Number of records in editorial history: 326136 (Displaying 500 most recent.)
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 14:06
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A duck before two ducks.
A duck in the middle between two ducks
A duck, and a duck, and a duck
How many ducks is this.
Answer = Three ducks
Hookedy, Crookedy where do you stear
What's that to you clipped plane every year.
Answer = A river and meadow.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 14:04
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A long legged father a big bodied mother, and three little children no biger than other
Answer = A pot
I have a little sister Rose
The longer she lives the shorter she grows.
Answer = A candle
There was once a man who had no eyes.
He went out one night to view the skies.
He met a tree with apples on
He took no apples off, and he left no apples on.
Answer = There were two apples on it. He took one off, and left one on.
When do you put teeth in a hen.
Answer = When you are eating her.
A duck behind two ducks
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 14:01
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She sits in a pubble.
A little green shall and a little white bud.
Answer = A rush.
Four sticks standers, four didely anders Two peepers, two pokers, a licker and a swinger.
Answer = A cow.
A lepper of ditches a chipper of hedges.
A little brown cow and a leather pair of horns.
Answer = A hare.
The king of Moracco built a ship.
An on that ship his daughter sat.
An I'm not bound to tell her name
An there's three times I've mentioned it
Answer = Ann
Black and white and read all over
Answer = A newspaper.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:57
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Black and white, and white and black, and hops on the road like hail-stones.
Answer = A mag-pie
As green as grass, and its not grass, as white as milk and its not milk, as red as blood and its not blood, as black as ink and its not ink.
Answer = A black-berry
As I was going to the fair of St. Ives I met seven men every man had seven wives.
Every wife had seven sacks.
Every sack had seven cats.
Every cat had seven kits.
Kits, cats, sacks, and wives
How many was going to the fair of St. Ives.
Answer = One.
Little ginny huddle.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:53
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What is the bigest wonder on the map of Europe.
Answer = That Hungary did not eat Turkey.
an iron lamb with a woolen tail
Answer = A needle and thread.
As round as an apple, as deep as a cup
all the kings horses wouldnot put it up
Answer = A well.
What relation is your aunts sister to you if she is not your aunt.
Answer = Your mother.
What can go up the chimeny down but can't come down the chimney up.
Answer = An umberella.
As I was going over Wexford bridge
I met a Wexford scholar.
He took off his cap and drew of his gloves. Please tell me the name of that scholar.
Answer = Andrew.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:49
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Answer = A haw.
There are two pigs in yonder sty, one of them wet and the other dry. When they get meat it is loud they cry, and when they get none it is there they ly.
Answer = Two grinding stones of a mill
Riddle me, riddle me, ranty roe,
my father gave me seed to sow.
the seed was black, the land was white
Riddle me that and I will give you a pipe.
Answer = Ink and paper.
Full all day and empty at night.
Answer = Your boots.
What wears boots and has none.
Answer = A football.
Round the house and round the house and sleep's in the corner at night
Answer = A brush.
Cut and given out but never eaten.
Answer = A packet of cards.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:45
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tar upon her peticoat and tar upon her back.
Answer = A sheep.
As I walked out and as I walked in, I saw a head head and life therin. the eighth was picking and the ninth got free, riddle me that and hanged I will be.
Answer = A bird's nest in the scull of a dead ass.
I have a little house and it wond not fit a mouse and there are as many windows on it as are on the Lord-mares house
Answer = A thimble
As I went out on my grandfathers gap, I met a boy with a little red cap He was standing on a stick, with a stone in his belly Riddle me that and I will give you a penny.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:42
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As I went up to Barley hill Barley hill was shaking. I put Barley hill in my pockets, afraid the ducks would eat it
Answer = An ear of oats.
As I went up Tara hill Tara hill was shaking. Four and forty bulls tearing up an acre.
Answer = Two horse harrowing
Stiff standing in a bed,
first white and then red.
Answer = A carrot
What goes from house to house with its head down.
Answer = A nail in a man's boot.
What goes from house to house and stops at no mans house.
Answer = a path.
As I went up Tara hill I met a Tara lass. There was
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:17
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all work hard in the open air such as shoeing asses, and horses, making ploughs, and harrows. They have a lot of instruments with which they work with. They have sledges, hammers, pincers, chisles, and punches. They also have a great big anvil, and it is two hundred and twenty four pounds weight.
There is one fire place in every forge, and one bellows. The bellows are made of leather and wood. There is a long pipe from the bellows to the bottom of the fire. When you want to blow up the fire you pull a chain up and down. They burn wet slack or coal on the fire. The black smith goes to the
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:14
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There are two forges in Newcastle, Mullagh, Kells, Co. Meath. The smiths names are John, and Charles Mc Guinness. The forges are situated on the side of the road beside one another a short distance from Newcastle chapel.
Long ago Eoin Mc Guinness had a forge
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:14
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in our garden just beside "Cookes cross", Newcastle, Mullagh, Kells, Co. Meath. He was the father of the other two smiths.
There is a cross road near Moynalty, Kells, Co. Meath, and it is called "Maxwells cross". A man named Edward Farrelly had a forge at it. All his ancestors were black smiths.
There is an old forge at Corlat cross, and it is situated on the bank of the Borora river, but it is not in use now. The black smith who worked in it was Peter Farrelly who was a relation of Edward Farrelly of Moynalty.
The roofs are made of wood and the walls are made of stone and clay. They
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:09
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There are two forges in Newcastle, Mullagh, Kells, Co. Meath. The smiths names are John, and Charles Mc Guinness. The forges are situated on the side of the road beside one another a short distance from Newcastle chapel.
Long ago [?] Mc Guinness had a forge
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:09
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There are three tailors around Oughterard. They all work at home in their houses. Some of those have cloth in their houses and the people buy it when they want to get a suit made. This cloth is got in the shops. A good many people around Oughterard wear clothes made of their own home spun tweeds or bridin as it it called.
A machine, a needle, a thimble and scissors are the things a tailor uses. Some people still make their own shirts. The women long ago used to make linen shirts for the men, and
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:08
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There are three tailors around Oughterard. They all work at home in their houses. Some of those have cloth in their houses and the people buy it when they want to get a suit made. This cloth is got in the shops. A good many people around Oughterard wear clothes made of their own home spun tweeds or bridin as it it called.
A machine, a needle, a thimble and scissors are the things a tailor uses. Some people still make their own shirts. The women long ago used to make linen shirts for the man, and
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:04
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So Dick walked pass him and into heaven. "If you ever get to heaven don't forget to look for 'Dick the tinker' with his bag.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:04
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Long ago this is how they used to go home from the marrage. The bride would be behind the man and they would race home and all the rest after them. When they would be goning into the house the bride would
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:03
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began to tempt him. Dick told him to go to the bag and get him a stick. When the devil put his hand in the bag, he was stick to it. Then Dick gave him the best beating he ever got, or perhaps, ever will get.
Dick died and was condemned to hell, and when he landed at the gates the devil would not let him in. So Dick turned and went up to Saint Peter and asked him to let him in, but Saint Peter answered "you can not get in here either." Then Dick told him to go to his bag and get a new pair of boots that he was going a piece further. When Saint Peter put his hand in the bag he also got stuck to it.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 13:00
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Once upon a time there was an old tinker who used to go from house to house begging for his living. The people called him "Dick the tinker". He always carried a bag on his back and anyone who touched it, stuck to it.
One day the devil appeared to him and
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 12:58
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again. You may go now and you will get to the fair alright." The girl went, got her cow, and went to the fair in safety.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 12:57
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light on his whisker and if she did she would go into the fire herself
The girl kept turning the man in the fire and one of the sparks happened to light on his whisker The man jumped out of the fire very quickly. The girl ran to the door screaming and shouting because the man was running after her. The two hands came to the door and opened it and let the girl go in.
The old woman said "Can you tell me a story now, my good gir." The girl said "Yes, yes, I can tell you a story now." She then told what had happened outside. Then the old woman said, "Well now, the next time a poor old woman asks you to a story, tell her one and nothing like that will ever happen to you
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 12:54
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brought with her and she ate it. The old woman again said. "My Good Girl, will you tell me a story." The Girl said she had none to tell at all. Then the old woman said "Well, well, well, off you go. you are of no use to me"
Two hands came and opening the door, took her by the hair of her head and put her outside the door
After a few minutes the girl saw two men coming and they were carring another man who seemed to be dead. They then lit a fire and put the supposed dead man into it. They saw the girl and called her over to turn the man in the fire. The two men went and the man in the fire rose up and told the girl to turn him in the fire but not to let one spark
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 12:50
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Once upon a time there was a man who went to a fair early one morning. He had a girl and he told her to follow him with his cow to the fair. She did so and while she was going she passed through a wood and lost the cow.
She searched the wood but could not get her. She soon sighted a house and she went over to it. She knocked at the door and saw two hand coming and opening it for her. The girl went in and saw an old woman sitting at the fire. The girl went up to the fire to warm herself and then the old woman asked her to tell a story. The girl said that she had no story to tell.
After a while the girl took out lunch which she had
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 12:47
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people doing there. Well, the people nearly turmbled across each other in trying to see which of them could get out of the room first and they were all shouting:- "Oh, the dead is coming to life again"
It so happened that Floody was getting old and was realy dying this time. He died under Benny Reilly's cart in Newcastle, Mullagh, Kells, Co. Meath. He had a pipe in his hand and wore a dress made from a sack.
That is the way Floody departed.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 12:33
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He told the old woman to tell every one that he was dead. At that time if a person from a poor house died the owner of the house was given a lot of money by all the neighbours who came to the wake.
Floody and the old woman got busy and prepared the house. When everything was ready for the wake Floody lay down and pretended to be dead. He lay very still. At anyrate the word went round that poor Floody was dead and all the people gathered in. Then the woman would go over and rub Floody's face and say:- "Ah, my pooir Floody. R.I.P." Then she would let a chew of tobacco into his mouth. This kept on for a few hours and the people were thinking of going home.
Then someone heard Floody begining to breath. After a few minutes Floody let one roar to know what had happened or what were all the
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 12:28
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would also pray aloud.
This day the parish priest got Floody to go behind one of the statues in the chapel and to answer him while he would be saying his prayers.
Floody was behind the statue in good time, At the usual hour the holy man marched up the chapel. He walked to the statue that Floody was behind. He knelt down and started "The Lords Prayer" aloud. When he was at "Give us this day our daily bread" a voice was heard from the statue saying "Go and Earn it." It was Floody but the man thought it was the statue that spoke. Out ran the holy man from the chapel. He nearly died with the fright
Now the old woman that Floody was staying with was getting very poor. Floody thought of a plan. It was a good way for getting money.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 12:24
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Once upon a time there was a man named "Floody". He was called that name because he was found along a river after the great June flood. An old woman who happened to find him took him into her care and reared him.
Now as Floody was getting older he started to go about from place to place. At this time Newcastle chapel was been built. The parish Priest, been a very funny man, Floody got aquanted with him.
There happened to be a very holy man in the parish and he used to come to the chapel every day at the same hour to pray. He
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 05:26
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Tuesday is for wealth,
Wednesday is the best day of all,
Thursday is for losses,
Friday is for crosses, and
Saturday is no day at all.
On the fourteenth of February which is called Valentine day they used to make fun of the people who were too old to be married by drawing out images and putting them on their doors.
With regard to the crops they day that if the potatoes were not sown before or shortly after the seventeenth of March, they would not be worth sowing, and if the wheat or barley were not sown before the month of May they say it would not be worth their while wasting their time in sowing them, but the people of the present day do not make use of these rules.
The borrowed days which are the first fifteen days of April they say were called the "Reagh Days."
They had many superstitions.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 05:23
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Tuesday is for wealth,
Wednesday is the best day of all,
Thursday id for losses,
Friday is for crosses, and
Saturday is no day at all.
On the fourteenth of February which is called Valentine day they used to make fun of the people who were too old to be married by drawing out images and putting them on their doors.
With regard to the crops they day that if the potatoes were not sown before or shortly after the seventeenth of March, they would not be worth sowing, and if the wheat or barley were not sown before the month of May they say it would not be worth their while wasting their time in sowing them, but the people of the present day do not make use of these rules.
The borrowed days which are the first fifteen days of April they say were called the "Reagh Days."
They had many superstitions.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 05:05
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Long ago the people had many superstitions about the days of the week. With regard to going into a new house they say that it was unlucky to go into one on Friday
On May Eve it was a custom to bless cattle and place them under the protection of Our Blessed Lady it was also a custom not to give or sell milk.
On the first of February Saint Brigid's Eve the old folk in other counties in the west make crosses from rushes and place them outside the doors.
The farmers when sowing their
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 04:59
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When you see a new moon bow seven times, but not through glass, and you will get your wish.
Not to take off your wedding-ring until you would die, or else your luck is broken.
To see three white horses in one day, you would soon cross water, or to count nine stars for nine succeeding nights you would soon be rich.
"A whistling woman or a crowing hen,
Brings bad luck to the house they are in."
An old rhyme regarding marriages is also said here;
It is, -
"Monday is for health,
"Tuesday for wealth,
"Wednesday is the best day of all,
"Thursday for losses,
"Friday for crosses, and
"Saturday is no day at all.
Of all of these I would prefer Monday to them all, because
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 04:48
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In this locality many people believe that some days are luckier than others. Friday is counted very unlucky on which to start business, to remove into a new house, or start ploughing, sowing or reaping.
Some say its unlucky
"to get your hair cut on Moday, or
"Cut your nails at night or on Sunday
"If a hen hatched chickens in July
"They are weak and will soon die."
Never walk under a ladder if possible, or if you go a long journey on Friday and chance to meet a red-haired woman, a pig or a magpie be sure and turn back because you shall have no luck that day.
To light a third cigarette with the one match, or having three candles lighting at the same time.
If you put on any of your clothes inside out, it would be very lucky to leave them that way.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 04:34
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and the people would not even sell the milk on that day.
With regard to cutting your nails they say -
Cut them on Monday, cut them for health,
Cut them on Tuesday, cut them for wealth.
Cut them on Wedesday, cut them for a letter.
Cut them on Thursday, for something better.
Cut them on Friday cut for a wife.
Cut them on Saturday, for a long lfe.
Cut them on Sunday cut them for evil,
and during the week you will be ruled by the devil.
It would be better for a man not to be born at all than to cut his nails on a Sunday.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 04:26
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Friday is for crosses
And Saturday is no day at all.
Marry in May you'll rue the day.
Marry in June your life is all a honeymoon.
Marry while the snow falls fast and true love is sure to last.
With regard to moving from one house to another they say
Saturday's flitting makes a short sitting.
It is also unlucky to commence work on Friday such as - ploughing or sowing, building a new house or teaching in a new school.
If you have not your potatoes sowed before Saint Patrick's Day, it is said you might as well not sow them at all.
Another old saying is - it is unlucky to change money on the first day of May, also if you get the first bucket of Spring water on the first morning of May you take the profit off of everyone's milk,
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 04:15
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not long reached there when a neighbour came and told him that another cow of his had died.
On hearing this he went to bed and never arose again for a whole month. During that time all sorts of misfortune befel him. He greatly wondered what was the reason. Many things came into his mind and at last he thought of the last evening in the rath when he, in such anger and rage, had forgotten to close up the hole he had made there. So off he started and when he reached home that night good news awaited him. A brother had died in America and had left him two thousand pounds.
He was delighted and said that it was very good and that he never again would he touch fairy gifts. So the treasure remains where it is and shall always stay there as no one dares to touch it. It is in Mr Cardiff's field.
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 04:01
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One morning he rose very early and prepared for his task. When all was ready he set off and in half-an-hour he reached his destination. He set to work quickly and continued until evening. By that time he had a great hole made. He felt very tired and after a short time he proceeded homewards.
On his arrival there he found one of his cows dead, but he did not mind as he thought he would soon find the hidden treasure for which he was digging, and that would make him very rich.
Next day he set out again and proceeded to his work. He worked very hard until night was approaching. Just at six oclock he turned up an old mug. He jumped with joy, but when he saw what it was he nearly died. He threw down his spade and started off home very disgusted with himself. He had
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 03:50
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Another story regarding the hidden treasure in Bulgan is that of the man who brought home the stone which are lying on the spot where the treasure is hidden.
This man, a former owner of this land went one morning to the rath and brought home the stones. That day he built a pighouse with them. When he arose next morning he found the house had fallen, so he built it up again, but the next morning it was the same thing. Once more he decided to rebuild it, and when he had it completed he put some pigs into it. That night he retired to bed early very pleased with himself as he was sure the house would not fall again, but alas! it did and the pigs were also killed. The poor man then suspected that something was wrong
senior member (history)
2020-01-26 03:41
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is an old, old tree and if an attempt was made to go up that tree you were bound to fall.
They also say that near this tree a ring was found. The finder brought it home and locked it up in a box next morning a green leaf of peculiar variety was in it instead of the ring. It is said that an old hen and chickens or a black pig mind this gold. It was rumoured that a man saw a black pig emmerging from the castle ruins one windy night; the victim died the next night.
It was also stated that a peculiar kind of chicken was found dead near the drawwell.
Bruce De Burgh had Polehore Castle the highest castle in the county Wexford being able to recieve a symbol of war from the rest of castles.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 23:34
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(Composed by Michael McGinley, a native of Ballybofey. McGinley is a brother of Cú Uladh
His name I love to mention,
In old Ireland he was born,
I surely loved him dearly,
But alas! from me he’s gone.
He’s gone unto America
And he promised to send for me,
But the sight of my bonny Irish boy
I never more shall see.
II
I earned my passage to New York
And I soon arrived there,
Hoping to find my Irish boy
I quickly did prepare
I searched New York, New Providence,
And Boston all in vain,
For the sight of my bonny Irish boy
Was nowhere to be seen.
III
The other night while in my bed
I dreamt I was his bride,
And sitting on yon bluebell hill
Where we sat side by side,
We were gathering the primroses
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 20:22
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na fearaibh acht d'fhanadhar ann go dtí meadhon oidhche.
Do chualadar an coileach ag glaodhach. Do phreab an bhean ruadh 'na seasamh agus dubhairt sí. "An t-aon mar a thugann léis an Cuireata a bhuaileadh é agus an dara glaodhach coilig sé mo bheannact a sgaoileadh leis.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 20:17
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Tá loch i measg na gcnoc i nGleann-Garbh, loch breá[?] iseadh é, Loch na h[?] an aimn ata air.
Deirtear go bhfuil Caisleán breagh istigh san loch agus go bhfuil feirm ann leis. Sé an loch is mó sa Ceathain é. Tá leath an locha dubh mar ní thaithneann an ghrían ann ó Lá Samhna go Lá Bealtaíne. Tá failleacha ós cíonn na locha agus is é an ainm atá ortha na na failleacha dúbha.
Bhí fear ag baint arair ann uair amháin agus d'fhan sé ann tamall na h-oidhche. Bhí sé ag imtheacht abháile nuair a chonnaic sé dhá chean déagh de bhá dubha agus tarbh ag teacht amach as an loch. Tháinig ana uaigneas air, taréis tamaill do chualaidh sé glaodhach coilig trí uaíre Do chaít sé uaidh an arair agus do rith sé abháile chómh mear is a bhí sé na chósa. Tháinig na comharsain[?] isteach ag sghuraidheacht nó ag imirt cártaí mar bá ghnáth. Nuair a bhíodhar tamhall istigh. Do thosnuigh an fear ag innsint a scéil dóibh agus bhíodar ag magadh fé.
Timcheall a deich a clogh san oidhche do bualadh cnag ar an ndoras agus tháinig bean ruadh isteach. Ní raibh aithne ag aoínne uirthi. Lúigh sí isteach chun cluithe cártaí d'imirt. Tháinig sgannradh ar
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 19:56
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Bhí bean ann fadó agus bhí sí in a cómhnuidhe i gComar-Cáin. Aon lá amháin bhí sí ag fághail bháis agus bhí ana trioblóid aigne urithi.
Bhí stocha lán súas d'ór in aice na leapchan aice agus bhí sí ag machnamh conus a thabharfadh sí an t-ór léi go dtí an saoghal eile. Fé dheire do chuimhnig sí ar sheift a dhéanamh chun an t-ór a thabhairt léi. Do ghlaoidh sí ar a chailín aimsire agus dubhairt sí léi sáspan d'fhághail agus é líonadh le h-uisce. Do dhein an cailín amhlaidh agus chuir an bhean an t-ór go léir isteach sa sáspan agus dubhairt sí léi é chur ar an dteine agus gan feuchaint air in aon chor. Ní túisge bhí an bhean as radharc an cailín ná thóg sí an clúdac de'n sáspan agus d'feuch sí isteach.
Nuair a chonnaic sí an t-ór go léir tháinig dúil mór aice air agus do thóg sí amach é agus do chuir sí píosa mór d'ime isteach ann in a ionad. Nuair a bhí sé beirithe do thóg sí de'n teine é agus do chug sí do'n mnaoí é agus d'ól sí é.
Annsan dubhairt sí leis an gcailín aimsire go raibh sí sásta agus fuair si bás.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 19:40
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1. Self praise is no praise.
2. Work begun is half done.
3. A good beginning is half the work
4. Health is better than wealth.
5. People who live in a glass house should not pelt stones.
6. Stop talking and go a head with the work.
7. A friend in need is a friend indeed.
8. Love and a cough cannot be hid
9. Marry the man you know and do not marry the man you do not know.
10. Leave the country or be in the fashion.
11. He who dose not drink but water
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 19:39
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1. Self praise is no praise.
2.Work begun is half done.
3. A good beginning is half the work
4. Health is better than wealth.
5. People who live in a glass house should not pelt stones.
6. Stop talking and go a head with the work.
7. A friend in need is a friend indeed.
8. Love and a cough cannot be hid
9. Marry the man you know and do not marry the man you do not know.
10. Leave the country or be in the fashion.
11. He who dose not drink but water
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 19:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tháinic siad agus tháinic an dhá Rí níos luatha ná a tháinic Cúbán. Nuair a tháinic Cúbán an tSléibhe níor mhaith leis an Rí an inghean a thábhairt dhó. Chuir sé amach [caileach ceart?] aige agus nuair a bhí sé ag dul thar coill diarfhuigh sé di dhá mbeadh an choill sa mbaile aici céard a dheanfhadh sí di. Dubhairt sí go ndeanfhadh sí stóilíní agus caithaoireacha dí. Ní tusa an ceánn ceart adeir sé agus chuaidh sé ar ais aríst léithe agus chaith sé sa doras i agus bhris sé
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 19:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
cnáimh a ceathramhadh. Cuireadh amach a bhean fhéin annsin aige agus nuair a bhí sé ag dul thar an gcoill diarfhuigh sé dhi Dhá mbeadh an coill seo ag baile agat céard a dheanfhádh dhí. "Dheanfhinn teach-mór agus caisleán dí" adeir sí. "Ó is tusa an ceánn ceart" adeir sé.
Dimthigh siad leó abhaile agus bhí siad an compóirteach. Lá amháin bhí bean cúbán an tléibhe ag neigheachán an páiste ag an teine agus tháinic préachán anuas an simléar agus sgiob sé an páiste leis. Bhí brón
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 19:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tháinic siad agus tháinic an dhá Rí níos luatha ná a tháinic Cúbán. Nuair a tháinic Cúbán an tSléibhe níor mhaith leis an Rí an inghean a thábhairt dhó. Chuir sé amach coileach cearc aige agus nuair a bhí sé ag dul thar coill diarfhuigh sé di dhá mbeadh an choill sa mbaile aici céard a dheanfhadh sí di. Dubhairt sí go ndeanfhadh sí stóilíní agus caithaoireacha dí. Ní tusa an ceánn ceart adeir sé agus chuaidh sé ar ais aríst léithe agus chaith sé sa doras i agus bhris sé
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 19:00
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mo iarradh fhéin sa oidhche amáireach. Annsin dúbhairt siad leis an tríomhadh inghean suidhe sa gcathaoir ach dúbhairt sí nach suidheah. Dúbhairt siad léithe mar a dheanfhadh sí an rúd a dubhairt siad léithe go gceanglóchadh siad sa gcathaoir í agus go gaithfheadh sí fanachth ann nó go dtiocfhadh a hathair abhaile. Shuidhe sí mar sin fhéin innte agus dúbhairt sí "Iarrimse ar Dhia agus ar mhiarbhúilte na cathaoire go dtiocfhad Cúbán an tSléibhe go mo iarradh fhéin sa oidhche amáireach
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 18:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ann. Bhí an clann inghin ag deamamh spóirt [sá?] sa gcistean agus buaileadh duine acu faoi an doras agus dfosgail an doras. Chuaidh an inghean be shine siar sa seomra agus shuidhe sí sa gcathaoir agus dubhairt sí "Iarrimse ar Dhia agus ar mhiarbhúilte na cathaoire an Rí is breághtha i nÉireann a theacht go mo iarraidh fhéin sa oidhche amáireach. Shuidhe an darna highean sa gcataoir agus dubhairt sí "Iarrimse ar Dhia agus ar mhiarbhuilte na cathaoire an darna Rí is breágtha a theacht go
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 18:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bhí Rí i nÉireann fadó agus bhí triúr inghean aige agus ba iad na mná ba breághtha i nÉireann iad. Bhí cathaoir draochtach ag an Rí agus chuile lá nuair a theigheadh sé amach chuireach sé glas ar an gcathaoir nó ar an [doras?] a bhíodh an chathaoir ann.
Duine ar bith a shuidheach sa gcataoir agus ímpídhe ar bith a diarfheadh sé ar Dhia gheobhfhadh sé é. Lá amháin chuaidh sé amach agus níor cuimne sé glas a cur ar an seomra a raibh an cathaoir
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 18:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mac is n dá eangal déag atá i bflaitheaas Dé go mo coingbheál féin ar déagh staid.
4) Go mba [duan?] dorchada an dún seo bfuil muid ánn Go mba sluagh dál an sluagh seo cugainn a Mhic Muire is a Rí na nGrást coinnigh do cochall in ár dtimceall go lá bán.
Paidir Fairrge.
Cuirimse lobainn maghaidh na [tuinne?] Lobainn is [Óbann?] ánn ar cumdach Dé is Coluim Cille muid.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 17:05
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Murrisk is situated beside the sea about sis miles to the west of Westport. As the name tells us, it is by the sea, mur meaning the sea and uisge the water
It is at the foot of Croagh Patrick or Cruac Pádraic the hill of St Patrick where St Patrick spent forty days and forty nights praying and fasting on top of this mountain.
Before St Patrick came it was called Cruachán Eagla or the Eagles mountain because the eagles used to live there. At that time most of it was covered with woods.
The small road leading to Croagh Patrick is called [?????] na Míos or the road of the dishes. It probably got that name because there used to be a Pattern in Murrisk in a field near the road. The people used to cook food at the pattern and eat it from dishes.
To the North East of Murrisk the sea come in, in some places and forms deep holes in the land. This
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 16:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there lived a man in Drumamuck. This man lived in a cave. He used to go to Scotland every year. He would have all the breeds of ducks, hens, drakes, and guinea-hens home with him. The people nicknamed him Paddy the duck. He sheltered the priests the time the were persecuted in his cave. The ducks and drakes used to meet him coming from his Ceilidhe every night.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 16:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago when the famine was raging in Ireland, the people were all dying of hunger. There was a soup kitchen down at Kings of Drumamuck. Every day people from around came for their soup. This day the people came and there was not soup. They were very hungry. They did not know what to do. There was a man there that day and he had a fiddle and they all started dancing. They forgot they were hungry. The Kings have a shed where it used to be. The pot that held the soup was a very big one. It is there to be seen on Sam Wedlock's street.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 16:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Queen Eliziabeth and there is a record of them being pardoned. O Reilly was described as a gent and the Soolaghans as gallowglasses. The funeral of a Soolaghan would not pass through the manor of Skeagh no matter how far it had to go round. Of three brothers of the O Reillys one lived in Skeagh, one in Corroneary and one in Muff, and it is said that each morning they would blow a horn blast so they could hear each other.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 16:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Queen Eliziabeth and there is a record of them being pardoned. O Reilly was described as a gent and the Soolaghans as gallowglasses. The funeral of a Soolaghan would not pass through the manor of Skeagh no matter how far it had to go round. Of three brothers of the O Reillys one lived in Skeagh, one in Corroneary and one in Muff, and it is said that each morning they would blow a horn blast so they could hear each other.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 16:02
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tradition tells us that there was a monastery in Skeagh in ancient times and that it was on the site of the house of the late Bartle Hanlon. No mention of it appears in the old record but in the Grants of Eliziabeth. Amongst other religious property in the district is mentioned Kileagh and it cannot be identified It is suggested that this is at one with the monastery of Skeagh. Tradition also tells us that the monks of Skeagh attended the ancient church of Saint Brigid in Knockbride and what when the monastery was demolished that three of the monks swam across Skeagh Lake and three old whitethorns trees mark the spot where their pursuers killed them. And that the last monk who read Mass in Knockbride old church was called Michael O Cleirigh. Until about sixty years ago an old ruin about 20 feet high containing a flight of stone steps stood at the south end of Hanlons house but it is since demolished. The manor of Skeagh appears in the Grants of Eliziabeth James gave a grant of 1,000 acres in Drumamuck to one of the Hamiltons some years ago. The trouble was taken to plot out all the grants in the surrounding district on the modern map and it was found that the manor of Skeagh was left a complete blank and was therefore bound to be at one withe the above mentioned grant. A Philip O Reilly lived in Skeagh and also Soolaghans[?] in the days of
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 15:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There lived in Inniskeen a very wealthy man named James Garvey, Lannett, Co. Monaghan.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 15:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There lived in Mullecrew Co. Louth a man name John Gallog who could make churns, about fifty years ago. It is said that some of the churns he made are still in use, in the district.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 15:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There lived in Drumboat Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, a man named Peter Flynn. He was known locally as the Nailer Flynn. He could make all kinds of nails.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 15:46
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On a hill overlooking Coroneary Lake on the north side was an ancient castle of the O Reillys. Its site is still to be seen in a field of Michael Kavanagh and part of the mote is still open. Inf the fiftys of the last century Colonel Grenville the then landlord took down the ancient ruin to build a pound which is still to be seen. He also brought part of it to build the present Coroneary House which was then erected as a residence on the model farm which he started here. There is a tradition that when the castle was attacked by the troops of Sir Charles Coote a boat load of gold and valuables was put out on the lake and it sank between the point of the peninsular and the graveyard. An old woman who went by the name of Anna and who lived on the opposite side of the lake from the castle and had a public house there said she saw it sinking. The place where she lived is to this day called Carriguna[?} and many of the glasses in the public house were dug up round it.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 15:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There lived in the townland of Drumkeath, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, a man named Owen
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 15:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There lived in the village of Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, about forty years a man named James Mc Ardle who used make gates and ploughs.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 15:36
approved
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awaiting decision
him. Mr Whit heard this in town. He had to go home another road for fear of them. After this he stopped all his tricks and would never hit anyone.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 15:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There lived in Channonrock Co. Louth a man named Cristy Farrell who was known locally as "Crisy the Rat." There was no one who could thatch a house like him. It was said that the houses he would thatch would not let in the rain for years. But he lost his employment when the people got slates on their houses.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 15:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Once upon a time there was a man who lived in the manse. He was a minister named White. He was full of fun and always playing tricks. Mr. White would drive a pony and trap. When he would meet anyone on the road he would draw out with his whip and whip them. When he would go anywhere on his ceilidhe at night if the people were vexed with him coming in if they were barefooted he would walk on them and say he did not mean it. This was all for tricks. One night he came to our house on his ceilidhe about ten o'clock. There was no one in the house but my father. My father was barefooted all of a sudden Mr White lifted his boot and left it down as hard as he could on my father's foot. Then he said "O did I walk on you" I didn't see your foot. One day he was in town and a crowd of fellows planned to gather up and take him out and kick
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 15:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Byers installed March 16th 1921. When the Rev. Thomas Byers left Corglass in 1924 there was no minister stayed any longer than a few months. Mr. Eakins is now in Corglass and the protestants are fixing the Manse house for him to live in now.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 15:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Corglass church was founded 1714. It was reroofed in 1902. The graveyard is all round the church. There are pictures hanging round the walls in the inside of the church. There are pictures hanging around of Vimmy bridge. There are writings on them about the men that were killed at Vimmy bridge.
The following were killed: Sergent Robert Boyd, Private R.H. Burns Private, Frederick Cranston, Robert John Gibson, Thomas Hall and Patrick White. The first minister in Corglass was the Reverend Montgomery. He died in the year 1795 and was buried in Corglass graveyard.
The second minister was Mr White He lived in the Manse house. He was married and had four children. One of the sons went on for a minister after the father died in 1862. The Rev. Patrick White junr was installed in 1862 and died in October 7th 1872. There was Rev. Thomas White installed February 18th 1874 died January 25th 1906.
Rev Joseph Alexander Magill was ordained May 30th 1906. He left Corglass on the 26th August 1920 and went to Greenbank. Rev. Thomas
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 14:58
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Carraig leath-taoide atá le hais Oileaín Cléire ( iseadh an Geascanán ) agus is é an nós, filidheacht do dhéanamh nuair a gabhan daoine treosna an chalaithe ann. ( don chéád uair. M Ó C)
Bhí an tAthair Labhrá Ó Mathghamhna ag dul treasna, uair, i mbád a's d'iarr an fhuireann air amhrán (sic) do dhéanamh mar b'e an nós é. Dubhairt an tAthair Labhrás:

" A Gheascanáin cé sámh do station
I lár na dtonn cois Ínse Cléire
Mara mbeadh an tEaspos 's a Shlighe
Geallaimse dhíbh
Ná tiocfainn-se choidhche bhur n-éileamh
Ach ó caiithfad-sa stríochadh a's géilleadh
Beannuighim le díograis cléibh síbh
Agus aithchim ar Chríost
Do chur rath ar bhur dtír
Agus bhur bhfaraigí taoidibh éisge

( Domhnal Ó Ríogáin do thug so do Máighistreás Uí Chonaill O.S. i Rinn Garóige i bPr. na Rátha
( Bhí an giota so i gcló ag Tórna in Irisleabhar na Gaedhilge. Tá tagairt don Athair Labhrás ag Conchubhar Ó Muimhneachán ina leabhrán: Dánta Séámuis Mhóir Uí Muimneacháin. M Ó'C )
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 14:53
approved
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awaiting decision
(Ón Clár Ceóil i gCorcaig 1898)

Tá an fraoch glasthall, mbarr Charraig Donn
Tá an ghrian ag lonnradh ar Árd na Laoi
Is blátha crann, ag snámh fá ghreann,
I lár na dtonn, sain Abhainne Bhuidhe
An lá gan brón ar dtráchtaim fós,
I meadán na neól im' luighe;
B'é an lá thug Domhnall rádh fé dhó,
I bpáirt seadh gheobham a stoír mo chroidhe

Taréis Abráin 's na beabthain bláith;
Beidh samhradh sámh ar faghail airís;
Acht rian ná tásg cá bhfuighead go bráth
Ar Dhomhnall bhréagh mo ghrádh! mo mhaoin
Thug rás fé scóip, go Páiris Mhóir,
Chun namhaid na Fodla, chlaoidhe;
N-a dheáidh seadh gheobhad, thar sáile an cheóidh
Ó's páirteach fós liom stór mo chroidhe

(Tórna)
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 12:44
approved
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awaiting decision
Amanna Míadhmharacha
Sí an Inid an t-am is gnáthaighe do'n bhliain chun postai a dhéanamh sa cheanntar seo. Tá amanna áirithe do'n bhlian go ndeir na sean-daoine go bhfuilid mí-rathamhail chuin pósta mar atá an Aidbint, An Carghas, um Shamhain, Mí na bealtaine agus sa bhFoghmhar:-
"An rud a ceangluightear sa bhFoghmhar scaoiltear san Earrach é" a deirtear.

Laetheannta Míoadhbharacha
Tá dhá lá do'n t-seachtmhain go ndeirtear go bhufilid mio-ádhmharach leis chuin pósta mar atá Dia Luain agus Diardaoin.

Nósanna i dtaobh na h-Inide / "Scéala Cleamhnais"
(a) Cleamhnaistí a deintear annseo. Cuirtear "sgéala cleamhnais" ó mhuinntir dhuine de'n lanamhain go dtí muinntir an dhuine eile agus má bíd sásta ceangal nó cleamhnas a dhéanamh ceaptar lá chuige agus téidhtear go dtí baile mór an Daingin chuin gach nidh do shocrú.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 12:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
John Linehan, a sergeant of the Royal Irish Constabulary stationed at the R.I.C. hut in Inagh shot himself with his own rifle on a Sunday night in the month of September 1904.
He was a native of the Co. Donegal.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 12:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tomás Ó Tíghearnach
Cnoc Uí Faith
Baile an Mhuilinn

* * *

Tá áit i n-aice le Cnoc Uí Faith agus cailleadh fear ann fadó i lár na h-oidhche agus fuair duine eicínt é ar maidin. As sin amach nuair a thagann duine an belach sin, caitheann sé cloch isteach. Sin sean nós atá ag muinntir na h-Éireann. Tá tobar i n-aice na h-áite sin freisin agus tugtar Tobar Éamuin air mar ba Éamonn an t-ainm a bhí ar an bhfear a fuair bás i-n-aice leis.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 12:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tomás Ó Tíghearnach
Cnoc Uí Faith
Baile an Mhuilinn

* * *

Tá loch ins an áit seo a tugtar Loch na h-Altóire air. Seo é an mianaigh atá leis an t-ainm; fadó ins na laethe peanamhla ní raibh cead ag na sagairt aifreann a rádh mar bhí saighdiúr Shasana ghá lorg, agus chuaidh sagart amach i mbád agus léigh sé Aifreann ins an oileán seo agus mar gheall ar sin, tugadh an t-ainm Loch na h-Altóire air.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 12:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Pádraig Ó Tighearnach
Cnoc Ní Faith,
Baile an Mhuilinn
Bhí aithne aige feín ar an t-sean mhnaoi

* * *

Bhí bean in-a cómhnaidhe ins an gceannar seo d'ar bainm Máire Ní Eidhin. Nuair a bhí sí óg bhí sí in-a bhean follán, láidir. Fuair sí bás timcheall fiche bliadhan ó shoin nuair a bhí sí i ngar do'n chéád. Tá Tuam timcheall ocht míle ó'n gceanntar seo agus nuair a bheadh bainbh ag teastáil uiathi theigeadh sí go dtí baile mór Thuama, lá an mhargaidh, cheannóchadh sí í, d'fhiocadh sí uirthi, chuirfhadh sí isteach i mála í, chrochadh sí ar a dhruim í agus d'iompóchadh sí abhaile í. Ní ar truchaill ná ar chárr a rachadh sí acht shiubhaladh sí gach coiscéim d'en bhealach go dtí an baile mór agus arais.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 11:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
This is a story of a woman who married a protestant husband.
The woman was born a catholic. After she married the protestant, She did not attend the Catholic Church. When she was dying a friend of hers a stranger came to see her. She sent for the priest. He came into the house but the husband would not alow him to go into the room.
Her friend said "Faather if the beat you they will beat me so come on" They went into the room and the ladys friend kept her back against the door while the priest was annointing the patient.
She died soon after the priest was gone out. The husband said "I will not bury her let the Catholic Church bury her. She died a good Catholic after all.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 11:03
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are a lot of different games played now, apart from card playing. The best that we are aquainted with are school games, which are of a different variety. For girls there is high windows, colours, and jack-stones, and there is also a nice play called lazy Mary. Girls also play hide and seek, and marbles now as well as boys. Those games are played at nearly every school and all scholars love some sport like that at Recreation time. Some of the elder take great delight in tossing pennies, playing skittles, and also drafts. A lot of young people play some very funny tricks at christmas time. Some buy false faces to frighten others and go around on Boxing Day, acting as mummers. They generally have music, while there are good dancers amongst
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 10:57
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
had a hump, and he asked him how he got of the hump, and he told him the story. The next night the other man went past the fort, and they were playing music, and he began to play, he didn't play the music right, and, the king of the fairies, asked who was spoiling their music, and he said to bring him in until they would put the other man's hump on him, and they brought him in and put the other man's hump on him, and sent him home with two humps on him.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 10:53
approved
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awaiting decision
There is one old graveyard in the parish of Denn. It is in the townland of Carrickaboy Protestants and Catholics bury in it. The ruins or walls of a chaple still exists in it, and it is said that Saint Patrick said Mass in that Chaple at one time. There are stone flags in it, and when people wanted to bring bad luck on a family they would (they) turn them. It is not level, and it is surrounded by trees. People were brought from other parish's to bury in it. There are tombstones in it and some of them date back to a very early date. There is a nice new graveyard at the upper Chaple and it is kept in very good order.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 09:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The fairs that are best known to us are the fairs of County Cavan
In these fairs cattle, sheep, cows horses, pigs and goats are sold and bought
Buyers come from all parts of Ireland to them. In May there are two fairs in our native town Ballyjamesduff.
Both are noted cattle and pig fairs and farmers travel a very long journey to them.
The cattle and pigs are sold on one green and the horses on another.
Cootehill is thought to have the best pig fair in the county - they are sold in a street called Bridge Street and the cattle are sold at the market house.
In every town there is a pork market held every month.
There is a large square in Cavan with big sheds called the egg market. The men who buy the cattle, horses and pigs for exportation are called dealers.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 09:18
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awaiting decision
Tailors are not so plentiful as in former days, for the simple reason that the young men became so fashionable that they have to deal with the large firms in the Cities and large towns for the latest styles, There is only one tailor in our district Whose name is Peter Smyth Moher His instruments comprise a meaasuring tape a thimble needle a large scissors and a large pressing iron titled the tailors goose, When he is cutting out he uses chalk for marking. People in general supply the home tailor with suit lenghts to their taste, When at work seated on a bench he crosses his legs In olden times when there was no speedy method of sewing the people employed the tailor to come to the home to make clothes for the family of home made cloth.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 09:12
approved
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awaiting decision
It was supposed that there was a crock of gold, under a lone tree in a field, before James Smiths house of Lackanduff. One night a man, had a dream about this place, and about this crock of gold. Some day later he came with an excuse, to buy a horse, and he viewed the place around. He went away, and that night he came at twelve oclock, and lifted the flag, that was over it, and took the rock of gold. In the morning the flag was turned over, and a track where the crock was, The cart was turned to Lacken lake, and as it was a fair morning it couldn't be traced any further.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 09:07
approved
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awaiting decision
In all farmers houses in this district churnings are made especially in the Summer. Long ago as there were no creameries the people had much more churnings than nowadays. They made large firkins of butter, and sold them at large prices. People who came in while the churning was going on were supposed to help otherwise the people would accuse them of taking the butter from the churn as many of the ancient people believed in those old witch-crafts. They believed that some people were all to turn themselves into hares and had old charms which enabled (to) them to take the butter from the milk.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 09:00
approved
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awaiting decision
Long ago as the people had no barometers they had to be well skilled in weather signs. Many of the the present day people still believe in them and most of them are true. On last Tuesday night the Aurora Borealis were to be seen vividly in the Northern sky. An old man told me that it was a sure sign of storm. This had proved true as Saturday night was very tempestuous. It is believed that a ring round the moon is a sign of rain. When the crows fly low and hang their wings as if they were pierced by a gun it is said that rain is sure to come. It was believed that if the cat when washing his face puts his paw behind his ear that it is a sign of heavy rain. If the dog is seen eating grass which is an unusual thing, it is also a sign of rain and storm. When a rather unusual heat comes from the fire it
(1) When a cat sits with her back to the fire its a great sign of rain.
(2) When a cat is scraping timber it a sign of high wind.
(3) When a crow flies low its also a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 08:51
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(4) When the fire throws out more heat, than usual rain is expected.
(5) When there is a ring far away from the moon, the storm is near.
(6) When the ring is near the moon the storm is far away.
(7) When the wind is in the west, we are going to have a terrible storm.
(8) When the robin flies to you it is said to be a sign of snow.
(9) When the lark flies low with its head down it is a sign we will have rain soon.
(10) Before a thunder storm the air gets warm.
senior member (history)
2020-01-25 08:48
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My father tells me that about 23 years ago on the 14th August, a terrible thunder, and lightning storm arose, it began at 10 oclock and lasted the whole night, there was a terrible rains fall also, and people who were visiting in their neighbour's houses had to remain there for the night. It didn't do much harm in this part of the country, but it flooded bogs, and low-lying land, it ripped up the road, and washed stones into the fields. The next morning was grand. It was known as the August flood. He also tells me about a big wind storm that was in the year 1839 on the 6th January, it did a lot of damage in this part of the country, it blew reaks, of hay, and oats through the country, it knocked trees, it swept the roofs of bad houses, and the thatch was blown off houses that were
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 23:49
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Fhad is mairfidh síol mairfidh foirseadh.
Má sheinneann an chuach ar chrann gan duilleabhar díol do bhó agus ceannuigh arbhar.
Na triosdáil a coidhche le hoidhche Fhoghmhair na le cailín Domhnaigh.
Tig an fear ionraice 'na cuid fhéin am eighinteach
Geimhreadh mór craosach slugfaidh sé a bhfuighe sé
I gcúl a bhaic a thoisigheas an t-anró. Is doiligh a sáith de'n chorón a thabhairt do dhroch bhainteoir.
'E réir a chéile gnídhthear caisleán
Ní thuigeann an sathach an seang agus mar dtuigeann féin ní in am.
Níl aon seort amuigh nach nighfeadh uisge ach bean salach.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 23:45
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le saidhbhir a's daidhbhir na tíre
Do chaitheadh sé píosaí óir
A's le duine bocht eile níor spíd leis
Buidéal de'n tSíbhín d'ól.

Seo amhráin a sgríobh Riocard Bairéad

Fuaireas é seo o m'athair
Micheal Bairéad
Peadar Bairéad
Druim,
Sáilín
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 23:33
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( Newspaper Cutting Photo of Shoemaker circa 1925 )
First Page reads:-
Irishwoman a Skilled Shoemaker
Mrs Kate O'Reilly, of Mohill has worked for a great number of years at her trade as a shoemaker. She is contractor to the Mohill Workhouse, and can turn out a shoe unaided from start to finish.
Photo by C. Meehan, Mohill
Photo about 15 years old ?
Mother of Owen Reilly, painter, Mohill

* * *
Stories of hidden treasures are common enough around Mohill but the trouble is to prove whether such stories are false or true. The following may be taken for what they are worth. In Tullyoran there is the remains of an old Cromlech or "giants grave" supposed to contain treasure. The story goes that a poor old man was visited by a stranger who told him to dig under the stones. He did so, found treasure and became rich. Everything went well until a neighbour once asked how he acquired his wealth. The old man told and at his earliest opportunity the neighbour went and dug under the stone. No sooner had he done so than the first man's wealth dwindled away and he became as poor as before.
On Tullybradden hill about a mile from Mohill there is a circular mound with trees on it. Some years ago men working on the railway lines are said to have dug in it for treasure. They found a built shaft going down into the earth but became afraid and covered it up again.
Treasure is also reputed to be hidden on Lurga Hill, between the Cloone and Drumlish Roads from Mohill. Men digging for it were chased by a volley of stones which came from no where.
In the lands of Cranagh and Cloonaughill
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 23:10
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LINGUISTIC:-

Práisgín - Doirnín - Cnoc - Alt
Ceó Bróin - Crannóg - Caibín - Feadóg
Hí Muc - Spadach - Clabar - Billeóg
Hi Gé - Sleaghán - Carraigín - Tioc
A Tháisge - Stúcán - Céilidhe - Gréisc
Bó- Bó - Brosna - Caoineadh - Smidirín
A Mhic - Riabhóg - Crag - Sidhe
Crúisgín - Gáimbín - Cogar - Gobán
Dallóg - Stóca - Loch - Rath
Spriosán - Stóilín - Láidhe - Dún
Síogán - Currach - Lagach - Bróg
Balbán - Dúidín - Lios - Tae
Amadán - Bogóg - Meithil - Bean-Sidhe
Bóithrín - Fuisge - Mar Dheadh - Uchón
Buachaillín - Go Leor - Mántach - Mo Bhrón
Cailin - Go Bráth - Seál - Deoch
A Stóir - Dubhtháin - Sláinte - Méilín
A Grádh - Ceannabhán - Sgilit - A Pháiste
A Mhuire - Fáilte - Straimpín - Go Bráth
Buachalan - Forc - Spall - Báitín
Cruiteachán - Portlóg - Strae - Ciseán
Smigín - Pordóg - Steibhín - Sleaghan
Gasún - Práite - Bladarach - Cléibh
Cais - Púicín - Leadóg - I gCionn
Gogair - Cró - Baclóg - Maoilín
Stibhín - Cipín - Bainín - Beisín
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 22:51
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shouted the old queen 'What more do you want, only to see that she never shed a tear, there's not a Ceó Broín on her for her own child.
The queen rushed out of the room and told all in the castle what the young queen had done. She is such a hard-hearted wretch says she, that she is sewing away, and she never let a tear fall for her child much less to deny that she killed it. Then the people were so horrified that they all began to call out that she should be burnt, as was done with witches in them times. They began to prepare a great pile of wood to have it ready for the next day.
The king was like a man insane, but no matter how he coaxed her she never spoke, but just gave a sorrowful shake of her head, so he could do no better but agree to have her burnt next day.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 22:46
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Girrseach
Snas
Naigín
Bodhrán
Brachán
Gliogar
Buachalán
Sroth
Buaile
Flaitheamhail
Prioca
Truimeach
Tramach
Cabóg
Mí-adh
Céiseóg
Púicín
Sgreag
Straoill
Luascán
Pigín
Coinnlín
Liobar
Suagán
Sceilp
Pisreóg

Maidhe-briste
Gropadh - (called or Pron. Groop in this area)
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 22:25
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of her she committed suicide by throwing herself from one of the windows of the Castle. Her grave, known as "The Black's Grave" is still pointed out on the sloping mound in front of the modern building which was demolished by the present owner, Mr James Williams.
The castle next seems to have come into the possession of the MacRannalls family of Lough (?). This family were of a divided allegiance but Brian of Cloncorick seems to have thrown in his lot with Owen Roe ( - See further details at page 3).
About the 1798 period the lands were in possession of a William Irwin. This man built a range of out-offices in a quadrangle and had a stone inserted in the gable wall of one of the houses:- "Erected by William Irwin 1797" is the inscription upon it. The stone has been preserved by the present owner (J Williams)
A man named Simpson was also in possession and it probably was he who built the front to the building. There was some beautiful cut stone used, brought from the Aughavas quarries and dressed by stone masons on the grounds. We then hear of people named Jameson being the owners. These people never lived in the building. The house and lands then passed into possession of Mr W. Francis
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 22:13
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Woodford is Longfield (also called Drumlevan) in which were the remains of an O'Rorke Castle. These three Castles - Woodford, Longfield and Cloncorick - were in a direct line with one another and also were on the direct route to Tara. The old man John Sheridan, whom I have already mentioned, told me that the last O'Rorke to own Cloncorik was a John O'Rorke and that he had been declared illegitimate at a Court of Claims held in Carrigallen in the end of Elizabeth's reign. If this should be correct he (John O'Rorke) might possibly have been a brother of Brian Óg of the Battle Ones (?) and son of Brian na Murtha (Brian of the Ramparts) executed at Tyburn for sheltering the soldiers of the Spanish Armada. Brian na Murtha was twice married - first to one of the O'Donnell's and then to a lady of the Burkes (Clanrickarde). Brian Óg was a son of the first marriage and this marriage was declared illegal by the English and the children of it illegitimate. If Brian Óg and John of Cloncorick were brothers it would be a corroboration of the old man's story.

John O'Rorke of Cloncorick is said to have spent some time "in foreign parts" - India is mentioned. He is said to have taken home with him an Indian Princess as his bride. Owing to his ill-treatment
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 22:10
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five eggs and hatches for a few weeks. It is supposed to be unlucky to meet a magpie on the road.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 22:10
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falls on Sunday she will wait till the next day. She builds her nest on a very high tree and builds it out of sticks and clay. The crow lays five or six eggs and hatches them for three weeks. The robin builds her nest in a ditch with moss and lines it with feathers. She lays four eggs and hatches them for three weeks. The wren makes her nest in an old wall. She lays from twelve to sixteen eggs. The blackbird builds her nest in a very thick bush. She lays four eggs. The thrush builds her nest in a tree and lays five or six eggs and hatches for a month.
The swallow builds her nest in a barn and lays six or seven eggs. She hatches for three weeks. The magpie builds her nest on a high tree. She builds it with sticks and moss and puts a roof on it. She lays
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 22:05
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There are wild birds to be found in my district such as the swans. These birds fly from Killbeg lake to Ballinlough lake and they build there. No one kills a swan because they are afraid that they would kill the children of Lir. A pidgeon build her nest on a very high tree. she makes her nest out of sticks and clay and then she lines the nest with hair and feathers. She lays five or six eggs and hatches them for three weeks. The crow is a very clever bird and when a man goes out shooting there is always a crow on the watch and when she sees him she calls to the other birds. Then they all fly away.
The crow starts to build her nest on the first day of March and if the day
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 22:01
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their burrows and these foxs bring hens, ducks, turkeys, and geese, in the neighbouring villages and that is reason Foxboro got its name. The old people say that in trouble times in Ireland many a brave man came and stayed in this hill from both Roscommon and Galway and they were kindly treated by the people of Foxboro.
There is a field in my village and its name is bush field and there is a bush growing in the middle of this field. No one ever cut this tree because people say that faries stay under this bush. This bush can be seen from the public road. It is also near a very large bog and that is the reason that this field got its name.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:58
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ash sticks, reaping hooks, iron bars and any weapons they could leave their hands on. A fierce fight ensued in which the Catholics gradually got the upper hand. It is not recorded that anyone was killed but desperate wounds were inflicted on both sides. When evening came peace was restored and both parties left for home.
In a few hours time the Orangemen returned and the inhabitants of the village suffered a merciless attack. It was then that O'Neill the famous blacksmith specially distinguished himself. He had taken part in the fray in the earlier part of the day but now he had to take command of the townspeople. He opened his forge and not a scrap of iron was left. All was handed out, bars of iron, tools, and even old shoes were distributed. He succeeded in keeping the Orangemen at bay whilst swift messengers went out to the surrounding country to summon those who had left their homes. These returned with a a cheer heard on "Bredagh Hill". The Orangemen were swept from the village and never again did they dare to tyrannise over the people. The grandchildren and great grandchildren of the famous blacksmith are still to be had in Carrigallen. The following poem commemorates the foregoing events.
(next page)
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:57
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About two hundred years ago there lived a man in Foxboro and his name was John Grorke and there are fields called after him. Those fields are called "Grorkes". Another man lived in this village and his name was Pat Rury and his fields are called after this man and the are called "Ruries".
There was a field in Cloonreliagh and it was called reliagh and children were buried that were not baptised and that is why the village is called Cloonreliagh after this field.
To the east of Foxboro lies about twenty acres of bog which joins the counties of Roscommon and Galway together. In the Galway part of this bog there is a very large hill of sand and it is known as the hill of Cruicawn. In this hill up to the present day foxs have
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:52
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í Druimín. Bhí feilm an mhór ag an bhfear seo. D'feadfa a rádh go raibh dá fheilm aige ceann amháin i Dromconaí agus ceann eile i Druimín. Acht bhí a theach agus a arus aige i Druimín. De brigh gur tógadh an sgoil ar pháiste talmhan le Séamus Ó Coinneagáin fear á raibh comhnuidhe air i Druimín tugadh an t-ainm Drimmien School air agus sin an t-ainm atá ar clár na sgoile agus an t-ainm atá in usaid indiú gidh gur i Dromconaí atá sé tóghta.
Tá Séamus Ó Coinnigeáin ar slig na marbh anois. Tugadh an fheilm i Druimín dá mhac Séamus Ó Coinneagáin. Tá seisean idteach na ngealt iláthair na huaire. Tá muiriginn mhór air agus tá an duine is óige da chlann ar an sgoil seo agamso annseo. Bhí mac eile aige Seághán Tomás Ó Coinneagáin é sin a fuair an fheilm a bhí aige i Drumconaí. Níor phos an fear go dtí le goirid. Is ar
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:52
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pure spring water. Some men would fasten wood and make barrels and churns in which to churn the cream. These men were called coopers and there is a man in Glunsk in Co. Galway and he is still carrying on his trade. There was a nailer in Ballinlough and his name was Brennan. This made nails for the blacksmiths and for the shoe makers.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:50
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About eighty years ago there were no candles but one's made out of rushes. First of all the rushes were pulled and dried on the hob. Then they would peal the rushes and dip them in grease. Then the people would get a sod of turf and put the rushes in the sod of turf. When people had no presses they would make baskets for the clothes. First of all they would boil the rods and peal the skin of the rods. Then the people would weave the rods together and make baskets of them. They also make skibs out of rods.
When people wanted to make a spade they would go to the Blacksmith and give him four lbs of iron and a lb of steal and a bag of black turf. Then the blacksmith would shape the iron and steel into a spade. He would temper it in
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:36
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Poll Capall
A field in Gurteendrish is called Poll Capall. There is a story told of a man who ploughed that field in spite of several warnings from "the good people". While ploughing the earth opened and swallowed the man, his pair of horses and plough. The hole is still pointed out by local people where the ground opened.
Thos. Tannian (60)
Gurteendrish

Note:- Some people call this field "Poll Capall Dáithí", as Dáithí was the man who attempted to plough the field.

Páircín Eddy
Eddy lived there long ago.

Baile na gCnocán
takes its name from the surrounding sand hills.

"Bóithrín Daly"
from a family called Daly who lived there.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:29
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a mile from the hill owned a cow which died a few days after calving. The owner did his best to rear the calf on the very small inadequate supplies of milk given by the kind neighbours. Yet the calf throve inexplicably.
One night he heard a strange noise in the Bóitheach, and on going out to investigate he discovered a beautiful white cow suckling the calf. He followed the white cow till she reached what is now called "Cnocán na Bó Sidhe" where she disappeared.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:25
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A small hill within two hundred yards of the School is known to the local people as "Cnoc Checily". An old woman named Cecily kept a "Sheebeen" there over a hundred years ago. It is probable that she distilled the "mountain dew" among the neighbouring sand-hills. On the night of the "Big Wind" Cecily's cabin was full of her usual customers. Some had not paid for their drinks when the hurricane swept away the roof. There was a rush to the door. But Cecily branded each defaulter with a pinch of ashes from the hearth, saying "I'll know you in the morning, a Ghrádh"
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:23
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a third book and it was a spelling book. The fourth was a carpenter's book. There were slates used for figures in those schools. The teacher used to stay every second night at the houses of the children
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:22
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About seventy years ago there were hedge schools in this district. There was a hedge school in Larry Kelly's house in Foxboro and Larry himself was teaching. This man was a native of Foxboro. In summer time they would go out into a field or by a ditch and teach there. In winter they always went into a farmer's house or barn and taught there. There was a hedge school in Keyfield and Tom Gallaher taught in that school. He taught where Martin Waldron now lives. These teachers were paid one shilling every three months. The subjects they taught were reading, writing and arithmetic. There was no Irish taught in these schools.
At the time same book did all the family. The first book was a primer and the second was a Reading Made Easy. There was
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:17
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in he sits down and start talking. Then he mentions what he came for. He asks her parents will they give a fortune or not. When the pair are returning home after been married the young boys light straw to welcome the couple. That night the big boys dress up and put straw round their feet and get sticks, and go to the house and they all start dancing. If they do not get plenty of drink they will start fighting. These boys are called "phalpers". When a marriage takes place they come home the longest way and if they had horses they would be racing home.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:14
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People get married at anytime of the year but it thought that they should not get married in Lent or advent. Every girl that is not married before Shrove Tuesday salt is shaken on them to keep them fresh for a year. People of this district always get married in a church. It is supposed to be lucky for a bride to wear something old, something new, something she borrowed and something blue. It is supposed to be unlucky for two of the same family to get married in the same year.
Sometimes matches are made and sometimes they are not made. The man always sends somebody to ask the girl for him. The man who goes to ask the girl always dress in his best clothes and go to the house at night fall. When he goes
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:11
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it was no easy job for a garsuin.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:10
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people had to drive their cattle of the street and the police could not interfere until it was over. They fought for two and a half hours till at last with great struggling the Hart man won the day. My grandfather says that Hart from near Loughglynn has the ladder in remembrance of that day. My grandfather is eighty years of age and at times he tells me of the strong men of this district. He tells me that day himself and his comrades were carrying weights and they made a bet to see which of them could carry the heaviest weights.
They went to the village shop where was a bag of salt containing six cwts. Each one tried to lift it but it failed them. My grandfather got it on his back and carried it to the mill at Claugh and up the steps which numbered fifteen and he says
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:06
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About fify years ago there lived a number of heroes in this district according to what the old people say. My grandfather tells me of a big faction fight which took place at Ballinlough when he was a young man. It happened on a fair day when two families of the Harts and MacDonaghs fought over a ladder. A man named Hart bought the ladder on the street. He went away on some other bussiness and in the meantime a man named MacDonagh bought the same ladder not knowing it was sold. He went to carry the ladder down the street and to put it on his cart and just then he met Hart man and he said "that is my ladder I bought it."
Then the two men started to fight and before it was finished there were a hundred men on each side. The
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 21:01
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A yellow sunset is the sign of bad weather. When the swallows are flying low and close to the land it is a sign of rain. When a rainbow is seen in the morning it is a sign of broken weather and when a rainbow is seen in the evening it is the sign of fine weather. When the wind blows from the west is the sign of bad weather. A darkness in the air which shades the sun's light and makes it appear whitish or at night if the moon and stars grow dim rain will follow. When a crowd of crows are to be seen in a field it is the sign of rain. If a cat turns his back to the fire it is bad sign.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 18:44
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To find a curse for Doneraile.
And may grim Pluto's inner[?] jail
For ever groan with Doneraile

Sung locally v. often
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 18:43
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May no one coffin want a nail
That wraps a rogue in Doneraile.
May all the thieves that [?] & steal
The gallows meet in Doneraile.
May all the sons of Granuale
Blush at the thieves of Doneraile.
May mischief big as a Norway whale
Oerwhelm the knaves of Doneraile
May curses wholesale and retail
Pour with full force in Doneraile
May every transport that sets sail
A convict bring from Doneraile.
May every churn & milking pail
Fall dry to [?] in Doneraile
May cold and hunger still congeal
The stagnant blood of Doneraile
May every hour new woes reveal
That hell reserved for Doneraile
May every chose ill prevail
O'er all the [?] of Doneraile
May no one wish or prayer avail
To soothe the woes of Doneraile
May the inquisition straight impale
The raparees of Doneraile
May Charon's boat triumphant sail
Completely manned from Doneraile
Oh may my couplet never fail
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 18:34
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Be ever heard in Doneraile
May patriots kings and common weal
Despise and harass Doneraile
May loudest thunders ring a peal
To blind and deafen Doneraile
May vengeance fall at head and tail
From North to South at Doneraile
May profit light and tardy Sale
Still damp the trade of Doneraile
May fame resound a dismal tale
When she lights on Doneraile.
May Egypt's plagues at once prevail
To thin the knaves of Doneraile.
May frost and snow and sleet & hail
Benumb each joint at Doneraile.
May wolves and bloodhounds trace & hail
The cursed crew of Doneraile.
May Oscar with his fiery tail
To atoms thresh all Doneraile.
May enemy mischief fresh and [?]
Abide henceforth in Doneraile.
May all from Belfast to Kinsale
Scoff, curse and damn you Doneraile
May neither flour not oatenmeal
Be found or known in Doneraile.
May want and woe each joy curtail
That e'er was known in Doneraile
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 18:24
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Alas how dismal is my tale
I lost my watch in Doneraile
My Dublin watch my chain and seal
Pilfered at once in Doneraile
May fire and brim stone never fail
To fall in showers on Doneraile
May all the leading fiends assail
The thieving town of Doneraile
As lightning flash across the vale
So down to hell with Doneraile.
The fate of Pompey at pharale
Be that the curse of Doneraile
May beef or mutton lamb veal
Be never found in Doneraile
But garlic soup and scurry kail
Be still the food of Doneraile
And for ward as the creeping snail
The industry be of Doneraile
May heaven a chosen curse entail
On ragged rotten Doneraile
May sun and moon forever fail
To beam their lights on Doneraile.
May every pestilential gale
Blast that cursed spot called Doneraile
May no sweet cuckoo thrush or quail
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 18:16
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Ah, there is no place like old Ireland for kindly hearts are there.
Chorus.
One ambition still is left him and he guards it in his breast
'Tis to see his country righted ere he's laid down to this rest
Chorus.
Now he's fifty years amongst us five decades for our good.
And our hearts go out to greet him with Esteem and Gratitude.
May his days be longer with us and may heaven on him bestow
Its everlasting blessings for his good deeds here below
Chorus.
God bless his life of laboured love: his like we're wanting more. Ect.
Sent from abroad to
Troys Ballmakill
Relatives.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 18:11
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Long Life to Father Flannery that soggarth kind and true,
Whose life was spent unselfishly doing good to you and me.
For fifty long and laboured years he journeyed far and near,
Through arroyos, swamps, in heat and to bring the dying cheer.
Chorus
God bless his life of laboured love: his like we're wanting more
For he's faithful to his people and he's to the core
A Gael of Gaelic heart and soul and acts, and thinks and feels
And that is why he's honoured now by faithful hearted Gaels.
Sure his heart is set in Ireland where he left long long ago,
Where there's music in the rivers where the little shamrocks grow
Where the air is sweet with perfume from the hills and valleys fair,
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 16:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago there was a spring well in the Ffrench estate (Monivea, Co. Galway - recently bequeathed to the Irish Nation by Miss K. Ffrench who died in Harbin, Manchukuo).
A policeman who stopped to take a drink there fell in and was drowned. Since then the well is known locally as
"Poll Gárda".
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 16:22
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
One of the sand-hills in Ballinamona about a half mile from the School is known locally as "Cnocán na Bó Sidhe". A poor man living in Doire Glasáin about
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 16:19
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A small hill within two hundred yards of the School is known to the local people as "Cnoc Chesily". An old woman named Cecily keep a "Sheebeen" there over a hundred years ago. It is probable that she distilled the "mountain dew" among the neighbouring sand-hills. On the night of the "Big Wind" Cecily's cabin was full of her usual customers. Some had not paid for their drinks when the hurricane swept away the roof. There was a rush to the door. But Cecily branded each defaulter with a pinch of ashes from the hearth, saying
"I'll know you in the morning, a Ghrádh"
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
steeping the rushes in melted grease.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was a man named Paddy Boyle, of Drumagrella, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan who could make the rush candles. The neighbours around used to buy them at fourpence each. They used make the candles by
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:44
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rejected
awaiting decision
Over 100 years ago fights between Catholics and Orangemen were very common in this district. The Protestant section had most of the good land, and as nearly all landlords and land agents were of that religion the Protestants felt they could trample on the Catholics and always tried to do so.
At last the Catholics of Carrigallen, Aughavas and Drumreilly made up their minds that they would stand such abuse no longer and they determined to teach the Orangemen a lesson. A district still called the "Manor" lies in the middle of a triangle formed by lines joining Carrigallen, Killeshandra and Arva. The two latter towns are in Co Cavan.
The Manor was inhabited then, and still is, by Orangemen. No Catholic was permitted to live in this district extending for 4 or 5 miles through Co. Cavan, and within a few miles of the Leitrim border. These Orangemen treated the Catholics with the greatest of cruelty and contempt in the towns adjoining. No fair could take place in which unfortunate occurrences did not take place - many lost their lives in these rowdy fights. It became known that the Orangemen were to parade in Carrigallen on a certain day and the Catholics determined to "have it out" with them. Many of the Orangemen had swords and the Catholics brought
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
ash sticks, reaping hooks, iron bars and any weapons they could leave their hands on. A fierce fight ensued in which the Catholics gradually got the upper hand. It is not recorded that anyone was killed but desperate wounds were inflicted on both sides. When evening came peace was restored and both parties left for home.
In a few hours time the Orangemen returned and the inhabitants of the village suffered a merciless attack. It was then that O'Neill the famous blacksmith specially distinguished himself. He had taken part in the fray in the earlier part of the day but now he had to take command of the townspeople. He opened his forge and not a scrap of iron was left. All was handed out, bars of iron, tools, and even old shoes were distributed. He succeeded in keeping the Ornagemen at bay whilst swift messengers went out to the surrounding country to summon those who had left their homes. These returned with a acheer heard on "Bredagh Hill". The Orangemen were swept from the village and never again did they dare to tyrannise over the people. The grandchildren and great grandchildren of the famous blacksmith are still to be had in Carrigallen. The following poem commemorates the foregoing events.
(next page)
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:42
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rejected
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On my way to school I pass a place which is still known as the "Green". It is so called because a man named the "Miller" Mc Cabe kept a bleach green for bleaching linen.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:37
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rejected
awaiting decision
About a hundred years ago, there lived in the townland of Drumond, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, a man named Peter Malone who could dye linen and frieze in all colours.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:33
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rejected
awaiting decision
frieze.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:32
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rejected
awaiting decision
In the townland of Drumond, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, there lived a man named Michael Mc Cabe. He could weave linen and
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About forty years ago there lived a woman named Mrs. Alice Leen, Carrickakelly, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. This woman could make her own candles.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Going eastward from the pretty little church of Burnfort, is the townland of Island, which gets its name from the fact that it is literally an island surrounded by a stream. The remains of several Cromlechs are to be seen, and there in the outlying townland of Greenhill there is an ancient Ogham Stone. The owner of the land had it removed some years ago from its position in a field, and now it lies in a dyke nearby.
At Lissard (Lios Árd) can be seen the remains of stone circles, believed to be early pagan burial places, and the older residents call this place Rayna Gaoithe, the Windswept Hill.
(Both Ogham Stone and Stone Circle are shown on Ordnance Map Second Edition 1904, Cork, Sheet 42).
Cromlechs and Oghams Stones mark the burial places of kings, princes and chieftains. The burial mark for the lower classes was a stone circle.
In Burnfort there is an old Danish fort (marked on map) and in the vault which is beneath it there were several Ogham stones discovered.

(Received above account from Mollie Sheehan, a pupil of Burnfort School)
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:15
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tá sé macánta muna bhfuil an diabhal i bhfad istig ann

* * *

"Tá sé sa leabhairín dá mbeadh sé sa cheannín" a deireadh sean mháighistir scoile le'n a scoláirí"

* * *

"Is gnáthach gac Domhnach 'na lá saoire
Is gnáthach faoilinn ar an dtráigh
Is gnáthach tart bheith ar fhear an t-siubhail
Agus roimis an toradh tagann an bláth

* * *

"Bean bhreágh no tig ar ád agus capall bán i mbéal doruis"
trí rud maith a bheith agat
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a cloth and wrung and the juice of them would make starch.
[Drawing]
- straight spade
- local or whack spade
- cutting spade
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"Beag no mór do shíntiús is fearr é ná a fheabhas do leath-sgéul"
"Bhfuil aon scéal agat?" arsa sean iasgaire (Pádraig Ó Súilleabháin, aois 70, An Duínín, Baile na nGall, Ciarraidhe) liom lá.
"Ní mór atá" arsa mise agus scaoil mé chuige an beagán a bhí agam. Nuair a chríocnuigheas ar seisean liom
"Beag no mór do shíntiús is fearr é ná a fheabhas do leath-sgéal."

Micheál O'Ruairc O.S. do bhailigh
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
"Ní aithneóchadh sé h ar thóin phaca"
arsan Pádraig Ó'Súilleabháin chéadna, ag tagairt do dhuine éigin a bhí gan scolaidheacht
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 15:01
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Dhá leagan de'n cheathramhain "Fiche Bliadhain ag Fás"

Fiche bliadhain ag dul i neart
Agus fiche bliadhain go maith
Fiche bliadhain ag dul thar n-ais
Agus fiche bliadhain gan mhaith

(Tomás Ó Cinnéide, An Charraig, Cill Cumhaille, Baile na nGall
aois: 62 a d'innis do M. O'Ruairc O.S.)

* * *

"Fiche bliadhain ag fear ag fás
Fiche bliadhain gan fán ar a neart
Fiche bliadhain sall is anall
'San chuid eile is cuma ann é no as"

(Tomás Ó Conchubhair, Áirde Mór, Baile na nGall
Aois: 71 a thug do M. O'Ruairc O.S. )
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:59
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a cloth and wrung and the juie of them would make starch.
[Drawing]
- straight spade
- local or whack spade
- cutting spade
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:56
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
big anvil in every forge, and long ago the people had great belief in it. If a child was poor or sick they would say it was brought by the fairies and another one left in its stead. They would bring the strange child to the forge leave it sitting on the anvil for many nights. In a few nights it would lose the power of the fairies.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The forge door is divided into two halves so that if you close one half, and leave the other open it will keep the horses from going out, and you will have enough light to shoe them. There is one big window on the forge. There is a small tank built beside the fireplace and it is always kept full of water to cool the red irons. There is a great
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:51
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
town about every month to buy iron for making horse shoes.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
town about every month to buy iron for making horse shoes.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
banners, Champions, Kerr Pinks, Arran Victors, Lumpers, Irish Queens, British Queens, Dates, Arran Chiefs, Beauty of Hebron.
The potatoes are dropped in a line about nine inches apart in a drill, and about one foot in a ridge. They have to be sprayed twice. Some people spray three times. We dig the drills with a ploug, and the ridges with a spade. We put the good ones in pits, and give the little ones to the pigs. Potatoes were used long ago as startch. First they were peeled and then they were grated. Then they were put in
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:45
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rejected
awaiting decision
We grow about two acres of potatoes every year. Half drills and half ridges. Drills do'nt do as well as ridges on a wet year. We manure the grouond first, and then plough it. Sometimes the ground is ploughed and harrowed twice before the drills are made. We plant Epicures, Arran
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
is coming the potatoes are taken from the field and put in pits at the house.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ridges are planted with shovels and spades. The spades are bought in shops. We sow four different kinds of potatoes. Arran banners, Champions, Kerrs Pink and Victors.
In Summer they are sprayed with blue stone, and washing soda. The blue stone and soda are stept in a barrel of water 'til melted. Then they put it on the leaves of the potatoes to keep the blight away. In Autumn the men of the house dig them, and the women pick them from the earth. They gather them into a bucket. Then they put them in bags for the men to carry them to pits. When the Spring
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
We grow about an acre of potatoes every year. We sow them in ridges because the land is sandy. If you sowed them in drills they'd grow up and be all scutch.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:35
approved
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awaiting decision

Tobar na Tríonóide i
Parráisde - Cill Ainín
Conndae - na Gaillimhe
Baile Fearainn - Cluain Mór
Tobar Cuana i
Parráisde - Uachtar Árd
Conndae - Na Gaillimhe
Baile Fearainn - Caladh na Muc
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:32
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rejected
awaiting decision
Gaillimh de ghnáth. Bíonn damhsa agus fleadh ann arís an oidhche sin.
Tar éis míosa a chaitheamh ó bhaile tagann an cailín agus a fear arais ar cuairt chuig tigh a h-athar. Bíonn oidhche mhór grinn eile aca an oidhche sin.
Deirtear nach ceart do daoine pósadh ar Déanamh Diardaon, Dia h-Aoine nó Dia Satharn-
Thursday for crosses,
Friday for losses,
And Saturday no day at all.
Crochtar sean-bhróg ar chúl an ghluaistean nuair a bídh ag dul cun pósaidhthe chun go mbeidh rath ar an mbeirt nua pósta.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Lee was supposed to have gone down half way, and each time he would have a light, and it would go out. Then he would get afraid, and come back. There are alot of forts in Co. Cavan.
There is another fort in the townland of Drumfominia. It is on Patrick Smith's land. It is composed of palm bushes, with a ditch surrounding them. Every night at twelve o'clock fairies are to be seen dancing, and heard singing. There are also a number of lights seen there every night. The man that owns this fort, cut some of trees and he has a sore hand ever since
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There are three forts in the parish of Lavery, in Co Cavan. There is one in a field of John Reilly's of Drummollard which overlooks another lake also It is composed of bushes, whins, and a rock. It circular in shape with a ditch surrounding it. Some of the old people say that they heard people singing, and dancing, and playing music at it.
Opposite that fort is another one. It is a mile distant from Drummollard Fort on the East side of Drumminduff. It is surrounded by palm trees, and a ditch. It is said that the fairies used to be seen kicking football at twelve o'clock every night.
Then on the West side of Dumminban is another one. It is situated in the middle of Tom Smith's land. This fort is overlooking a small Lake near by, and it is composed of lone-bushes, and a stone ditch surrounding it. There is an entrance with stone steps leading down to the cave. An old man named James
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
a ghníos na cleamhnaistí i gcómhnaidhe. Teigheann siad go dtí teach na mná agus cuireann siad in iúl dá h-athair is dá máthair gur maith léo a leitheid seo í a phósadh. Annsin bíonn seanchas aca fá shaidhbhreas an fhir - méid stoc atá aige, méad talamh, an cineál tíghe srl. Annsin ní foláir socrú fá spré na mná. Má tá airgead ag a h-athair geibheann an fear an méid atá ag dul dí. Muna bhfuil gheibheann an cailín stoc nó pé rud gur feidir lenn a túismíghtheóirí a thabhairt dó. Nuair a bhíos gach nídh sochruighthe bíonn "oidhche mhór" i dtígh na mná.
Tugtar cuireadh do na chomhursana teacht go dtí an teach agus tagann gaolta an fhir leis. Bíonn damhsa, ceol, siamsa is spórt ar sibhal i rith na h-oidhche ar fad.
An Pósadh Féin:- Maidin lae an phósaidhthe teigheann an fear fá dhéin an chailín. Bíonn a cháirde féin leis. Tugtar tae nó deoch dóibh i dtígh na mná. Annsin gluaisidh go léir go dtí an séipéil. In dhiaidh an Aifrinn teigheann na daoine go léir go dtí teach an fhir agus bíonn fleadh agus féasta mór aca. Teigheann an lánamhain nua ar thuras i ngluaistean - go
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:28
approved
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awaiting decision
I live in Alice Vale in the parish of Kilmessan. I live in a thatched house about three quarters of a mile from the village. There are four houses in the townland of Alice Vale, two of which are thatched and two of which are roofed with slates. There are about twenty people between the four houses. Our house is made of mud and boards and thatched over with straw.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
KIlcarn,
Navan,
Co. Meath
Told by Mrs Brien,
Same address
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:23
approved
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awaiting decision
to the hall-door.
There are many ruins of houses in our townland. A few hundred yards from our house there is the ruins of an - old house. An old man named William Mulvany lived in this house. One night four men burned it when he was in bed. In one of our fields there stands the ruins of a house. This house was never occupied. It was said that it was built on the fairie's path. The man who was going to live in the house heard fairies dancing and playing music. A few years ago the house fell. Some of the stones of the wall are there yet.
All the fields in Bellinter have names. One of the fields is called Harry's Hill. A man named Harry Maguire lived in this field and that is how this field got its name. Another field the brick field, got its name from a brick-yard being in it.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
sold or sent away, One of them is believed to be the museum in Dublin, and the other in the jewellars shop in Glasgow. But there was no further investigation or search made for gold in or around the District.
There were gold coins found in the thatch of a house on one occasion near Ballyjamesduff but this was believed to be hidden there by a robber as he ran by. He afterwards forgot where he hid it.
Some years ago there was a story told of a man who dreamt where there was gold to be found in the edge of a fort in Crosserlough. He went to an woman who lived in Duffcastle and told her his story. She told him to bring someone with him and go there at twelve o'clock at night and bring his tools and someone with him, and not to speak a word from the time he would go till he would return.
When he was digging a while his spade struck against the pot
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:19
approved
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awaiting decision
Hidden Treasure
Mines and hidden treasure are very scarce in this part of the Country. But gold was found on two occasions at Ballyjamesduff, on one occasion when the water Pump was being sunk in Market Street a nugget of gold was found. On another occasion the same was found outside Ballyjamesduff at Curglass. These were
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:18
approved
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awaiting decision
I live in the townland of Bellinter. There are thirty people living in Bellinter. Some of the houses are built of stone, brick and concrete and roofed with slates. Others are built with clay and covered with thatch.
There are woods in Bellinter, covering about fifty acres. Many pheasants are in these woods. One of the nicest houses in Meath is in Bellinter. It was built in the year 1800. It is eight storeys in height. There are many steps going up
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:16
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Hidden Treasures.
A few months ago Mr James Conway, Stradone Street. Ballyjamesduff, parish of Catlerahan found the handles of guns at the back of the house which are said to be buried since the time of the Fenians, and they are still to be seen at his home.
About two or three years ago my Father found a sword in a field and he gave it to the school master of Ballyjamesduff named Master Mac Colgan. R. J. P. A few years ago men were digging at the back of Mrs. Mac Canny's house on the Convent Grounds Ballyjamesduff, they found the remains of an old cross, and an arch of a Church. And it is said there were the ruins of an old Church there.
Mr McEnerney Drumestagh, Lavey found a noggin which belonged to his Gand-Mother, which is as good as ever and is still to be seen.
Owen Monaghan, Lavey, found a pike or some thing for fighting with, in the roof of a house when he was going to slate it, and the date in which it was made on it. And it is said it was made during the time of the Black and Tans
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:12
approved
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awaiting decision
houses are near the ditches and have paths from them. These paths lead to old roads that used to be used long ago. Much traffic went these roads long ago. One man that lived near a road was "Tom the Shot."
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:12
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
'a Phobail and on till it came to a road beside Dunsany. Many people travelled that road in olden days. On one side of the road there is a big mound. There are eight trees around the bottom of the mound and one on the top of it. It is said that a high-up person was buried there long ago. This person lived in Tara in the time of King Cormac. Each field in Arlonstown has a name. The "Limekiln field" is one of the fields. It got its name from a limekiln that was in the centre of the field. The walls of the limekiln are there yet, and the passage into is there too. The "angle field" is another one. It got its name because it has three corners. Another field is called "McNally's." It got its name from a man of the name of Mc. Nally who lived in a house in that field. The "long field" is another one. It got its name because it is a long field and has four corners in it. There are ruins of old houses in nearly each field. Some of the
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:11
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Is i rith na h-Inide is mó a póstar agus i mí Meitheamh.
Laethannta atá mí-ráthmhar:- Dia h-Aoine agus Dia Satharn.
Míosa atá mí-ráthmhar:- Bealtaine agus Samhain mar leanann na sidheóga an leánamhain nua má póstar iad i rith an dhá mhí seo. Deirtear nach adhmharach an rud (beirt) má phósann beirt d'ón clann amháin i rith na bliadhna céadhna.
Deirtear nach cheart do'n chailín pósta cuairt a thabhairt ar thígh a h-athar go ceann míosa tar éis lae an phósta.
Má castar asail ar an mbeirt ag dul chuig an bpósadh deirtear gur chómhartha mí-ádha é sin.
Má's fear an chéad duine a bhuaileas leo tar éis teacht amach ó'n séipéil is deagh-cómhartha é.
Déantar cleamhnaistí san gceanntar seo i gcómhneidhe. Tá daoine ann agus is fearr iad ná daoine eile chun cleamhnaistí a dhéanamh agus mar sin 'siad na fir céadhna
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Is i rith na h-Inide is mó a póstar agus i mí Meitheamh.
Laethannta atá mí-ráthmhar:- Dia h-Aoine agus Dia Satharn.
Míosa atá mí-ráthmhar:- Bealtaine agus Samhain mar leanann na sidheóga an leánamhain nua má póstar iad i rith an dhá mhí seo. Deirtear nach adhmharach an rud (beirt) má phósann beirt d'ón clann amháin i rith na bliadhna céadhna.
Deirtear nach cheart do'n chailín pósta cuairt a thabhairt ar thígh a h-athar go ceann míosa tar éis lae an phósta.
Má castar asail ar an mbeirt ag dul chui an bpósadh deirtear gur chómhartha mí-ádha é sin.
Má's fear an chéad duine a bhuaileas leo tar éis teacht amach ó'n séipéil is deagh-cómhartha é.
Déantar cleamhnaistí san gceanntar seo i gcómhneidhe. Tá daoine ann agus is fearr iad ná daoine eile chun cleamhnaistí a dhéanamh agus mar sin 'siad na fir céadhna
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:07
approved
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awaiting decision
I live in Arlonstown. There is one family in it. There are fourteen people living in our house. There are many ruins of the old houses in the land. One of these houses belonged to "Jack the Shot." There are marks of old roads that ran through the fields. One of the roads ran from Mr. Steens house Cnoc
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:06
approved
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awaiting decision
I live in the townland of Ballinavaddogue. It is not a very large townland. It is good land. There are six families on this townland. There are a few old people. Mrs. Pollock, who lives at Foley's in this townland, is eighty-six years of age. Mrs. Maher is eighty two years of age. Thomas Farrell is seventy five years old.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 14:01
approved
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awaiting decision
or the Fenians and it is still to be seen.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About seventy years ago there lived a man named John Hanratty, Carrickakelly, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. This man was the champion thatcher of Inniskeen, he used to thatch for the people of Inniskeen. When he died the people missed him very much. Another famous thatcher was James Carroll, of Drumboat, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:53
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awaiting decision
James Mc Gahan of Candlefort, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. This man died about thirty years ago. He was a good basket maker. The people for miles around used to get their baskets from him.
The O'Carrolls of Mulacruw, Co. Louth were also basket and creel makers. It was handed down to them from their forefathers, they used to bring them to the town of Dundalk and sell them there.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:49
approved
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awaiting decision
The churn is three feet in height. It is one foot four inches on the top and at the bottom it is one foot six inches wide. The sides are straight up as far as the crib and (on the) then slanted. There are various parts, bottom, sides, On the sides there are 6 hoops and one the top there are little nicks which make the lid fit evenly on it. There is a hole in the lid for a dash.
In Winter milk is generally scarce and hard to thicken therefore churning is done once a week. If a stranger comes in during the churning, he or she is supposed to take a hand in it, If he wouldn't he would bring the butter with him.
The churning is done by the hand around here, and the dash is merely upwards and downwards and when it is nearly finished it is given a rolling motion to gather the butter together. Then there is some boiling water poured in when starting in order that it might bring on the butter by heating
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:45
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awaiting decision
Then cold water is put in when nearly finished to firm or harden the butter.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:45
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awaiting decision
Superstitions.
To meet a corpse on the road is unlucky.
If you fall on Whit Sunday you will never get better.
If the cock crows at your door some one inside the house will die.
If the cock crows before midnight it is unlucky because something is going to happen.
If you break a mirror you will have seven years bad luck.
If you drop your glove it is a disappointment for you and some one else has to lift it.
If you see straw on the road you should touch it three times. It is very lucky
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:42
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The is a drawing of a sword and what is either a cane or a sword stick obscuring the text on this page.
Transcriber
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:41
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and you will get your wish.
If you meet anyone on the stairs it is a sign of bad luck.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:41
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Old Objects
There are two old books in our house called "The Nation" One is a late edition 1884 but the other is 1844. The cover of the first one is very old and worn but there is only one side of the cover on the second one and some of the pages are torn out. My Daddy says that they belonged to my Great Grand Father.
I have also got a sabre and some people think it is very ancient. Daddy found it in the garden, it has got a blade handle with notches at the sides. It is about two feet long and as it gets narrower. I have heard that it was used in duelling long ago. It has got a case the shape of a walking stock. You could use it for that purpose. The reason is that
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:33
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Severe Weather.
In the year 1897 the ice was on the ground for nine weeks Lacken Lake was covered with ice 4 feet deep and the fish were frozen up against the ice the people crossed it an bicycles and in traps to attend Mass on Sundays Farmers brough horses and carts full of hay accross it to fodder cattle Children crossed it going to school. Old Women were afraid to walk on it and tied all their goods to their backs sat on the lake and got two sticks to push them along. When it started to melt some parts flowed over fields.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:30
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thunder and lightening. Don't set a young goose if the mare is in foal. If a mare in foal is drawing a cart it is not right to carry butcher's meat in the cart in case she would foal too soon.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:29
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Superstitions
If the rainbow stretches across an old person's house he is going to die. If you give buttermilk to anyone on the first May morning that person is taking the butter of the churn. When setting a hen put irons under her, to keep away the
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:28
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Riddles
Q. Riddle me ranty ree has two eyes and can't see
A. A scissors
Q. If a fiddler in Cavan had a brother fiddler in Dublin how does it come that that the brother fiddler in Dublin had no brother fiddler in Cavan.
A. Because it was his sister.
Q. If you fell off an ass where would you get "down"
A. On a goose.
Q. What gets boots and never wears them.
A. A football.
Q. Which side of the cat has the most hair on
A. The outside
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 13:25
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An Old Graveyard.
There is an old Graveyard situated in the townland of Crossrule, Ballyjamesduff, It is still in use. There is no church near it. It is a Protestant graveyard. There is a stream running through down the middle of it. There are about one hundred and twenty graves in it, and twenty-five tomb-stones.
The Earliest date on a tomb-stone id seventeen seventy two. It is surrounded by trees, and there are trees growing through it. The trees are ash, copper beach, larch, sycamore, horse-chest-nut, and oak trees.
Superstitions:-
If you were going on a journey, and found a horse's shoe it is said that you would have good luck. If you find silver it is said that you are going to get more money. It is said that Saturday is an unlucky day.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 12:51
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badly thatched, that morning everybody was trying to get all their hay gathered, but most of it was blown away, and the owner could'nt get it.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 12:50
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There are many objects, and emblems of great value in Ireland. The ones most treasure and the works of the monks who made crosses that contained emerals, diamonds, rubies in years gone by, and which is preserved in Trinity College Dublin. Other great work was the harp which is believed to be the sweetest of all musical instruments. It is also to be found in Dublin. We read in our school books that the Books of kells is the famous in the world and we read also in the papers where a great architect is making a copy of it. Another object of great interest is St Patricks bell. It is preserved in
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 12:16
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mac is n dá eangal déag atá i bflaitheaas Dé go mo coingbheál féin ar déagh staid.
4) Go mba [duan?] dorchada an dún seo bfuil muid ánn Go mba sluagh dál an sluagh seo cugainn a Mhic Muire is a Rí na nGrást coinnigh do cochall in ár dtimceall go lá bán.
Paidir Fairrge.
Cuirimse lobainn maghaidh na [tuinne?] Lobainn is [Óbann?] ánn ar cumdach Dé is Colum Cille muid.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 11:38
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Go mbeannuidhe Día dhíobh a triúr bráithre" "Go mbeannuidhe Día agus Muire dhíbh" "Cá bfuil sib a' dul indiú" "Go dtí Sliabh na h-Ollamh ag baint Olann go caoirigh." Tuga lib is tugaidh chugam olann na n-olaige is olann tirim chaorach is ná glacaidh aon duais as ucht.
"Tá céithre phosta ar mo leabhadh céithre aingle ortha sgartha sgarta Má fhágaimse bas as seo go maidin i bhFlaitheas Dé go raibh m'anam
Luigim ar mo thaobh deas is iompuighim ar mo thaobh clé diultuighim go na Spioraidheacha is gabhann an Spiorad Naomh Guidim Peadar is guidim Pól Muire Mór agus a
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 11:38
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Riddes
Q. What lives in winter dies in summer and grows with its root upwards.
A. icicle
Q. As round as an apple as plump as a ball climbs over church steeple and all.
A. The sun.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 11:34
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The Big Wind
It is over 100 years since the night of the Big Wind. It lasted for a whole night and it did great damage The old people say it blew the roofs off houses and tops of potato pits. People say it was dangerous to be outside and it was twice as dangerous to be inside Trees were blown down and people killed.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 11:32
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Old Schools
There is an old school in Kildorough but it is in ruins now. The roof was blown off a few months ago. The people say the Protestants were upstairs and the Catholics downstairs. Some are on the wall where the children wrote them. The stairs is outside of it.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 11:31
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gold himself that night the (his) workman got sick and died.
It is supposed that when the monks were leaving Abbeylara they buried their treasures in a well and closed the well again and planted a tree over it. The treasures are not supposed to be got until the tree falls. One of the stems has already fallen
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 11:30
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Hidden Treasures.
There was a hidden treasure in Cavan and it was locally known by everyone. But whoever would get it was to die. A man named Mr. Kinkade had a workman digging in a field. He struck the treasure with his spade. His master sent him home for a drink so that he would get the gold. He took the
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 11:28
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Old Prayers.
When people are selling things to anyone they say, "May give you luck." When people are passing anybody working they say. "God bless your work." When getting up in the morning they would say. "Thanks be to God for having saved me from all the dangers of the night and may He save me from the dangers of the coming day."
When a person goes into a house he says "Gd save all here," or "May God bless this house When a person is going from your house to his house say, "May God bring you home safe. When you are passing a graveyard say, "May God rest all the poor souls that are buried there." In time of war they say "May God keep away the war.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 11:25
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On New Years night if you give money to anybody you will give the luck away with it. It is said that if you go out on Hallow Eve you will see a ghost and if you left a cup of water on the table it would be gone in the morning as the souls in Purgatory would drink
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 11:24
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Superstitions
Many people believe in superstitions. If you met a woman with red hair on your way to the fair you would have bad luck. If your right hand was hot and your left one cold you would get a surprise and if your left hand was hot and your right one cold you would get money.
If you met a white horse on the road you should spit out three times. If you saw one magpie you would have bad luck, and if you saw two you would have good luck. If you were walking with a person on the road and that they let anything fall you should pick it up and you would get an invitation but if the person that let it fall picked it up he would get a disapointment.
If anybody int he house broke a mirror they would have bad luck for seven year. There are black insects and when you one of them creeping anywhere if you kill it you will have seven sins taken off your soul. If you crept under anything you wouldn't grow any bigger. If you found a pin or anything else on the road and when you left it down if you didn't spit on your hand you would have a disase
If you see three lights in a room at the same time it is the sign that somebody is dead.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 11:18
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she did so he commenced cursing her and using all sorts of threats and he went off in a puff of smoke and when she turned round she saw her own child in the cradle so the spell was broken.
Another time there was a child who was overlooked and faded away till you scarce would know him. An old woman told the mother if she suspected any of the neighbours coming in to cut a piece of their clothing without their knowing it and burn it under the child's nose. If the child sneezed the spell would be broken and he would be himself again.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 11:16
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Superstitions
There was once a woman who had a baby which she was very fond of, all her spare time was wasted on the baby. In her great surprise on awakening one morning what must be her grief when she discovered her baby was gone and in its stead she found a poor sickly being crying day and night. The poor mother was distracted. She went to a very wise man to see could he do anything for her
Someday soon after she went to the market. He told her when she would come home if there was no change in the child to put on a large fire of turf and throw the child into it. The moment
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 11:11
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scheduled as drainage country, will loose some thousands of pounds as a result of the rains of 1938.
Down in Gowra district where the drainage systems have not yet been started the farmers are in a bad plight. More than 200,000 acres a liable to be flooded.
Motoring along Killshandra area small isolated fields showed the effects on the last weeks flooding. Potatoes and hay have been lost. At Dunwell the farmers are trying to dig their potatoes out of ponds.
Mr Thomas McDonnell who has a small farm out side of Cavan town, gave me peculiar explanation for the failure of the potato crop in some parts of the country. "The drought in the early Summer did as much damage as did the winter rains." he said. In the fairly high grounds the potato 'seeds' never gripped the soil. Either way the crop would have been small. But the streams from the mountains bringing too much moisture when it cam loosened the stalks again.
The failure of the crops is not as bad in our district as the farmers have got a good part of their potatoes dug and their hay saved. As or the turf nearly them all are lost. Never before has the country saw a bad harvest.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 10:50
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There are a lot of stories, and traditions connected with the penal times, and I will now tell you a few of them which I heard relating to my district. There is a rock called "Carraig an Aifrinn" situated near the village of Ballinamorrive, and it is said that in penal times, when the priests were hunted, and had no churches to celebrate Mass they said It on this rock.
There is a story told about a man named Morrison who lived at a place called "Morrison's Bridge" about two miles from here. This man was a Protestant who hated priests so much that if he met one on the road he would abuse him, or even strike him with his whip.
This man met with a very bad end, as he was shot in his own house one night. The priests also said Mass in certain houses, and when they were going to do so, word was sent to all the Catholics in the district so they might attend It.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 10:49
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Coruigimse an leabhaidh seo anocht i nainim na naomh agus naimim an Athar An Mhic is An Spioradh Naom is an t-ainim fhéin a [mhic.?] Céard sin tá tú rádh a mháthair Paidirín bheannuighthe a mhic. Shíl mé nach dtiochfadh tú go lá agus níl aon nduine a dearfhadh e trí huaire agus [dul?] i mbáis codlata na hoídche dhó ar bhaoghal dhó pianta Ifrinn go bráth.
Paidir a déarfhá a'cogailt na teineadh
Coiglímse an teine seo anocht mar coiglins Críost cách Bríghid na bun is Muire ina bárr an dá eangal deag atá i bflaitheas na nGrást a' [comhduacht?]an tighe is na ndaoine go lá.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 10:39
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There are many monuments spread throughout the County of Cork. In my district there is a standing stone in the lands of Daniel Donoughue and the Earl of Desmond was supposed to be buried underneath it long years ago. There is also an inscription on it and people have often tried to discern this marking on the stones but it failed them.
This was the writing of the olden people and some learned people say that if you stood watching it for some time at the end of each one of the marks you would see shot signs.
There is an other stone near St Olan's Well in Aghabullogue in the lands of Mr Murphy. It is very enormous varying from six to eight feet in height and about four feet underground. People have no experience who was buried underneath it.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 10:28
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There are no monuments in this district, but there are a lot of stones that there are old traditions attached to. There are two very large stones in the land of Mrs Ambrose of Caherbaroul called dalláns. These stones are about seven feet overground, and it is believed they are the same number of feet underground. There was a stone on top of them, but it was taken off some time ago.
They stand upright, and are about eight feet apart, and the old people thought there were some giants buried there. There are also some remarkable stones in the land of Mrs Hayes of Knockglass called "The Druids Table". There is one big rock supported by two small ones acting as legs.
There is something similiar to this "Druids Table" in the lands of Mrs Bohan, Knockglass. Some strangers came to look at these stones some time ago trying to discern the marks that are on them. There are more stones in the land of Patrick Ahern, Kilberrihert, forming a square, and the place they enclose is called "The Soldier's Grave".
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 10:27
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an bhean cuireadh do'n cheathrar chuig féasta. Leag sí anuas ceithre chupán agus dubhairt leo suidhe chun buird. Leag sí píosa leathair chuig an ngréasuidhe, píosa adhmaid chuig an siúinéar agus píosa éadaigh chuig an táilliúr. Leag sí greadadh le n-ithe 's le n-ól ag an bhfeilméar. Nuair a chonnaic an triúr eile an cleas a h-imreadh ortha chuadar amach. D'fhan an feilméar ón am sin amach.
Cáit Nic Allmhuráin, Clochbhreac, Co. na Gaillimhe. Aois 16 bl.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 10:22
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táilliúr, gréasuidhe, feilméar agus siúnéar ar a tóir. Dubhairt an tsean-bhean léi an feilméar a thógáil ach dubhairt sí go mbfhearr léi an fear a mbeádh céird aige.
"Tá go maith", ars an t-sean-bhean, "a chomhairle féin do mhac Éanna 's ní bhfuair ariamh níos measa."
Dubhairt an t-sean-bhean léi sean éadach a chur uirthí féin agus a h-éadan a dhathughadh. A dhul chuig teach gach duine de na fir agus déirce iarraidh air agus an duine a bfhearr a thiubharfadh déirce dí a phósadh. Rinne sí amhlaidh. Chuaidh sí chuig teach an ghréasuidhe agus d'iarr déirce air.
"Níl aon cheó sa teach agam go dtagaidh mé ó'n siopa tráthnóna," ar seisean.
Chuaigh sí chuig an tailliúr agus chuig an siúinéar ach dubhairt siad-san an rud céadhna. Nuair a chuaidh sí chuig teach an fheilméara bhí sean-bhean istigh ag déanamh maistreadh. D'iarr sí déirce uirrí.
"Tiubharfaidh mé déirce dhuit agus do pháigh," ar sise, "má fhanann tú agam go tráthnóna agus congnamh a thabhairt dom. Tá séisear fear ag obair ag mo mhac agus tá cinnt orm freastal a dhéanamh dóibh."
Dubhairt an bhean óg go raibh a cuid éadaigh ró-shalach le dhul ag déanamh an mhaistreadh. Thug an bhean éadach glan dí. Tháinig na fir isteach chuig i ndinnéar ach níor airigh ceachtar aca í. Sa tráthnóna thug an bhean cáca mór, mioscán ime agus deich sgilleacha págh dí. D'innis an bhean óg an sgéal dá máthair agus dubhairt sise 'nois nár dubhairt mise leat go mbfheárr comhairle beirte ná cómhairle duine amháin. An oidhche i n-a dhiaidh sin thug
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 10:21
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a ingean lé pósadh. Dan agus phósadar agus mhaireadar go sona.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 10:14
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Sean-bhean agus a h-inghean
Bhí sean-bhean ar an mbaile seo fadó agus bhí bean óg d'inghean aicí. Bhí siad an-tsaidhbhir agus go leor beithidheach agus caorach aca. Mar gheall ar a saidhbhreas bhí go leor fear ag iarradh na mná óige le pósadh. Bhí
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 10:08
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a chapel in Cork and only used on rare occasions. There are a good many houses having emblems of St Patrick and St Brigid in the form of crosses and are made from rushes and straw, but interwoven so nicely that they shine beautifully. perhaps nothing is so delightful to the youngsters of Ireland
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 10:07
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Long ago the people were very industrious, and they used to make their own candles, butter, baskets, nails and many other useful things. They used to have long funnels the shape of a candle and they were called moulds. First of all they put a kind of cotton thread into the middle of the mould and knot it at the end.Then they used to melt the tallow and it liquid into the mould and leave it there until it gets hard.
They used to also make baskets out of twigs in the following way: They had a frame with little holes and they put long pointed twigs into the holes and then they twisted the lighter ones around them. They continued this work until the basket was completed. Very few are making their own butter nowadays but long ago the people used to make it always and they were very fond of the buttermilk. Nail-making was also a great craft up till recently. The used to redden iron and then put it into a little shape and point it.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 10:04
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Mo chrádh agam adeir an sean duine mar an fíor dhuit sinn" "Eirge suas a inghean agus an biadh agus an deoch is fearr sa teach leag ag na fir seo é. An biadh agus an deoch is fearr a chonnaic siad ariamh leag sí cuca é.
Nuair a bhí sé sin itte acu diarfhuigh an sean-laoch cé iad fhéin agus nuair a chuala sé go bé Loinnir agus Drúcht a bhí ann deirigh sé aniar agus bhí sé chom maith leó fhéin agus diarr sé ar Loinnir fanacht indhíndigh leis agus go bfuigead se
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:55
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Every herb that grows on the land has its own particular use. All these weeds help to make medicines which we buy in the shops. Penny leaves are used to cure sore legs by boiling them with cream and oatmeal. Meachan a abha is a weed which grows near streams is a cure for boils.
"Robinhedge" is a weed which grows in open fields. The "Dog leaf" is the worst of all weeds but it is a cure for nettle sting.m "Rib Leaf" is a weed which cures corns. "Sorrel" is a weed which is used for the purpose of making dye and the colour of this was black. "Foxglove" was a weed (wa) to cure sore throat. It was also used as a medicine. Some people boil ivy leaves to remove stains from clothes. Long ago people used to eat nettles and it used to cure rheumatism. Chicken weed is found in tillage land but not so plentiful.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:53
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Necessity is the mother of invention.
Spare the rod and spoil the child.
Honesty is the best policy.
Rome was not built in a day.
Thistle seeds fly.
A rolling stone gathers no moss
The day of the wind is'nt the day of the scollob.
Better late than ever.
The early bird catches the worm.
It's an ill wind blows no one any good.
You can fool all the world some of the time, and some of the world all the time, but you can't fool all the world all the time.
After a storm there is always a calm.
The hills are green far away.
The darkest hour is before the dawn.
Empty vessels make most sound.
Get rich by honest means alone.
Too many cooks spoil the broth.
Plough deep while the sluggards sleep.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:52
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Chuaidh sé de léim tar na rásúirí Chrom sé faoí na snáthadhaí. Rinne Dúcht Uaine na rud céadhna. Ní raibh lé feiceál isthigh acu ach bean agus í ag fuagháil. Bheannuigh siad don bhean agus bheannuigh sí dhóibh. Bhí sean laoch thiar ar a leabaidh. Nuair a chuala sé an chainnt d'fiarfhuigh sé cén sórt daoine iad fhéin.
"Muise do [dhona agus do dothairna?] adeir Loinnir "is aisteadh an rud duit a dhul ag fiarfuighe dhinn-ne cén sórt daoine muid fhéin oidhhe Nodhlagh mór ha hÉireann agu gan fhios agat cén uair a bhlais muid grím bídh saoghalt
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:50
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.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:50
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An Cailín Leisgeamhail
Bhí cailín ann uair amháin agus bhí sí an-leisgeamhail. Chuaidh a máthair amach lá agus d’fhág sí cáca ar an teine agus dubhairt léi gan é fhágail ró-fhada thíos. Nuair a tháinig sí isteach ‘san tráthnóna agus í trom tuirseach fuair sí an cáca dóighte. Chuaidh sí amach lá eile agus d’fhág sí pota leite thíos agus dubhairt leis an gcailín é a mheasgadh go minic. Nuair a tháinig sí isteach an tráthnóna seo fuair sí an leite dóighte. Rug sí ar mhaide, bhuail an cailín agus chuir amach ar an tsráid ag caoineadh í. Casadh duine uasal thart agus dubhairt an mháthair gur bí féin a bhuail í mar go raibh sí ag obair ró-chruaidh. Dubhairt an duine uasal go bpósfadh sé féin í agus thug sé leis í agus dubhairt go raibh sí go han-mhaith. Tugadh cuid mhaith olna dí agus dubhradh léi a chárdáil sa sgioból. Chuaidh sí
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:49
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amach agus ní raibh fhios aici céard a b’fhearr dí a dhéanamh. Tháinig bean mhór chuicí agus dubhairt sí go ndéanfadh sí dí é dá dtugadh sí an bhainfheis dí. Chárdáil sí dí é agus cheap an duine uasal agus a mhuinntear gur bí féin a rinne é. Phós sí féin agus an duine uasal agus bhí saoghal maith aca i n-a dhiaidh sin.
Áine Ní Sheóighe, Driseachán, Co. na Gaillimhe. Aois 14 bliain
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:48
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Wilfull wast makes woefull want.
A friend in need is a friend indeed.
Keep a firm grip or your home steads.
Large ships may venture far, but little boats should keep near shore.
Far away cows have long horns.
Handsome is who handsome does.
Beauty wouldn't boil the pot.
Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy and wise, late to bed and late to rise makes a man beg before he dies.
Every man has his price.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:45
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An Cailín Leisgeamhail
Bhí cailín ann uair amháin agus bhí sí an-leisgeamhail. Chuaidh a máthair amach lá agus d’fhág sí cáca ar an teine agus dubhairt léi gan é fhágail ró-fhada thíos. Nuair a tháinig sí isteach ‘san tráthnóna agus í trom tuirseach fuair sí an cáca dóighte. Chuaidh sí amach lá eile agus d’fhág sí pota leite thíos agus dubhairt leis an gcailín é a mheasgadh go minic. Nuair a tháinig sí isteach an tráthnóna seo fuair sí an leite dóighte. Rug sí ar mhaide, bhuail an cailín agus chuir amach ar an tsráid ag caoineadh í. Casadh duine uasal thart agus dubhairt an mháthair gur bí féin a bhuail í mar go raibh sí ag obair ró-chruaidh. Dubhairt an duine uasal go bpósfadh sé féin í agus thug sé leis í agus dubhairt go raibh sí go han-mhaith. Tugadh cuid mhaith olna dí agus dubhradh léi a chárdáil sa sgioból. Chuaidh sí
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:43
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A penny wise and a pound foolish.
A burnt child dreads the fire.
A thing of beauty is a joy for ever.
A half a loaf is better than no bread.
Young a gambler, old a beggar.
Every cloud has a silver lining.
Look before you leap.
One good turn deserves another.
Cleanliness is next to Godliness.
Better ware shoes than sheets.
Hard upon hard makes a bad stone wall, but soft upon soft makes none atall.
For the want of the nail the shoe was lost.
For the want of the shoe the horse the shoe was lost.
For the want of the hore the rider was lost.
Children and fools, they shouldn't handle edge tools.
Bachelor's wives and maiden's children are well trained.
Necessity does everything well
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:37
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Long ago the people lived mostly on oat meal bread. First they would get a vessel and fill it with oat meal.
Then they'd get hot water and put it on it and mix. Then they would take it out on the table and flaten it and place it on the bread iron before the fire. Some people made what was called boxty by pealing and grating the raw potatoes then they were wrung through a cloth and put in a basin. It was mixed with flour also and was quiet dark when baked. It was good bread and those who used it were strong and healthy. Others made potato cakes which were made by pounding boiled potatoes this was mixed with flour and was quiet white when baked. It was thought to be very good and was without soda. Another great favourate was the oat cake. The oat meal bread was good for the. It was baked standing up to the fire.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:24
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long ago the people used spades. Long ago the spades were made locally by a blacksmith named Jim Mansfield. Before the potatoes are sown they are cut into halves or sometimes quarters each piece having an eye. These pieces are rubbed with lime. The local people do not help each other in sowing the potatoes. In the summer months when the stalks are well over the ground they take the clay from them they flag them they weed them and then they put the earth back again and then they spray them. There are various kinds of potatoes in my district such as the Kerr-Pinks, Champions, Sutton Abundance, and the Scotch Champions. The Kerr-Pinks are the best eating potatoes in my district. Potatoes were used as starch
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:23
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The herbs, and weeds most commonly found in this district are the thistle, and the rush. The thistle is supposed to grow only in good land, and the rush in bad wet land. there is a weed called "Prusocuibhe" also found in this district, and it spreads rapidly, and in this way it is very harmful to any crop which may be growing in the same field.
There is a very poisonous herb growing in some wet places called bainián. This is a very deadly herb to anything that eats it, and it is sometimes used for a very bad purpose that is for killing fish in the rivers. The way it is used is:- The roots are put into a bag, and crushed between two stones, and the juice that comes out of it is very poisonous. It was often heard that people using this weed burn their face with it, that is if they rubbed their hands to their faces after using it.
People used eat the following herbs, the water cress which is found growing near a spring, the nettle, and delisk which is got in the ocean. Bloodweed is also found in this district, and its colour is yellow with red spots. It is said that the reason these spots are in it is:- When Our Saviour was dying on the cross this plant was growing under it, and some of His Blood fell upon it.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:17
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6th Centruy Church at Gallen
Details of Findings. page 1.
The efforts of thirty men excavating the grounds of Gallen Priory, Ferbane, in an attempt to trace the site of the 6th cen. Monastery of St. Cynock, have laid bare the remains of a rectangular sepulchural slabs.
Mr. T.D. Kendrick Assistant Director of the British Museum is in charge, with Prof. Thomas OCleirigh, M. A. Assistant Art and Historical Department National Museum Dublin. Prof. Mc. Allister, M.A. who visited the site accompanied by Mr. T.H. Mason, says the excavation adds a new chapter to the history of early Christian Calling Art. Mr. T. O'Deirg, T.D. Minister for Education; Mr. H. Flinn, T.D., Mrs. J. Plunkett and Mr. Leask are among many who visited Gallen during the past few days.
In the Priory ground's a small Museum to house all objects found, will be erected. Dr. Brew. Harvard University is superintending exploration works at Lagore Bog, near Dunshaughlin, on which 45 men are employed.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:14
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Long ago the Mass was offered in a lonely place in Clonascra in the parish of Ballinahoun. Clonascra was formally part of the parish of Clonmacnoise. There were people watching for if their enemies came they would be slain both priest and people. It was common in those days to say mass in lonely places. In those days priests were obliged to travel on a horse. Priest were not very plentiful in those days.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:12
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There is an old graveyard in Glebe Co Offaly called Mullagh-Killeen in which infants that are still born are buried. It is used up to this day. It is square in shape and the entrance to it is facing the East. There are ruins in it of a church.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:11
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I hear this story from my uncle Martin Murphy. Between Mr Joe Egans of Fadden More and Mr Kieran Claffeys of Fadden More there lies the ruins of an old castle.
In this old castle
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:10
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It is the firm belief of the residents of Clonfanlough that buried deep in the ancient Lough of Clonfanlough lies a chest of gold. Tradition tells that it is guarded by a black cat of unusual size. For the simple reason that to obtain this treasure two lives are to be lost none of the people of that district ever attempted to seek for it. Long ago two women believed to be witches attempted
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:05
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What tree does a rabbit sit under when its raining?
(Answer) A wet tree
The more you take the more you leave behind you
(Answer) Footsteps
As I sat in my Grandfather's window, I fell in, what did I fall against?
(Answer) My will
Spell sweet in three letter
(Answer) a nut
What is full, and holds more?
(Answer) A pot of potatoes, when you pour water in.
Spell red rogue in three letters
(Answer) Fox
As round as an apple,
Ad deep as a cup,
And all the kings horses,
Are not able to pull it up.
(Answer) A well.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 09:02
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A jumper of ditches
A cropper of thorns
A tiny little fellow
With two leather horns?
(Answer):- A rabbit.
What is the difference between a hearth rug and a bottle of medicine?
(Answer):- One is taken up and shaken. The other is shaken up and taken.
What is it when you pull its tail its nose will bleed?
(Answer) A pump
Patch upon patch without any stitches
Riddle me that, and I will buy you a pair of breeches?
(Answer):-A head of cabbage
Long legs, short thighs
Little head, and no eyes.
(Answer):- A tongs
What is it, that its neck is never full?
(Answer):- A chimney.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:59
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What goes up a stairs with its head down?
(Answer):- A nail in a man's boot.
Where did Noah strike the first nail?
(Answer):- On the head.
What smells most in a Chemist's shop.
(Answer):- The nose
What is the biggest wonder in the Continent of Europe.
(Answer):- That Hungary does not eat Turkey
What is the difference between a hill and a pill?
(Answer):- One is hard to get up, and the other is hard to get down.
London, Derry, Cork and Kerry
Spell me that without a (K)?
(Answer):- That
A house full of people and still not a single person in it. (Answer):- They were all married.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:57
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make one wheel a day.
Pat Carroll, Drumass, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. He was famous for wheel making.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:54
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Thomas Hoey, Drumass Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. He could
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:54
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What nation does a criminal dread most?
(Answer):- Condemnation/
What would you fill a barrell with to make it lighter?
(Answer):- Holes
Why is milk like dancing?
(Answer):- Because it strengthens the calves.
Over the head, and under the hat, whats that.
(Answer):- The hair of the head.
Black as ink, as white as milk, and hops on the road like hailstones.
(Answer):- A magpie
How's that a cow looks over the ditch.
(Answer):- Because she can't look under it.
A long legged father and a big bellied mother, and three little children like one another. (Answer):- A pot.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:52
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Pat Myers, Drumkeith, Co. Louth, was a good rope maker. He could make six ropes a day.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:50
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Mickey Meegan, Ballyrush, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, was a good thatcher.
Jack Hoey, Treagh, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, was a good thatcher.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:45
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Mickey Meegan, Ballyrush, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, was a good thatcher.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:43
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Nicholas Hardy, Dunmahon, Knockbridge, Dundalk, was a good plough - maker. He could make one plough a day and paint it.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:37
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Mat Rice, Dundalk, was a good plough - maker. He could make two ploughs a day and paint them.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:28
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Paddy Sholder, Gorteen, Inniskeen, Co. Louth, was a good spade maker. He used to earn his living at spade making.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:25
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Thomas Duffy, Caracloughan, Inniskeen, Co. Louth, was a good basket maker. He could make baskets out of "sally" rods.
Barney Duffy, Caracloughan, Inniskeen, Co. Louth, was a good basket maker. He could make ten baskets a day out of "sally" rods.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:17
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Michael Grant, Drumass, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, was a good candle maker. He used to make forty candles a day.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:14
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Joe Grant, Kednaminsha, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, could make all sorts of ploughs. My grandfather has one of them still at home.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:09
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Thomas O'Reilly, Castlering, Co. Louth, was a first class gate maker. He made wooden gates at that time, and sold them to the whole district.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:05
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A man named John Duffy, Channonrock, Co. Louth, could make twenty spades a day. The spades at that time, were not as good as the spades that are made now.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 08:01
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A man named James Duffy Dundalk, Co. Louth was a renowned wheel maker. My Father used to buy them from him.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 07:58
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A man named Owen Duffy of Stonetown, Co. Louth, was a great thatcher. He thatched one side of a house, twenty nine feet long and sixteen feet wide in too days.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 07:53
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Jack Mc Geough who lived in Stonetown, Co. Louth, could make baskets from sally rods.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 07:51
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Pat Verdon, Castlering, Co. Louth, was renowned for rope making.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 07:44
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Edward Kelly, Mullacrew, Co. Louth was famous for making churns and he also made barrels.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 07:42
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Joe Coleman, Dundalk, Co. Louth, was a great man for Tanning leather.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 07:40
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Peter Ward who lived in Channonrock, Co. Louth, could make any class of nails.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 07:38
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James Mc alroy, Topriss, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. He was famous for wheel making. He could make four wheels in one day.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 07:35
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Patrick Meegan, Treagh, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. He was famous for spade making. He could make twelve spades in one day.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:37
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Long ago the Irish chieftains were casting a great stone on the sand hills of Ballybunion. Fionn Mac Cumhail being present took the stone and threw it into the sea, but the other chieftains were not
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:35
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pleased because they could not measure the distance he threw the stone and they got another stone.
They told Fionn to throw the stone in such a way that it would not go into the sea. But Fionn seeing that the stone was too large he would not cast the stone at all but he promised to come to the place on a certain day and that he would bring a nice stone for casting. Fionn did not come on the
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:32
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appointed day but he came a few days after with the stone and the other chieftains were vexed with him.
Fionn in order to stop the vexation of the chieftains threw the stone and it rested in Lisroe. Now the other chieftains were ashamed that they were not as strong as Fionn, and this is how Fionn was looked upon to be so strong.
This stone is to be seen today here in Lisroe. Its width is a half foot and
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:28
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What is it that no one wishes for, and yet when he has it does not wish to lose it? A bald head.
What turns without moving? Milk turns sour.
It is up high, it is as red as
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:27
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red blood, it is as white as milk and it is as sweet as honey? An apple.
It is the shape of your head and it is as long as one hundred trees put together? A ball of thread.
As I went up a bothrin I saw a thing and it was neither fish, flesh nor bone and three weeks after it walked into the house? A hatching egg.
A white featherless bird came down from Paradise and perched on the walls of Paris? Snow.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:23
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It is in the shop and it is not sold, it is in the meadow and it is not cut, and it is in the river and it is not drowned? The sun.
A busy mother, a lazy old father, twelve little children and they all the same colour? The clock.
Why does a cow look over a ditch? Because she can't look under it.
What part of a cow goes over a ditch first? Her breath.
Why does a hen pick a pot? Because she can't lick it.
When would you expect to find a ship very clean? When it leaves
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:18
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There lived in Coolanelig, Co Kerry a great hero. This hero's name was Sean Burns and he was noted for being a great strong man. Some people say he was the strongest man in Ireland.
One day Sean and two men from Derrindaffe namely John Cronin and Willie Kirby went to the lime kilns of Ballintocher with three cars for lime. There were a great many
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:16
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men with cars waiting for their turn to get lime before them. The two men of Derrindaffe thought they could not get any lime that day with the crowd and they told Sean to come away home with them. But Sean said nothing only took the horse from under the car. Then he went under the car and walked through the crowd with the car on his back until he came in front of all the cars and then he said where is the man that can take it
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:13
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out now. All the men were now afraid of Sean so that he also brought the other two horses and cars through the crowd as well.
Sean Burns went to Tarbert one day with a load of oats to sell it and on his way he met a batch of men who knew him, they waited until he was coming home to beat him. But when he was coming home he saw them waiting for him he stood up in the car and he caught hold of the side lace and pulled it through bolts
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:09
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Long ago the old people used to make candles with tallow. Old cows were fattened and their flesh eaten. When the cow was very fat they would kill her and they would get a big peck of tallow
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:08
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and all and they ran in all directions with the fright.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:07
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from her.
They would then heat the tallow in a pot. Then they would get short sticks about six inches long and they would fasten strong threads about an inch apart fastening altogether seven threads on to each stick.
Then they would catch the stick and dip the hanging cords into the pot of tallow, a little bit of tallow would then stick on each of the seven cords and they would put away
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:04
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that stick and do the same to another stick until all the sticks are dipped into the tallow. Then they would start again at the first stick and so on until they come again to the last stick, and they would keep dipping the cords until there is a big lot of tallow around them. Then the candles are made and the people hang all the candles up on a crook to harden.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 06:02
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About thirty three years ago in the month of February, a great storm arose in the night and it carried the roof of a cowhouse the property of Pat Kirby of Derrindaffe. The sheets of iron did great damage, the first damage it did was to break a window in the school of Derrindaffe. Some of the tin was taken as far as Lacca and more of it was blown three or four fields away and the tin was so battered that no use
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 05:58
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Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday the best day of all,
Thursday for crosses
Friday for losses
Saturday no luck at all.
At that time people were very fond of feasting at marriages.
When a married couple were returning from the chapel the men with horses used to have a great race home to see who would be at the house first. All the people used to have sidecars at that time and it was no surprise to see about thirty sidecars coming from
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 05:55
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the wedding.
Strawboys were very common at weddings long ago and they used to get plenty drink.
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 00:10
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Dubairt fear as Acaill liom ná bí gan céill,
Na bí ag gol na ag éagcaoin 'n diaid Col na Bing,
Béurfad bean agus dhá chéad bó dhuit,
Agus acra múinéár i agaidh gach ceann,
Silim fhéin gur fearr an méid sin,
Ná bheith ag gol na a éagcaoin 'n diaidh Col na Bing

Dá dtiubhrfá bean agus trí chéad bó dom,
Agus trí acra muinéar in agaidh chinn,
B'fearr liom acra den bogach bháidhte,
Atá idir róad agus innsin drian,
Agus cad rinnc 'ndiaidh cailíní la saoire is Dómhnaigh
Ar fud na ngróbhanaí seo Cúl na Bing

Tá litir sgríobhtha in mo phóca,
Le chur Dia Dómhnaigh le Chúl Bing,
Go bhfuil mé in mo luighe le bliadan is ráithe,
Le aicid bháis agus tinneas cinn
Mar bhfhuighid mé fóirthín ó Rí na Grásta
Ná mo shláinte bheith mar is cóir
Gléasaidh tomba agus Cúnrach Plár dom,
Agus sínídh amárach dom i mbun Sliabh Mór

Dá mbéidh fhios ag búachaillí dá bfuil san áit seo
Go bhfuil mé ag éagcaoin mo luighe tinn
senior member (history)
2020-01-24 00:10
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awaiting decision
Tiocfad siadsan agam fhéinse,
Le acraí gléasta agus coastaí cinn,
Gléasfhaidhe bainnis agus féasta,
Agus do gach aon fhear ghá slotadh ag ól,
Go gcurfinn chéad fear ar meisc in aoineacht,
I dteach Tom Dalyl le féan is beor.

Collected from:-

Patrick Mulhern,
Byhalla,
Attymass
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 22:56
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Joyce connects this with Ciabhach applied to a marshy place with long grass. There surely is a marshy place in Kivvy adjoining the townland of Drumsilla. There is a bog there in which long grass grows and water collects to such an extent that the main road 9Carrigallen to Killeshandra) is often flooded to such an extent as to be impassable for pedestrians.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 22:47
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Ordnance Survey maps. To the east of the hill the land slopes away gently. The tradition is that two Kings fought a single combat here in the distant past. The terms of the combat were arranged on the top of Mullach an Dá Rí and the combat took place in the lower plain to the East of the hill.
In the townland are also "The King's Well" and "The King's Grave". The latter is probably a Druids' Altar as it is on the side of a hill farther to the North and facing eastwards. Tradition does not say who the Kings were.
From earliest times, tradition says, Cloncorick was the residence of a King or Prince. It has always been connected with the O'Rorkes', Princes of Breffney. Woodford Castle - now in ruins - was the principal residence of the O'Rorkes' up to the 13th Century when the division into East and West Breffney was made - Breffney O Rorke and Breffney O'Reilly. Woodford is to the North East of Newtowngore about 7 miles from Cloncorick and the ruined castle is on the lands of people named Maguire. These lands formerly belonged to Gore (a planter) and hence "Newtowngore". They afterwards were owned by people named Upperton (English stock) but at present the Gael is again in possession. Between Concorick and
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 22:37
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PLACE NAMES (Contd.) :-
The townlands in the school area are Aughawillan, Bredagh, Calloughs, Cloncorick, Corglass, Cloughea, Cornaughy, Drumsilla, Drumcannon, Kilbracken, Killahurk and Kivvy.

AUGHAWILLAN
"Achadh an Mhuilinn" "The field of the Mill". There is still a corn mill in the Townland and tradition says the place was never without one.

BREDAGH
"Bréadach" a breach, a cut, a narrow glen. This is one of the Townlands in which the village is situated. The south side of Main St. and the whole of Church St. are in Bredagh. The narrow glen is on the south side of the village. A small stream flows through it from Carrigallen Lough to Gangin Lough.

CALLOUGHS
"Ceallacaigh" "church lands" "Ceall" Church
There is a slight tradition that a monastery existed here in the dim distant past, but even the oldest person can give no details.

CLONCORICK
"Cluain Comhraic" "The meadow of the Single Combat". This is the second of the townlands in which the village is situated, the whole of the North side of Main St. being in it. Dominating the village on the North side is a high hill, called by the older generation "Mullinadaree" = "Mullach an Dá Rí" the hill of the two Kings (evidently "Dá here is = Beirt). The hill is so marked on the
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 22:37
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Máire Ní Sheibhlin - páiste scoile a bhíodh ar scoil na [Breacad??] Árd a' Rath tuairim 1925, a d'aithris seo dom mar chualaidh sise é ag Bean Phaidí Uí Dhomhnail as a Scadamann baile i gceanntar na scoile.
Tá Bean Paidí 'nois marbh
S Ó Caiside
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 22:12
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The old people had many cures which are not used at the present day. The dog leave was a cure for nettle burns, and the rib leave was a cure for headaches. The food left after a ferret was a cure for measles. Sugar and soap was a cure for boils or skin trouble. The rib-leave was also a cure for corns. When people have a sore throat they put a stocking around it in the night and the pain was supposed to be cure in the morning.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 22:02
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The old people had many remedies for curing their ailments, and I will now tell you a few of them which I heard. For instance if a child had the thrush they used the ganders breath. When a person had a sore hand or a sore leg, they used bread steeped in water for healing it, and when a child had the whooping cough, they used cross it nine times under a donkey.
The water that was used for cooling the iron in a forge was used for removing warts, and parraffin oil was used for healing cuts, and burns.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 22:02
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The curlew is a grey bird. She has a long beak about two inches long. She builds her nest in the bog. She lays four eggs. The eggs are green with brown dots. She makes the nest out of keeb. The curlew hatches four weeks on the eggs.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 22:00
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rejected
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Irishman said, "Is he my father as well as yours." "Oh yes, we're all one brethern". The Irishman said the Lord's Prayer again, and this time wright.
The minister put his hand in his pocket, and gave him a shilling, and told his servant to give him a four pound loaf. "And if you forget it within a week come back to me and I'll learn you again."
Then the Irishman left the house roaring "The Lord's Prayer like a devil: But after all the Irishman knew it better than the Minister When this was finished I asked if it were true, and when it happened. The man answered my last question first, and said, "It happened in the year 1872 over 66 years ago, and
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:55
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moreover, I can guarantee, it is quiet true, so I left my story-teller, with a consciousness I had got a good story on that night.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:51
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There are a number of wild animals on the mountains here namely the rabbit, the hare, the fox, the badger, the goat, and the lizard. The rabbits make burrows with moss and straw. The hares make their nests in the long grass. And the fox makes his nest under the big rocks and it is called a den. The badger makes his nest in the dry banks. The goat sleeps in cliffs and rocks. And the lizard makes his nest in the
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:50
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Máire Ní Sheibhlin - páiste scoile a bhíodh ar scoil na [Breacad??] Árd a' Rath tuairim 1925, a d'aithris seo dom mar chualaidh sise é ag bean Phaidí Uí Dhomhnail as a [Scadamarn??] baiel i gceanntar na scoile.
Tá bean Paidí 'nois marbh
S Ó Caiside
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:50
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Measles:- Boil the leaves and roots of nettles in milk and give to drink to the person who has the measles.
Warts:- If one could find water resting on a rock one should wash the wart nine times with this water and say each time "rock-water, rock-water it isnt you I want but your cure for my wart."
Toothache:- Write "toothache go away" on three slips of paper and stick the three slips in three mearing walls until some rats take them away and then the pain will go.
Headache:- Go to a well from which there is water runing and look at yourself in that water and the headache will go.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:49
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On my fathers farm there are a number of fields there is the white garden; it got this name because white stuff like grass grows on it. In my fathers farm also there is the black garden it was given this name because it is almost covered with black bog. There is another one called the round garden it was given this name because there is a big fence all around it.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:46
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We have one big field called "Garraudh Pheadair". It is not known who this man was but the was supposed to be a foreigner. We have another field called "Garraidh Bán or the white garden.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:44
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Mmeasles:- Boil the leaves and roots of nettles in milk and give to drink to the person who has the measles.
Warts:- If one could find water resting on a rock one should wash the wart nine times with this water and say each time "rock-water, rock-water it isnt you I want but your cure for my wart."
Toothache:- Write "toothache go away" on three slips of paper and stick the three slips in three mearing walls until some rats take them away and then the pain will go.
Heacache:- Go to a well from which there is water runing and look at yourself in that water and the headache will go.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
[-]
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Mol Dubh a' Ghleanna
Siúd thall é mo theach nífhuil díon air nó sgraith
'S é déanta ar thaoibh a' bhóthair
Nuair a chríonas an t-slat ní bhíonn uirthi meas
Mar a bhíos ar na crannaibh óga
Nach [ladhach? lag?] críonna í an bheach nuair a ghnidh sí a nead le gréin agus le teas an Fhóghmhair
Ní críona í ná an fear a bhréagas a bhean
Nuair a gheobhaidh sé í i dtús a hóige
II
Tá ba breaca 'gam ar shliabh gan a'n duine le bheith na ndiaidh
Ach mise do mo threorughadh leobhtha
Tá fhios ag an t-saoghal nach ortha atá mo thnúth
Cé gur bhain siad mo chiall go mór damh
Mise bheith liom féin feasta coichche ní bheidh
Anois i dtús mo óige
'S gur fann guth gach éin tráth labhras sé leis fhéin
Ar mhalaidh ná ar thaoibh na mónadh
III
I cruaidhe é ná an steel mo chuid-se de mhnáibh an tsaoghail
Is charraic atá ann do chroidhe a dheigh bhean
Nuair nach dtuigeann tú an taobh de cholbhadh na leabtha a mbím
Is páirt de mo dhubh-bhróin d’éisteacht
Cúl na láimhe is gile na cúig méar’ is faide
Do dhá shúil gorma gile-geala
Nuair a théidheas an bhean dubh a mach
Caillfeadh an grian a teas
‘S tig smúid ar an ghealaigh le náire
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:37
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mhaith leis an bhuachaill sin a dheanamh, acht fá dheireadh rinn sé é. Nuair a ghearr sé na chosa agus an ruball dé d’athruig sé ina fhear, dhearbrathair dón chailín a bhí ann.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:36
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rejected
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a bháile. Chuaidh siad fhad leis an rí. “Rinn muid obair mhaith arsa siad san. Níor labhair an cailín. Bhí sí i gcomhnuidhe ag caoineadh. Níor ithe an capaill bhí sé igcomhnuidhe ag deanamh tormán. Níor ceoil an éan. Ní rabh phios ag an rí caidé a bhí mí ceart. Tháinig an madadh ruadh tart, tharraingt sé an buachaill amach as an thobar. Dubhairt sé leis go rabh fear bocht in áit eighin. “gabh tusa go dtí an sean duine” agus dubhairt sé leis “eadaigh an tsean duine a chuir ar féin. Dubhairt sé leis a eadaigh féin a tabhairt dón sean duine. Rinn sé seo. Dubhairt sé leis a ghabhail go dtí an caislean. Chuaidh an buachaill go dtí an caislean. Chuaidh sé go dtí an doras. Nuair a bhí sé ag an doras, thoisigh an t-ein ag gabhail cheoil, thoisigh an capaill ag ithe, stád an cailín ag caoineadh. Ní fhios ag an rí cáidhe a bhí cearr. Chuaidh an cailín go dtí an doras, thoisigh an beirt ag craitheadh lamh. Tháinig an buachaill isteach, agus d’innis sé an sgeal dón rí. Bhí an athas air. Phos an cailín agus an buachall. Lá ‘mháin bhí an buachaill ins an choill, chasadh an madadh ruadh air arais. Dubhairt sé leis a chosa agus a ruball a ghearradh dé. Níor
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:35
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rejected
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ar lorg an cailín. Casadh an madadh ruadh dubhairt sé go dtabharfadh seisean é go dtí caislean, béidh ingean an gharaidhe. Tugh an madadh ruadh é go dtí an caislean. Chuaidh sé isteach san gharaidhe. Bhí an cailín annsin. Bhí an rí ag amharc amach an fhuinneoig. Tháinig an rí annsin, dubhairt an rí go gcrocfadh sé e muna bheadh an obair seo deanta i seacht lá. Tá carraich suas giota ón caislean seo. Chaithfidh sin abheith deanta agat sul abhfuigheadh tú a cailín. Chuaidh sé go dtí an carraigh agus thoisigh sé ag obair. Nuair a bhí an seiseadh lá caitthe ní rabh mórán obair deanta aige. Tháinig an madadh ruadh. “Suidhe Síos” arsa madadh ruadh. “Tá tú tuirseach” rinn sé sin. Nuair a bhí sé tamaill in a codladh mhuisgail sé bhí an obair go léir deanta ag an mhadadh ruadh. Bhí an athas air. Chuaidh sé go dtí an rí, “Tá an obair deanta agam anois. Maith go leor”, arsa an rí. Fuair sé an cailín annsin. Chuaidh siad go dtí an caislean arabh an capall óir ann. Rinn siad an rúd ceart an uair seo. Fuair siad an capall, agus chuaidh sé féin agus an cailín ag marcaidheacht ar an chapall óir go dtí an caislean a rabh a t-éan ór ann. Fuair siad an tean fosta. Bhí a dhá dearbrathair annsin. Fuair siad greim ar an bhuachaill, agus caith siad isteach i dtobar an domhain. Síl siad san go rabh uisge ins an tobar acht ní rabh. Chuaidh an bheirt
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:34
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“caithfidh tusa an t-éin sin a fhaghail”. D’imthigh an mac leis. Chuaidh sé fríd coill, agus casadh madadh ruadh air, dubhairt an madadh ruadh leis a gabhail ar a dhruim agus go dtabaradh seisean é go dtí chaislean agus go mbéadh éin ann mbeadh d-at buidhe ar dubhairt sé go mbeadh dá chasa ann. Bheidh ceann amháin aca deanta d’óir. Bheidh an ceann éile deanta dé admad dubhairt an madadh ruadh leis. “Tabhairt leat an casa a béas deanta dé adhmadh. Tá an éin ins an ceann”. Chuaidh an buachaill isteach. Cónnaic sé an chasa óir bhí an bhron air. Bhí sé ag gabhail a chuir an éan isteach ins an chasa óir, acht thoisigh sé ag gabhail cheoil. Tháinig an ríog annsin, dubhairt sé leis go leigheadh seisean ar shiubhail é dhá bhfuigheadh sé an capall óir. Chuaidh an buachaill ar siubhail. Chasadh an madadh ruadh air. Dubhairt sé go dtabairadh seisean é go dtí caislean agus go mbeadh capaill óir ann. Beidh diallaidh óir ins an stabla. Béidh ceann eile deanta de adhmadh. Dubhairt an madadh ruadh leis an ceann admaidh a thabhairt leis. Chuaidh an buachaill go dtí an caislean. Chonnaic sé an capall óir, agus chuir sé an diallaidh óir ar an chapall thoisigh sé ag deanamh torman. Chualaidh an rí an glór chuir sé amach a-rm. Thainig an rí amach, dubhairt an rí go gcrocfadh é muna bhfuigheadh sé inghean an rí. Chuaidh an buachaill ar
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:33
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Bhí ríogh ann aon uair a mháin. Bhí tríur mhach aige. Bhí cheann amháin dhá bhliadain déag, bhí ceann deic mbliadhna, bhí ceann eile ocht mbliadhain. Bhí garraidh ag an rí, agus bhí crann ann a rabh ubhlaí ór air. Bíodh da h-ubhallaí seo cunntaisuighthe gach bhliadhain. Bhí siad cunntasuighthe an lá seo agus bhí ceann aca caillte. Dubhairt an rí go gcaithfeadh an mac a ba sine suidhe an oidhche seo leis na h-ubhlaí a coimeadh. Nuair a tháinig an mheadhon oidhche thuit sé ina codladh agus chuaidh sé fhad leis an rí. Dubhairt sé leis nach bfacaidh sé rúd ar bith. “Tá ceann aca ar shiubhal indiu arais” bhí rud eiginteacht ann. Bhí an fhearg ar an mhac, agus d’imthigh sé leis. Nuair a tháinig an oidhche, dubhairt an buachaill a bhí deich mbliadhna go suidheadh seisean an oidhche seo. Rinn sé an rúd ceadna cosamhail leis an cead buachaill chuaidh seisean ar shiubhal fosta. Dubhairt an buachaill a bhí ocht mbliadhain go suidheadh seisean. Shíl an rí go sé ró óg, acht shuidhe sé go maidín. Nuair a táinig an mheadhon oidhche, chualaidh sé tormán ins an aer, léim sé ina sheasamh. Connaic sé éin, bhí cluimhreach buidhe uirthí. Chaith sé cloch, agus thuit ceann dén a cleiteacha go dtí am talamh. Chuaidh sise go dtí an rí dubhairt sé go bhfacaidh sé ean, agus seo ceann dén na cleitheacha
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:25
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Eolas ag bainnt leis an Sgoil in Gortin Iubhair a bailigheadh ág Séamus De Bruin ón a athair Tomás De Bruin.

There were about 60 pupils in constant attendance of Mullacbrock National School. They wrote on slates with slate pencils. It was a dwelling house owned by Gustavus Dobson before it was turned into a school. When Gustavus Dobson died my Grandfather James Browne bought his land and he gave it for a school. Matt Cashin Drumhirk and Mrs Cunningham taught there. There is a lane leading to it from the road. The inspector came once a year and held an examination. When it was over the master sent for a creel of apples to John Reynolds Cloonee and they would run races until the apples would be all gone.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:19
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Suideamh Ceart na Sgoile Seo

4 1/4 míle thoir ó Maothail 3 mile ó dheas ó Cluan. In Gort an Uibhair ar an dtaobh cle de'n bhóthar ón gcros bóthair i Mul na Drumna go Cluan.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 21:17
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An Sgoil a bhí í Drum Caol Buidhe

There is an old moodwall tatched school on the right hand side of the road from Mohill to Cloone. The roof has fallen off and the walls are crumbling but some years ago it was in a better condition than at present. I have enquired with Mr Patrick Donnelly about it and he knows nothing about the teachers or the method of teaching. There are few older people who could tell anything about it.
Séamus Browne Gortinure tells that the pupils wrote on slates with slate pencils. Master Mitchell of Drumkeilvy was teaching in it. He lived in part of the school.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 20:56
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it.
The first goose is killed on Michaelmas day
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 20:56
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Farmers considered Mondays unlucky days for ploughing long ago.
On Saint Brigid's night people used dress up and go around from house to house.
The time for setting the potatoes is between Saint Patrick's day and the twenty-fifth of March. Any oats that was not in before the first of May was called cuckoo oats.
There was a fairy cow who used to sleep in Glenabo and this cow was very boastful. March came and it was very cold and she had no grass to eat. When March was over she went out looking for new grass but March borrowed a day from April. When she went out she saw green grass in the middle of a bog and she went out for it and got drowned in her attempts to get
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 20:45
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Humpty, dumpty sat on a wall
Humpty, dumpty got a great fall
All the kings horses, and all the kings men
Are not able to put humpty, dumpty together again.
(Answer) An egg.
A basket of eggs cost so much, what would a load of turf come to?
(Answer) Ashes.
What fish cannot swim?
(Answer) A dead one.
How are burglars like railway trains?
(Answer) Because they remove other peoples goods, without disturbing the sleepers.
On which side of a jug is the handle?
(Answer) On the outside
When is a fish like a bird?
(Answer) When it rises to take a fly.
Which house is never dark?
(Answer) The lighthouse
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 20:38
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What is it that is not in or out?
(Answer) A window
What insect does the blacksmith make
(Answer) The fire-fly
Why is there not such a thing as one while day?
(Answer) Ever days begins by breaking
The fiddler and his wife, and the piper and his mother. How would you divide three whole cakes between them, and have no broken bread.
(Answer) The fiddler's wife was the piper's mother, so each got a cake.
Pray tell me this answer I beg,
It has a broad foot, but no sign of a leg
(Answer) A hill.
Why is a (full moon) half moon heavier than a full moon.
(Answer) Because a full moon is lighter than a half moon.
I, am neither beast nor fowl although I
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 20:33
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have legs.
Laid fresh daily although I am not eggs
I am neither trees nor flowers.
Although I have leaves a many,
And without me for food, you might not get any.
(Answer) A table.
What bridge is seldom crossed over?
(Answer) The bridge of your nose.
What part of a cow goes out the gap first
(Answer) Her breath.
Flies high, flies low, cut the grass, but never mows.
(Answer) Wild geese.
Two black men, and one white man were out motoring. The two black men ate the white man. What was the number of the car.
(Answer) 281
What is taken from you, before you can get it?
(Answer) Your photo
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 20:28
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Luke had it before. Paul had it behind. Matthew never had it ar all. Mrs Mulligan had it twice in succession. Dr Loul had it before and behind, and it was twice, as large in the front.
(Answer):- The letter L
What words make you sick, if one letter is omitted
(Answer) (M)usic or (Q)uill
What goes up, when the rain comes down.
(Answer) An umbrella.
When up I am full, When down I am slender, Give me a pull so gentle and tender.
(Answer) A stocking.
As I went out in a field of wheat,
I found a thing that I could eat,
It was neither fish, flesh or bone.
In three weeks time, It could walk alone.
(Answer) A hen - egg.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 20:18
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Name ...............Address
Thomas OBrien , Rivers
Michael Richarstown, Killeenagariff
John " "
Michael Moloney Knock Brack
Martin Cosgrove Rich Hill
Michael Cooke Anna Murroe
Patrick Callinan Laught Lisnagry
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 20:17
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Name ...............Address
Thomas OBrien Rivers
Michael Richarstown, Killeenagariff
John " "
Michael Moponey Knock Brack
Martin Cosgrave Rich Hill
Michael Cooke Anna Murroe
Patrick Callinan Laught Lisnagry
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 20:15
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I
You sons of the shamrock now listen a while
And I'll sing a few verses that will cause you to smile
Its about our hay making and raking like wise
That tunes up our farmers and here are their cries
Crying the devil such weather came never
Tis idle to work or be clever the cure is to help one another
And Province might take our part
II
The summer being healthy and the autumn mill
And our untidy farmers the dreaded a spill
Terr Frawley being anxious to go to the sea
He invited us all to Murroe for the hay
And I'll tell you actions were charming
And so were our faction alarming
You'ld swear twas the Salvation Army
Promenading through old Garryown.
III
The morning came round woth a mist and a fog
And instead of drawing hay you wouldn't put out your dog
Our cargo was scarce sure we hadn't a grain
And says Penders to me the keep Lipton in blame
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 18:35
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A man named O' Moore lived at Cashel with his only daughter Kathleen.
One evening while he was tending his cattle he saw a man pass by riding on a black horse bedecked with foam.
Suddenly the horse reared and the rider was thrown to the ground and hurt badly.
This man was a kindhearted man and took the injured man into his house and had him medically treated.
His daughter fell in love with the stranger and during the wedding the bridegroom took his bride into another room and there he disappeared
When her father found he she was dead.
Afterwards he was seen riding past with her spirit in front of him.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 18:30
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 18:30
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There is a field in Cooraganive where unbaptised children were buried. Lights were often seen there.
There was a certain man with his wife and his two children living on his farm.
This man ploughed this field which was not the correct thing to do as any person who did it would have bad luck.
One night his wife was up late ironing clothes when a tap came to the window. She quenched the light and just then the door flung open.
She fell in a faint and when she recovered she saw a small man sitting on a chair
He said that as a punishment for what her husband did her child would die and for fifteen years the grass would remain untouched and that no crop would ever grow in that field.
It so happened that the child died and the grass remained untouched.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 18:25
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and make him hiss and the sore throat would be cured.
Ring worm:
The juice of dock roots mixed with lard. The docks were boiled and the juice taken off. It was then mixed with lard and administered as an ointment.
Yellow Jaundice:
The juice of primroses mixed with cream. The primroses were first boiled and the juice then strained off.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 18:23
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used.
Burns:
The white of an egg and a grated potato mixed with boiled cream was used as an ointment. By licking a lizard on the stomach and then rubbing your tongue to the burn it was cured. The cure on the tongue was also permanent.
For a tooth-ache:
Bite the leg off a frog from the knee down and you will never get a tooth-ache again.
Cuts:
It was the custom to rub wax over the cut to prevent any dirt entering. Also to chew rib leaf and put it on the cut.
Corns:
Hang a hedge hog over a fire and rub the juice to the corns and they are cured. Also put an ivy leaf on the corns for five nights.
Sore throat:
Put a gander under a basket for a night and in the morning put his beak into your mouth
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 18:19
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63.
When does a chair hate you?
When it cannot bear you.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 18:17
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For warts:
Every morning, for seven mornings in succession, make the sign of the Cross with Holy Water and after a while they disappear. Also, get a slug. Rub the slug to the warts, then stick the slug on a white thorn bush and according as the slug withers on the bush the warts will be wearing away, until they have gone completely. Also bleed the warts, and get a bag of stones, and put the blood on the stones, place them on the road in a paper bag and the first person who takes up the bag gets the warts. The sap of the dandelion was also used. Warts were rubbed on the dew every morning before sunrise until they disappeared.
For whooping cough:
If a child had the whooping cough place him under and over a female donkey nine times with his back downwards and he will be cured. Also ferret's milk was
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 18:16
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On the sixth of January 1839 an awful storm occurred over Ireland. The people of the country named it "The night of the big wind" because it was the worst storm ever heard of.
In the County Roscommon there was a salty crust on the walls and gates. Petrels, which are never found anywhere except on the sea were found dead everywhere in the middle of the country. The majority of the houses in the country were unroofed. There was a scarcity of crows in the country for five years after.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 18:06
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In 1917 there was a big snow storm. Farmers suffered great losses. Their sheep were smothered
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 18:03
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in the snow. The roads were covered with snow. six feet high. The men had to give their cattle hay because the grass was covered with snow.
Then the snow got frozen over, and the country people could not get to town for their provisions for one week or more, no cars or carts were able to travel on the roads.
After a while men were employed to shovel away the snow.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 17:54
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ailpín, ná bí 'cainnt, clochar, currach, turlach ceobán, cnocán, cnocnáinín, glám, glár, smiodairíní, fuar-nimh, troighthín, buailtín, colapán, doirnín, céiseog, puilleach, práiseach, múilleach, brochán breág, seoch, steall, scoilleann, croidhe na féile, marbhán, camrachán, bacach, cailleach, cailleaichín salach, béinneach, galldoighre, brusgcar, ciseán, bodach, straos, cár, clab, pus, cruit, túirne Mháire = togh tobac, liúgh,plab, cúl, cúilín, feac, gobán, giobach, cnadán, raithneach, caonach liath, fearbán, coicín a cluic, léasadh, gobán saor, gobadán.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 16:00
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Edward Mc Geough, Drumcay, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. He was famous for spade making. He could make twelve spades in one day.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:55
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Patrick Callan, Drumnagrella, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. He is famous for thatching. He thatched mostly all the houses in that area.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:49
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Edward Mc Geough, Drumcay, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. He was famous for spade making.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:45
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rejected
awaiting decision
candles. My father, Bernard Duffy, Candlefort, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, remembers her.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Agus ní binne liom cómhrádh a deanamh leat
Go héadtrom a's atá in mo ceann.

(VI)
Ach a beag go dtug mé grádh dhuit,
Gheibhean árus ó mo muinntir féin,
Ba agus caoirigh bána i mbáirc,
Le na gur cun féir,
Codladh fada Samhraidh
A's greann a beith gá déanamh leí
'Gus cead rinnce ar fud na gleannta,
Ag piocadh plannseóga le stór mo chleibh
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Bridget Duffy, Drumas, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, was famous as a maker of tallow
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
mé í troc(?) as indiu
Aithris go luat as go tapaidh
Go bhfacha tú aréir a's mé ag gol,
Má fhághann tú cómhrádh geanamail
Leigfeadh(?) orm agus beidh me istigh.

(V)
Mo lean nach bfuil mé in mo einin
Go n-éireóchainn o tom go tom
Ná in mo eascon lúbach acrac,
Ag léimnigh ó tonn go tonn.
Sgriobfainn a's léighfinn cruaidh gaedilge
Le bárr mo pinn
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:39
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
James Moore, Drumearl, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. He used to make churns. A few of the churns are to be seen yet in this district.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:36
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tuige nach dtigeann tú a ghrádh gheal,
Agus fáílte ag mo muinntir romhat,
Tuige nach dtigeann tú a gradh géal,
Agus fáilte uata uilig go leor romhat.
Agus mar a bfuil siad toilteannach sásta,
Ar an géas sin a fágháil réidh,
Sa cill seo thall atá mo árus
Ar an Phápa ní toillead é.

(IV)
Lonndubh ag gearr an acaire
Go dtí an caislean Ata ar chúl a' chrích
Agus aithris ar mo cailín deas go bhfaca
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
stuama,
Ag iomchur ualach as gá gol go trom,
Bfearr liom baint na luachra
A's ghá tuairgint go lá mo bháis,
Ná do leabh a bheith ar mo gualainn,
A' cur do tuairisc a's gan tú le fághail.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
James Moore, Drumcay, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. He used to make barrels. A few of the barrels are to be seen yet in this district.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:30
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A dhíbhir mo gradh i bhfadh uain
Agus gan dul agam teacht gá gaobhair,
Lá Isaoire ná go moch Dia Luain.
Bhíodh sé ag cuir sa díleann,
Agus an oidhche ag cuir sneachta faoi'n dtuaith,
Go mba rogha féin a bheinn ag imteacht
Go mbeainn chomh haoibhinn le eala ar an gcuan

(III)
Tuige nach dtigeann tú a ghrád gheal,
Agus fáilte ag mo mhuinntir romhat,
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Co. Monaghan, where Tommy Fitzsimons, Lannet, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan, kills the cattle now. He grew "sally" rods along the river. Some of the baskets are to be seen yet.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:25
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
O, bhí mé lá go brónach
Le mo sheoltáinín ag tóin a tíghe,
Go síorraidhe ag silt na ndeoraidhe
A's ag cómhrádh le na cailíníbh
Ní suim a bí 'na glór agam
Sé is docha gur ag magadh bhím,
Act tá mé óg go leor,
A's ní phósfaidh mé acht grádh mo chroidhe

(II)
Beannacht Rí na hAoine ar an té
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:18
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There was once a man called James Mc Gahon, Lannet, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. Long ago he made baskets out of "Sally" rods. He used to live in a little house on Toal's hill Lannet, Inniskeen,
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:09
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About twenty - four years ago there lived a man named James Callan, Ednamo, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. He used to make candles. He made twelve candles a day. They were much in use at that time in this district.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 15:04
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
two years ago there lived a man named James Mc Gahon of Mullinahinsa, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. He was the man who first made a plough in this district. It was a wooden one, and the man who worked it was his brother, John Mc Gahon. It was a good plough, and lasted many years.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Ceanntar na Sgoile
Ainmeacha Gaodhlacha - Aiteacha Bailte

Cluain - Meadow
Cluain Tuirc - (Torc) - Meadow of the Wild Boar
Cluaincluice - (cluice game) of the Games
Cluaincolraí - ( Coll - hazel )
Cluainfannon - St. Fannon
Corriscoffey - round hill

Gubagraphy - Gob a' Grafaig or Point of the Graffan - a tool
used to root up surface soil

Furnace - smealting furnaces (Sorn) in past generations
Gort - Gort - an enclosed field
Moheraven - tree cluster of the Eavens
Braenross - point of the evil smells
Ruskey - Ruaisg - marsh
Ruskey na Mona - boggy marsh
Dromod - Drom Fhada - long ridge
Drumard - Drom Árd - high ridge
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:55
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About ninety -
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:54
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
About ninety years ago there was a man named James Rhode, Ednamo, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan. He had one daughter who was always kept busy gathering rushes, and little bits of twigs, he was famous at making baskets.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
John Callan, Dundalk, Co. Louth could make barrels and churns.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:44
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Frank Byrne, Dundalk, Co. Louth could make ropes.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Drumgoolin, Co. Louth could make soap.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Druimín is anim don sgoil seo. Drimmien an litriú béarla atá ar an gcloic ar eadán na sgoile agus Drummeen an litriú atá ar léarsgáil an cheantair. Ni fios dom fe'n cad chuighe an difriocht san litriú agus tá sé deacar freisin a thuigsint cad é an fáth gur tugadh an t-ainm Druimín uirthí. Mar is i Drum Conaí ? Drumcony atá sé suidhte agus beidhfí ag suil le Sgoil Náisiúnta Drumconaí mar ainm uirthí.
Seo an mhíniú a fuair mé féin ó fear san gceanntar seo. Beidh sé gá cur isteach níos deanaighe ag dalta sgoile is doca.

Beagnach caoga bliadhan ó shoin nuair bhí an sgart pároíste ar lorg ionad nó suidheamh do'n sgoil, fuiar sé é ó Séamus Ó Coinneagáin fear go raibh comhnuidhe ann(?)
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Patrick Rochfort,
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:40
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
John Carroll, Priorstate, Co. Louth, is a good thatcher.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:37
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Tom Matthews, Mullacrew, is a good basket maker. He makes them with "sally" rods.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Dan Kelly, Artherstown is a good wheel maker.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Thosuigh an fear seo ag múineadh do roinn an oideacas san mbliadhain 1867. San sgoil i Mullach Broc a thosuigh sé. Bhí sé ag múineadh i sgoil Mullach Broc i nGort an Iubhair agus i Druimín. Le linn do bheith in a múinteóir chuaidh sé go dtí an Oilean Úr. Bhí sé in a oide catoiliceach acht thug sé dulgas an tSligne(?) do bhuachaill óg ann agus chaill sé a phost. Tháinig sé arais go hEireann(?) agus thosuig sé ag múineadh annseo airist.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Derri na Sligne is a muddy marshy lake in J. Waldron's. Loch Buidé is the yellow lake. Lochín na Geamhna(?) is the resort of wild geese in winter time. Grallach = the hurling field and Spaddagh the boggy field are both in J. Ryan's land. Shaimh Mór is a big wild field in Finan's land. Cnochan na Tochar is a hill between Finan's and T. Jordan's. Garraidh a Lion, Garraidh a Dubh, and Poul Mear (?) are T. Slaun's land. Crag na Male is in P. Carrol's land. Cnocáínin Bán is in M. Ryan's land. The black Eskir is the name of a range of hills going from Derrylahan to Cluaincan. All the above are in Derrylahan. Doireen = the bush field and Cnocánín an Diabhail(?) are in M. Smith's place in Brackloon.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:32
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Derri na Sligne is a muddy marshy lake in J. Waldron's. Loch Buidé is the yellow lake. Lochín na Geamhna(?) is the resort of wild geese in winter time. Grallach = the hurling field and Spaddagh the boggy field are both in J. Ryan's land. Shaimh Mór is a big wild field in Finan's land. Cnochan na Tochar is a hill between Finan's and T. Jordan's. Garraidh a Lion, Garraidh a Dubh, and Poul Mear () are T. Slaun's land. Crag na Male is in P. Carrol's land. Cnocáínin Bán is in M. Ryan's land. The black Eskir is the name of a range of hills going from Derrylahan to Cluaincan. All the above are in Derrylahan. Doireen = the bush field and Cnocánín an Diabhail(?) are in M. Smith's place in Brackloon.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:08
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
eaten. It is found in dry sandly soil. There is a weed called chicken weed. The old people say it was a cure for an ailment the time of the famine as the Nerve ton.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 14:07
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
is a weed called crow foot, and another called yarrow. Long ago when the men were scarce in tobbacco they'd smoke these two weeds. There is also another weed callled catakecka. It is'nt a very harmfull weed It grows about one foot high. A purple blossom comes on it every year. Fileria is a herb which grows along a river. It was often used as great medicine for Kidney disease. There is another weed called the buhalon or fairy horse. There is also another weed called the briscon. It is a plant that you can hardly see above the ground with roots like potatoes on them. These are roasted in the fire and
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:53
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a very bad weed growing in poor land called scutch. It is a grassy weed that spreads through the clay and choakes the potatoes. There
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
with bread, butter, and salt. It is very healthy for the blood. There is a weed that gtrows up with the water cress, and it is deadly poison. Mushrooms are also very healthy. You roast them and eat them with salt.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:49
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
diease. It is good for a person also. It makes an old heart young. Nettles is given to turkeys when they are getting the red head. Black heads will cure a cows cough. Robin round the hedge is a cure for Itch. Comfurry is a cure for a start or any beeling on a cows udder.
There are three sorts of thistles, the Blessed thistle, the shee thistle, and the ordinary thistle. There is a big weed called the rag weed. A yellow flower comes on it. Water cress is a very healthy plant. It grows in water. The people eat it
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:45
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A number of herbs or plants grow on some good land, such as dandelion, nettles, black heads, robin round the hedge, Comfurry. Dandelion is a most usefull herb. It is given to fowl to keep them from getting the liver
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:42
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
cure for gum-boils. Touch and heal is a cure of the burning hive. Comfurry is for pig feeding. All these herbs were used long ago.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:41
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The most harmfull weeds are nettles, cow-foot, dockens, prusha, yarrow, chickenweed, stinkenrogers, thistles, garden tormenter, scutch, redshanks, marrow gold, everon. They spread very rapidly, and cannot be killed. The herbs that are for cures are dandelion, marchmalice, blithens,ivy, lilly-root, sarral, touch and heal, hemlock, comfurry. Dandelion is a cure for a cough. Marchmalice is a cure for a swelling or a pain. Blithens is a cure for warts. Ivy is a cure for a corn on your foot. The lilly-root is a cure for boils. Sarral is a
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:31
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
it is forthcoming) because they cannot eat much bacon during Lent. On May day it is customary to make a bush, and put egg shells, and May flowers on it. On that morning people often go out early to wash their faces in the dew, so that they may have a white complexion all the year.
It is customary to rise early on Easter Sunday morning to watch the sun dancing.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:29
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
there are twelve candles lit, and one for each person in the house. On the first of May the people make crosses out of rushes. They put them over the door of the animals shed so that they won't have any sick beast during the year.
On "Hallow Eve" all the people make colcanon and whatever is left over is put on one large plate. They put spoons round the colcanon for the "Holy Souls" to eat it. The usually put a ring it its centre.
People do not throw out water on that night lest they might throw it on the "Holy Souls" who are out on that night.
On "Shrove Tuesday" the people make pancakes. On that night they fry plenty of bacon (if
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
they'd bury the wren beside the door. It is an old saying that if you don't give something to the wren-boys you won't have any luck the coming year.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The twelvth day after Christmas is called "Little Christmas". Some people keep part of everything for that day. It is said that if you give away money on that day you'll be giving it away all the year. On that night
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:20
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
it. When they are going they bring some instruments with them. When they come to the houses they sing the following song:-
"The wren the wren the king of all birds
On St. Stepens day was caught on the furze.
Although she is small and her family great
Rise up land-lady and give us a treat
Up with the kettle and down with the pan.
Coppers or silvers to bury the wren
If you haven't it in you pocket you have it in your purse.
And if you don't give it to us you'll have the wrens curse."
If they didn't give them something
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
On St. Stephens day the boys dress up in old clothes and go around with the wren. The men dress up at night and go around. When night comes the boys divide the money between them. If there's any money over they by sweets with
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:14
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
the fair with it.
If things had to be done twice they'd be done right.
Marry a mountain woman and you marry the mountain.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:13
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
The longer you live the more you hear.
Its never too late to mend.
Every cloud has a sliver lining.
One swallow does'nt make a summer.
All is not gold that glitters.
The old dog for the hard road, and the puppy for the path.
The day of the wind is not the day for thatching.
Seeing is believing.
Honesty is the best policy.
Its a bad wind that does'nt blow good for somebody.
The world would'nt make a race horse out of an ass.
The newer the chapel the further from God.
If I had only a kitten I'd be in the middle of
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 13:10
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
A good word never broke a tooth.
Live horse and you'll get grass.
As you live so shall you die.
A new broom sweeps clean.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 10:50
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
were thrown at her. Stones were thrown at everyone that day forward who crossed the yard until the ashes were replaced in the fort.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 10:48
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Long ago fallow was burned and the ashes were used for the purpose of dyeing linen.
William Burke owned a farm in Derrinatubrid commonly known as the Brake. In this farm is a fort. William Burke burned fallow inside in this fort. So he once stripped the bushes and briars from the sides of the fort, burned them and mixed the ashes with that of the fallow. He hired two men to watch the ashes to prevent it being stolen. In the middle of the night stones were thrown at them. They could see no one. They were terrified and they ran to Burke's house. They roused him out of his bed and told him their story. He was angry at their terror. He said it was someone trying to steal the ashes. So he went into the dairy and took the keelers down to the fort. He filled them with the ashes and brought them into the dairy. All the time the stones were falling around him in showers.
The following day the servant girl went to the dairy to make the churn. While going across the yard stones
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 10:35
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
So good by and God be with you
Says old Johny Dhu.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 10:34
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
With here white spotted apron and her calico blouse
She began to frighten and I said boo
and dont be afraid man its only Johny Dhu.
V
I met a little flaxy haired girl one day
Good morning little flaxy haired girl I did say
Good morning little beggarman and how do you do
With your rags and you tags and your old ring a doo
VI
I'll buy a pair of leggins a collar and a tie
And a nice young lady I'll fetch by an by
I'll buy a pair of stocking and colour them blue
And an old fashion lady I will make her too.
VII
Over the road with by bag on my back
Over the fields with my great heavy sack
With m holes in my shoes and my toes peeping throu
And a Skeenery of my, of my old rig -a-doo
VIII
I must be on the bunk Its getting late at night
The fire is all raked and out went the light
Now you've heard the story of my old rig-a-doo
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 10:28
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I
I am a little beggar man and begging Ive been
For three score and more in this little Isle of Green
I'm known from the Liffey down to the Ssecuces [?]
Shure I'm known by the name of old John'y Dhu.
II
Of all the trades going shure begging is the best
For when a man is tired he can sit down and rest
He can beg for his dinner he has nothing else to do
And cut around the corner with his old rad-a-doo.
III
I slept in the barn down a cur-a-lan
shure a wet night and all I slept until dawn
Whith holes in the roof and the rain coming through
And the rats and the cats they were playing pick - a boo
IV
Who did I waken but the women of the house
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 10:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a hill in County Waterford called Cnoc an Aifrinn. It got its name from the penal times. The people attended Mass on this hill because the soldiers were watching the priests always and they could not say Mass in the church because if they were caught they would be shot on the altar. While the priest said Mass on Cnoc an Aifrinn a few men used to watch from some high points. Then if the soldiers were coming they were dressed in red suits and were easily seen. The alarm was then made to the priests who quickly fled with the people. The priests were not noticed in the crowd as they wore the same
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 10:24
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
meetings held and stones were fired by the people. The Riot Act was read by the officers in charge and then the orders were given to fire. A volly was upon the unarmed crowd and many of them fell killed and wounded and the rector carried the widow's corn over the bleeding corpses. this was the last fight remembered of the Penal Days.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 10:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
XI
When I started for home indeed it was time
Twas a wonder the cow didn't ramble away
The price being slack, I jumped up on her back.
And I'll never forget that bullock fair day.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 10:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Cnoch an Aifrinn. Then they went and said Mass.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 10:23
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
There is a hill in the townland of Rathgormack, called Gallow's hill. It is called Gallow's hill because during the time of the Penal Days people were hanged there. The forces of the Crown used to hang those that would go against the law.
A great fight took place at Curraheen Rathgormack on 18th of December 1834. A seizure had been made on the corn of a poor widow to pay a Protestant rector. Her neighbours became excited and assembled in crowds for the purpose of preventing the carrying away of the corn. A boreen led from the purpose of preventing the carrying away of the corn. A boreen led from the road to the widow's house. In this boreen the neighbours erected a barricade and were ready to defend the corn. The Officers of the law approached well supported by armed police and military. These were some
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 10:21
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
courting of lassies
and calling for porter and whiskey galore.
IX
There was humour and pleasure, and drink without measure
Steem from the punch, puffed out from each store
From drinking the whiskey, they got pretty frisky
Upon my word it was then the right work did begin.
X
The devil such welting, such thumping and pelting
And in every house there were nothing but rows
At Clothers, and Hayes's, they flammed [?] it like blazes
McCaples, and Delaneys, Butler's and Gows
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 10:17
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
new Sunday frocks.
And a blackthorn stick in the hell of each fist
With their shirt collars white, and their coats buttoned tight.
Every step the would take, their shillaly they would twist.
VII
There were carloads of women with curls and fringes.
and bags of hay stuffed, they sat at their ease
When they came down, they marched up the town
Their white stockings were spattered all up to their knees.
VIII
Between twelve and one, when the business was done
The houses were crowded with women and men
There were gingling of glasses and
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 09:43
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
As it happened many in Newport before.
IV
At half-past eight when I thought twould come wet
Such numbers of people ne'er saw before
They were there from Murroe, Ballina Killaloe
Castleconnell, Gurtshane likewise Cappamore.
V
From Thour, and Fethane, Lacamore and Knowckawn.
Garabane, Crockofoyle, Bilboa and Doan
From the milestone Kilcommon, Coolmore and Longisle
VI
They were coming in flocks with their
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 09:38
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
I
On 23rd of October so simple and sober
I walked up to Newport to sell an old cow.
The fair of renown that was held in that town.
The bullock fair day that everyone know
II
The morning being chill and I felt rather ill
Myself and my comrades went into John Ryan's
Who kept a nice shop and a beautiful drop
Like the dew on the mountains it sparkles and shines
III
We took two pints of stout and 'twas then we walked out.
We said ;twas too early to take any more
For fear of being, and blind drunk before night
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 09:33
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
(1) He's as ugly as sin.
(2) " " black as the hob of hell.
(3) " " like a drowned rat.
(4) " as bold as a baubh
(5) " " cross as a weasel
(6) " " proud " " peacock
(7) " " slow " " snail
(8) 'Tis hard to kill a bad thing
(9) You can't break a dog off his trot
(10) He's as crooked as a ram's horn
(11) Don't let the cat out of the bag
(12) A big swank
" " knob
" " toff.
(13) He could see the grass growing
(14) He's very dark in himself
(15) 'Tis very hard to get into him
(14 & 15 mean a person that is stand-offish or unsociable).
(16) 'Tis as long as a wet week
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 09:27
approved
rejected
awaiting decision
Their baggage bags and cartridge
Their guns and arms "go leor"
We took them to the castle
We placed them peaceful nigh
And as we did them speedily
We blew them in the sky.
Here we are brave Sarsfield said
With speed he rode away
Many a health to him was drank
In Limerick town next day
Here's another health to Sarsfield
Who led us one and all
And burst the foe artillary
Round Ballyneaty wall.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 09:23
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Our Irish man in bloom.
III
At the lonely hour of midnight
Each man laid on his steed
And across the Bridge of Cullen
He flew like lightening speed
And up the hills like thunder
Towards Ballyneaty walls
When we laid our foes securely
Our guns and store and all
They asked is for the password
And Sarsfield was the man
Here I am our general cries
And down on them we ran.
O God we cleared the foemen
And the moon and stars gave light
And for the Battle of the Boyne
We had revenge that night.
IIII
We "slained" them all
Brave Sarsfield said
They bid us take the store
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 09:15
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I
The night felt dark round Limerick
When all our lamps were still
And for our foes in ambush
(Wh) We laid beside the hill
Like lions we boldly waited
Watching for our prey
With gallant Sarsfield at our back
By the dawning of the day.
II
From Dublin came the yeoman
With guns and warlike store
They gained the walls of Limerick
They wanted ten times more.
Little was their notion
At night they'd meet their doom
To meet with noble Sarsfield
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 06:19
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[-]
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 06:19
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senior member (history)
2020-01-23 06:18
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when the day's work was over he went in search of the crock but he could not find it.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 06:17
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and its height is about four feet and it is standing in the ground.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 06:16
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the wash.
Why is a horse a peculiar eater of food? Because he eats best when he hasn't a bit in his mouth.
What has a head but no face? A match.
When its head is cut off it gets bigger. A pillow.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 06:14
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When geese are seen to fly it is a sign of wind.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 06:14
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When swallows fly high it is a sign of fine weather and when they fly low it is a sign of rain.
When you hear the sound of the train very clearly at about four or five miles away, it is a sign of frost.
When you see crows diving up into the sky and down again, it is a sign of a storm. When you see the smoke spreading out when it leaves the chimney, it is a sign of rain. When you hear the Yellow Hammer
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 06:11
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whistling, it is a sign of rain. When you see the seagulls flying inland it is a sign of bad weather and when you see them flying towards the sea it is a sign of good weather.
When you see a wisp of hay going across the meadow with the breeze it is a sign of good weather. When you hear a whistle through the door it is a sign of rain. A halo round the moon is a sign of rain.
A morning rainbow is a sign of rain and an evening
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 06:07
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rainbow predicts fair weather. A deep blue colour in the sky even when seen through clouds indicates settled weather. Fog indicates fair weather. When the dust rises on the road it is a sign of rain.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 06:05
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In olden times there were three meals a day breakfast dinner and supper were the meals. Breakfast was the first meal of the day. At twelve o'clock they had dinner and before going to bed they had supper. People generally worked before breakfast. For breakfast they had tea and bread and sometimes butter and sometimes eggs. For dinner they had potatoes and bacon and cabbage
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 06:02
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or turnips but on Friday and on fast days they had no meat. For supper they had mixed bread and skimmed milk. On Easter Sunday there was a feast of eggs as at the present time.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 06:00
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There was gold supposed to be by three men in a field in the farm at Patrick O Connor in Islandanny. The people used to see lights there at a certain hour by night. They found the gold after a short time. They dreamt of getting gold three nights in succession and that a black cat would come and keep running around them, but they were to hold on digging for the gold. They decided to come to dig the gold at twelve o'clock that night. They found the gold and walked away. Two of them were labourers and the
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 05:57
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2020-01-23 05:57
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senior member (history)
2020-01-23 05:56
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other a farmer's son. The two labourers were from 75 to eighty years old and the other man was about thirty years old. They divided the gold between them and they went away.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 05:55
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1. Four little bottles above in the hill their mouths turn down and can not spill. A cow's paps.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 05:54
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2. I have a little house and a mouse could not live in it and all the men in Kerry could not count how many windows in it.. A thimble.
3. A little white and round house and it's full of meat but has no doors or windows to let me in to eat. An Egg.
4. Hoddy doddy with a round flat body and a big flat hat what is that. A Pot.
5. A flock of white sheep on a red hill here they go, now they stand still. Teeth in your gums.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 05:50
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6. Riddle me riddle me, what is that, over the head and under the hat. The hair of the head.
7. I had a little sister, they called her Peep Peep, she waded the waters so deep, deep, she climbed up the hill so high high, and dear little sister has a very bright eye. A star.
8. What is the smallest bridge in the world. The bridge of your nose.
9. Tis black tis white tis red all over. Newspaper.
10. I see it and you don't see it and its
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 00:15
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the Treaty stone famed Garryowen
And Patrick Sarsfield's name,
How colleens brave and Shannon wave
Held a foe at bay,
In that little Munster village castle Connell far away.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 00:14
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I
There's a cottage on the hillside
With a dear old mother there,
By the emerald green of Plassy
And the towering hills of Clare,
Where the fragrant breeze is blowing
And the Shannon spreads its spray
In that little Munster village Castle Connell far away.
II
It was there in happy childhood
I learned of Limerick's fame,
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 00:13
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Tríomhadh braon d'uisge an Dómhnach(?)
A chuir mar eol liom
Ag déanamh eolais go tír Phádhraig(?)
Ceithre coirnéal ar mo leabaidh
Ceithre ainglí uirthe scartha
Dá bfuighfinn-se bás roimh maidin
I bhFlaitheas Dé go raibh m' (ANAM
leabaidh

( Críoch )
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 00:12
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The rosy lips of Mary from Murroe
V
We then came on together
Until we came to the painted gate
Go home go home my Mary
I fear its getting late
I'll try to earn a fortune
And your foot steps I'll pursue
And in spite of fate I'll come again
To court you near Murroe.
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 00:09
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(leagan eile ar uimhir 19)

Sínighim síos ins an leabaidh
Mar síneadh Mac Dé ins an uaigh
Brat Mhuire orainn mar éadmhaigh
A Mhuirnín mo mhíle grádh thú
Is tú mo dochtúir laigheas tinn agus slán mé
Is tú mo charad anama ar leabaidh mo bháis thú
Céard sin leat in do láimh dheis
Cé sin rómhat - tá na h-ainglí
Cé sin do dhiaidh tá na h-easbuig
A Rí na Ríghthe d'fulaing na mílte is na milliúin lot
Go sábháilidh tú muide ar ghach olc
Go mbeannuighidh Dia dhuit a phaidir geal geal
Go mbeannuighidh Dia agus Muire dhuit
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 00:09
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Coming down the road
But alas our time it was cut short
When her mother came in view
Sure I had to quit down by the
Smiths with Mary from Murroe
III
We then came on together until
We came to the boiling well
Twas there we sat together
Until the dark night fell
And darksome was the vision
That lay around us two
And may freedom's light for ever
Shine on you Mary from Murroe
IV
We next came on together
Till we came to the sally grove
The wood Cock and the pheasant
Came noting from above
Our enemies stood on the road
But us they could not view
And twas then I kissed
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 00:04
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I
If I were at home in Lackamore
I'd take my pen and write
Strange thoughts run in my bosom
To Mary take a flight
It was in her fathers garden
From boy hoods pride I grew
When first I came to count a Dame named Mary from Murroe
II
Twas the evening of the funeral
At the cross above the forge
I met my lovely Mary and she
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 00:02
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Chonnaic mé do scáilín
Go mall mall areír
Ar bhruach na tuinne báidhte
Acth níor scannruigh tú mé
Ba tú ba deise
Ba tú ba lághach
A bhfacthas ariamh
Agus do mhalairt ní bhéarfaidh(?)
Nó go dtéighidh mé sa gcré
senior member (history)
2020-01-23 00:01
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Like a swarm of bees and lanaries we crowded the Knockers and careys
We being full of our tricks and fagaries we lifted a hulla bool loo
VI
Ned Curtin walked in with his hat in full gear and said where is the land lady
And God save all here
We are all weather bound we must stay here for the night.
Up spoke Mag Ahern saying go like the light
O we shelter we're no mountainy cadgers says [?]
We are no mountainy cadgers we are a respectable crew.
VII
When I over heard this thrown I bid for the door
Saying tis time to be going with a sad lamentation and home sure we flew.
With horses and waggons and and [?] to the crew
Crying the devil such weather came never.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:57
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Tis idle to work or be clever
But if I was at home I would never again go drawing the hay from Murroe
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:55
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To view the Shannon waters,
By the Falls of Doonass.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:55
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I (next Page)
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:54
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I
In Doonass I was born
And 'tis there I'd like to die,
Down by the Shannon waters,
My bones they should lie,
and if fortune never favoured me,
The sea I'd never cross,
I'd be buried in castle Connell,
By the falls of Doonass.
II
As I rolled out one evening,
A sol shone it's race,
Down by the Shannon waters,
And the light blowing breeze,
I carelessly strolled out,
My leisure hours to pass. P.T.O.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:52
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ó thonn go tonn

(VII)
Cá bhfuil fear a chleacht é agus anois dá thréiscinnt
Cé bhéadh cé'n cás do' a croidhe bheith tinn
Acht bradáin an t-séasúir ó thigeanns léar nádúir
Agus caitheanns an data(?) i measg na dtonn
Sé fearacht agam-sa é da mbéinn i bpárlús
Go mba fhearr liom árus i gCul na Binn.

( A CRÍOCH SIN )
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:51
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I left home you see
And I am tired of travelling (says)
Says the turf man from Ardee.
III
Your cart is nearly worn friend
Your ass is very old
It must be forthy summers
Since that animal was foaled
He was yoked to a trap
In September forthy three
When he cantered for the midwive
Says the turf man from Ardee.
IIII
Now I must not abuse my ass
With this old haxel rod
For indeed I do not mind the day
That poor old Jack was shod
The hairness that is on his back
Was made by John McGee
And he's dead this four and forty years
Says the turf man from Ardee.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:48
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Le eachraí aerach agus coístí ann
Ó ghléásfadh bainfheis dom sin agus féasta
Gach nídh dá breáththa agus togha ceoil
Go mbeith dhá fhear déág ar meisge in éinfeacht
'I dteach Tom Dálaigh i gCúl na Binn

(VI)
Bhí mé in Acaill cé gur mhian liom fhágaíl
Ba mhaith an aít é ar shiochrán oidhche
Bhí biadh agus leabaidh ann agus céad míle fáilte
Agus cómhrádh sásta ann ag teacht na h-oidhche
Bhí na lachan ba bhreághtha ann a bhí in Éirinn
Agus na h-ealaí ag snámh ann
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:46
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I
For sake of health I took a walk,
One day at early dawn
I met a jolly gentleman
As I slowly walken along
The grandest conversation passed
Between himself and me
Till at last I got acquainted
With the turf man from Ardee.
II
We chatted very freely
As we walked along the road
He says my ass is tired
And I want to sell my load
For I had no refreshment since
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:43
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There was a man one time and he had a lot of (turkey) cows. But when he could drive them in to milk them they would have no milk.
He went out one night about twelve o clock to see them he had a greyhound with him. When he came near the cows he saw a white hare sucking one of them.
He set the hound after the hare. The hound followed the hare around the field. But as the
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:42
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Imeasg na ngróibhnaí atá i gCúl na Binn

(IV)
Tá litir sgríobhtha ar thóin mo phóca
Le cur amárach go Cúl na Binn
Go bhfuil mé mo luighe le tuilleadh agus ráithe
Le aicíd áithrid agus tinneas cinn
Mar bhfuigheadh mé fóirthín ó Rígh na nGrásta
Ná mo shláinte anois mar is cóir
Acht gléasfaidh tuamba agus cómhra cláir dhom
Agus cuirighidh i mbárach mé faoi bhun Sléibhe Mhóir

(V)
Dá mbeadh a fhios ag buachaillí
Atá ag bun Ghleann Néifin
Go bhfuil mise i m'aonraic agus in mo luighe tinn
Thiocfadh sgata aca aniar amárach
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:40
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One night as a man was going to Newport he saw a turkey on the road. He hit the turkey with the whip to make it keep out of his (ito) way. When he looked again the turkey was as big as himself. She ran after him and when he was going a passed a house the turkey let a roar. The man got a bad fright and had to be carried home.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:38
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Several people used tan their own leather. They used make tombereens of goat skins. A tombereen is a kind of a drum with which they used play music.
Mr Clancy my grandfather got a pair of shoes made out of a dog skin. He put the fresh skin into 'a' lime for three or four days to burn of the hair. When the hair was burnt of he hung it up and rubbed preservative to it.
P.T.O.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:35
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Ó bhéarfadih mé bean dhuit agus dhá chéad bó leí
Agus acra móinfhéir in aghaidh an chinn
Ó bád agus eangachaí agus a bhfághail le h-aghaidh pléisiúir
Agus tiúbhraidh éadail isteach gan tuim(?)

(III)
Dá dtugfá bean dhom agus dhá chéad bó leí
Agus acra móinfhéir in aghaidh an chinn
Gach a bhfuil go báid agus de eangachaí as seo go Bófainn'
Ná saidhbreas Sheóirse acht a fhághail gan roinn
Go mba fearr liom acra gan bhogach bháidhte
Atá idir an ród agus inghean draigh
Cead rinnce le cailíní la' gaothhra agus Dómhnacha
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:35
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They used to get a hurdle made of sally rods and put the flax on it and out it over the fire to dry. When it was dry they used clove it to knock of the hulls. Then it had to be drawn through a [?] and taken to the mill.
Dye
Dye was also made around my neighbourhood. The juice from a certain tree called logwood. It is boiled with sheeps manure and made into dye. Dye was also made from rocks.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:31
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grulling jobs
With the farmers I have seen
And holidays like an [?] visits
Are few and far between.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:29
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I
One stormy night not long ago
As I lay awake in bed.
From listening to the winds outside
Strange thoughts ran through my head
I began to think within myself.
That soon I'd be a man
And how to make a living
I commenced at once to plan
II
The Farmer's life I soon ruled out
Because I could not see that
The socalled joys of T farming
Meant anything to me.
When I thought of all the
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:28
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(I)
Mo léan agus mo dheacair nach bfuil mise i nGúr Buidhe
Ó in mo láimh-se dubhach agus peann
Ó sgríobhfainn síos in dubhach ar an mbán dhuit
Gach ceárd agus gach aítiú abhí ins an ngleann
Acht dá mbeadh gach rud agam a bhí in Éirinn
Céad fairíor géar go bhfuil muntrea(?) fann

(II)
Séard a dubhairt fear as Acaill liom
Ná bíodh díth-ceilleacht ort ná bí ag gol
Nó ag éagnach indiaidh Cúl na Binn
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:27
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cold.
To make another verse on it
I think is waste of time
Especially as I got no prize
For my famous rhyme
III
Even though this schoolboy is a poet
Which I think will rise to fame
And at some future date his poems
Will shed lustre on his name
So now that he's contented
And his mind is set at ease
For my book I can return
To read with peace and ease
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 23:11
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Is an bhfarraige do líonadh le héisg dhibh.
II
Do siubhailís sa Sasna, Albha agus Éire an bhFrainnch le chéile agus taobh thall na Róimh.
Mar a raibh saghairt agus easpoigh sa mhéíd sin; a leithéid súd in aon bhall níor thaobhaigh um threó
Do léigeamhfad leabhar na laigs laidine dhuit gan (dearmea) dearmadh in mbhéarla, an t-aifreann, le chéile agus ba aireach é a searmóin.
Croidhe fiall fairsing imeasgh fáilthe dhá réir sin agus ar an bhfódh.
III
Téigeann sé ar an gcharraig ag cailaireacht is af glaodhach ortha.
a díaraidh (a) i gchás do réidheacht idir maoir agus gach treó.
Acht dhá dthiochfadh leis an eaglais an obhair súd do deanamh súd sochair saoghal chun na gCapers go deó.
Bhailigh: Máire Ní Drisceóil. Cumolán, Inis Cléire.
Fuaireas ó: CIarán Ó Drisceóil, Cumólán, Inis Cléire
anonymous contributor
2020-01-22 22:59
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clothes as lay men in order to disguise themselves.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 22:59
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25. Brown spots on the frog's skin are, according to the elders, a sure sign of a rain s-
26. Dogs eat grass-blades when rain is near. (To bear out nos. 25&26, vide[?] following:-
"My dogs so altered in his taste
Quit mutton-bones, on grass to feast.
The frog has changed his yellow vest,
And in a russet coat is dressed")
26. Cows gather together in a corner of a field when snow is near.
27. When a blue flame is seen in the heart of an open fire, we may expect rain.
28. Similarly a red flame denotes thunder and lightning.
29. Insects on the wing at eventide, mean rain.
30. Insects hovering close to ground mean snow.
31. Crickets chirping loudly at fireside mean rain.
32. When sheets of soot take fire & light on the side of a kettle or whatever vessel is on the fire, we may look out for rain.
33. Smoke falling groundwards after leaving chimney means rain is coming.
34. To see cattle running is a sign of wind from the west.
35. Beetles & cockroaches crawling on the floor denote coming damp weather.
anonymous contributor
2020-01-22 22:57
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meetings held and stones were fired by the people. The Riot Act was read by the officers in charge and then the orders were given to fire. A volly was upon the unarmed crowd and many of them fell killed and wounded and the rector carried the widow's corn over the bleeding corpses. this was the last fight remembered of the Penal Days.
There is a hill in County Waterford called Cnoc an Aifrinn. It got its name from the penal times. The people attended Mass on this hill because the soldiers were watching the priests always and they could not say Mass in the church because if they were caught they would be shot on the altar. While the priest said Mass on Cnoc an Aifrinn a few men used to watch from some high points. Then if the soldiers were coming they were dressed in red suits and were easily seen. The alarm was then made to the priests who quickly fled with the people. The priests were not noticed in the crowd as they wore the same
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 22:52
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on the following day.
11. Rainbow in the evening denotes rain.
12. The North wind brings snow.
13. When crows fly at a high altitude we are sure of getting fine weather.
14. When swallows fly low & skim the ground, they remind us of approaching rain or showers.
15. Sea-gulls come inland when there is a storm brewing at sea.
16. When a frog is found in a dwelling-house, the inmates remark that such an instance show we will have rain.
17. And apparent ring around the moon shows coming bad weather.
18. Fast-moving clouds mean rain.
19. A clear round moon shows coming fine weather.
20. West-wind brings dry weather, but fairly cold.
21. Crows perched in close formation - sign of a storm.
22. When soot falls down the oven chimney into the hob, we are getting rain.
23. The apparent nearness of distant mountains means a storm is brewing.
24. The apparent nearness of local hills is a sign of rain.
anonymous contributor
2020-01-22 22:49
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Cnoch an Aifrinn. Then they went and said Mass.
There is a hill in the townland of Rathgormack, called Gallow's hill. It is called Gallow's hill because during the time of the Penal Days people were hanged there. The forces of the Crown used to hang those that would go against the law.
A great fight took place at Curraheen Rathgormack on 18th of December 1834. A seizure had been made on the corn of a poor widow to pay a Protestant rector. Her neighbours became excited and assembled in crowds for the purpose of preventing the carrying away of the corn. A boreen led from the purpose of preventing the carrying away of the corn. A boreen led from the road to the widow's house. In this boreen the neighbours erected a barricade and were ready to defend the corn. The Officers of the law approached well supported by armed police and military. These were some
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 22:46
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The beliefs mentioned here are common in every farmer's house in the district.
1. Birds flying low foreshadows coming rain.
2. A red sky shows a hard wind.
3. A copper-coloured sky shows we are to have a frost.
4. The East wind brings severe weather. Old people say that all sickness comes from that point; they never go about much while the East wind blows.
5. When the cat turns his back to the fire, a storm is at hand.
6. A goat seeking shelter denotes rain.
7. When birds whistle loudly, we may know that a storm is at hand.
8. Smoke ascends straight from the chimney heralds fine weather.
9. Dust on the roadway means warm weather.
10. A red hue scattered over the sky on a summer's evening means a "day for hay"
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 22:41
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last day of February. The tradition still exists of an old cow, known as the "Bó Riabac". She had been ailing all the Winter and expected to die before the winter months finished. However, when the last day of March arrived, and she still lived, she became boastful, and she "wheeled" against the Winter. She died however on the 15th of April, and those fifteen days are still known as "the days of the Old Cow" or "the Riabac Days". Long ago the corn used be cut earlier than now, and then the geese were let out to pick amongst the stubble. This period (September) was known as the "Harvest of the Geese".
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 22:36
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Friday used be the luckiest day to transact business in any shape or form. It used be believed that potatoes not planted before St. Patrick's Day were not worth planting atall. The same applied to onions not planted before the
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 22:25
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In 1934 at Carnadre Creamery a terrible fire broke out in the night time about three o'clock. It happened by accident. It is said that a vast quantity of petrol was spilled near the store at the back of the Creamery. The manager whose house was a short distance from the Creamery, noticed the great light shining in on his bedroom window.
He arose quickly and spread the alarm in the neighbourhood. By the time assistance was available, the greater part of the entire building was consumed by the flames. All the useful, and most important articles were destroyed. A few articles were saved which were made of iron-ware, which the flames could not destroy. No one made any effort to save the furniture as the flames were too great and lives might be lost.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 22:20
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Last year I was talking to a man named John Stapleton. Our conversation drifted from one thing to another. We began to talk about gold. I asked him had he ever a dream about gold being hid in any place. He told me that he never dreamt of hidden gold. He then told me the following story.
There is a fort in the land of Feeragh. In it there is a tunnel leading to an underground chamber. The chamber is laden with gold and precious vessels of every description. It is said that there is an opening on the boundary of the fort, leading to it. Yet nobody searched for it, from that day to this.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 22:16
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pot of gold and it would be to be found there anytime if anyone searched for it but that they would have to dig very deep for it. This man was left back to the same spot as he was taken from. When he got there he did not know where he was so he got some person that he met on the road to leave him home. When he reached the house and got alright he told what happened and what he was told. My father was talking to him a few days after and he told him also. No one ever searched for it yet but it is really true it is there.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 22:13
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A couple of nights ago as I was sitting by the fire in my own house reading a story book my father began telling some stories. I left down the book to listen to him because I always like listening to old stories. He told me one story and I took great interest in it because it was a very good one. I am now going to tell you it as well as I can. One sunday a man by the name of Carty was going to his own bog for a creel of turf and had a creel on his back. As he was walking along the road a blast of wind came along and lifted the creel and himself off the road. He never felt himself going until he was landed in a fort not very far from this school in the village of Kilbride. He was surrounded by a crowd of lovely men and women and in the midst was an old woman. She told him that under a piece of ground on which he stood was
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 22:08
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tunnel and some of the old people hold that there are some valuable vessels hidden in the ruins of the old Church also.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 22:07
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The night before last as I was sitting beside the fire with my father and mother, I asked them to tell me if there was any golden treasures near our house, but before they had time to answer me an old man, named Eddie Dockery, happened to come in rambling. When he was a while seated I asked him if there was any gold hidden near this place and he said that there is a tunnel running underground from beside our house up to the Protestant Church. This tunnel belonged to the monks long ago. In it there is supposed to be very valuable vessels of gold and silver. One time, about ten years ago a man named Jones made an attempt to go into the tunnel, but he was not able to go very far as the air inside was very bad. It is also a common belief of the people from the place that the treasure is hidden about middle way up tunnel. There is also the ruins of an old Church situated about one hundred yards away from the old
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 22:03
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They continued digging for a couple of hours, but a terrible storm arose and the men became afraid and all went home and the treasure still remains to be found.
anonymous contributor
2020-01-22 21:47
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Whelan who was murdered by the yeos in 1798 had a grandson Robert Whelan who was one of the 1898 Centenry Commt.
This Robert Whelan lost his life under tragic circumstances in 1925. On the 16th March 1925 he was coming from Enniscorthy late in the night. Within about a half mile from his home he received fatal injuries about the head. As he was in charge of the horse and cart it was thought at first that the injuries were accidental, but an inquest was held and the jury returned a verdict of "wilful murder"
No one was ever brought to justice for it.
He did not become unconscious till after reaching home. His servant man out him to bed, and he then lost consciousness, and died about twenty four hours later.
Lieutenant Stone & Lieutenant Stedmond.
Lieutenant Stedmond lived at Permount House Askinvillar Kiltealy, Stone Lived ay Kiledmond Both were yeomen, and were feared and hated by the people.
Whyte (referred to at the beginning of Book) told me Lieutenant Stone gave a "Cancer Cure" to Stedmond. The "cure" or its recipe remained in the Stedmond family and later was handed on to a man named
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 21:23
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iad a fhéin agus rinne an cailín beag chuile shórt compóirteach caoí nach raibh na fir beaga ariamh roimhe sin. Bhíiodh a bricfásta réidh ag an gcailín beag dóib ar maidin agus annsin theigheadh na fir beaga ag baint óir dhóibh fhéin Sin a bhíodh siad i dheanamh ar feadh an lae. Nuair a dimthigh an cailín beag ón mbúistéir ní raibh fhios aige beo cé an chaoí a gheobfhadh sé ar ais go dtí an bhanrioghan gan croidhe an cailín a bheith aige. Bhíos aige go marbhóchad sí a bhean agus a pháiste agus é fhéin faoí nach déarna sé mar dúbhairt an
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 21:00
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Ní aithnóchadh súil dá ghrinne go raibh a leitheidh chor ar bith ann. Dimtigeadar ag siubhal agus fios acu cá rabadar ag dhul. Nuair a bhí sé deirneach casadh cúirt dhóibh nach bfaca siad a leithidh roimhe ariamh.
Ní raibh bun chleite isteach innte ná bár chleite amach innte ach aon chleite amháin [pacóige?] a bhí ag deanamh fasgadh agus dídean i na mullach. Bhí ceanabháin bhána na muinge mar tuighe innte agus snáithidí nimhe mar sgoilbh inntí. Bhí [pábáil rasúirí cruadhadh?] taobh amuigh fré chéile innti agus a mbéal fosgailte. Loinnir a bhí chun tosaigh
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 20:52
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fhéin ar mo ghreathuidhe i n-am
I mbun na carraige nó ar bárr an t-sléibhe
Bárd sin géim uaim, gach maidin ceóigh
Is buan mo mhallacht do'n té chuir bréag uirthí
D'ith sí an gréasaidhe is é ag lasgadh bróg

Dá bfágainn-se sgian a mb'fhearr dí faobhar,
Ach ní fhághfainn liab orra siar go tóin,
Dá gcásfaidhe an croiceann liom, is fághail leis ? gcaoradh
Díolfainn piginn é fé na luach

Aibhistín Mac Choinnigh
Coill Dá Laogh,
Átha'n Cláir,
Co Shligigh
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 20:47
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D'ith sí an pluid, is ba mhór an sgéal e
Doisín léinteacha, agus píosa sháil
Is ba chuma sa donas goidé dhéanfadh an méid sin
Ach ropar Shéarlais agus cóta Sheáin

A Shean Bhó Bhuathais (Mhothais), nách raibh tú saoghalach
Ach b'olc an t-íocuidhe thú i mBaile Cuan
Gur b'é do gaisge imtheacht amach fé na ríoghachtaí
Ag feitheamh ar dhaoinibh a tiocfadh cois cuain,

"Is ní Shean Bho Bhuachais (Mhothais) mé" arsan bhó is í ag géimnigh
Ach beireach spéireamhail de'n gcineál mór
D'íosfadh pota dá mbruitricéadta ann
Is dinnseóchadh sgéal ar an gceann Jew mór
Tá an oidhche dorcha, sgaip na reálta agus thoisigheas
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 20:46
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first Saturday of January it is counted lucky. If a person went to visit anyone in June it is counted unlucky. If they go the first Sunday in Marck it is counted lucky.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 20:45
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Travelling Folk
About eigthty years ago people used to go around selling little things such as apples and pins and oranges and other little things. There was a man named Larry Dillon. He used to sell things in the houses around and then he would tell a story.
He said, "One day I was coming down by the chapel in Toomevara." " I saw a crowd of people around Father Meades grave." And this is what he said.
"I was coming down feather street
A crowd of poor pluckers I chanced to meet.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 20:44
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rejected
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first Saturday of January it is counted lucky. If a person went to visit anyone in June it is counted unlucky. If they go the first Sunday in March it is counted lucky.
Travelling Folk
About eigthty years ago people used to go around selling little things such as apples and pins and oranges and other little things. There was a man named Larry Dillon. He used to sell things in the houses around and then he would tell a strory.
He said, "One day I was coming down by the chapel in Toomevara." " I saw a crowd of people around Father Meades grave." And this is what he said.
"I was coming down feather street
A crowd of poor pluckers I chanced to meet.
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 20:44
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rejected
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times no men would go to plough in it on a Monday. It was considered unlucky to work in it on a Monday. One time a man went to plough it on a Monday and the horses ran away and he broke his leg. Then no one ever worked in it on a Monday from that time. Some farmers say when they would be sowing a crop that Friday was the luckest day to do it. They say when they sow it on a Friday there would be more return out of it.
About eighty years ago people would not change into a different house only on certain days. They say that the first Monday in February is counted unlucky to go into a new house. The first Saturday in May is counted lucky. It is said if you start to build a new house on a Saturday you will never finish it. It is counted unlucky if a man started to plough the first Friday in January. If a man started to plough on the
senior member (history)
2020-01-22 20:42
approved