode away. He collected all his rent, then he filled a bag with coppers and stitched the notes in the pocket of his saddle. He started for home and as he came along Richard awaited him held him up and demanded his money or his life. The agent picked up the bag of coppers and flung it as far as he could into the cave saying "You can follow it now. Richard was so avaricious that in his hurry to get the money he slipped on the flag of the cave and was dashed to pieces beneath and that was the end of Richard the Robber but Richard's Bed still remains to be seen.
Not far from this lies a place called The Weaver's Haggart. Right across from the mountain stands the ruins of four houses which were supposed to have been built but never roofed as it was believed the place was haunted. Castlewrixon at one time belonged to a very rich gentleman
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:28
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from Gorey to Arklow in June 1798. When they came to within a couple of miles from the town they saw a man running from a farm now occupied by Condrens of Curranstown. The man seemed to have a gun under his arm and O'Reilly was ordered to overtake the runaway and arrest him. The fugitive was overtaken and marched at the head of the army accompanied by O'Reilly. When they came to a spot now known as the Cross Roads at the head of the town, O'Reilly saw some English soliers at the other side of the river. He had learned from the fugitive (Madders) that he was a Protestant and he left his farm because he was afraid he would be killed by the Irish soldiers. He had intended to reach the town and seek the protection of the English soldiers who were stationed
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:23
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(Caislean Eóin)
The parish of Ballyhea has many townlands and each has its own history. In the townland of Castlewrixon and in Cuis-lán-Óin mountain is a famous spot known as "Richard's Bed". Richard was a highway robber who lived in a cave beside this place. He used to meet people travelling from Cork to Dublin, hold them up and take their money from them. Richard's Cave is situated beside the road which at that time was the main road from Cork to Dublin.
A gentleman used to travel this road from Dublin to Cork to collect his rents. Each time he passed he was held up by Richard and robbed of his money. At last his agent thought of a plan. One day he said to his master. "You stay at home and I will go and meet the robber. As he passed the mountain he was held up by Richard who spoke very kindly and said, You will be very late returning" and, what
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:13
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seedy wart on the hand or finger.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:12
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awaiting decision
Local Cures
Marchmalet, a wide leafed plant wtih a blue flower grows wild around the ditches. It was used in olden days as well as at present for curing sprains or swelled joints. The leaft is plucked form the plant and boiled. Then it is strained and put in a bottle or jar. A sprain or swollen joint is bathed three or four times a day. A fairly tall weed called Wortweed generally found in turnip drills between June and September produces a kind of milk when plucked and broken which will cure any kind of a
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:09
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awaiting decision
1(a) Dr. Truell, (b) Mr. Stoney. There is an old courthouse in Mr. Truell's yard, which is 250 years old. Men were sentenced to be hanged there in '98. Stoney was very cruel to the people and tried them himself to be hanged.
2. Killoughter, Captain Halpin
3. Ballybla, Mr. Rebell
The landlords were put on the land by Cromwell. They were not hard on the people because the latter were not poor. Dr. Truell married a girl named Miss Gardener whose father had got the estate from Cromwell. Cromwell and his soldiers are
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:07
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Clonmannon and Killaderrig which was confiscated by Cromwell, Ballyrea which was owned by a family of Ushers until in 1664 it was purchased by a family named Rebell. In 1646 when Cromwell was in the district he camped upon Ballyrea Castle Grange wsa owned by a family named Vockers. There was a castle on the land and a big mound of earth opposite [theysite] of the castle and in a direct line with a castle upon Ballyrolon.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:07
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There were no local hereos only Informers for the yeomancy . If we Irish call them heroes.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:05
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The school was built by the landlord, Captain Halpin on the site of an older one. All the way from Killoughter crossroads to Blackbull there was a row of houses long ago.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:05
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There is a
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:04
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When the farmer had taken up his potatoes the poor people used to go into the fields and go after him looking for small potatoes to eat. The people had a small piece of land of their own which they used to grow oats and other things they wanted.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:02
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awaiting decision
thank them and give them money. One of them collects the money which is afterwards divided equally.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 18:01
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awaiting decision
On Hallow E'en night some men and boys and some girls dress up and go from house to house. They wear false faces and old fashioned skirts and coats. They bring accordians and fiddles with them.
When they go into the house one or two of them play the music and the others step-dance and dance other dances. Then they start singing one by one. The person who is singing the song sings till he comes near the end of it and then they all join in. Then the people of the house
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 17:58
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awaiting decision
The fairs around here are always held on the fair green in Wicklow. There are no fairs held on hills or in cemeteries.
When the animal is sold the two men that are bargaining strike hands. When the animal is sold a label is put on its head.
There is a special fair held for the sheep. The fairs are last Tuesday of every month. The buyer gives sixpence or a shilling for luck.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 17:24
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awaiting decision
[-]
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 17:22
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awaiting decision
1- 3- '38.
The travelling folk.
Some of the old travellers still call to our home. Those same people have done so for many years. Some of them are really very poor other s are getting on fairly well. The poorer of these take alms of money, food and clothes. Other generally wish to take only ( only) money alms.
The richer of those travellers sometimes sell small articles such as prayer books, rosary beads, needles, pins, studs, laces, and a lot of other little things and in this district they do very good trade. They buy their supplies in big towns where they get them at a cheap rate.
The people who need charity are always welcome in this district. In some places these people lodge, but no longer than one night. When people give them lodgings they allow them to sleep by the kitchen fire or in the barn. Although they have food with them they are generally given a good meal
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 17:21
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around long ago as well as at present.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 17:20
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There were not many shops long ago. The people used to go to the nearest town to make purchases. The people used to buy and sell after Mass as they do today. They used to give money for the goods they bought. There were no days on which business was supposed to be unlucky. There were no markets held long ago. The people used to call the coins - half crowns, shillings etc "franks".
When the people got the goods long ago without money it was called "tick" or "score". Pedlars went
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 17:14
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When the hen or any fowl is going to hatch a mark is put on the eggs.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 17:13
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The cows have names such as "Blackie", "Brownie" "Molly". When driving cattle out of a field the driver says "cowup" or "cowon". The cowhouse is made of concrete with concrete floors. The cows are tied by the necks to stakes and also to "beals."
A horse shoe is hung up in cowhouse to bring luck to the animals.
The call for a goat is "bell" "bell". The call for a hen is "tuk" "tuk" and for a duck "weety" "weety"
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 16:40
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III The Royal house of O'Rourke, princes of Breffney
92 Teargnach: his son,
prince of Breffney, a younger brother of Eochaidh who is no 92 on the O'Connor pedigree.
93 Breannan: Son of Teargnach, the founder of the McGovern clann.
IV Royal House of McGovern,
lords of Teallach Eochaidh
94 Boathin: his son.
95 Moneach: his son.

96 Eochaidh: his son: a quo Teallac Eochaidh.
97 Dungaile : His son.
98 Cosarach : His son.
99 Ioombar : His son.
100 Ruairc : His son.
101 Teighe : His son.
102 Connor : His son.
103 Samhradán : His son
(Samradh summer)
104 Muireadhech : His son.
105 Giolla na Naomh : His son.
106 Giolla Iosa : His son.
107 Donagh : His son.
108 Brian Breagach : His son.
109 Thomas : His son.
110 Fergal : His son.
111 Brian : His son had four brothers. Tomás na Teasóige, Donach Ballach, Maoilseaclan agus Cormac.
(O Harts ''Irish Pedigree)
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 16:35
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''Mac Shamhradháin [snaidhm] go neart
Ar Teallach Eachaidh Oirdhearc.''
''McGovern, the mainstay of strength,
Rules over noble Tullyhaw.''
Arms of the Clann :-
Argent. Oak of a mount vert an oak tree proper on a chief azure., a crescent between two mullets argent. Crest. An oak tree proper.
Explanation :-
The oak tree is considered the emblem of virtue and strength.
The Romans made their civic crowns of its branches and gave it to such as had saved the life of a citizen.
The McGovern Pedigree
--------------------------------
The clann is said to be descended from Eochaidh Muigh Meadhoin,
the 124th Monarch of Ireland.
I. Royal house of O'Neill Monarchs of Ireland and Kings of Ulster.
86 Eochaidh Muigh Meadhoin (Eochy Moyrane) was the 124th Monarch of Ireland and in the eighth year of his reign he died a natural death at Tara A.D. 366.
II. Royal house of O'Connor, King of Connaught
87 Brian; eldest son of the king of Connaught.
88 Duach Galach: his youngest son; first Christian King of Ireland.
89 Eoghan Searbh: His son.
90 Muireadach: His son.
91 Fergus: his son, king of Breffney.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 16:18
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Ballinadrideen the meaning of this word is supposed to be Baile na Druidin(?) the town land of the starlings.

Ballinoran Baile an Fhuaráin the town land of the spring

Ballinagrath Baile na Greatha the meaning of this is supposed to be "Greagh" - a course mountain flat

Shinana - Sean Eanac the old marsh

Fiddane - Feadán means a streamlet

(It is Mrs Herbert, Ballyhea that told her this)
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 16:14
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There are the ruins of an old castle in Newstone the last person that lived there was Mr Mc Gourish it is built five hundred years and I do not know who built; It is in the Parish of Drumcondrath in the townland of Newstone and the Barony of Slane Lower and in Co. Meath.
There is a portion of an old castle at Magheracloy in the parish of Magheracloy and the Barony of Farney Co Monaghan,
Over the doors and windows of the castle, there is some very beautiful carving;
On the top of the castle there are two battle towers from which it could be defended in case of attack; There are also dungeons in which prisoners were kept, In Drumbridge graveyard there are the ruins of an old church; The holy water stones are there yet; and on them there are flowers carved. This church is about six hundred years old; The way it was destroyed was the time there were plunderers in the country and it was burned, it is in the Parish of Drumconrath and the Barony of Slane Lower in Meath, In the kitchen of Magheracloy castle there is a dresser which is three hundred years old. On the front of the dresser there are four lions beautifully
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 16:09
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In olden times about 70 to 100 years ago a football lasted often a whole day from dawn of day to dusk.
The boys wore heavy nailed shoes, and when one boy got tired, there was another to take his place.
The teams got into a big field with a ditch at each end. They began to kick from the middle and the goals were its ditches at the end of the field.
One district would challenge another, and there was always a fight before the match ended. There was a football match between Swanlinbar an Corlough
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 16:03
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Cahirmee fair comes but once a year. Cahirmee is a great annual horse fair which lasts for three or four days. Buyers come from England and pay good prices for horses. Gipsies and tinkers come from every part of the world there. A good many people go there to buy horses. Long ago it lasted for a week but now it only lasts for three or four days. Cahirmee fair is held in Buttevant. About twenty years ago the fair was held in Cahirmee. When Cahirmee fair is over the tinkers all depart to different places. They often fight with one another to the great delight of some of
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 16:03
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the young people who go there in the evenings to see the performance. The tinkers usually turn up for this fair and travel in caravans to it in order to be there in time. The horses are bought at different prices such as £50, £80 to £150. The shop keepers in Buttevant especially the public houses do a great trade during the days of Cahirmee.
Cahirmee fair began this year on Saturday and was finished on Tuesday. After Cahirmee there are tinkers and gipsies all around the country. The people are annoyed from them for five or six days after the fair.
Bridie Rea, got this information from her father Edmond Rea of Ardnageehy, Charleville. A farmer about 60 years of age.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:52
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There is a horse fair held every year in Buttevant about the twelfth or thirteenth of July. It is known as Cahirmee fair and it was called Cahirmee because in former years it was held a mile outside the town at a place called Cahirmee. It holds three days but long ago it held for a week. People come from all parts of the world to buy or sell horses not alone do people come from England but also from France, Germany, Russia, and alot of other places. The week before the fair the roads are crowded with caravans and gipsies. Before the fair tinkers and gipsies are seen moving towards Buttevant. They do not go in to the middle of the town but stay about a half a mile outside it. Every evening after the
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:51
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work of the country is finished great crowds go to see the fair.

Julia O'Keefe go this from her father Daniel O'Keefe of Castlewrixon Ballyhea who is a farmer aged about 60
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:50
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Thousands of people died for the want of food. The second year of the famine was worse than the first. The people died in hundreds on the roads and in the fields. They built work houses for the people before the famine. The people did not like the work houses and would not go to them (in 1847) until their last need.
They crowded into them in 1847, many of the people died in the work house but the work house saved many other people's lives. There was food distributed around to the people to save them from death.
Some of the landlords acted very cruelly. They kept on evicting their tenants because they were not able to pay rent. Both (Catholic) Catholic and Protestant clergy helped the hungry in many ways and helped the sick and dying. Ireland lost over 4,000,000 people in the famine.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:43
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The townland of Cahirmee is situated halfway between Buttevant and Doneraile. Here are two fields where a very famous fair was held long ago which was called "Cahirmee Fair". The names of the fields where the fair was held were known as the galloping field, and the market field. The market field was occupied by horses, buyers and travellers. The galloping field was the one in which the horses galloped before they were bought. In the market field also there was a double row of tents running through the middle of it in the form of a street. There was also a tent for Vetinary Surgeons to examine the horses. A house stood on the side of the the road in which men used to put their coats, saddles, and bridles.
Nowadays this fair is not held here. The owner let the fields to the Military in the year one thousand nine hundred and twenty to exercise their horses and the people
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:43
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boycotted the fair and it was transferred to the town of Buttevant where it is still carried on. This fair is traced back to the fifteenth century and perhaps before it. At that time the fair continued for a month and became famous all over Europe. Buyers from the four Continents came to buy "The Irish Hunter for the armies of the world". However, from one century to another the fair shortened from four or five weeks to three, two and one week until finally in nineteen hundred it lasted only for four days. This continued to the beginning of the Great War when the days of the fair were reduced to two days and since the above incident occurred in the year one thousand nine hundred and twenty the fair is held in Buttevant on the thirteenth and fourteenth of July.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:43
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Irish people. The potato blight comes very suddenly a brown spot was seen on the leaf of the plant after a while a lot of spots were seen on the plants and then the plant fell off. Today they have a way to prevent the blight with stuff bought in chemists' shops, the government started work and gave some employment but it helped the country very little. Roads were built where they were not needed.
The workmen were that weak for the want of food they could not do work. Large quantities of Indian meal were sent to Ireland but the people could not buy it. The hens stopped laying and the people had to buy a little meal. The poor farmer had only his grain for to pay his rent. The children became very hungry, their mothers were broken hearted they used to go in crowds to the mill to get some meal. The father of the house stayed out till after bedtime not to see the children crying.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:40
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sgáthmhoga, agus thug sé de Séamus iad agus d'ith sé iad.
Nuair a bhí sé sin itthe aca tháinig an cocaire anuas i gcoinne an éinín don fhear saidbhir. Nuair a thug sí an téinín chuige, bhí an croidhe agus na sgathmhoga ithte, agus d'iarr sé don chocaire ceard deirigh dhóibh, no an raibh aoinne san gcisteannach a dith iad. Dubhairt sise nach raibh ann acht beirt mhac an fheilmeara a tháinig isteach tar éis na sgoile agus go gcaithfeadh grubh iad a dith iad. Bhí an oiread uilc ar an bfear saidbhir is gur dhíbrig sé an feirmeoir agus a bhean agus a inghean amach as an teach agus níor thug cead pósadh don leanamhain óg gur chaith siad dul abhaile aríst. Nuair a tháinig Seán agus Séamus abhaile tráthnona dhibhir an t-athair iad le neart bata agus dubhairt leo gan a theacht i ngiorracht seacht míle don teach aríst go bráth.
D'imthigheadar leo agus bhíodar ag imtheacht agus ag síor imteacht i gcaitheamh na hoidhche agus aríst lár na bhárach go dtáinig siad go dtí geata teach sgoile agus sheas ag an ngeata. Dhearc an mháighistir amach agus chonnaic iad, agus chuaidh sé amach chun cainnte leo, agus d'innis siad dhó an chaoi a dhibhrigh an t-athair iad.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:33
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tuibhrann tú tinghean do mo mhac-sa sé an mead spré iarrfas mé ort an t-éan atá ag breith na huibheacha seo. Geobhfaidh tú sin agus fáilte ars an feirmeoir bocht mar bhí rímead air a bheith i gcleamhnas leis an bhfear saidbhir seo. Shocruigh siad an lá le h-aghaidh an phósadh agus an lá a bhí an pósadh ann, cuireadh Seán agus Séamus chuig an sgoil agus níor innsigheadh tada dóibh faoi an bpósadh. Dubhradh le comhursa an béile a réidteac dóibh nuair a thiocfaidh siad abhaile.
Nuair a tháinig siad ní raibh duine sa teach rompa acht bean na comhursan, agus dubhairt sí leo, agus dubhairt sí leo go raibh a deirbhsúir pósta le mac an fhir saidhbhir seo agus go rabhadar ag an mbainis.
Dhearchadar isteach san gcliabhán éin agus bhí an téinín imthighthe as. Níor fhanadar leis an dinnéar ithe acht d'imthigh siad go dtí an teach a raibh an bhainis ann. Thángadar isteach san gcisteanaigh agus bhí cocaire ann ag bruith feóla, Dhearc "Seamus" isteach i bpota beag a bhí ar leithrigh, agus dubhairt sé le "Seán". Seo é an téinín seainne thíos sa bpota seo. Dhearc Seán síos agus dubhairt sé gur bé. Chuir Seán síos a lámh agus thug sé aníos croidhe an éinín, agus dith sé é, agus thóig sé aníos na
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:23
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lá roimhe sin. Ní rabhadar cead slat ón teach nuair a chonnaic siad an téinín aríst agus thosuigh siad ag leanamhaint dhó agus le tuitim na hoidhche rugadar air. Nuair a thug siad abhaile an téinín thaitnigh sé go han mhaith leis an tathair agus thug sé suipéar maith dhoibh. Rinne sé cliabhan éin dhó ahis chuir sé isteach ann é.
Maidin lár na bhárach nuair a bhí sé ag dul isteach chuig an baile mór ag díol na sguabhanna chonnaic sé ubh sa gcliabhan éin faoi an téinín. Thóg sé amach an ubh agus bhí sí ar an ubh ba deise dá bfaca sé ariamh agus bhí sgríobh uirthí nach raibh sé indon a léigheadh. Thug sé ag fear ceannuigthe í a bhí sa mbaile mór a bhí an saidbhir. Dubhairt an fearr ceannuigthe leis go dtuibhraidh sé céad púnt dhó ar an ubh, agus bhí an spóirt ar an bfear bocht, agus nuair a fuair sé an t-airgead thug sé cairt plúr agus earraidhe abhaile leis. Lár na bhárach bhí ubh eile san gcliabhan éin, agus thug sé chuig an bfear ceannuigthe aríst í, agus thug sé céad punt eile dhó ar an ubh sin. Lár na bhárach bhí ubh eile ann agus thug sé chuig an bhfear ceannuigthe aríst í agus thug sé trí chéad punt dhó. Anois ars an fear ceannuigthe leis an bfeirmeoir bocht seo. Tá mac agam-sa agus tá inghean agat-sa, agus má
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:11
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emigrated to America. He appointed Tom Webb to collect the rents for him.
During the life time of John Headach, the tenants (had) had a hard time. If a man pulled an ash-plant he paid as much for it as if it was a large tree he had taken.
In the nineteenth century tithes were collected. There were paid in money usually.
The animals were confiscated if the money was not available. The tenants resisted the tithes and after a time they refused to pay tithes altogether.
The Irish Land Commission bought the Johnstown estate in November 1037. In December the farm was divided amongst several farmers and it is probably that most of the land will be tilled.
Obtained from, Collected by-
Mrs Hogan, Larkin's Hill, Sara Hogan, Larkin's Hill, Puckane, Puckane, Nenagh.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 15:07
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fhada agus dhéanadh sé sguabhanna de'n fhraoch agus thiubhradh sé isteach chuig an mbaile mór iad chuile lá margaidh agus dhíoladh sé iad.
Chuaidh an bheirt aca amach an tráthnona seo agus chonnaic siad an téinín ba deise dar leag súil ariamh air. Thosuigheadar ag léanamhaint an éinín, gur thuit an oidhche ortha agus chaith siad a theacht abhaile gan aon éinín agus gan aon sguab, mar bhí an tráthnona caithe aca ag leanamhaint an téinín.
Nuair a thangadar abhaile gan aon fraoch, bhuail an t-athair iad, agus chuir sé a chodhladh iad gan aon suipéar. Chuadhar chuig an scoil lár na bharach agus nuair a tháingheadar abhaile chuaidh siad amach ag baint an fhraoigh mar an lá roimhe sin. Ní rabhadar i bhfad ón teach nuair a chonnaic siad an téinín aríst agus d'fan siad da leanamhaint go dtáinig an oidhche ortha agus chaith siad a theacht abhaile chuig an athair gan aon fraoch. Ceibhre ce'n bualadh a fuair siad an oidhche roimhe sin, fuair siad a dhá oiread an oidhche seo, agus cuireadh a chodhladh iad gan aon suipéar agus cuireadh chuig an sgoil iad ar maidin gan aon bricfeasta.
Nuair a tháinig siad abhaile san tráthnona, cuireadh amach iad mar cuireadh an
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:59
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Bhí fear san tír seo fadó agus bhí beirt mhac aige darb ainm doibh Seán agus Séamus. Bhí an bheirt mhac ag dul chuig an sgoil chuile lá, agus nuair a thiocfadh siad abhaile tráthnona chuireadh an t-athair amach ar an sliabh iad ag baint fhraoch
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:56
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Local Landlords.
Long ago Ireland had been divided into large ranches. Those were generally the property of Protestants, so that many of the landlords were hostile to catholic tenants.
John Headach was the landlord of Johnston district. The Headach family have been settled in the district since about a hundred and fifty years ago.
The Headach (family have been settled in)
estate consisted of about six hundred acres.
Claree, Peterfield, and (...?) were once part of the Johnstown Estate.
John Headach was a fairly good landlord.
There are several ruins of houses on the estate.
This shows that evictions must have taken place.
The evicted people went to (bonnaught..?) or up on the mountains. The Headach family got the Johnstown ranch (after) after the bromwellians plantations.
After a few years John died and his son became landlord. (him) He
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:56
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an leigheas á dhéanamh acu. Rún is eadh an leigheas de bhrí sin.
Tá nós ag daoine áirighthe crúdh capaill do chuir ós cionn an dorais (taobh istigh) agus é iompuighthe taobh síos suas. Ceaptar go dtugann sé raibh ar an dtigh.
Ma bheireann bó gamhan lá Coille comhartha é sin nach mbeidh aon rath ar na h-ainmidthe i rith na bliadhna sin.
Nuair a gheibheann duine buidéal leighis ón dochtúir ní ceart d'aoinne é a bhlaiseadh gan an céad bhraon a thabhairt don duine bhreóite.
Chuala na piseóga seo ag Máire Bean Uí Thuama, Gortleathard, Cillgarbháin
Fuair sí bás Feabhra 23adh lá 1928 in aois a naoi mbliadhna is ceithre scór. Nhreacas sa leabhar seo iad an 4adh lá d'Abrán 1938/
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:52
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na fathaigh annsin, agus tháinig inghean an righ chuige agus leigheas sí é. Bhí an draoidheachta imtighthe de inghean an righ annsin, agus phós sí féin agus an t-éireannach agus mhair an bheirt aca fa shéan agus fa shonas uaidh sin amach.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:49
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'Nutsy May'.
(We catch hands) A number of girls catch hands at one side and others catch hands at another side. Girls number one come shouting to the others, -
"Here we come singing for Nutsy May
On a cold and frosty morning"
Girls number two shout:-
On a cold and frosty morning.
For mutsy may on a cold and frosty morning"
"Who will you get to pull her away
On a cold and frosty morning".
Then Nutsy May is pulled away from one side to the other and so on until all the girls are on the one side.
Collected by:-
Sara Hogan, Larkins Hill, Puckane.
Mgt. Starr, Lisquilabeen, Coolbawn.
Obtained from- Mrs Hogan, Larkin's Hill, Puckane
Mr. Starr, Lisquilabeen, Coolbawn
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:49
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leigheas sí é. D'fan sé an dara hoidhche agus tháinig na fathaigh aríst. Nuair a bhí siad gar de'n teach, thosuigh siad ag cainnt agus dubhairt siad go raibh fear geanamhail rompa anocht agus go rachadh sé ag imirt cártaí leo. Táinig siad isteach agus reidhtigh siad tae aríst agus dubhairt siad leis cupán tae ól, acht níor thug sé aon árd ortha. Dubhairt siad leis dhul ag imirt cártaí leo acht ní rachadh. Nuair a chinn ortha é mhealladh mar sin cheangail siad le ropa é, agus fuair siad bior iarann agus dhearg siad é, agus bhí siad dá tholladh agus dá lasgadh gur ghlaoidh an coileach ar maidin agus beigean dóibh imteacht annsin.
Ar maidin tháinig inghean an righ chuige aríst agus leigheas sí é. D'fan sé an tríomhadh hoidhche aríst, agus tháinig na fathaigh, agus reidhtigh siad tae. Dubhairt siad leis cupán tae ól, acht níor thug sé aon árd ortha. Nuair a chinn ortha é mhealladh mar sin, rinne siad loch mór uisce taobh amuigh de'n doras, agus chuir siad cloigeann an téireannach bocht síos ann, agus ar maidin nuair a bhí fhios aca nach raibh sé marbh, rug ceann aca air, agus chait sé suas go bárr na spéire é agus nuair a thuit sé anuas, bualadh ar chloch ghlais é, agus chuir sé lorg a dhá choise inntí, acht níor marbhuigheadh é. D'imthigh
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:46
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Old ruins
There are the ruins of an old monastery in the town Louth. Beside this monastery there is a little house and it was all made of stone; it was supposed to be for holding valuable belonging to the monastery and the monks; there is a legend about this house it is said there came a knock to the monastery door one night, and a monk asked lodging and they would not let him in, he lay down on the ground and in the morning he was dead and this house was found built over him; There are the ruins of an old castle in Nicholastown and the remains of it are to be seen yet it is in Ardee, Co. Louth and there was a dungeon in it for keeping prisoners;
There are some large stones there still and there is writing in Latin on them; The castle was built in the year 1816;
There are the ruins of an old castle in a field belonging to Jack Murphy it was knocked by a man name Cromwell and this happened in the year 1651.
Written by Angela Martin on th 5 May 1938
Told by Mrs Martin Reaghstown on 4th May 1938
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:45
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bailiú as na aon rud mar sin, mar deirtear go bhfágann na daoine maithe máchaill ar a leithéid de dhuine.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:40
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''Aistriú an Luain ó thuaidh nó aistriú an Aoine ó dheas, muna mbeadh agat ach pocán gabhair ní dócha go rithfeadh leat.''
Dá mbeadh duine ag imeacht ó bhaile agus gur ó thuaidh a bheadh a thuras ní léighfeadh na sean daoine dó () Dé Luain. Mar an gcéadaoin í leigfidís dó dul ó thuaidh dia h-Aoine. Deirtear na beadh aon phioc den ádh ag an duine sin.
Nós atá ag a lán daoine gan mhuc do mharbhú Dia Luain. Deirtear ná bheadh aon rath ar an gcuid eile ded' mhuca.
Deirtear leis nach ceart do dhuine a chuid gruaige so bhearradh Dia Luain.
Nuair a thagann duine isteach i dtig agus go mbíonn ? á dhéanamh ann, bíonn air buille do bhuaileadh leis an ? nó an bairle do chasadh mar bheadh amhras ar na daoine gur leo an ? go mbéarfadh an cuairteóir an t-ím leis.
Má bhíonn dhá dhoras i dtig, is ceart do cuairteoirí teacht isteach ags dul amach an doras céadhna.
Aon áit go mbíonn lios ní ceart dul suas air, brosna do bhailiú as, bláthanna do
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:38
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When the square is filled the marks are added and wherever has the most wins.
'Chip-chop-cherry'.
When we play 'chip-chop-cherry' we draw a large circle and divide it into several it into several sections. A number is written in each space. Each person playing starts at certain number and goes all round the circle saying "Chip-chip-cherry, all the men in Londonderry, could not climb over the big high walls of chip-chop-cherry." The person playing strokes out the number he stops at and writes it down again in a column of his own. When all the numbers are stroked out the person with the greatest result wins.
'Box'.
If we play box one get a piece of paper and puts dots on it. Then she draws a line joining two of the dots. Whoever can make the most squares wins the game.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:37
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sí gur inghean righ a bhí inntí agus go raibh sí fa dhraoidheachta ag triúr fathaigh agus go mbeadh sí amhlaidh go bfanfhadh duine éicint trí oidhche sa teach acht dubhairt sí go marbhochadh na fathaigh duine ar bith a d'fhanfadh ann.
Dubhairt an t-éireannach go bféachfhadh sé féin iad acht dubhairt sise nach raibh aige acht droch sheans acht dá mbeadh an t-anam ann chor ar bith ar maidin go raibh buidéal aicí a leigheasach é. Dubhairt sí leis gan tada a dhéanamh a déarfhadh na fathaigh leis no go mbeadh sé féin fa dhraoidheachta freisin. An oidhche sin bhí sé sa teach agus ar an dó dhéag tháinig na fathaigh agus reidtigh siad tae. Dubhairt siad leis an éireannach cupán tae ól, acht ní raibh baoghal air. Nuair a bhí an tae ólta, dubhairt siad leis a dhul ag imirt chártaí leo, ach ní rachadh.
Bhí siad ag iarraidh é mhealladh chuile chaoi acht chinn ortha. Bhí draoidheachta ag na fathaigh agus rinne siad trí bhullán mhór dhiobh féin agus chuir siad adharca ortha féin chomh fada le maide láimhe. Thosuigh siad dá chur go barr an tighe le na h-adharca fada agus níor stop siad gur ghlaoidh an coileach ar maidin, acht níor mharbhughadh siad an t-éireannach amach is amach.
Tháinig inghean an righ chuige ar maidin agus
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:32
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whoever catches most begins. She scatters out the stones and picks them up seperately. The, she throws them out again. This time she takes two ones and then two together. Then she takes two twos' and the next time one and three together. Then she takes four together.
She then proceeds to do high ones'. She keeps one stone in her hand and throws up the other. She does the same as before until she has high fours done. She then does 'creep'. She tosses the five stones on her hand. Some stay on the back of her hand. She has to pick the others in between her fingers and turn all into her palm. When we get tired of the hard work in school two play 'for- and - goose', chip-cherry' or 'box': We draw a page of squares. One takes fox and the other goose. The fox marks x in one square and the goose o. Each trys to get the others' letter in between his and if he can do this he gets one mark
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:26
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"Mademoiselle, she went to the well, She did not forget her soap and towel, She washes her face and dried it well, She said her prays and jumped into bed."
The girl who says this the most times without letting the ball fall wins.
'Didgy-Dodgie.'
In Spring, when the cowslips in bloom we play 'Didgy-Dodgie'. We gather cowslips and cut off their stems. Then we divide up the little flowers and put them between our fingers. Then we tie the flowers together and have a nice 'Didgy- Dodgy'.
When we play with it we say:- "Didgy-Dodgy four and (...?), How many years am I to live?
The number of times the girl can throw is the number of years she will live.
'Jack-stones'.
In Summer we play 'Jack-stones'. About four play together. We 'toss' the stones and
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:22
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[-]
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:22
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the churn. The wife did not like the look of the butter and thought I had a hand in it. Some time after as I was going to market I met this woman coming home from market. She said to me ''Have you much butter?'' Not suspecting anything I told her I had a good share. She said to me ''Have you much butter?'' Not suspecting anything I told her I had a good share. She said some words then, and whatever they were, I found for a good while after that whenever I made a churn I had not my right share of butter. Sometime later I met her. She asked me if I had my right share of butter. I said I had not. ''Oh'' said she (naming some people living a good distance away) ''so and so have more than their right share of butter I hear.'' She wanted the blame to be put on them for taking my butter.
The Danes it was that made the lioses. There are two of them near where I was living. If you go down into the lios you can move a kind of stone and you will find a passage from one lios to another. In that part of the parish there is a lios in about every third farm. I do not know anything about them, but once with my own two eyes I saw twenty one hares running round one of them. (These five accounts were taken down from Mrs. Bridget McCarthy (née Mahony) of Carhoomeengar, Kenmare, aged 81 years, on Oct. 20th 1936. She now lives in the New Road, Kenmare. Copied into this book March 21st 1938. Sr. M. Gerard.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:21
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Bhí Éireannach ann fadó agus bhí sé amuigh ag fiadhach lá. Chonnaic sé éan mór geal agus thosuigh sé ag caitheamh leis acht dá mbeadh sé ag caitheamh ó shoin leis ní fheadfhadh sé é bhualadh. Is gearr gur imthigh an t-éireannach isteach thrí aill mhór ag leanamhaint an éin agus nuair a chuaidh sé isteach chonnaic sé teach mór agus bhí bean in a suidhe ar cathaoir inaice na teineadh. Labhair sé léithe agus dubhairt
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:20
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'High Gates.'
When we play "high gates", all join hands save one. She comes along and says, "this gate is locked". The others say "Yes, and bolted." She proceeds all round the ring saying this. Then she goes around saying :- "I have a little dog at home and he would not bite you". After a while she says "But he would bite-----". The girl named follows the other until she catches her.
'Rabbits in burrows'.
Two join hands and one runs in under the arms when playing "Rabbits in Burrows." Each three do this. One girl stands alone and claps her hands. The 'rabbits' run out from under the other girls' arm- 'burrows'. They try to get into a 'burrow'. This goes on until everyone is tired.
'Mademoiselle.'
Four of five of us usually play 'Mademoiselle' together. We get and each one throws it up against a wall saying each time,
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:19
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Holy Well
In the field opposite the school and about twenty yards from the road there is a Spring well. The well is just at the foot of a very ancient oak which bends over it and has protected it for over a century. This well was thought very much of in ancient
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:19
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Folklore: - Bridgetown
The village of Bridgetown in ancient times was called (Átha-Gile-Ghaill?) meaning the Ford of the Church of Saint Gall.
The present church of Bridgetown was built around ninety years ago. Before that time the Parish Church was built upon the site on which the schools now stand. There is a portion of the walls of the schools which was part of the walls of the church.
It is said that the remains of two priests were interred in the small school-yard between the school and the road. The school was erected in the year 1850.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:17
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Fuaireas an píosa béaloideas mar leanas ó sna sen-daoine a bhí 'na gcomhnuidhe sa cheanntar.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:16
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sé féin amach sa loch, agus tháinig se isteach slán agus tá an fear eile ag dul siar is aniar, agus béidh sé mar sin go deo.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:15
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About a mile from the village of Bridgetown and near the road leading to Killaloe, is the very ancient burial-ground of Kilcredan. The burial-ground is rectangular in shape and is n area about an acre. Part of the walls of the ancient chirch are still to be seen, and the Holy Water Font of the old Church is still there. Two very old tomb-stones are in the Church-yard. They were hewn from a very hard slaty species of rock. They were erected almost one hundred and fifty ears ago, andthe inscriptions on them are still very legible.
There are not so many people butied in ilcredan of recent years, and the Church yard was planted with trees about fifty years ago, and
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:13
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an loch agus bhí an fear ann roime.
Bhfuil fhios agat ce'n fáth a bhfuil mise annseo le cead bliadhain. "Tá fhios agam ars an buachaill. Ce'n fáth ars an fear. Tabhair soir mé thar an loch agus innseochaidh mé dhuit annsin é. Thug sé soir é agus annsin dubhairt an buachaill leis na maidí ramha a thabhairt de'n chead duine eile a thiocfadh isteach sa mbád agus é féin a chaitheamh isteach sa loch, agus go mbeadh sé saor. Thug an fear sin mála airgead dhó agus d'imthigh sé go dtí an teach, a raibh an crann óir aca. D'innis sé doibh go raibh luch annsin ag bun an chrainn, agus dubhairt sé leo í mharbhughadh. Thug an fear sin mála airgead dhó agus d'imthigh leis go dtí an fear a raibh an sruthán fíona aige agus dubhairt sé leis go raibh cat ag ól an fhíona agus an cat a mharbhughadh. Thug an fear sin mála airgead dhó freisin. Chuaidh sé chomh fada annsin agus bhí a athair ann roimhe. Cá bfuair tú an t-or a dubhairt an t-athair agus dubhairt seisean go raibh sé ag siubhal ar airgead ó shoin. D'imthigh an t-athair annsin agus chuaidh sé go dtí an loch agus bhí an fear ann roimhe agus dubhairt sé leis an bfear é a thabhairt siar. Gabh isteach sa mbád ars an fear agus thug sé na maidí ramha shó agus léim
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:10
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these trees give the place a very lonely appearance. An inteligent old man, and a great authority in local tratition, who once lived at Kilcredan, but has long since gone on the way of Truth, told me that a Saint Crédan lived there, at the time that another Saint of the same name lived in West Clare.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:10
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A local Story.
About twenty years ago. There was a Lephurmn seen by the school children around Killough N.S. This little elf was seen up at Giggets hill behind the ditch. No one could get near him, when you would think you were near him, he would be far away.
He was seen occasionally for some time and then one morning there was a long stone dug up on the hill at the back of the school and written with red chalk on the stone the amount of money to be found under it. There also seemed to be the impression of a pot at the bottom of the stone. So the little elf was supposed to be minding the money. He never was seen after.
My cousin Mrs Garry told me this story.
Ellen Fleeson,
Williamstown,
Caddagh,
Mullingar.
11/5/1938
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:05
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e.g apple and oranges. They come back and stand in the centre of the field. The others walk along in a straight line and pass through under the uplifted arms of the two, saying 'here's the robbers coming through'. The last stands and the others ask her which of the two things she liked best. She goes behind the back of the girl who has the article she likes best. This goes on until all had been questioned. Then the pull a tug - o' - war. Whichever side seperates first loses the game.
'Queenie'.
We often play 'Queenie'. One person gets a ball and stands with her back to the others. She throws the ball over her shoulder and someone else picks it up.
She calls 'Queenie'. The girl by herself turns round and guesses who picked the ball. If she does not guess right the person with the ball becomes 'Queenie.'
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:05
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e.g apple and oranges. They come back and stand in the centre of the field. The others walk along in a straight line and pass through under the uplifted arms of the two, saying 'here's the robbers coming through'. The last stands and the others ask her which of the two things she liked best. She goes behind the back of the girl who has the article she likes best. This goes on until all had been questioned. Then the pull a tug - o' - war. Whichever side seperates first loses the game.
'Queenie'.
We often play 'Queenie'. One person gets a ball and stands with her back to the others. She throws the ball over her shoulder and someone else picks it up.
She calls 'Queenie'. The girl by herself turns round and guesses who picked the ball. If she does not guess right the person with the ball becomes 'Queenie.'
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:01
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ran and was beaten. Now when the man had the two creels of turf home the master took him and put the silver shoes on him and the man ran him, with his own, master riding him. Now the horse spoke again to the master and said, "put golden shoes on me because I am going to England because there is going to be a very big race there. There was another horse there named Miss Squitcher and she had silver shoes on her. But when the other horse had the golden shoes on him he would be able to beat Miss Squitchers one. Now the master of the horse did so, and the master took him to England and started him to run but he refused to do so, until the other horse ran with him. The horses ran neck to neck until the last jump. Miss Squitcher's horse fell into the trench and broke her neck. As he was coming home with victory the horse heard a noise under the bridge and he jumped in and neither the horse and the man on his back were never seen again.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 14:00
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in a chodladh é, bhain sí prioc as agus dhúisigh sí é. Tá ceist agam ort adubhairt sí. Tá srúthan san domhan thoir, agus bhí fíon cúpla bliadhain ó shoin ann agus níl ann anois acht uisce. Tá sé sathach éasgaidh é sin fhághail amach ars an fathach. Tá cat annsin agus tá sé ag ól an fhíona agus mar marbhochaidh siad an cat ní bheidh an fíon aca agus tá cránn ann freisin, a raibh bláth óir ag fás air, trí bliadhna ó shoin, agus níl aon bhláth ag fás air anois. Bhuel tá luch mhór annsin ars an fathach agus tá sí ag ól sugha an óir agus mar marbhochaidh siad í sin, ní bheidh aon ór aca.
Thuit sé in a chodladh aríst, agus dhúisigh sí é agus dubhairt sí leis go raibh fear annsin thoir ar an loch le cead bliadhain agus nach bhfuil sé indon é fhághail. Bhuel dá mbeadh an fear sin sathach críona gheobhfadh sé sin amach. Dá dtughadh sé na maidí ramha do dhuine éicint agus é féin leim a thógáil amach sa bhfairrghe, bheadh sé saor. Bhí an buachaill ag éisteacht le chuile fhocal. Chuaidh an fathach amach aríst ag fiadhach, agus nuair a fuair an cailín imthighthe é chuaidh sí féin agus an buachaill amach ag an lachain dhearg. Léim an lacha agus bhuail sí an cailín le na sgiathan, agus thuit an cleitín óir ar an talamh.
Rug an buachaill ar an gleitín agus d'imthigh leis agus é chomh sásta leis an righ. Chuaidh sé chomh fada leis
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 13:59
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Will you marry me, sire, and the Y.O.U?"
The rider turns his back in disgust saying :- "no, you are too dirty, too dirty, too dirty, No you are too dirty and Y.O.U"!
Then he returns to his own hand 'Johnny Geranium'.
One stands against the wall and the others go off together. They think of something as p.p.- picking potatoes. They join hands and come near the wall saying-
"Here we come"
"Where from?" Johnny asks
"Washington"!
"What's your trade?"
"Lemonade!"
"What do you work at"?
The others give any initials and do as if they were doing that work. The other guesses and if she guesses correctly she tries to catch some of the others.
'Robbers'.
Two join hands and think of something
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 13:56
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Once upon a time there lived a man near Doon Lake who was employed by Major Going. As he was going home from work one evening he met a gipsy. They gave him a mare, that fell tired on them, - to leave it in the field near the lake until they would call for her.
He thought they would call for her from day to day until two years passed away. One morning he saw some other animal with the mare. To his surprise it was a young foal. His skin was spotted with spots about the size of a penny on his skin. Time passed away and the gipseys took the mare and left him the foal. The foal was a year old and he started to ride the foal, to work. And then he went drawing turf with him. The foal spoke to the man and said "your master is running a horse in England and he will not win but tell him put silver shoes on me and I will win the race. The man only laughed at the idea. The master'shorse
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 13:54
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a large ring. (On..?) goes inside in the centre and closes her eyes. Those in the ring say, "Frog in the middle, jump up, jump up
The Frog jumps up and catches someone. She must guess her name and if she guesses right the others is the frog. If not, she has to be frog again.
Another of our favourite games is "here is the gipsy's rider". One person act as a gipsy. The others join hand and stand in a line. The rider approaches them say:- Here is the gipsy's rider, rider, rider,
Here is the gipsy's rider and the y.o.u"
The others say-
"What are you riding here for, here for, here for. What are you riding her for and the y.o.u
"Riding to get married, get married, get married,
Riding to get married, and the Y.O.U"!
Each one says:-
"Will you marry me, sir, me, sir, me, sir.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 13:49
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a brass man driving?
A Needle thread and temble.
Old Mrs Twitchet has but one eye and a longtail which she lets fly and every time she goes out a gap she leaves a bit of her tail in a trap.
A needle and thread.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 13:49
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silk, satan, calico, rags.
'Pickey'.
In winter we play pickey. We draw a square and divide it up into four or six 'leds'. Each person hops from one bed to the next until he goes around the whole square. \if he succeeds in getting around he chooses one bed and puts his initials on it. The others must jump over his bed until all the bed are owned 'Grug'.
In Summer we play 'grug'. All the girls stand up in the field. They all call 'grug' and fall and tip the ground. The last person to reach the ground is called the 'grug-woman. If she catches any of them, the one she catches is the grug-woman the next time, if not, the other keeps her job.
'Frog in the middle.'
When playing 'frog in the middle' we form
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 13:48
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loch seo le céad bliadhain, agus ní feidir liom é fághail, acht an bhfuil fhios agat-sa ce'n fáth sin agus dubhairt an buachaill nach raibh fhios. Tá sé chomh maith duit a dhul abhaile a dubhairt an fear, mar tá fathach sa domhan thiar agus má fheiceann sé thú bainfidh sé an ceann díot,
Caithfidh mé an cleitín fhághail ar chuma ar bith adeir an buachaill. Chuaidh sé chomh fada le teach an fhathaigh agus bhí an fathach amuigh ag fiadhach. Ní raibh sa teach acht an cailín aimsire. Chuaidh sé isteach agus dubhairt sé leis an gcailín gur an tóruigheacht an cleitín óir a bhí sé. Dubhairt sé leí annsin go raibh sruthan san domhan thoir, agus go raibh sé in a fhíon cúpla bliadhain ó shoin acht nach raibh ann anois acht uisce, agus tá crann ann a raibh bláth óir ag fás air cúpla bliadhain ó shoin agus níl tada ag fás air anois, agus annsin dubhairt sé go raibh fear ar an loch sin thoir agus nach féidir leis é fhágáil.
Tháinig an fathach isteach annsin agus chuaidh an buachaill isteach annsin i bhfolach air. Faghaim baluch an éireannach ars an fathach, agus dubhairt an cailín leis gur ocras a bhí air. Thug sí béile dó annsin agus nuair a bhí an béile ithe aige, tháinig sé anuas chuig an teine agus thuit sé in a chodladh. Nuair a fuair an cailín aimsire
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 13:47
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"A little wood a little wire a little house without a fire?"
A Birdcage
"The flour of England the fruit of Spain met together in a shower of rain, put in a bad tied up with a string riddle me that and I'll buy you a ring?"
A Plumpudding
"What is the biggest bridge in the world?"
The Rainbow
"It grows in the wood with leaves in it
It grows in the field with hair on it
It goes on the road with bone in it"?
A Clog
"Long legged father big bellied mother
three little children and they all the same colour?"
A Pot and hooks and legs.
I have a steel mare with a flaxen tail and
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 13:46
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"A little wood a little wire a little house without a fire?"
A Birdcage
"The flour of England the fruit of Spain met together in a shower of rain, put in a bad tied up with a string riddle me that and I'll buy you a ring?"
A Plumpudding
"What is the biggest bridge in the world?"
The Rainbow
"It grows in the wood with leaves in it
It grows in the field with hair on it
It goes on the road with bone in it"?
A Clog
"Long legged father big bellied mother
three little children and they all the same colour?"
A Pot and hooks and legs.
Ihave a steel mare with a flaxen tail and
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 13:36
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40
22 nd March 1938.
Now that the Spring is with us the turf cutting season is not far off.The preparation for turf cutting generally takes a day or two.At first the implements are collected and 2 men take them to the bog. They consist of a barrow a a shlan 2 forks and a shovel .Long ago Friday was generally the day to begin work in the bog first as it was supposed to be the lucky day. Two men
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 13:30
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41
always work together when cutting turf.The creels is supposed to be good work for a man to cut in a bog.
Thirty creels of turf is called a hundred of turf and when it is clamped the clamp is supposed to be seven feet long feet wide and seven feet high.
Long ago the principal way of measuring things were hands thumbs and fingers.The height of a horse was always measured by hands ,a hand been counted 4"in measuring timber thumbs were used
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 13:29
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loistín ar fhear an tighe. Thug fear an tighe sin shó agus d'fiafruigh sé dhé a raibh aon bharamhail aige ce'n fáth nach bfuil fíon ins an sruthán sin amuigh mar bhí cúpla bliadhain ó shoin. Níl fhios agam ars an buachaill, acht tá sé chomh maith agam a bheith ag giorradh an bhealaigh go dtí an domhan thiar.
Bhí sé ag imtheacht annsin no gur thuit an oidhche air agus chuaidh sé isteach i dteach eile. "Cá bhfuil tú ag dul arsa fear an tighe. Tá mé ag dul go dtí an domhan thiar ar seisean go bfaigheadh mé an cleitín óir atá faoi sgiathán an lachaín dhearg. An bhfeiceann tú an crann sin amuigh arsa fear an tighe, agus dubhairt an buachaill go bhfeiceann. Bhí bláth óir ag fás ar sin fadó, agus níl sé ag fás anois air ars an fear. An bhfuil fhios agat-sa ce'n fáth sin agus dubhairt an buachaill nach raibh fhios agus d'imthigh leis. Bhí sé ag imtheacht agus ag sior imtheact no go dtáinig sé chomh fada le loch. Bhí fear annsin agus bád aige. Tabhair go dtí an domhan thiar mé ars an buachaill. Thug an fear siar é agus annsin d'fiafruigh sé dhé ce'n áit a bhí sé ag dul agus dubhairt an buachaill go raibh sé ag dul go bfaigeadh sé an cleitín óir atá faoi sgiathán an lachain dhearg. Bhuel tá mise ar an
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 13:25
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42
a thumbs measuring 1"and cloth was measured be fingers the finger used been the middle finger which was supposed to be 41/2 ins.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 13:06
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'Spy'
On Spy Wednesday we play 'spy'. One remains in the den and the rest run off to hide. The remain hidden until the person sees them and calls 'spy'.
'Skittles,'
When we cannot go out on a wet day we play 'skittles' indoors. We get seven short sticks and one fairly long one. The numbers one to seven are put on the seven sticks or skittles. Each person throws the other sticks and whoever knocks the greatest number of sticks wins the game. 'Skip'.
Many of our girls skip during recess.
Two persons take an end of the rope each and turn it. Someone else jumps in and skips. The others say:-
tinker, tailor, soldier, sailor, richman, (poorman..?) farmer's son or (loots..?), shoes, (buttonlost..?), clogs or hat, cap, bonet, wreath- and- veil, or wheelbarrow, ear cart, carriage and
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 13:01
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nuair a rachadh sé anonn.
D'imthigh an buachaill agus an leitir in a phóca aige, agus bhí sé ag imtheact no gur thuit an oidhche air i bhfad ó bhaile. Níor raibh fhios aige cé rachadh sé, acht chonnaic sé solus beag istigh i lár coille. Tháinig sé chomh fada leis an solus acht ceard a bheith ann acht teach beag bhí ag cúpla gaduidhe. Chuaidh sé isteach sa teach agus nuair a chonnaic na gaduidthe é, bhí siad le é mharbhúghadh. D'fiafruidh ceann aca dhé ce'n áit a bhí sé ag dul agus dubhairt seisean go raibh sé dul go Sasanaigh le leitir chuig an Rígh. "Spain an leitir dhom ars an gaduidhe. Thug an buachaill an leitir dó agus leigh an gaduidhe í. Nuair a bhí sí leighte aige, chaith sé isteach sa teine í agus sgríobh sé ceann eile, agus sé an rud a bhí inntí, ingean rígh Shasanaigh a thabhairt de'n bhuachaill nuair a rachadh sé anonn, agus an bheirt aca a bheith pósta.
D'imthigh an buachaill leis agus ba ghearr go raibh sé i Sasanaigh. Chuaidh sé chomh fada leis an rígh agus d'iarr sé an inghean air. Tháinig an inghean isteach agus dubhairt sí nach bpósadh sí é, go bfuigheadh sé an cleitín óir atá faoi sgiathain an lachaín dhearg sa domhan thiar. D'imthigh an buachaill leis agus bhí sé ag imtheacht no go dtáinig an oidhche air. Chuaidh sé isteach i dteach agus d'iarr sé
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 12:33
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nuair a rachadh sé anonn.
D'imthigh an buachaill agus an leitir in a phóca aige, agus bhí sé ag imtheact no gur thuit an oidhche air i bhfad ó bhaile. Níor raibh fhios aige cé rachadh sé, acht chonnaic sé solus beag istigh i lár coille. Tháinig sé chomh fada leis an solus acht ceard a bheith ann acht teach beag bhí ag cúpla gaduidhe. Chuaidh sé isteach sa teach agus nuair a chonnaic na gaduidthe é, bhí siad le é mharbhúghadh. D'fiafruidh ceann aca dhé ce'n áit a bhí sé ag dul agus dubhairt seisean go raibh sé dul go Sasanaigh le leitir chuig an Rígh. "Spain an leitir dhom ars an gaduidhe. Thug an buachaill an leitir dó agus leigh an gaduidhe í. Nuair a bhí sí leighte aige, chaith sé isteach sa teine í agus sgríobh sé ceann eile, agus sé an rud a bhí inntí, ingean rígh Shasanaigh a thabhairt de'n bhuachaill nuair a rachadh sé anonn, agus an bheirt aca a bheith pósta.
D'imthigh an buachaill leis agus ba ghearr go raibh sé i Sasanaigh. Chuaidh sé chomh fada leis an rígh agus d'iarr sé an inghean air. Tháinig an inghean isteach agus dubhairt sí nach bpósadh sí é, go bfuigheadh sé an cleicín óir atá faoi sgiathain an lachaín dhearg sa domhan thiar. D'imthigh an buachaill leis agus bhí sé ag imtheacht no go dtáinig an oidhche air. Chuaidh sé isteach i dteach agus d'iarr sé
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 12:27
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was broken. This turned out true. It was never the boy himself who was there but some one from the other world- one of those who are about at night and are doing their purgatory in this world. Shortly after the brother's death the place was cold and the boy was taken over to Killarney.
This is a true story of a neighbour I had. He was a young boy. He had the habit of being out late some nights. When he gave himself that habit the parents locked the door and he could not get in. He slept in the barn a few nights. One night there was to be a dance at the house, and his father and brother were going to town for things wanted. Though it was night they met a funeral, when no funeral could be there. When the funeral came in sight of the dwelling house a whistle was heard from it. The boy, who was inside the house, came out at the whistle to see who wanted him. A few days afterwards he took sick, and in less than a week he was dead. Whatever killed him it must have been when he was out late he took it. He was called away by the whistle from the funeral.
I went into a neighbours house. The husband had just made a churn and he asked me to wash
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 12:19
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food, before he got bad entirely. After that they never used to see him eat or drink by day or by night. He never went to bed, but remained day and night sitting on a wooden block by the fire. And anything they wanted to find out he could tell them no matter what it was. He lived like this for eleven or twelve years. The Monsignor knew him well. His twin brother died when about twenty one years or so.
People went to the wake. One man, a neighbour, told him to come away from that place where he was sitting. In reply he told the man, out of everyone, of all that he (the neighbour) had done or said that was out of the way at any period of his life. Everyone else was afraid to say a word to him, and he spoke to no one. Though he had not seen me for about eleven or twelve years since the time of my sisters wedding, and could not have known me, he spoke to me by name saying ''Welcome Bridgie Mahony''. The night of the wake he said it to the grandmother, ''Your two sons-in-law are coming now.'' As it happened they were coming, but at the time he spoke they were so far away that they could not be seen from the house. He told a neighbour to go to a certain field and that the mare was there but her chain
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 12:18
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37
some time his wife offered house and land for sale it was purchased by a man of the O Dwyere from the parish of Tulla.
The tenants were opposed to the sale and refused to pay rent to the new owner.There was a good deal of trouble and law until it was taken over by the Court of Chancery.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 12:14
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36
10th March 1938.
Folklore.
In olden times when all the best land in the country was owned by cruel landlords it was a constant cause of trouble between landlord and tenant.
In this parish the Caher estate was the best to cause much alarm among the tenants.Caher house and about 20 acres belonged to a family of the O'Haras for a considerable length of time. Mr O Hara died and after
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 12:04
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Is ceart go dhaoine pósadh a déanamh ar De Máirt agus De Céadaoin. Caitheann daoine eadach gorm, bán, agus donn. Is sean-fhocal é seo. "De Luain agus De Máirt soir." Nuair a phósann daoine i ngorm beidh an t-adh orra, nuair a phósann daoine i mbán beidh siad go deas le chéile agus ní bheidh siad ag troid. Nuair a phósann siad i nglas mairfidh siad i nhfad ó bhaile. Is pisreóg a bhíonn acu nuair a bhíonn síad ag teacht amach as teach an phopail tar-éis a bheith pósta, an duine a thiocfaidh amach i dtosach geibhfidh sé sin bás i dtosach. Is sean-fhocal é seo "pós i ngorm i rud eicint nua agus i rud eicint ar iasacht agus i rud eicint bán." Nuair a bhídís ag pósadh fadó bídís ag cuir seál le daoine eile orra. An lá a phósanna siad ní dhéanann siad aon obair ar bith. Ní théigheann siad abhaile go ceann míosa. Déantar cleamhnas thart timcheall na h-áite seo fós.Tagann an buachaill go dtí teach an chailín agus fiafhruigheann sé í. Mar nach bhfuil sé sásta leis an spré ní thógfaidh sé í acht má tá, leagann siad amach lá le h-aghaidh na bainfheise: Tugtar beithidhigh agus airgid mar spré. Cuid acu geibheann siad céad púnt.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 11:59
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''I and my husband were at the funeral of my godmother who was buried in Kenmare about forty or fifty years ago. Her husband was biried in Killarney, in the Abbey, and by rights she ought to have been buried there instead of in Kenmare. As we were returning from the funeral and were past the town of Kenmare and near the cross my husband said ''I must hurry on the horse. There is a funeral coming I want to be off the road''. My husband saw the funeral coming from the direction of Killarney but I could see nothing. It was the husband of my godmother coming from Killarney to be buried with his wife''.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 11:52
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Lá amháin bhí beirt fhear amuigh i mbád ar an loc agus bhí sé sáthach stoireamail. 'Sé ab t-ainm a bhí orra Risteárd Seóige agus Padraig Ó Suilleabhán as Durus. Ní raibh siad i bhfad amuigh nuair a tháinig siolla gaoithe agus d'ionntuigh sé an bád bun os cionn. Bhí Risteárd indon snámh a dhéanamh acht ní raibh Padraig.
Shnámh Risteárd isteach acht congbhuigh Pádraig greim ar na madaí rámhaí. Bhí go leór daoine ar an trágha acht ní raibh aon bád acu le dhul amach ag iarraidh an fhir eile. Bhí máthair Risteárd annsin freisin agus dubhairt sí leis nuair a bhí sé ag teacht isteach in aice leis an trá "farior" nach bhfuil tusa amach san áit atá an fear sin agus an fear sin in do áit sa.
Ar an bpoinnte sin dimthigh Risteárd síos fen uisge agus bádhadh é. Tháinig an fear a bhí amuigh slán. Na fir a bhí ag an loc dubhairt siad go gcaithfeadh siad an bhean amach sa loch agus i a bháthadh mar gheall ar é sin a rádh le n-a mach acht d'fiafhruigh sí orra gan í a chaitheamh isteach agus níor chaith.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 11:46
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I believe that I once heard what is called the Banshee. It was about 11 o'clock at night. I and two of my sisters were in the same room when suddenly we heard a strange sound very high and clear. To me it seemed more like a succession of high musical notes growing gradually higher and dying out at the highest. The others thought it more of a wail and one said there were a few low sobs at the end which I did not catch however. I passed along the gable of our house and only the wall separated us from it. It was so loud and clear that there could be no mistaking the fact whatever the cause. The next Sunday evening an Aunt of ours died. She used to frequent our house a good deal, staying at night very often. She was a Mrs. O'Donoghue and the Banshee was said to follow her husbands family.
Maighread NÍ Dhonnchadha
Ana-mór
Gleann-fleisce
Cill Áirne
Lá breithe 2.5.1900.
anonymous contributor
2019-06-18 11:44
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Potato row, single toe,
And out foes she"!
Anyone pointed to runs out and tries to get back again to the den.
'Ring a Rosey'.
In Summer when the grass is dry we play 'Ring a Rosey'. We form a large circle by joining our hands together. Then we say:-
"Ring, a ring a Rosey
A Pocket full of posies
Asha, Asha, all fall down".
Then when all have fallen the game ends.
"Dan-Dan thread a needle".
When we play 'Dan, Dan, thread a needle", each two join hands and hold them (up) up high The others run out in twos under the arms saying:
"Dan, Dan thread a needle, sew, sew, sew, ask your mother to stitch a (butterwhole..?), no, no,no and hold their arms up high. Each couple does this until they are tired.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 11:41
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Why is a flea like a train?
Because it goes over the slleepers.
A three quartered c ross
And a circle complete,
Two semi circles with a line to meet,
An angled triangle standing on its feet,
Two semi circles,
And a circle complete?
Answer Tobacco (TOBACCO)
Spell a red running rogue in three letters?
(Fox)
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 11:40
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at one time a number of Saints were going from Tobar na Naomh to Ballyvourney. The mountain path being so steep and narrow they could only walk one behind the other. When the first arrived at Ballyvourney he found he had forgotten something at the well. He told the one next to him and so the word was passed from one to the other and the last was just leaving the the well when the word reached him so that he was able to bring the forgotten object to its owner. This object was said to be a pair of glasses. Whether glasses were know in Ireland in the days of the Saints I do not know.
Dromnaharuich is the name of a townland about midway between Loo-bridge and Headford. I once heard that this also was a place for paying ''rounds'' long ago and that it was for this it got its name- drom na h-Aithrighe.
It was an old custom for the people of Glenflesk to go to ''the City'' on ? day to do ''rounds'. The ''City'' was in Rathmore and the Glenflesk people crossed the hill on foot to get there. A pattern andd amusements accompanied the doing of ''rounds at 'the city'''; this was not the case with the doing of ''rounds'' at ''Tobar na Naomh'' probably because, as far as I remember, they were not done on any special day of the year.
senior member (history)
2019-06-18 11:40
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