Líon iontrálacha sa taifead staire: 283826 (Taispeántar anseo na 500 ceann is deireanaí.)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 19:15
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potatoes down in rows across the ridge and covered them with the sods and earth dug up from the trenches.
The potatoes were also set another way. When the sods were graffed they were gathered in a heap and left there to dry. When they were quite dry they were burned, and the ashes called "béiréan" was placed over the potatoes.
When the potato(es) stalks came over the ground they were earthed but never sprayed as no blight was to be seen or nothing was known about it.
The potatoes sown were of a different brand from those sown now. Some sown were Champions, Black Bulls, Irish Whites, Green Tops, Red Roses, Brown Fancies, and horse potatoes. Horse potatoes were large and were given mostly to horses; they resembled the Aran Banners we have now. The Brown Fancies were of a brownish colour. It is said that the year of the famine when the potatoes blackened, a man dug out some potatoes to see what kind they were
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 19:03
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before they were fit to dig. He said "I sowed Champions here, and it is Brown Fancies that have grown" Of course it was how they were blackening and looked like Brown Fancies.
The potatoes were always sown early; they tried to have finished before Saint Patrick's Day always. They were generally fit to dig after nine weeks.
The flax crop was an important crop too; it used to be sown in this district but it was given up. It was sown in the same way as oats was sown. In the month of April it was sown. The farmer would first "redden" the ground - that is plough it and harrow and bush it. It was bushed by getting two or three big bushes on which a few sods or stones are placed. Then the horse was tackled and he pulled the bushes around the field. It would be ripe about the month of August and was pulled by the hands. Then it was made up in bundles
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:58
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potatoes down in rows across the ridge and covered them with the sods and earth dug up from the trenches.
The potatoes were also set another way. When the sods were graffed they were gathered in a heap and left there to dry. When they were quite dry they were burned, and the ashes called "béiréan" was placed over the potatoes.
When the potato(es) stalks came over the ground they were earthed but never sprayed as no blight was to be seen or nothing was known about it.
The potatoes sown were of a different brand from those sown now. Some sown were Champions, Black Bulls, Irish Shites, Green Tops, Red Roses, Brown Fancies, and horse potatoes. Horse potatoes were large and were given mostly to horses; they resembled the Aran Banners we have now. The Brown Fancies were of a brownish colour. It is said that the year of the famine when the potatoes blackened, a man dug out some potatoes to see what kind they were
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:53
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The principal crops sown around here in olden times were - potatoes, turnips, wheat, oats, barley, rye and flax. No ploughs, harrows, or other farm implements now in use were to be had in those days. Only spades, shovels, and "grafáns" were used.
In preparation for the potato crop they "graffed" the trenches - that is to cut sods about two feet long and a foot wide with the "grafán" - and left the part which would form the ridge untouched. Then it was manured. Sometimes they sanded it or spread weeds on it for manure. They brought the sand and weeds from the strand in two baskets - one on each side of a horse's back. "Top loads" those baskets were called. The weeds were called ribbons which were of a brownish colour. They were cut with "crooked hooks" and taken in by boat. Sometimes they were out from a boat or from the rocks. They grow beneath the water.
When manured they laid their
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:46
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catch him, and he endeavored to protect himself with it. One of the Foleys took up a bone and he "closed" Hart. They "knocked out" Hart and captured him and took him to Dunmanus barrack and he was transported.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:45
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following lines :-
According to custom, and according to rules
A bard at this cottage, was treated like fools
Too grand to admit him, too proud for to hear
Clapped the door against his nostrels, was something severe
Afraid to admit him, as old Gaitly said
The door must be closed as the cash was hard made.
Travelling to markets and fairs far away
Poor Hughie made money so Gaitly did say
Dont think said this woman that you can come in
To speak to the sister of proud Hughie Finn
Because this grand woman distains the young men
So keep away over from the house of Hugh Finn
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:43
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seen. It is said that an old man died there the time of the famine and that he had only a sixpence in his pocket.
A man that lived near where MacSweeney lives now died with the hunger. He was "Denny the fiddler's" father, who lived there. This man had a small house above the "gulleys" in the hill. In a small house in Glaun there were four found dead. These people were dead a week before anyone knew it. They were buried in some graveyard without any coffin.
There were twice as many people in Glaun before the famine as there is at present. The people used to till the hill and sow crops there before the famine came. There was only one family left in Glaun after the famine. That family were Bowens. All the the other people died with fever and hunger.
There was a cow stolen in Rathara by Hart who lived where Andrew McSweeney lives now. He stole the cow during the night and he took her to "Poll an Oighen" to kill and skin her. That night snowed heavily and the Foleys tracked him through the snow. When they reached the place where Hart was he was skinning the cow.
He had the knife when the Foleys tried to
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:39
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In the year nineteen hundred and nine an old poet or bard as he wished to style himself was travelling this side of the country. This old chap treated everyone as they would treat him. So it happened one day that he called at Hugh Finn's house. Hugh had an old servant at the time who closed the door against him. That is why he composed the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:37
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This same hound from the Tanyard done a most wonderful thing one night while sleeping in Clougharoasty. It is believed and all holds its quite true that the family went to bed one night. The parents taking the baby who was very young to bed with themselves, and the dog nestled in the kitchen. Some time during the night the child was taken by the fairies unknown to all. When morning came there was a terrible alarm in the room seeing the child was missing. The kitchen was searched and after some few moments the dog was noticed lying rather nearer to the door than he was ever seen before. Looking sharply they saw something (sleeping) and sure enough there was the child, and the dog after capturing him from the fairies minding him between his paws very carefully.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:33
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the people brought them home sometimes.
Several cows and sheep were also stolen from the people by other poor, hungry persons. A man called James Collins a native of Colla, stole a cow from Mr. Keeffe of Colla also. He drove the cow up the hill until he come to the Moss Rock by "Fionn's Ridge". He ate the cow there, but the guards tracked him. When he saw the policemen coming up the hill he sat on "Fionn's Ridge" mocking them. But he was caught and sent to gaol. He escaped by making a rope of bedclothes.
Not long after the same man stole a sheep from Patrick Sullivan, a native of South Schull. He chased Mr. Collins but he bit off O Sullivan's nose, but did not succeed in keeping the sheep.
There are three or four houses in ruins on the side of the Shountullig hill which are supposed to be the abode of people before famine times. There are graves in Patrick Lucey's fields. It is supposed that it is people who lived in the houses nearby are buried there. There is also a grave in one of Florence Sullivan's fields near which was an old ruin. There was a house in the corner of one of my father's fields (Glaun) near the road. A piece of the wall is still to be
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:25
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was nearing cockcrow and she should leave but if she had a boat or a ship she would carry her brother to Cíll Moo. He was brought to Cíll Moo and there buried. The woman was his deceased sister it was said.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:23
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There is a story told about the Schull graveyard. A priest who was a native of Cove was buried in Schull but it had been his wish to be buried at home. A small dog was continually keeping watch over the grave.
The friends of the priest came by night, and dug up the corpse and brought it back to Cove. The dog was not seen after. There is a priest buried in the churchyard in Schull, named Dr. O´ Connor, and another named Fr. John Barry in Stouke graveyard. Many people go making rounds to Dr. Barryś tomb on the 20th of June each year. The disused graveyards are called "Kiels." One of them is situated in Kielbronogue in a field owned by Richard Willis, which is now over-grown with ferns. It is supposed that unbaptized children were buried there.
There is a story told of a man who was a native of Cíll Moo. He was working for a farm somewhere and he died there. The people of the place did not know in what graveyard they would bury him. The night of the wake a woman came in and began crying. The people did not know her. Some of women told her to seated. She replied she would not because it
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:15
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the hollow of a tree.
The birds that come to our district in summer are the swallow, swift, cuckoo. The swallow and swift build their nests of mud in barns and cowhouses or under the roofs of dwellinghouses. The cuckoo lays her egg in another birds nest.
The corncrake is heard in the meadows in summer. She makes her nest in the grass and lays seven or eight spotted eggs. The young ones are black in colour. Some people say that the corncrake becomes a waterrail when autumn comes others say she goes into a hole in a ditch and sleeps the whole winter and spring.
The waterhen or moorhen, teal, widgeon, and wild duck build their nests along the banks of a river or pool. The plover builds its nest in a marsh, The carrioncrow or scawlcrow is bigger than the ordinary crow and has grey feathers on the top of its head. Farmers do not like the carrioncrow because if follows young lambs and picks out their eyes.
There are many partridges and pheasants in this district also. They build their nests in rush bottoms or in furze, Woodcocks are to be found in the woods in the late autumn.
Old people say that if swallows build under the eaves of a house they bring luck to that house and if they build in a cowshed there will be luck with the cattle during the year.
Some people say if the starling builds its nest
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:14
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There are five or six graveyards in this district situated at, Schull, Stouke, Dunbeacon, Cíll Moo, Cíllhaingeal, Bawn na-Cnocán, all of which are still in use. Cíllhaingeal is round shaped. There is a ruined church in Schull graveyard and also in Cíllhaingeal graveyard. Schull, Dunbeacon, and Cíllhaingeal slope south or south east. There are tombs and crosses in Schull and in mostly all the graveyards. The crosses are made of iron or wood. On the iron crosses little flowers of iron are put on to them as ornaments. People are buried within the ruins of the church.
Every family has its own piece of the graveyard and when it is full a new piece is again bought. There are a couple of disused graveyards in the district. They are called "cílls". There is one in south Lowertown and one in Cíllromáin. One is situated in Killbronogul in a field owned by Richard Willis which is now overgrown with ferns. Unbaptised children were buried in "cílls". There is also a "cíll" in Coosheen in which there are head stones. It would cover a rood of ground. There are letters
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:14
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the hollow of a tree.
The birds that come to our district in summer are the swallow, swift, cuckoo. The swallow and swift build their nests of mud in barns and cowhouses or under the roofs of dwellinghouses. The cuckoo lays her egg in another birds nest.
The corncrake is heard in the meadows in summer. She makes her nest in the grass and lays seven or eight spotted eggs. The young ones are black in colour. Some people say that the corncrake becomes a waterrail when autumn comes others say she goes into a hole in a ditch and sleeps the whole winter and spring.
The waterhen or moorhen, teal, widgeon, and wild duck build their nests along the banks of a river or pool. The plover builds its nest in a marsh, The carrioncrow or scawlcrow is bigger than the ordinary crow and has grey feathers on the top of its head. Farmers do not like the carrioncrow because if follows young lambs and picks out their eyes.
There are many partridges an pheasants in this district also. They build their nests in rush bottoms or in furze, Woodcocks are to be found in the woods in the late autumn.
Old people say that if swallows build under the eaves of a house they bring luck to that house and if they build in a cowshed there will be luck with the cattle during the year.
Some people say if the starling builds its nest
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:04
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the side of the tomb-stones in Coosheen. Nobody can read them now. The "cílls" are never interfered with. It is also said that these "cílls" were the burial places of the people before the graveyard in Schull.
There is a priest buried in the churchyard in Schull named Fr. OConner and another names Fr. John Barry in Stouke graveyard. Many people go making rounds to Fr. John Barry's tomb on the twentieth of June each year.
Once there was a man and woman passing Cíllhaingeal graveyard and there was gravel thrown at them. Shortly after the woman died. Cíllhaingeal graveyard is bounded by a river and there is also a river in Schull graveyard.
In the western side of the Glaun hill up east of Timothy Driscoll's there is a kind of grave. Long ago there was a chieftain living here and people say he was buried there and some treasure buried with him. On top of the clay there is a heap of stones and there is a fairly large stone standing in the centre and there is some writing carved on it.
This writing is nearly blotted out now. It was read by many people in olden times. No one ever tried to find the treasure.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 18:03
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to try and capture what they thought must be an old witch. On the day appointed they met at Corbane and half the countryside was there also to enjoy what they thought must be a great hunt and sure enough they were not disappointed, for directly they got into the field up popped the hare, shook himself, hopped of for some distance on three legs. The twelve hounds were immediately let loose on him and sure enough such play was never seen since or before. All round Corbane and Kilcooley until the majority of the dogs were played out. The hare then took down Craughwells boreen and when they reached the gate outside the Church yard there was only two dogs in pursuit. One being the black dog from the Tanyard, the other a Killimore dog. The Killimore dog lay there unable to go any further leaving the Loughrea dog alone to pursue the hare. The hare headed straight for the castle along the old level car-way. The hound so close to his heels that the people who witnessed the hunt could hear the dog snap his teeth at the hare. They also said that they could hear the hare crying " blood and 'ounds" He headed straight for the pidgeon house and entering a shore he was never seen after.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:57
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There are five or six graveyards in this district situated at, Schull, Stouke, Dunbeacon, Cíll Mod, Cíllhaingeal, Bawn na-Cnocán, all of which are still in use. Cíllhaingeal is round shaped. There is a ruined church in Schull graveyard and also in Cíllhaingeal graveyard. Schull, Dunbeacon, and Cíllhaingeal slope south or south east. There are tombs and crosses in Schull and in mostly all the graveyards. The crosses are made of iron or wood. On the iron crosses little flowers of iron are put on to them as ornaments. People are buried within the ruins of the church.
Every family has its own piece of the graveyard and when it is full a new piece is again bought. There are a couple of disused graveyards in the district. They are called "cílls". There is one in south Lowertown and one in Cíllromáin. One is situated in Killbronogul in a field owned by Richard Willis which is now overgrown with ferns. Unbaptised children were buried in "cílls". There is also a "cíll" in Coosheen in which there are head stones. It would cover a rood of ground. There are letters
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:33
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ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:33
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ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:32
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ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:32
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ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:31
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Dr. Hicks, a native of Derreenatra, was the landlord of Mount Gabriel. He took away half of the mountain from the people. He built a fence from the mine road across to "the but". He put cattle on it himself. They used to go around eating the people's crops.
He also cut down some of the finest trees that grew on Mount Gabriel and shipped them across to England.
Thomas Marmion, a native of Skibbereen, was the landlord of South Glaun. His agent was Miss Kitty Mac Carthy, a native of Glaun. Marmion was considered as good but she was considered as bad. She evicted a family called Goggins and gave them a bad one. She also took some of their land and raised the rent. The people should do what the landlord wished them to do.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:26
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pointed prongs, and on the outer end of one a sharp blade was attached. Croppy pikes do not exist in the district now-a-days. Oftentimes, battles and skirmishes took place in the fields all over the country.
Miss Gloster was the last landowner of Glaun. Her father, Mr. Gloster married Miss Clarke the former landowner. Miss Gloster's agent was T. H. Marmion, a native of Cappoquin, Co. Waterford. He gathered the rent in Schull, in a hotel, on March and October. Miss Gloster lived in England.
Richard Notter, was the landlord of Lissacaha. He lived in the south of Lissacaha, and his house is now occupied by Mrs. Wilcox. He was considered a bad landlord. He took some land and bog from Mr. Hegarty, a native of Lissacaha. The people had to buy the turf from him then.
The people that hadn't the rent paid, their cattle was taken and rent to the "Pound". There was a "Pound" in Ballydevlin, near Goleen, in which the people's cattle were put. If they hadn't the rent paid before nine days they cows would be taken and "canted". The old, women used earry west grass from Glaun, as they would get nothing to eat at the "Pound", and milk them then. The ruins of the "Pound" are still to be seen.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:21
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of the County Galway who used to come long distances to get his ploughs as he was supposed to be the best ploughmaker in the district and his ploughs were famous all over the two counties.
He was also famous for making spades, shovels and fire-cranes. He used to also make coulters and mould-boards for ploughs.
At that time the other parts of ploughs were made of wood. Iron-gates were also made by this smith, some of which are in existance yet.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:16
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Long ago, sidecars of bailiffs and peelers travelled the road from Skibbereen. Bailiffs were special men whose business it was to take the value of the rent in cattle and other goods from people who were unable to pay it.
Sometimes the people hid their cows on the bailiffs by driving them to a neighbor's field and milking them there.
Tithes were collected in the district also by the landlord's agent for the landlord, as a tribute from his tenants. Tithes meant that one third of every field's produce was to be confiscated.
If it were a field of potatoes, every third ridge was taken. If it were a field of corn in stacks, they agent's men would knock the stack and take one third of the number of sheafs in it. The same would be done at every stack in the field. Othertimes they took the whole of every third stack.
The people resisted this law and when going to cut the corn or dig the potatoes, they carried all procurable weapons, such as hatchets, pikes, etc. A few had "croppy pikes". They were distinguished from the ordinary pikes by having a long handle, three sharp
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:13
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There was a blacksmith named Pat Mulligan living in Garrynagran in the Parish og Dysart in Co. Roscommon at the beginning of last century.
He had his forge on the roadside between Ballyforan and Dysart. He used to make ploughs for the farmers who lived near him, and also for farmers
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:08
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To save the life of Cadogan
Their efforts were in vain;
The judge decreed that he should die
A traitor to the crown,
No more to see his native hills
Or visit Bantry town.
XIII
The names of Dennis and his band
Are loathsome now to hear,
They dare not visit Bantry
Their hearts are full of fear;
The grass they tread will wither
And never again will grow,
When trampled by Iscariots
Like Dennis and Dukelow.
XIV
Now like the owl that shuns the day
When darkness is around,
They creep from their hiding places
Where reptiles doth abound;
May Cadogan's spirit rest in peace
On that bright heavenly shore,
Before that court above the clouds
Where sorrow is no more.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:07
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"Pruigín, Pruigín."
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:06
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When calling hens I say "Tuk, Tuk, For ducks I say "Bathy, Bathy," For Turkeys I say "Beeb Beeb." For chickens I say "Chick, Chick."
When calling pigs I say "Hourish." For calves I say "Suck, Suck. For cows I say "Pruig, Pruig or
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:02
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Baile sathach mór atá ann agus é suidhte cúig míle ó Gaillimh. 'Sé an fath go nglaoidhtear an t-ainm sin air, ná mar gheall ar an méid cairneán cloch atá thart timcheall an bhaile. Tá go leor daoine fíor-Gaedhealach(?) ann agus tá an-eolas acu faoi cúrsaí an t-saoghail fadó. Tá furmhór de na daoine saidbbhear agus tighthe sluinne(?) acu.
Bhí clú agus cáil ag Cearnmhór(?) nuair a bhí an cogadh ar siubhal 'sa mbliadhain 1916-1922, mar bhí na daoine ag teiceadh ó na Sasanaigh.
Tá baile beag ann ar a dtugtar "Baile na nGrialluise" mar gheall ar an méid Ghrialluise atá i n-a gcomhnuidhe ann. Sé an t-ainm is coitchiant 'san áit é.
San am fadó marbhuigheadh píléar ag an gcrois-bhóthar agus rinneadh amhrán faoi. Tá an t-amhrán sin ar eolas ag na Sean-Daoine anois.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 17:00
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From him there was no moan;
He knew he would be murdered
As thousands were before,
By Norbury and Lord O' Brien
Throughout old Erin's shore.
X
Though young in years, his spirit proud
O' Brien could not break,
He tried to cheat Norbury
And his own life take;
He knew what Wolfe Tone did
When in his youth and prime,
He tried to do the same
He thought it was no crime.
XI
Long life to Paddy Meathe
His name will never die,
The judge and jury in the court
He boldly did defy;
He knew the trial would be a farce
Presided by O' Brien,
The Judas of the Irish race
From Cork to Ballyline.
XII
Gilhooly, Flynn and Barry
Tried with might and main
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:55
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The peelers in pursuit of him
No evidence could find.
Through treachery they did conspire
To gain that heroe's mind.
VII
Another trial the jury packed
The spawn of Cromwell's breed,
To hand this gallant farmer's son
At last they succeed;
The jury found him guilty
The Judge's charge was vile,
With gown and wig a la Norbury
A native of the soil.
VIII
And now his spirit hovers
From Cork to Bantry Bay,
For Dennis and Dukelow
Both swore his life away;
When he received his sentence
Disappointment did abound,
Among his friends and countrymen
Who gathered all around.
IX
He faced the laws and prison walls
Like Emmet and Wolfe Tone,
Despite the judge and jury
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:53
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agus d'athruigh sé isteach i gcloich í. Sin an fath nár chríocnuigh siad an tuar.
Tá an chloch sin ann fós. Deirtear freisin gur cuireadh Righ na h-Eireann ann ach ní creideann na daoine é.
Deirtear freisin go mbiodh airgead agus ór i bhfolach ag na daoine ann fadó.
Tá an chloc seo cosamhail le mhnaoi agus tá a lán sgríobhnóireachta air. Tá cnoc beag ag bun na Cloice seo agus cúpla cloch caithte annso is annsiúd.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:51
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He swore I was the man,
He saw upon the staircase
With a pistol in my hand.
IV
The jury found him guilty
One bleak December day,
And the Judge made up his mind
To take his life away;
He was murdered in old Ireland
Far across the sea,
One thousand men like Cadogan
Would set old Ireland free,
V
When they took him to the prison
No danger did he fear,
He knew that he was innocent
This gallant mountaineer;
The jury thought the same of him
But some decreed it so,
Despite the perjured evidence
Of Dennis and Dukelow
VI
The blood hounds and informers
Baffled at the sea,
Hounded, gallant, Cadogan
Which proved his destiny;
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:50
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Tá tuar i n-aice le mo theach ar a dtugtar tuar Ros-Cam. Tá sé i n-acie an roilig. Cuireadh cóir ann(?) cúpla bliadhan ó shoin. Tá sé suidhte in n-aice na fairrge agus is féidir é d'feiscint go maith ó'n mbóthar mór.
Tagann go leor daoine ann gach Samhradh agus i rith na bliadhna. Tá sé thuas ar bhárr cnuic. Bhí seipéal i n-aice leis uair amháin ach níl ach fothracha an t-seipéil ann anois.
Nuair a bhí na daoine ag déanamh tuar seo fadó thárla go dtáinigh an "Chailleach Bhearach" thar an áit seo. Ar sise "Má bhíonn sibh ag obair níos fuide is gearr go sroicfidh sibh an spéir. Chuir sí draoidhteacht ortha annsin agus d'imthigh leithí. Ní raibh siad i ndon aon chloch eile a thógáil as sin amach. Tháinigh fearg mhór ortha agus rith duine acu i n-a diaidh. Bhí slat draoidheachta aige agus nuair a tháingh sé suas leithí thug sé buille de'n t-slait dí
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:46
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A Tribute to Tim Cadogan
I
Tim Cadogan was a farmer’s son
His lawful debts he paid.
Of landlord or of bailiff
He never was afraid.
No Bird, no, crow, no magpie
His spirit proud could tame,
A rough and rugged son of toil
From the Kerry hills he came.
II
One day he went to Bantry
‘Twas in the afternoon,
As he had often done before
In Winter time and June,
A bird was winged that morning
A minion of the crown,
No loss is he to Bantry
Or to any other town.
III
It was Walter Dennis,
He did my cause betray,
That cursed vile informer
He swore my life away;
Before the Judge and Jury
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:46
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man. A song was then composed about him, which is:-
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:44
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hills there also, except on the north side.
The land is fairly good throughout, but it is very good in the south side. There is only one river of any importance in Gubbeen, which separates Lowertown from Gubbeen. Trout, salmon, and eel are to be found in it.
Gubbeen itself got its name from the mouth or inlet which is in the south side by the sea.
Famed Gub
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:41
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There are very few ruins in Gubbeen now, the ruins of two dwelling houses, and a big corn store, being the only ones. The owner of the corn store was called Fred Brown, the Tyrant. He bought the corn from the neighboring farmers, and sold it to English traders who came for it in ships. One of the ships was called "Gubbeen". Fred Brown was drowned coming from England. One of the dwelling houses was occupied by a family called Courtney who died at the time of the famine and the other house was occupied by a family called Woods. They removed from that to Corthna, and their descendants are still living there.
There are sites of houses also pointed out by old people. Once house was occupied by a man called Murphy who emigrated to America. Another house situated near the road to Glaun was occupied by a family called Driscolls, who died at the time of the famine.
Several families emigrated to America in the famine times. Their unoccupied houses thrown down and the stones were used to build other houses. There is only one bog in Gubbeen, and there are very little
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:37
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Tá Tobar na Caillighe suidhte i n-aice stáisiún Úarán Mór.
Deirtear gur leig an Chailleach Béarra a sgíth annso nuair a bhí sí ag dul le chabhair go dtí Ó Suilleabháin Bearra.
Tá sgéal eile faoi freisin. Nuair a bhí an Chailleach Bearra marbh tháinigh gach sean-bhean ó'n áit chun a gcuid éadaigh agus a gcuid gruaige a nigheadh.
Bhí tailliúr i n-a chomhnuidhe in n-Uarán Mór. Gach oidhche ar a dó-dhéag a chlog théigheadh sé go dtí an tobar. Nuair a chuaidh an fear go dtí an tobar oidhche amháin i n-áit buicéad uisge fuair sé buicéad fíona.
Gach seacht mbliadhain i n-a dhiaidh sin bheadh fíon le fághail ann.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:32
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The townland of Gubbeen, is in the parish of Schull, the County of Cork, and the West Carbery Barony. It is bounded on the north by "Fionn's Ridge, on the east by Ardmanagh and Corthna, and on the south by the Atlantic, and on the west by the Gubbeen River, which separates Gubbeen from Lowertown.
There are about eighty residents living there, which consists of twenty-two families. All the houses of the district are slated, save one thatched one. The family name most common is Driscoll and O'Regan. There are only four old people, over seventy living there. They are:-
William O' Brien, Gubbeen, Schull, Co. Cork,
Kathleen Sweetnam, Gubbeen, Schull, Co. Cork,
Mrs. Coughlan, Gubbeen, Schull, Co. Cork,
William Coughlan, Gubbeen, Schull, Co. Cork
None of them can speak Irish, but they can tell fine English stories.
The houses were more numerous locally in former days. In several parts of the district, streets of houses were to be seen, in which lived tinkers, weavers, and other tradesmen.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:22
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Some twenty yards below the grave or rather twenty yardrs or so across the bog is Manus's Well.
It is a well of clear spring water rising out of the bog. But the bog being only a few yards from the base of the hill the water evidently rises of the clay from a fissure or crevice in the harder hill bottom.
However that may be the people call it "Manus's Well" and it is very much used by turf cutters for making tea or for drinking. The water is tinged with iron and is very cold with no "taste of the moss on it" Summer and Winter it runs about the same rate and about the same coldness which argues its deep origin.
Manus is surely the one person of the Panish whose name will not be forgotten. Notoriety is as good if not better for purposes of immortality of name, than mere fame.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:19
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Many years ago a man whose first name was Manus and whose surname was probably McLaughlin hanged himself from a rib.
He was a Carrowmena man and the two townlands Lecamy and Carrowmena disputed not as to who should have his grave but as to who should NOT have it. He was refused Christian burial.
The townlands decided to bury him on the march in the wild bog at the foot of the hill to the east of the Glen Road. However the people possible not being good surverors he was buried on the Lecamy side some 20 yards and Lecamy people look on the fact as a grievance.
A turf road crosses at his feet or head - who knows or cares. His coffin was to be seen some 30 or 40 years ago with some bones.
It shows the savage nature of former times and the callousness of the present that such a thing could happen and that the bones of a person having blood relations in the place should be let lie like those of a cow or a horse. This is no fable. I saw the coffin end and name bore on
P.T.O.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:14
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For dancing on the river bank
Down where the waters meet
VII
Those lively boys and charming girls
Of sixty years ago
Have left this sad and dreary world
Of wars of toil and woe
An aged few are lingering on
Old Fenians to the ground
Who loved to join at freeing their land
The sporting lads from Glaun
[Poll an Digin a remarkable tarn on the top of Mount Gabriel. There are many legends about it.]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 16:10
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V
On Sunday when each lively boy
Would step the horn pipe
Those jigs and reels they did enjoy
And dance with keen delight
¨"Follow me down to Carlow"
The winsome "Bonny Kate
"The wind that shook the barley grain
"The pigeon on the gate"
VI
Their sports were on the velvet green
And down the river side
The football match, the hurling team,
The crowds from far and wide
The manly boys came down the hills
For dancing in the dell
The colleens fair came o'er the glens
Of lovely heather bell
VII
The crowds would join "the country dance"
When Sunday sport was o'er
The leading pair were lovely Nance
And Jack from Poll an Óir
The evening breeze was cool and grand
The violin music sweet
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 15:51
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When Seán was in his prime
At shooting cock to climb his way
For lonely Poll an Digin
The eagle there hath built her nest
High oer the heather glen
The badger goes to sleep and rest
And Reynard leaves his den
III
He often tracked thro´ moor and val
And sheltry wood for game
As shot rang out, he winged his prey
And seldom fired in vain
With Fosco down the rolling plain
Where partridge would be found
He broke the laws the tyrant frame
The sporting lad from Glaun
IV
The Fenian boys should cross the stream
And down Rathura hill
Where Seán would train the hurling team
To pike and rifle drill
His violin tunes were a rich treat
At every ball around
His dancing was correct and neat
The sporting lad from Glaun
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 15:38
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I
'Tis sixty years since Seán was young.
And well-known in Schull town
A favorite with his dog and gun
This sporting lad from Glaun
Chorus-
That land renowned for dancing
That grand old Irish game
Dan the Young and Clancy
And Tadhg from Turim Céin
II
In frost and snow twas only play
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 15:33
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bottom inside is covered with small stones. It is supposed to be some kind of grave.
Glaun was renowned for music and dancing some years ago. Michael Kelleher who died some years ago was famous for dancing and music. A song was composed about him called "The Sporting Lad from Glaun" but the name Seán was given instead of his name.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 15:25
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34. Sore lips or wounds. This cure is a general used for sore or breaking-out lips. It is called by old people the "scannán" cure. The part of an onion called the "scannán" which is like tissue paper is put on the sore place together with some cream.
35. Nettle juice is a cure for rheumatism when the plant is boiled in water and strained, and the liquid drank.
36. Warts. The cure for warts is to fill a little bag of stones: - a stone for every wart you have, and place the bag on the road. It is supposed that the wart will go to the person who takes up the bag. Another cure is to rub to the wart the froth of the potatoe-water when it is beginning to boil. Also to rub the water which is got from the pockets or [?] crevices of a rock to the warts.
37. Whooping cough. is cured by giving some milk to drink in a caucer to a ferret. Leave him drink some, and give the remainder to the person who has the whooping cough. Another cure is to tie a necklace of insects called "hairy Jacks" around the neck of the infected person and leave
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 14:30
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Dheunfad sé róistín, crodh trólach agus tlú
Na bior slachtmhar néata is gan breug na briogún
Nach álainn a dhéanfadh sé gráta phárlúis
An 'Jack' is an slabhra chun iompú ar scriú
Casúr deas néata, lenú agus ceapórd
Flyhook don iascaire is dubhán le h-aghaidh an dreóil
Meanuithe na gréasaithe agus tarraingí na mbróg
Siosúr, snáthad, meuracán is lannsa chuisleóir.

Míniú cuid des na focail san dán reamh-ráite seo :-
Gúiste. The instrument which makes hole for an tarachar.
Gribím. Small spades for cutting turf
Pitséirí. Knives for snagging trees.
Traich. A fork for killing salmon in shallow water.
Cara. A car minus wheels for taking turf down mountain sides.
Aisteal. Instrument used for combing flax.
Rácam. A mallet for pounding flax.
Cona. Nubs.
Bruideóg. A knife for killing sheep.
Cuing. A plough swing.
Croch Trólach. Crane attached to hearth in farmhouse. Potkooks hang from it.
Briogún. Hook used for hanging meat by butchers.
Léun. A trowel.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 14:15
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Dheanfadh mo scafaire tarrainge agus crúdh
Agus machine den bhfaision a bhuailfeadh arbhar
Lúbán don gcara fearsad is ughaim
Na glais agus na h-aistil, an eácam agus an comb
Sluasad agus poker, haingéir is pot-crúc
Agus flesh-fork ná fiarfadh gan breugh is sgiomóir
Béalbach do na srianta, don diallaid stíoróp
Spuir fé na rowlers agus trumpaí chun ceoil.
Dheunfadh sé geata den bhFaision ar dtúis
Boltha agus glas cnó agus scriú
Bannda roth-chairte agus acastóirí umhamhail
An linchpin agus an washer ag cur an fuireann ar siúl
Úirlisíchúipéire is fear déanta na mbróg
Stíl don mbuistéir cléibhear is bruideóg
Drill don choiréaladóir, dingtreun is an t-órd.
Na dhiaidh sindheunfadh sé ceacht gan mhoill
Na mbeadh iarla tóin riasta ná fiarfadh a ghreim
Hannlaí clár-sgeithe, cros-béim agus cuing
Soc, cóltar, más agus gan breugh an beuldoimhin
An cob-yoke, an bolta ia an slabhra ar an gcuing.
Sluasadh agus píce a bheadh air ba ladhar
Úirlis na saor a dheunfadh le faghairt
Stíl, slat-phampa agus ancaire don luing.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 13:56
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Bhíodh an duine seo ina chónaí idir Mhillerí agus Lios Mór
Sé an fear ceadna Maolcatha ar bhóthar an Cloichín nach maireann anois - a thug an t-amhrán seo domsa sa mbliain 1920.
Éistigheadh gach sár-fhear páirteach, ciúin, suairc
Go neósfaidh mé dán díbh ar an ráaire gan gruaim
Go bhfuightheá sa chéardchain gach áis a bheadh uait
Ar bhruach geal na trágha tá lámh le Lios Mór
An gúiste is an taráchar, an tál is an tuagh
Siséil, iarnaí, plána agus saw, beag nó mór
Gribíní is sleánta, corráin is speal shuairc
Scuirse breá ráinne agus grafán, slachmhar buan.
Dhéanfadh mo laoch-sa an méid sin gan teimheal
Agus tuille gur bhinn liom d'insint gan mhoill
Guna agus geur-chleith, bayonet agus claidheamh
Agus piostal a shéidfeadh na piléir as ár radharc
Billeóga, pitséirí, ráipéar agus spaic
An traich chun na h-éisc do thraochadh ar an linn
Na deimhis agus razors, gimléad agus wires
Agus lansaí, fairéiri na mbeadh lann de gach saghas.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 13:44
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An pósadh bhí i gCána
Bhí Rí na nGrásta ann i bpearsa
Bhí, agus a Mhuire Mháthair is narbh álainn í an bhainfheis
An chuileachta bhí i gcionn chláir bhí fíon ortha i n-easnamh
Agus an t-uisce bhí ins na h-áthraibh nár bhréag é le blaiseadh
Sí an Mhaighdean bhréag naomha í nár dhein riamh an peaca
An plannda úd do shíileuig ón Rí ceart do Fearra
Cuireadh bhúr n-athuinge go dílis chun Croí ceart a dalta
Chun an ród a bheith saor againn ag triall chun an Flaithis.
A Athair agus a Íosa, Rí-geal na cruinne
D'iomchuirig an choróin spíceach agus truimeacht na croise
Id stracadh sid straoileadh idir daoine gan chumann
Chun na glais úd do scaoileadh bhí choidhche i nár gcoinnibh
Nach ró-bhreágh na tabhartanais a fuairis ó do mháithrín
Le gráin ar an bpeacadh 'seadh thonaigh na grásta
Do chomhacht a bhí go mór as do thróchaire gan faillís
Go mbí Fuil R na Glóire beidh go deo ins an gCaillís.
Nach ró-bhreá an sólás thug Rí na nGrást dúinn in aisce
A chuid fola agus feola mar lón dos na peacaig
Ach mairg a chuireann spéis i n-ór buí ná i rachmus
Mar níl ann ach mar bheadh lóchán seachas glóire na bhFlaitheas.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 12:48
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There is still another story told about the same hound. There was a hare tobe found in a certain park in Carbane and no dog was ever able to capture him. So ther was a challenge between Loughrea and Killimore to see which could produce the best dogs.Such party taking six dogs
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 12:45
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pursuing the hare he stood stock still on top of the enbankment. Dolphin cursing the dog for loosing the hare as he thought so silly and coming up to the fort where the dog stood to his great surprise and what did he see but a little old woman picking wool of the small bushes which grew inside the fort. "Good morrow to you" said he. "Good morrow to yourself" said she. "Isnt it early your out" said he. "Isnt it early yourself is out" said she. "Did you see a hare passing this way" said he. "Did yourself see a hare" said she. The man thinking that she might have the hare concealed in her apron moved to search her but the dog with all hairs on an end rushed against his legs to hinder him. It was only then he realized that the old lady was a witch. With a creepy feeling he returned home and never went hunting on early Sunday mornings afterwards.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 12:40
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Once upon a time and not so very long ago either there was a Tanyard in Loughrea. The very yard now owned by Fintan Sweeney. The owner of the Tanyard kept a black hound and not a single white rib of hair could be found on him. It was believed by the people in olden times that such dogs were able to kill witches. The orignal home of the Dolphins was Clougharoasty. Now at that time a member of the Dolphin family who would be great grand-father of the present James Dolphin worked in the Tanyard. He used to come home every Saturday afternoon taking the hound with him for a hunt on the following day. One Sunday morning he awoke early and looking through the window what should he see but a hare skipping about just outside the house. "Be dad" said he to himself "that's very handy". He ran out bare-footed taking the dog with him and putting him on to the hare both hare and dog headed directly for a fort some six or seven hundred yards away from the start. Dolphin always keeping his eyes on the pursuer and the pursued he saw the hare top the enbankment of the fort with the hound close behind but instead of
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 12:33
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he saw a woman lying along the aisle, and she exclaimed, "Stop now Peter Kelly you have me all covered with blood". The hounds were yelling outside the window, when he came out. He called them up, and returned home, sad of heart to have chased the hare.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 12:31
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Years ago there was a hare in Limehill cover, that nobody could kill. Peter Kelly had two great black hounds, and he said he would not stop until he would kill the hare. He tried twice, and on the third day, he roused the hare, and away went the hounds after him, on along until they came to Tynagh, and the hare kept going until it went through (through) the window of the Chapel. Peter Kelly immediately rushed to the doors to see if they were closed, and on looking in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 12:27
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Sitting down to eat, he never took off his hat. The woman then told him, it was usual to take it off. So when he had just the hat taken off, he then came to himself and related every thing that had happened.
He could not believe after all he went through, how he was safe. It is said that it was the fairies, that was leading him astray.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 12:25
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One wild evening in Spring there was a man named Jack Berry from Killnadeema leaving the town of Loughrea on horseback. He took the wrong road, and kept travelling, thinking he would soon reach home. Before long he came to the village of Shangarry, and not knowing where he was, he asked aman was he far from Killnadeema. He directed him on to the right road, but unfortunately he went on to Kilrickle, over hedges, walls, and bogs. When he reached the village, he did not know what place he was in. At this time it was about seven o'clock in the morning. He knocked at a door, and a woman gave him a cup of tea
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 12:22
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the Parochial house. Up until the last two Priests left, this woman annoyed them several times. Then it is said that her time was spent, and on of the Priests said some masses for her, in order that she would not be seen again.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 12:20
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Some forty years ago there lived an old woman alone in the Parish of Tynagh. When she felt that death was near at hand, she sent for the Priest and owing to some reason or another he did not come to her. The second time she sent for him, he never came. So on the third message, he at last went, when he reached her house, she was then dead and three candles lighting some where near her bed. For years after, this old woman tormented the Priests that came to the Parish. On one occasion this Priest was near his house driving his horse. The Priests at that time had only horses and gigs as they were called, and he was was taken horse and gig (and) in over the wall, where he spent all night travelling through the wood, that is not far from
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 10:46
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and let the roof fall in and some in some cases they would dig out the foundation with crobars and let the walls fall down. They had men with them for this purpose called the crobar Brigade.
If there was not a vacant house for these families convenient to them. The people of the nearest parishes would gather and they were known in some cases to erect a house in one day and leave it almost ready for the evicted man and his wife to live in that night. There was a house built for one man in the townland of Crea.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 10:42
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it was turned into a priest's residence and a new church was rected by Rev. Fr. Hugh McGovern.
During this time the people were very poor and they used to work for three pence for clay. By this way they made a road and a cupla bridges in the parish.
Some time ago the greater portion of Glan was owned by a landlord whose name was Lord Ainsely. He lived in the Co. Down and he had an agent to collect the rent for him who lived in Cavan town. The people of Glan would have to go to Cavan town to pay the rent which is a distance of thirty miles. I heard it told that there was one woman who used to walk to Cavan town and she would be home in time in time to milk her cows that night which is a distance of sixty miles to and from it.
As usual some of the landlords were very cruel and bad. If any of the tenants did not pay their rent which had to be paid once a year. The landlord would send the Sheriff and a certain member of police and some times the horse soldiers came to Glasy.
But they never left the road unless they were needed.
There were (very) three house in this neighbourhood which were demolished because they could not pay the rent. They cut the [acp]?
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 10:33
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The following are the animals we have at home.
Cow
hens
ducks
donkey
turkeys
pig
Some people have names in their cows. Kitty, Kerry, Tut, Polly, and Daisy. Some cows are tied by the necks. They are tied with chains. They do(es) not make the tienes lockly. The cow house is make of ten and it is colled a stall. These are the calls for animals coll, coll, for cows suck, suck, for caves tuck, tuck, for hens chick, chick, for chickens wat, wat for pigs. If you had some of your
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 10:08
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The most harmful weeds on our farm are chicken-weed and the thistle.
The thistle does harm to grazing fields, because it keeps the animals from eating the grass.
The chicken weed is harmful, because it spreads.
Rushes will not grow in good land.
Whins grow in good land.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 10:06
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The most dangerous weed growing on a farm is Fox-glove, as it is deadly poison. Any animals that eat it will die. Ragweed spreads rapidly.
There are other weeds used for their medicinal properties. Dandelions cure warts and nettles are good for the blood.
In olden times the people made all their medicines from herbs and never had a doctor.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 10:04
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The names of the animals on the farm are horses, cows, calves, bullocks and sheep.
The horses occupy a stable. Each horse has a separate box with cobble-stone floor. Before him is the manger from which he is fed. The manger is about four feet high, with hay on one side, and a box for holding grain on the other. The horse is tied by the neck with a rope, which runs through a hole bored in the centre of the manger and which has a block fastened at the end, thereby giving the animal complete head freedom.
The cows dwell in a cowhouse or byre, as it is called. The byre is finished with concrete and has windows on both sides. They are tied with a chain, which is fastened to an iron run bedded in cement. Before them is a concrete feeding place about nine inches in depth.
Calves are closed in a shed, which is well ventilated. They are fed with milk, hay, turnips, meals etc.
when driving horses we say, "Gee up!" or make a clucking noise with the tongue.
When driving cattle in our district, we say "Hep" Hep" or "Ho! Ho!"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 09:57
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Some years ago, Thomas Jackson of Lisnaboe, Kingscourt, had a famous horse which won most of the big Races in England and Ireland for a few seasons. The horse's name was "Mudross".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 09:56
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Travelling Folk sometimes come around our district, generally in pony vans, selling articles and looking for old clothes and food. They are considered a nuisance. People sometimes buy from them. Their wares are generally tables, made of hazel-wood, bound with briar, also straw mats, pictures, laces, camphor balls.
They usually erect their camps on by-roads and they emerge from there to sell to the local people.
They sometimes travel in families, but more often in bands, and are usually seen on the approach of the local fair-day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 09:42
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The only holy wells in our district are Diana's and St. Kernan's well.
St. Kernan's well is situated at Carnaross in Co. Meath. People visit it on the first Sunday of August to say prayers. After prayers, there are sports, football, donkey races or sack races.
Diana's well is situated on the road side at Diana's cross, in Co. Meath. This well is also visited on the first Sunday of August. There are offerings left and prayers said, after which there are sports and a Concert held in a field near by.
The well rises out of a rock and there is a thick hedge growing over it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 09:38
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a large stone about a mile from our house, which is supposed to be about seven or eight ton weight. It is supposed to have been thrown by a Giant from the rock of Carrickleck. The marks of his hands are still to be seen on its surface. People have made several attempts to move it, but it is impossible.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 09:32
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It is very seldom that travelling folk call at our home, but they used to do so long ago.
These people were very poor. They sold small articles to make some money, but only some people bought from them.
Sometimes the travellers were welcome.
They usually stayed for one or two nights, and then they went on their way. It was seldom they brought food with them.
They travelled on foot in bands of perhaps ten or fifteen; sometimes they had carts.
Very often they came for fair days.
They usually brought news from distant parts and the local people came and listened to them.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 09:29
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The fairs are held in the towns.
Buyers still come to the farmers houses
There were fairs formerly which are not held now. The reason for this is because they were not a success; no people attended them. The people do not remember any traditions about fairs been held on hills, in neighbourhood of cemeteries or castles, forts, etc.
The town fairs are held in a special fairplace, which is called a "fair-green"
When an animal is sold luck money is given, no matter how much it is, it is called the "luck-penny". The "luck-penny" is calculated by the sum of money paid for the animal, if a large sum is paid, the bigger the "luck-penny"
When a bargain is made they strike hands to show they are satisfied.
When an animal is sold a halter or rope is given with it, especially with horses.
When an animal is sold it is
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 09:22
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
In our district a copper-coloured sky generally denotes rain. If the sun rises red it is the surest sign of rain. When the new moon is to be seen on the first or second day it is the sign of rain. When great number of stars is to be seen in the sky and some of them running it is a sign of wild stormy weather. Morning clouds dark and heavy indicate thunder and lightning.
A rainbow in the morning is a sign of and weather and terrible wild showers while a rainbow at night shows an improvement in a few days.
Wind in the north or east in Spring is a sign of dry weather while from any other art is a sign of rain. In our district south or south-west wind brings most rain.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 09:16
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putting the flat cake on a flag. This flag was put standing in front of the fire and was propped by another stone and left behind it.
Another way was by cooking on a griddle. The cake thus cooked was very hard and was considered by the people to be, apart from being healthy, a deterrent to decayed teeth.
Tea was a treat. It was only taken at Christmas or feast times.
When people went on a journey they took a few farrels of oaten bread with them. This was considered a more wholesome food than any other and as well they could fast and travel longer on it.
Among the better classes in the neighbourhood a practice was followed of killing a sheep and dividing it among the neighbours. Each householder did this in his turn. Each person
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 09:11
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was usually one which was hinged to the wall, had only two legs, and could be lowered or raised at will.
Fish was a common food in the neighbourhood. Fish were caught plentifully in the summer evenings. They were cleaned, dried and smoked. Then they were hung up in the corner of the Kitchen.
At Hallow E'en they used to make a boxty cake and boxty dumplings. When the cake (made from raw potatoes grated, squeezed and mixed with flour) was ready to cook the hearthstone was swept very clean and the cake was put on it. A cabbage leaf was spread cover it and this was covered with red ashes.In the morning it was ready for use.
The dumplings were boiled in a pot of boiling water and eaten, Sometimes with butter, sometimes with milk and sugar poured over them and other times with bacon gravy.
Oaten bread was also eaten. It was cooked by
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 09:05
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The usual number of meals was three a day. Tea was used in the houses of the wealthier once a day.
Oaten and Indian porridge, potatoes, home-cured bacon, eggs, cabbage, potatoes, turnips and buttermilk were the usual commodities.
Dinner was the principal meal. The potatoes were put in a home--made basket left on a pot in the middle of the floor. Each one had a porringer of buttermilk. Each one peeled his potatoes with the nail of him thumb, which was grown long for this special purpose. Salt was left on a dish in the middle of the potatoes and each one dipped his potatoe in the salt.
The breakfast was similarly dished up but the porridge was poured on to a dish and left on the centre of the table. This table
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 08:56
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are five forths in the neighbourhood of the school. They are on the five highest hills, Rahultan, LeggaKelly, Coole, Drumanny and Derryhoo.
Drumanny forth is in that townland, at the back of Hugh Connolly's house. It is far back from the road and is situated on the top of a hill. On a clear day Killoughter graveyard can be seen.
Coole forth is on a hill between Cloverhill and Redhills. It is a large forth.
Rahulton forth is in the townland of Rahulton. It is supposed to have been built by St. Ultan and thence the name.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 08:46
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In this district there are a great deal of poor people travel-ling about. They live in tents along the main road or in fields. Some of them live in caravans with wheels on them which are drawn from place to place with horses.
The people that live in those houses are called the travelling folk. They are so called as they are always travelling about from house to house. Some of them sell articles such as pins, needles, delph, laces, mirrors and all sorts of household things. Some people buy things and others do not.
When they go to a house they ask alms such as bread, flour, eggs
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 08:46
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it was turned into a priest's residence and a new church was rected by Rev. Fr. Hugh McGovern.
During this time the people were very poor and they used to work for three pence for clay. By this way they made a road and a cupla bridges in the parish.
Some time ago the greater portion of Glan was owned by a landlord whose name was Lord Ainsely. He lived in the Co. Down and he had an agent to collect the rent for him who lived in Cavan town. The people of Glan would have to go to Cavan town to pay the rent which is a distance of thirty miles. I heard it told that there was one woman who used to walk to Cavan town and she would be home in time in time to milk her cows that night which is a distance of sixty miles to and from it.
As usual some of the landlords were very cruel and bad. If any of the tenants did not pay their rent which had to be paid once a year. The landlord would send the Sheriff and a certain member of police and some times the horse soldiers came to Glasy.
But they never left the road unless they were needed.
There were twenty three house in this neighbourhood which was diminished because they could not pay the rent. They cut the [?]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 08:43
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During the Penal days there were very few families living in this parish. As there were no roads to get in or out apart one which is still to be seen. This road: was not fit for anyone only those on horseback and it was leading from Piacíar an mbothar to the black river which was a distance of nine miles.
It is also known that during this time the Mass would be delivered on the side of the mountain bordering Cavan and Leitrim. This spot was called "Aoth an t-ságairt". It was the one priest that would do four or five parishes. The remainder of the Mass rock is still to be seen and it is supposed to be a very holy place.
As time rolled by and as the people began to grow more plentiful they moved down to the foot of the mountain to Carrick West. Then in about 1796 a small church was built. This church was very simply built and roofed with thatch. Again in about 1856
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 08:41
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And he looking at his daughter.
Agus gheóbham arís an crúisgín is bíodh sé lán.
ix.
So now my song is ended,
And my pen is weary,
Success attend the gentlemen,
That carried on Cork races,
Many truth and hospitality abound,
Our little nation
And many trade and commerce flourish,
In our towns for future ages.
Agus gheobham arís an crúisgín is bíodh sé lán.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 08:40
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It is there you would see confectioners,
With sugarsticks and dainties,
The oranges the lozenges,
The lemons and the raisins,
There were gingerbread and spices there
To accomodate the o´ladies,
And pig crúibíns for twopence,
To be picking while you´re able
Agus gheóbham arís an crúisgín is bíodh sé lán.
VII
The bells rang out for starting,
The horses were impatient,
You would think they never stood on ground
Their speed was so amazing,
´Tis there you would see jockies,
And they mounted on most nately,
The pink, the blue, the red, the green,
The emblem of their nation,
Agus gheóbham arís an crúisgín is bíodh sé lán.
VII
´Tis there you would see gamblers,
Thimblemen and garters,
The sporting wheel of fortune there,
With its four and twenty quarters,
Others without scruple pelting bottles,
At poor Magie,
And her father well contented,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 08:40
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I
As I went down the Brickfield road,
To seek for recreation,
I took a tour to Evergreen,
Where sceneries were pleasing,
There were multitudes assembled there,
With their tickets at the station,
That my eyes began to dazzle,
And I going to see the races.
Agus gheóbham airís an crúiscín is bíodh sé lán.
II
There were passengers from Limerick,
And passengers from Nenagh,
Passengers from Dublin,
And sportsmen from Tipperary,
There were passengers from Kerry,
Where brave Dan was educated,
And the blare renoumed melesiano
That gained emancipation.
Agus gheobham airís an crúiscín is bíodh sé lán.
III
There were passengers from Charleville,
And numbers from Adare there,
The boys of Ballyanchullaig,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 08:32
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While silvery moon shines bright o'er
Cloone and lone Drumshanbo Hill,
5. Wild flowerets gay crown Kiltifea,
Dear Tooma and Cankeel --
Behold with awe that wonderous spa
All human illsq to heel
Aughnaglace I fondly trace the ford
And Murphy's Mill
Well I recall those features all
Around Drumshanbo Hill.
6. Mid holy ground the fonts abound
Where nightly faries sing
Entrancing themes to haunt our
Dreams around Kilkenny's spring
Mid hawthorn lanes and ripening
Grains, the birds their music thrill
In apple groves where love-light roves
Around Drumshanbo Hill.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 08:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1. From the U.S.A. this Christmas day,
Dear friend a note to thee,
In simple rhymes recalling times,
When we were young and free,
Mid singing brooks and dingling nooks,
In memory treasured still,
Where first a child I carolled wild,
Around Drumshanbo Hill.
2. My thoughts now fly to scenes gone by,
In Erin o'er the sea;
Where Patriarchs taught and true
Men fought for human liberty;
Where fenians bold were oft enrolled,
And nightly got their drill
Mid the silent shades and lovely
Glades around Drumshanbo Hill.
3. Full vividly I seem to see old friends
We'll ne'er see no more,
When fiddler's tune and piper's croon,
Spurred dancers on the floor,
The golden fields the spinning reels
The scutchers and the kiln,
Made labour joy for boy and girl
Around Drumshanbo Hill.
4. By Annagh's side a crystal tide in
Musing wavelets roll
Through flowery vales where banshee
Wails for some departing soul.
In Gubnastuckawne the Leprechaun his
Crocks of gold may fill.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 08:28
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morning fasting.
45. Sore eyes. Bathe the eyes in cold black tea, or hang a green shade or leaf on the eye, or put a piece of gold up to the eye.
46. Roast Potatoes. Put them into a piece of cloth or a stocking and put it around the sore throat.
47. Blane. This is a disease cured by lighting sooty straw under the animal's head. It makes the cattle hang their head down and a white matter runs from their nose.
48. Chilblains are cured by rubbing the juice of an onion to them.
49. Bad Health is cured by boiling and seasoning camomile and drinking the liquid.
50. Stomach pains. Tip the top of your toes every morning with your fingers and without bending your knees.
51. "Cleas ba Péisreis a cure for sick cattle. It is a cure used by knotting a cord in some manner over the animal's nose.
52. Bounds' water which is found in streams separating two lands. When drank it will cure almost all pains.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 08:25
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16. Water cress. is good for a bad stomach. is eaten raw.
17. Leeches. Leeches are good to draw the bad blood from an injured part of the body as they suck out the blood. The old people called them "Súgairí."
18. Tobacco is a cure for a toothache. It should be cut small and put down on the tooth.
19. Garlic is a cure for a pain in the stomach. It should be boiled in milk and strained an the brewage drank.
20. Blackcurrant jelly. is good for a sore throat.
21. Dock-leaf is a cure for a sore lip when it is applied to it. In the head of the dock-leaf a funnel-like stem is to be got. It is white and should be opened out and applied to the lip. The stem contains a sticky white matter.
22. Black Weeds are good for pains. The weed should be dried and rubbed to the part effected.
23. Primroses are good for hoarseness. The person that would be hoarse should eat them.
24. Snails are a cure for choking in the chest. The slime of the snails is to be drank
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 07:28
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Long ago people never wore shoes until they were about to get married. There are people still who wear no shoes. Mostly all the children going to school go barefoot. It was a custom long ago to put on their shoes at a cross-road when going to Mass and take them off again when coming home and tie the two laces together and put them across their shoulders. There were shoes that used to be called clogs. They were made with a wooden heel and sole and the upper with leather and an iron tip around the sole
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 07:23
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The churn we had was round with a churn staff. Everyone takes the milk to the creamery now. Nineteen years ago we last used a churn. A churn is like a barrel with two handles, one in each end. A churn is a little larger than a porter barrel. There are two handles in it and a door to put in the cream. The butter was put in a tub or pan and taken to the market the following day. About hiding eggs there is a mark put on the hiding eggs.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 07:19
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own eggs for catching and if you got eggs from somebody you would mark you own to see which eggs would not come out.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 07:17
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The following are the animals we have at home.
Cow
hens
ducks
donkey
turkeys
pig
Some people have names in their cows. Kitty, Kerry, Tut, Polly, and Daisy. Some cows are tied by the necks. They are tied with chains. They do not make the [?] [?]. The cow house is made of tin and it is called a stall. These are the calls for animals coll, coll, for cows suck, suck, for caves tuck, tuck, for hens chick, chick, for chickens wat, wat for pigs. If you had some of your
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 07:11
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holy ashes on their foreheads.
St Martin day. People kill a fowl and preserve the blood of it as it is supposed to be a cure for a sudden pain.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 07:10
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St Brigid's day. They make wooden crosses and nail them to the rafters of the house.
St Patrick day. All the Irish people wear shamrock on their coats and some men wear it on their hats in honour of St Patrick.
Ash-morning. Most of the people go to Mass and the Priest puts
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 07:07
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You are as slow as Mall bell.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 07:06
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Deep waters flow smooth and the mud lies at the bottom.
A watched pot never boils.
You never miss the water until the well runs dry.
Growing old growing worse.
Say nothing but saw wood.
Never shout until you're out of the wood.
The more hurry the less speed.
As long as a wet Sunday.
A stitch in time saves nine.
United we stand and divided we fall.
You are taller standing like a dog sitting.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 07:02
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in the garden. The pit is covered with rushes.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 07:01
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We have potatoes growing at home. We usually set half an acre. We usually set them in drills or ridges. Spades are not made locally, they are bought in the shops. When we are setting the potatoes we cut them in small pieces which we call sgiolans. When the potato stalks appear over the ground they "rise to" them. The names of the potatoes are Arran Banners, Ker Pinks, Arran Victors, Irish Queens, British Queens and Early Rose. The potatoes are dug in September. They open the drills with a plough. Then the people of the house go to the garden and pick them. Then they draw them with buckets and make a big pit
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 04:30
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"Big Paddy". Contd
of that wonderful combination of huge men. Who forgets their great victory in Wexford Park, 28 yrs ago ~ over the all-famous A.M.P. team?
But it is in the field of usefulness Paddy has left his lasting mark and there are many monuments to his wonderful skill and ability"
Big Paddy was a self made man never went beond "third Book" in School ~ Could scarcely read or write when he left school ~ but afterwards made good so good that he was a sort of John Sornier local "Book in Breeches".
Many local stories are told of Paddy. Here are a few, showing his resoucefulness and unselfishness.
Once when he was in a wood sawing timber + felling trees he, and two others were fitting
duine anaithnid
2019-06-24 04:17
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to bury unbaptised children on certain hills. One of these hills are still to be seen in Legnagrow. It is very green and fertile and in the centre a great white thorn bush grows. The infants were supposed to buried beside or underneath this bush.
To the present day no body walks near this bush as there is a stray sod on it and anyone who steps on this sod are carried away several miles from it.
Some of the people in Glangevlin bury their dead in Killinagh or Doobally. I suppose it is because these people were reared there and they like to sleep their last long sleep with their own kith and kin.
This is an old story which the old people tell when sitting around the fire on cold Wintry nights.
St Patrick when he was journeying through Ireland became ill one day. As he was cold he lit a fire to warm himself and to prepare some food. When he had the fire kindled a snake same out from the woods rolled upon in it and succeeded in putting it out.
But one small coal was still alive and a brave little robin clapped his wings before it and lit it again. By doing this he burned the feathers off his breast and from that day to this it is of a red colour.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 04:07
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our engineer + sea man he built + sailed his own boats, he sought + saved wrecks in the storms.
He mended our clocks + watches + yet had hands that befitted a fair sized giant. He was in short an all round man and t'were far easier tell what he was not than what he was.
His hands were handy + his brain the brighest
On the field of sport too he always "played the game" his game of games being "in the rope" ~ where he always "pulled his weight" and helped to bring fame + glory to the then famous Kilmuckridge "Tun team".
Here Paddy was at his best ~ alongside the three Mangan giants. To him in no small measure is due the wonderful achievement
duine anaithnid
2019-06-24 04:07
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There is but one graveyard in this parish and it is situated in the townland of Gub beside the chapel. It is of a rectangular shape and is supposed to be very old. It was taken in and fixed as a graveyard by a priest called Father Hugh McGovern.
There are not many old tombstones in this graveyard. The oldest is one which was erected in the year eighteen hundred and eighty six. The letters are written in Irish while the stone is supported on four smaller ones.
The tombstone itself is of a rectangular shape but the letters are long since washed away. The figures 1886 are still plain to be seen. Most of the other tombstones are in the shape of a cross or a book. There are a lot of trees growing in the graveyards especially pines and a kind of palm-tree.
These are grown on the wall which surrounds the graveyard.
Long ago it was the custom in this parish to bury unbaptised children after sunset. Afew people from Legnagrow were burying an unbaptised infant at nightfall some years ago. When they entered the graveyard they saw strange lights on all the tombstones and they also heard low weird crying. At once they fled in great fear. It was a custom also
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 03:53
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the nobler + the better sort that never sought reward.
His death is deeply lamented and deeply felt ~ a local, widespread sorrow, an almost personal and general loss, and not only to the immediate district of his home where his brain + muscle, his overflowing kindness and unselfish generosity have served us long + well but far away in many parts of the country, where his outstanding ability and kindly good nature were well known
Our " all round man" was Paddy.
He was our "first aid Doctor", and yet again our Dentist. (many a professional had a poorer practise ~ if a richer reward)
He was a carpenter builder
He dug the foundation - he gave you the key to the home he built for you. He was also
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 03:38
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His big manly voice was ever mellowed by an inate kindness of soul that ever shone through his soft kindly eyes. Kilmuckridge + district is today the poorer for his demise for a real a true, a lasting friend, a friend in need was dear big hearted "big Paddy"
To help others and be kind to speak well of all + sundry seemed his mission, and now that he has been called to his eternal reward he brings with him, our blessing and our prayers. It is our very least ~ and yet our very most ~ our best prayers.
We mourn for him + think well of him in death. Who is there for miles + miles again that has not shared largely + often of Paddy's kindliness + whole hearted generosity ~ his
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 03:25
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soon after his death, written by the local teacher Mr MacDonald, and it will serve the purpose of these notes to write it here.
"A great + good man passed away to his eternal reward on Dec 26th 1930 at the age of 74.
Mr Patrick Dempsey, a very prominent figure in his own native district was also well known in many parts of Co Wexford + even beyond it's confines where several important structures monuments to his keen intelligence and outstanding ability will long attest his worth.
His surely was a unique personality : "Big Paddy" we called him, yes he was, big + big hearted too - brainy to brilliance and brave too amost to folly, aye and brawny too as a modern giant and yet gentle as a child
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 03:11
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Thus we reach the end of an only two short review on John Mangan whose name will certainly be remembered in his native county.
His feats will long adorn our athletic chronicles for we must now look, with awe upon the deeds of the Kilmuckridge giant whose kindly, genial unobtrusive nature was the passport which secured him the affection + esteem of his contemporaries + neighbours of his own time + the admiration + memory of those that came after him.
Above from Notes + Cuttings supplied by Mr Murtagh Mangan, aged 59 yrs.
Kilmuckridge
at present living at K'ridge
Decr. 1938.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 02:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
in 1900. However, his only rival, Con Walsh, threw it 16' 2" at Cove in 1908.
Authentic achievements :~
Throwing for height :-
14' 6 3/4" Carrick-on-Suir 1898.
14' 8 1/2" Enniscorthy 1898.
15' 0 3/4" Enniscorthy 1900.
This became for the time the Irish + World's record in the native style.
Throwing with follow :-
30' 1 1/2" Carrick-on Suir 1898.
32 5" Ballsbridge 1899
This latter is still a record.
Throwing without follow :-
27' 0" Ballsbridge 1898.
27 4 1/2" Ballsbridge 1900
In 1895 he won three Leinster
Gaelic titles, 56 lbs for height
unlimited run + follow + for
throwing the 71 lbs.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 02:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
in 1900. However, his only rival, Con Walsh, threw it 16' 2" at Cove in 1908.
Authentic achievements :~
Throwing for height :-
14' 6 3/4" Carrick-on-Suir 1898.
14' 8 1/2" Enniscorthy 1898.
15' 0 3/4" Enniscorthy 1900.
This became for the time the Irish + World's record in the native style.
Throwing with follow :-
30' 1 1/2" Carrick-on Suir 1898.
32 5" Ballsbridge 1899
This latter is still a record.
Throwing without follow :-
27' 0" Ballsbridge 1898.
27 4 1/2" Ballabridge 1900
In 1895 he won three Leinster
Gaelic titles, 56 lbs for height
unlimited run + follow + for
throwing the 71 lbs.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 02:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
of this event when he created the Irish record of 27' 4 1/2" at Ballsbridge July 14th. 1900.
On that same day he contested another big weight event with its world expert, Tom Kiely, in slinging the half hundred unlimited run and follow. Kiely failed to reach his best but although on this occasion was beaten by Mangan (37' 3 1/2") still holds the record of 38' 11" for this the Irish style of throwing.
A contest in slinging the weight over the bar, Irish style, was proposed + he again excelled all his opponents. In his final throw he beat the existing record by throwing it 14' 6 3/4 at which height his record remained until he himself raised it to 15' 0 3/4".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 02:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
replied with 29' 10 1/2". Mangan then fell short + Delany fouled his throw. Called for final throw the power of the Leinster man was aroused + he threw it over the unprecedented distance of 30' 1 1/2".
Prodigious as this feat was, Mangans prowess was destined to surpass it almost exactly twelve months later, when he got in the astounding cast of 32' 5" at Ballsbridge Aug 7 1899.
Delany beat him in throwing without follow. The Riverstown man was an expert in this style + his immense height 6' 6", gave him an advantage which he knew how to utilise to the utmost.
As we shall see, however, Mangan also made himself master
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 02:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Delany of Riverstown, Hayes of Galbally, Horgan of Banteer
Phelan of Mullinahone + he were in competition - the greatest combination of giants that ever trod a modern art.
In the 12 t. round their respective throws were Phelan (who held the record at 28' 9" ) 27' 6"; Ryan 25' ;
Delany 28' 1 1/2" ; Horgan 26' 8 1/2" ; Mangan 28' 5 1/2"

Ryan + Phelan fell back in the next round + Mangan heaved the massive load 28' 8 1/2" - half an inch short of the record.
Delany threw it 29' 6 1/2" + then Mangan dropped it exactly on the same mark 29' 6 1/2" both beating the worlds previous best.
Mangan + Delany had to throw off for 1st place. The former began with 29' 8 1/2", Delany
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 02:02
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
athletic ability has always abounded.
He lived at a period when we possessed an amazing array of strong men. Never again perhaps can such a group be seen as that in which he figured in the Autumn of 1898 in Maurice Davin's famous arena Deer Park, Carrick-On-Suir.
At that select meeting Mangan made one of his best throws + records were shattered at almost every effort in half-a-dozen weight casting + jumping events.
Never were his abilities better demonstrated than on this memorable evening + his performances proved what rivalry could impel him to accomplish. In Slinging the 56 lbs. between the legs without follow, Ryan of Pallas,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 01:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
beyond the confines of his native county for competition. Nature had endowed him with tremendous physical powers; but he had no inclination to exploit them.
The fun of a parish contest was sufficient gratification for him at most times - he rarely sought distinction abroad. Had he done so + have been spurred to greater efforts by intensive rivalry it is certain that his feats which were unsurpassed evidence of his prowess, would have vastly improved.
It is safe to say that John Mangan knew not + even distained training + was satisfied to acquit himself with credit without ostentation + this philosophy seems to be characteristic of the manhood of his county where
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 01:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
came and told the people not to be afraid, so he knelt and prayed. The soldiers threw the oil on the houses, and to light them. But no blaze came. Nothing came only smoke and then quenched again. The soldiers continued throwing the oil till all was spent. Then they went away. After their departure, the priest told the people to go and live in their houses.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 01:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About the time of the evictions, there came a crowd of English soldiers to Dowra. The intentions of these were to plunder and kill the Catholics. One day, they went out to evict some people and burn their houses. They took oil with them to set the houses on fire.
After evicting, they went to burn the houses. But, the priest
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 01:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
living in it, and only six now. The ruins of their little "[?]" are to be seen yet. In Derrylahan there lived a poor man , his wife and son. The roof of their cabin was full of holes and the rain poured down on them as they lay starving in the corner. In the morning the wife said the man. "I think that you should to some country and live there for a while." The man went to England and got work with a farmer. After a few yeas he got homesick and wished to see his wife and son again. At last when he got some money he decided to come home.
When the reached the cabin he pushed the "torog" aside. The first sight met his eyes was an old woman and an old whiskey man sitting in the corner. The woman shouted out, Thank God, here's your father home. For many years after they lived on the farm.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 01:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As the famine left bad marks after it all over Ireland, it left no less here. It is said that nearly two hundred families left Glan, between dying with hunger and leaving the country by means of it. As the people had nothing to eat only potatoes and buttermilk, when the "blight" came on the potatoes they had nothing to eat at all. This disease was never seen before and it was known how to put an end to it. At the time the potatoes are sown like grain here. During the second year, the people stuck the "growings" of the diseased potatoes in the ground, thinking that they would grow all right for the next year. But this only spread the disease much more. A man living in Derrylahan stuck the "growings" in his garden. It is believed that the disease is in that ground yet.
When the famine was at its worst, the govern-ment gave relief grants to the people. A bag of oatmeal was distributed weekly in [?] and roads were being made. The women went out to break stones, and often when they went home again, they got their children dying with hunger. In December, when ice and snow covered the ground, the women of the district were breaking stones in Carraig-na-grow. After a few days they died on the heap of stones. The heap is to be seen yet and the the bones of the people amid the stones.
In every townland in Glangevlin there was nearly twice as many families living in it before the famine as there are now. In Bunrynflynn there were over sixteen families
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 01:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a landlord who was invited to have a hunt after game in Finaway. There was a flood of water in the river and it was so high that the tenants had to carry the landlord across. A day before he came the people of Finaway went out and rubbed bacon on the ground so that the dogs would scent it. This set the dogs crazy and they were scenting after the bacon. With the speed they were running, they ran through the river. The landlord could not get across the river after the dogs and one of the tenants had to carry him across and when he was in the middle of the flood he said he could not go any further so that the landlord would give him some money. The landlord said he would free him of a year's rent. The man floundered on another piece and he said that he could not go any further. So the landlord said he would give him a free receipt for the rent if he would carry him across. There was no delay in going across only the man wanted to make money. When the landlord got across he had to go to Castleraham after the dogs.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 00:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
bringing fodder to and from the mill when ground. Despite his assiduous endeavours this new diet did not produce the expected results on his stock of pigs. In fact their incessant appealing for something more substantial proved in no uncertain way that the diet was not a success.
This story of the furze mill brings us to an amusing incident which occurred about this time:-
When Henry Leader returned home after his second marriage the occasion was celebrated with much rejoicing. When the pigs heard all the commotion they also commenced squealing. The new bride naturally desired to find out the cause of all this noise being unaccustomed as she was to rural life. Henry Leader not wishing to depreciate his stock informed her that it was the "Butter Exchange Band" discoursing in their honour. The bride hearing this was highly pleased and praised the men for their kind reception. In all good will Mr Leader, rising to the occasion, sent a pound note by one of his men ordering him to give it to the "bandmaster" to drink a toast in honour of the occasion.
Henry Leader died about 55 years ago and is buried in Aghabullogue Graveyard.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 00:09
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the horizon. These massive pillars look down with haughtiness on a placid vale below. These blocks of masonry will remain for many generations despite the flight of time and people will come in some far distant day and ask how these originated. The answer is given here for the enlightenment of future generations.
There is a story too told about a cow which thought of taking a trip across over these pillars by walking on the trough over them. Having part of the journey across she overbalanced and fell over. When found she appeared to be dead. One of the men commenced to skin the cow, making an incision near the thigh, being called away on some urgent business he was unable to complete the work. On his return he found the cow grazing peacefully on the river's bank.
At one time Henry Leader embarked on a course of experiments in connection with pig-feeding. Needless to say had this idea proved successful it would revolutionise the pig-industry in Ireland and perhaps the world over. The idea was to fatten pigs chiefly on furze. He fed his horses on this and they thrived exceedingly well. Why not pigs? For this purpose he erected a furze mill. This was situated between the junction of the roads at the foot of Kilcolman hill and the river and was propelled by water power. In fact he had a specially constructed cart somewhat like a butt but much wider and over-lapping the wheels on both sides for the purpose of
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 00:02
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Some forts were pagan sanctuaries for instance the fort called Cathair Crobh-Dearg in Gort na gCeann townland in the neighbouring parish of Kilcummin East (in Kerry). Some were Christian churches for instance the fort called Cill Eoghain in Driseán parish.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 23:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
both side above. To overcome this difficulty he thought of a plan. He got his men to build some huge pillars in a line across the valley. He thought that by placing a wooden trough across the tops of these pillars he could bring water through a canal from a high part of the river basin and get it to flow along the trough and thus irrigate the land on the other side of the valley.
He succeeded in building over a dozen huge pillars varying from 80 to 100 ft high across the valley. These are of solid stone masonry still standing almost intact. On the top of each of these a recess was made through which a huge wooden trough ran. About midway on these pillars there were more spaces through which another trough was placed, to carry water to land on a lower level. For some years this irrigation scheme succeeded. Then the troughs began to leak in places acting like spring showers on the valley below. After some time the owner abandoned the scheme, the troughs became neglected and crumpled away in the course of time. But time has no effect on the massive pillars. They remain to the present day and will to future generations to remind us of what many call Leader's Folly.
It is indeed a most pleasant walk by the banks of the rocky Dripsey River from Clonmoyle Bridge (about two miles from Coachford). There you will come upon those huge massive pillars which are outlined against a backround of hills and the far-away mountains on
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 23:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Another custom was when people were putting in the rick. They would invite all their friends to help them. Any of them that had horses and cars would bring them to draw the hay and any of them that had no horses or cars would come to help to make the rick.
Then a barrel of porter would be got and when the rick would be made they would get their supper and talk around the fire until a crowd would gather. Then at night they would invite some girls and dance and sing and drink porter until morning.
That time porter was only 30 shilling a barrel and when it rose to £5 a barrel the people began to make their own ricks.
This was called the "Harvest Home".

Mrs. E Cullen 50 years
Ballyknocken
Blessington
Co. Wicklow
Eileen Cullen
Ballyknocken
Blessington
Co. Wicklow
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 23:35
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
tinneontaí a bhí faoí an treabhadh, do chuir Maoldhún amach dhá capall agus céachta agus rinne sé an treabadh dóibh agus bhí ortha annsin dul agus obair dhó.
Bhí ar na tinneontaidhche na claidhthe a conghbhail déanta agus nuair a shiubhalfhadh an tíghearna thart dá bfheicfeadh sé cloch ar an dtalamh beadh sé ag argóint leo.
Bhí Maoldun go maith dá gcuid tinneontaí. Nuair a bheadh an t-arbhar bailigthe isteach ag na daoine do thúbhradh sé spraoí dóibh ar a dtugtar an 'Harvest Home' air. Deirtear gur as Sasana a tháinig Maoldún mar do chaitheadh sé cotaí móra dearga mar na Sasanaígh.

Bríghid Seoighe, Tomás Seoighe,
Caithrín Liath,
Baile Áth an Ríogh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 23:28
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Na Tíghearnaí Talmhan
Sé Maoldún an tíghearna talmhan a bhí ins an gceanntar seo. Bhí talamh aige chomh fada siar le abhainn Chláir. Comhnuidhe sé i gCúill Áirne ar feadh ceithre ficheadh bliadhain. Tháinig sé ó Baile Átha Cliath gan fhios ag aoine, shiubhal sé isteach go Chúl Áirne, agus rinne sé teach mór annsin dhó féin.
Sé an caoí a rinne na
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 23:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
It is safe to say that there is no one in this parish of Coachford who has not heard of Leader's Buildings. Indeed the story attached to these has travelled far beyond the limits of our own parish. First of all before saying anything on this subject it would be well to say a few words on the man who was responsible for the deed which made his name famous.
Henry Leader was an eccentric gentleman who lived about sixty years ago. He resided in his farm at Clonmoyle but he also had another farm near Clondrohid (now Corcorans). He carried on extensive and intensive farming but his eccentricities were no great half towards his success in this department. Even to the present day many relics of his whims are to be found. Some people describe them as his follies. This brings us to the story of one of his most famous works namely Leader's Folly:-
A rivulet flows through his farm near Clonmoyle as his land sloped down to the river there was no means of irrigating the high lands on
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 23:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
St John's Eve is usually called Bonfire Night. Youngsters light bonfires still but the good old custom is slowly dying out. Here is a description of it fifty years ago by old Matt Farrelly.
The bonfire night you'd see the boys gathering from glen and dale and heading off to Legga Hill. Everyone would bring a glach of brosna and whins with him. Then came bands of girls wearing their white blouses and Sunday best to join in the dance which was soon to follow the bonfire. Last came the ould men and women chatting up the hill. As night fell we lit ours and you'd think the sky was in a blaze with all the bonfires lit in Leitrim and Longford. Then we started to cheer and were answered
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 23:13
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
and he took a slug out of the whiskey and that strengthened him. Then the cars stopped & the door burst open & they all burst in on the floor. Then he heard the tapping of a foot coming down to his room and a voice said to him "The master sent me down for you to come up to supper and as the tramp was hungry he went. When he went up to the kitchen it was shining with gold & when they were all seated at the table one of them said who will say grace & an old [beardy ? ] lad said "Who else only the stranger." When the tramp started to say grace they all rushed out & everything that was in the house was swept out also & he could hear all the cars and the vans going away & he could hear all the people screaming but he said nothing only walked down & got into his bed & took a good slug out of the whiskey & went asleep. The next morning the man called for him & he asked him did anything
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 23:03
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
happen him & he said nothing happened him & then the tramp went an along the avenue & he met the woman that lived in the gatehouse & she asked. him did he sleep in that house that night & he said he did & she asked him did he tell the man & he said he did not. "Well" says she "If you did you would have got hundreds of pounds from him because you are the first man that ever stopped a night in that house.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 23:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Many years ago there lived a woman all alone. All her relations had died some time previously so she felt very lonesome with nobody to talk to. One day she went to the city to buy provisions. It was a very long journey so it was well after nightfall when she neared her destination. She saw a light and heard great noise as of people talking. As she drew near, all the lights vanished, and not a sound could be heard in the vicinity. As she was going in the door a ghost clad in white garments passed her out. The woman became terrified, so she ran to a neighbour's house and asked leave to sleep there for that night.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
and he took a slug out of the whiskey and that strengthened him. Then the cars stopped & the door burst open & they all burst in on the floor. Then he -=heard the tapping of a foot coming down to his room and a voice said to him "The master sent me down for you to come up to supper and as the tramp was hungry he went. When he went up to the kitchen it was shining with gold & when they were all seated at the table one of them said who will say grace & an old [beardy ? ] lad said "Who else only the stranger." When the tramp started to say grace they all rushed out & everything that was in the house was swept out also & he could hear all the cars and the vans going away & he could hear all the people screaming but he said nothing only walked down & got into his bed & took a good slug out of the whiskey & went asleep. The next morning the man called for him & he asked him did anything
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
beings with whom he had been merrymaking.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a certain man coming home from a distant neighbour's house. On his journey homewards he had to pass by a certain liss. As he approached it he saw a beautiful castle in front of him. He became astonished at this strange sight and drew near to survey the building. As he did so he heard singing and dancing inside. At last he found courage to enter where he got a royal welcome. He enjoyed himself during the night, dancing and singing and feasting. At last he fell into a deep sleep and when he woke in the morning, he was lying on a fence nearby. It was only then that he realised that it was no human
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One night two fairies came in to an old man and told him that there was money buried in an old ruin near by. The old man set off, and walked until he came to the ruin. He found a book, from which he read, there is money buried here, but anyone that looks for it, will die of exhaustion, for he can eat no food. The old man said, "This can't be true. He dug a deep hole until he found a box. He ran home, for he had found the money. Next morning he was getting his breakfast. All the bread turned into water, so he had no food. Three weeks after he died of starvation, so the money was of no use to him. What was written in the book was true.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
was a big avenue leading up to it and there was a gatehouse at the end of the avenue and a woman lived in it by herself and she had the keys of the gate and when the tramp came to the gate he called the woman but she would not come to open it because she knew that this big mansion was haunted and she did not like to let him down. Then he went on down the road and got in across the big wall and went to the mansion and he met with the Boss of the house and he opened the door and the two of them went in and lit a light. The Boss put the tramp to bed and told him he would call for him at such & such an hour in the morning & then the boss went away & the tramp slept well that night & he had his own light lighting all the night & had a bottle of whiskey in his waistcoat pocket. Some time in the middle of the night he heard the noise of horses feet & cars coming up to the door
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
minds to sit up and strip her and so they did and dug her grave and when they had had done so they began to cut her fingers to get the rings and when they had her fingers cut to the bone the woman gave a jump and sat up in the coffin and began to talk to them and one of the men ran away with fear but the other man told her about the way she had fallen into the trance and the way the people had buried her. She gave them thousands of pounds as long as they lived every after.
Heard from Mr. Lacey formerly of Cappagh, Rathdrum.
Once upon a time there was a tramp who had no home and one night he went to a man for to get lodgings for the night. He had met with him that day before and he told him that he would give him lodging for the night. This man was rich and he had two houses and one of them was a big mansion and there
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One night a man was coming home from a neighbours house. He went through a lios to make a shortcut but suddenly he saw a host of people dancing about the fort. He followed them around for about two hours but still he couldn't find a way out. At length he threw himself against the ditch from sheer exhaustion. Suddenly a girl in a blue dress stood beside him. She asked him if he would like to go home. He was so speechless with fright so he could only nod. She led him to a gap which he could not see before and he went safely home.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:37
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time a woman had five or six golden rings and she fell into a trance and all the people thought that she was dead and so they put her in a coffin and buried her. At the same time there was two thieves and they knew that this woman had been buried and they knew that she had the golden rings an so one night they made up their
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Heard from Mrs Reilly Rathshannone, Hacketstown aged 79
One time there was two friends who lived together and one of them died. After some time he appeared and told the one that was alive that he was in purgatory and he told him to tell somebody to pay some little thing that he owed and he would go to rest. The other man said that no one would believe him so he caught him by the arm and left the marks of his burnt fingers in his wrist and said "now they will believe you.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1.
I often climbed the Hill of Ward,
Some thirty years ago.
And sat upon its grassy sward,
And viewed the vales below.
Tom Potterton, Kildalkey.
2.
One fine Sunday evening in the month of May,
To Rathcormac I did stray.
I met Tom Garry on my way,
There is a dance in Hesnans, Tom did say
The've Browne and McDonnell
for the night to play.
Whack fol the diddle o' the dye do day.
Told by Patrick Newman Wood, Kildalkey.
1.
I am lonely to night oh! my sad heart is aching,
To think I must part from my youths happy home.
And long are the green vales at morning are waking.
Far far from the loved ones in Trim I must roam.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
bread. When the man returned and heard the story he was very vexed. He followed the men with a wand and changed them into three big rocks and three little rocks. The rocks remain there to this day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was once a man who said that nobody ever left or would leave his house without food or drink. One day he was away from home and three strangers with three dogs came to the house. His wife gave them some drink but she had no food in the house. She told them to wait while she was baking some bread and they did. The three men did not like the appearance of the woman as she was very untidy and they would not eat the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
And Home by Curraghmore.
2.
I went down to John Doran,
To thresh a stack of rye,
A bolt flew out of the engine,
And blinded Johnies eye.
The day I met with accident
The day I went to Pass
cursed, I sacked the man
from the town of Mullingar.
3.
As I was going up Owen Keogans hill,
The steam was going down,
The Engine would not move,
But the wheels was going round,
Up came the Winter Miggin,
In a suit of grey,
He swore he'd drive the engine
Until the month of May.
4.
So he drove it up and down,
Ballivor town.
Smoking a cigar,
And you would think her was the genius
from the town of Mullingar.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:29
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
there shaking with fear, his teeth chattering, and his hands trembling. The light shone for what seemed half-an-hour and then vanished. The man then gave way and fainted, but he soon recovered. He ran home as fast as his legs could carry him. When he told the other woodcutters next day they could scarcely believe him. He never stayed out after midnight from that night out.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There once lived a man who was a woodcutter by trade. He dwelt on the edge of a great forest. One night he went to see his uncle who was ill and he did not return until very early on the following morning. When he was near his home he got a terrible fright. He saw a great red light which made everything as bright as in daylight. He stood
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 22:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
5
Dannie Mac Mahon .Dromandoora
Story Teller Jermiah Tuohy Faha.
Fighting
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
My name is James Regan,
I am doing the best I can,
I bought a noble engine,
And it pleases every man.
I threshed the country over,
From Ballivor to Donore.
And back by sweet Kildalkey,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
and he three quarted jared.
I have four men with me he said.
The best of loyal sons, and we wont go to Clonmore to night till we capture Dolans guns.
I have four men with me,
When he came to the crossroads,
He shook the road, I hear,
And Farnan swore by the belt he wore,
He nearly died with fear.
When he came to the Captain Yorkes,
He shook the handle-bar,
Old Katie came out and began to shout,
May the devil come and sweep your motor car.
John Kelly stood in the yard that night,
For Kildalkey he was bound.
He was thunder stricken with Lightening,
When he heard the horn sound.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The stepmother however proved very cruel to the little boy and wished to harm him in some way unknown to his father. One day as the father was on a long journey, the stepmother killed the son. When the father came home she told him that the son had died suddenly. The man, with a broken heart sat by the dead child that night. At midnight a ghost appeared and left a piece of paper on the child's face. The man read the paper and what was on it was "It is the stepmother who who has killed him." Seeing this, he immediately died brokenhearted.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 22:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
4
30 th June 1938
Folklore.
Long ago there was a good deal of fighting at fairs.
This faction fighting was worst when the Irish people became divided in the time of the Mc Carthyites and Parnellites.
The weapons they used were blackthorn sticks .And plants were also used and they were put up the chimney to season so that they last along time.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is one doctor Dolan,
A story, I will tell,
If you'd only listen,
To me just as I tell.
He has a little farm
His house is lake a Dun,
For to protect his bottles
Sure he keeps his uncle's funeral,
Himself and Old Cosmore.
They drank hand and fist,
In Mack's and Mary's,
Until they'd get no more,
They both went out upon the street,
Said Dolan I'll go home
He went up straight to Clonans,
Where he played up Garry Owen.
Then Old Cosmore turned in to Mat Mack's yard
Where he kept his motor car
There he met Cove Farrelly.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There once lived a man and woman who had one son, whom they loved with all their hearts. When the child was three years old his mother died, so in order to have some one who would love and care his son, the father married a second time
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 22:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A Glorious Day 3-6-1938
The street of Glenties, and the gateways off it, and all vacant spaces by it, were crammed with people and cattle, and carts, and tents, and applestands, and the houses were thronged to the doors, and to the windows, out of which hundreds were leaning to watch the great gay, surging crowed on the street below. The moving and talking, and shouting, and crying of thousands that hid the street; filled my ears with one continuous roar, that for a while owed and daunted me, who had never before heard anything remotely approaching it.
But the seething mass of people who struggled for passage wheresoever they wished to move had a fascination for me, and I was standing in wonder.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
that he was not guilty. She then thought it was the daughter who did it, but she also swore that it was not she who did it. Next day she went to an old wise man and related to him her trouble. The old man said that he would stay by the money himself and he would defend it. That night he slept in the room where the money was, but he remained awake. During the night he saw a woman coming down the room and taking away a few pounds, but the man watched her and took notice of where she hid it. Who should the person be but the woman herself, and it was she who always stole it in a dream. Next day the man went to where he saw her hiding it, and found all the money which was supposed to be stolen.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A most majestic pile.
Of ancient fame, o'er Dutch or Dane
Set foot upon out Isle
Told by James Simons.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 22:15
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Altar Linen
Altar Cloth: There must be three cloths on the altar for Holy Mass. The Altar Linen represents the linen in which Our Lord;s Body was wrapped for burial.
Corporal: A piece of linen, about twelve inches square, which the Priest places on the Altar, and upon which the Sacred Vessels rest.
Purificator: A square piece of linen with which the Priest purifies the Chalice and Paten.
Pall: A small square linen envelope, stiffened with cardboard, with which the Priest covers the Chalice during Mass.
Communion Cloth: A linen cloth laid on the Altar rails, out of respect, and for fear of an accident to the Blessed Sacrament.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:13
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was once a woman who lived with her son and daughter, who possessed great wealth. Every morning when she counted it there was always a few pounds missing. This went on for some time until at last the woman became suspicious, thinking it was the son who stole it. She brought him to court, but he swore
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:13
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
After the match would be made by the match maker the woman's people would go to visit the mans house to see it and see how much grass he had and how many cattle it would feed and how many cows he had and so on.
The Bride would pay some of her fortune at the wedding, and the rest maybe the next year.
When they would be married the brides chest (that was what the trunk was called) would come in a few days, full of bed linen which she made herself the year before the marriage. The woman would be said to be a bad housekeeper if she hadn't that chest full.
There would be no special presents
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 22:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A Fair Day 5-7-'38
It is a fair day in Ballinasloe, I have being here for the last two hours it is ten o'clock now. Today we have the great cattle fair of the year. The streets are thronged with people. The drivers are rushing here and there through the streets.
The cattle are lowing, the sheep are bleating, the horses are whinning, and the pigs are screeching, and the bonhams squealing and the crying of the drovers, which is a babel of noise.
I see farmers in charge of their cattle in the green, and the have a very busy time for fear the would mix with the other cattle. I see buyers walking about from one group of cattle to other trying to buy them. He has a small box of red paint and when he buys them he puts a mark on them with the paint,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
told him not to worry the sheep were all right. She told him to come fasting next morning & she directed him the way, after a while the fog lifted & he reached home. When he was churning milk with his wife next morning she gave him a bit of butter made into a pill she said it would not break his fast, but when he went to the rath the lady flew at him & told him he had broke his word & she said she was enchanted in the rath for thousands of years and he was the first that spoke to her & gave her the chance of freedom & then she disappeared the fog lifted and he found himself standing outside the rath.
One time a man removed two big stones that were at the entrance of the rath & cut down all the bushes & he was got dead there next morning. The people who have raths on their land never touch a bush on the ditch.
Back from the Dead
Told by Jas Byrne Knockanooker
One time a friend of a workman who worked at Joneses died & this workman used to see him appearing to him nearly every
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:09
ceadaithe
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daughter married.
The bride and groom should not visit the brides parents home for a month after marriage. Then they have the months visit and generally invite their friends and have a party.
Rita Dargan got this account from her mother Mrs. Dargan, a native of Clare.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Marriage Custom's
Eithne Conway got this from her mother Mrs. Conway.
Many people get married at Shrove, as they cannot marry during lent.
People don't get get married in May
Wednesday is a lucky day to get married: an old rhyme says:
Monday for health
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for crosses
and Saturday no luck at all.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The bride keeps the silver and spends the gold. But if it is the ring instead of gold she keeps it.
Match-Making
The man that would be going to marry the girl would buy a bottle of whiskey and bring it to the girls house. The match-maker would go with him. They would give it to the people of the house to drink. It is done in some places yet.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:07
ceadaithe
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the stones used in this wall were taken to build walls around each of the farms.
Nothing strange happened as they took the stones as they thought would.
One night as one of those men who used the stones passed the road he saw a light, and a man walked along the road in front of him in such a way that he could not pass. He stopped his way for about a quarter of an hour and then went out of sight as a great gust of wind swept past Some of the other men who used the stones hat the same adventure
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Place Names
From Essie Keogh
Part of our land is in the townland of Coolronan and the rest of it is in the Townland of Carranstown. The names of some of our fields in Coolronan are:
1. The Barrack Field
2. The Raspberry Field
3. The Long Field
4. The Bog Field
The Barrack Field: It is called the Barrack Field because it was opposite the barrack long ago.
The Raspberry Field: IT is called the Raspberry Field because there are raspberries growing in it.
The Long Field: It is called the Long Field because it is very long and narrow.
The Bog Field: It is called the "Bog Field" because it is bog ground that is in it.
The clay in it is brown coloured.
The field in the townland of Carronstown are:
1. The Castle and
2. The Bottoms
The Castle: It is called the Castle because it is said that there was a Castle there long ago. There is a Little Hill in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 21:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Lost Sheep
One time there was a young man after getting married. Some sheep of his strayed away & he got an account of them being on a hill somewhere. So he got up early next morning & broke his fast with bread & milk and started off. It was said there was a rath on the hill & it was covered in with white thorn. He wasent long on the hill when a heavy fog fell, but he kept travelling till he got tired. He didn't know where he was or how he would get off the hill. At last he discovered a lovely place covered over with trees. He could not remember having seen it before so he thought surely he was a long ways out of his way. When he was approaching it a lovely girl made her appearance at the entrance of it he asked her did he see any sheep anywhere and she
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 21:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago there was a farm of 365 acres in Scregg which belonged to a Protestant family, Potts which has since been divided. In the centre of this farm there was a tree which was surrounded by a great wall. This wall reached up to the top of the tree and was known as "the Monument" as it was known to be erected to the memory of some one. In the "the monument every night about 12 o'clock a light appeared and burned there for a few hours. It was said by the people around that the devil sat there every night from 12 o'clock but as the first cock crew at 3 o'clock he disappeared.
When this farm was divided
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 21:51
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Laurence Whelan again.
There used be another big cat fight at Quigleys. One night [Led?] Quigley was listening to them in the middle of the night one cat cried out "Don't kill my son Kate Collins' cat."
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 21:43
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There used always be a cat fight at the back of Tompkins. They used to come from all over the country with bows around their necks & you'd think they were talking to one another. This morning when the people got up there was a whole lot of grand cats killed. I remember one cat fight myself & there was a whole lot of cats killed at it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 21:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One night Pat Neill of the bog was coming through Sandyford & he could hear all the cats meowing and roaring & he had a great big black cat at home & when he went home he was telling people all about the cats and the cat was sitting by the fire & when he had told about all the other cats the cat shook herself & ran up the chimney & she never was seen anymore.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 21:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One night Pat Neill of the bog was coming through Sandyford & he could hear all the cats meowing and roaring & he had a great big black cat at home & when he went home he was telling people all about the cats and the cat was sitting by the fire & when he had told about all the other cats the cat shook herself & ran up the chimney & she never was seen anymore.
Wm. Blake Rathnagrew
There used always be a cat fight at the back of Tompkins. They used to come from all over the country with bows around their necks & you'd think they were talking to one another. This morning when the people got up there was a whole lot of grand cats killed. I remember one cat fight myself & there was a whole lot of cats killed at it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 21:33
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
whiskey & drank it. When he came back out Billy appeared to him again & Billy said "you weren't able to speak to me until you got the whiskey" & the man asked him what state was he in & he opened his coat & it was all in balls of fire inside & Billy told him if he'd pay a debt for him he'd get him out of Purgatory. The man had only one cow & he went off the next day & sold the cow & paid the debt & Billy was never seen after.
Heard from Garret Kelly Knockanooker
Powerful King.
There was one time there was a king and no one was able to fight him. Every day he used to come out & shout at the other army was there anyone able to fight him & they were all afraid to go near him & after etc.etc. This turns out to be the ordinary David and Goliath Story of the Bible.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 21:32
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
whiskey & drank it. When he came back out Billy appeared to him again & Billy said "you weren't able to speak to me until you got the whiskey" & the man asked him what state was he in & he opened his coat & it was all in balls of fire inside & Billy told him if he'd pay a debt for him he'd get him out of Purgatory. The man had only one cow & he went off the next day & sold the cow & paid the debt & Billy was never seen after.
Heard from Garret Kelly [Knockan..]
Powerful King.
There was one time there was a king and no one was able to fight him. Every day he used to come out & shout at the other army was there anyone able to fight him & they were all afraid to go near him & after etc.etc. This turns out to be the ordinary David and Goliath Story of the Bible.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 21:22
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Billy Byrne appeared back to a man after he been hung & the man wasn't able to speak to him. Billy disappeared again & the man then went into a house and got a glass of
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 21:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One time a man had a bet with another man that he'd put people in a [? ?] and he got seven straws & went to seven houses & at every house he gave a straw to each one and he told them that if they did not give seven straws to seven more houses that a sickness would come. Then the people were going around all night bumping into each other with their straws.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 21:19
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Faithful departed so he kept shouting that along the road. Then he met two men hanging a dog and they heard him say "Lord have marcy on all the should of the faithful depd. They kicked him around the road & told him to go home.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 20:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Heard from Hugh Higgins aged 46 Farmer Ardnaboy who heard it from his mother.
A boy and his mother lived together in a house. She was sending him to the shop one day for eyes livers & lights but he couldn't think of it so she said keep shouting it all the way along the road. He met a man vomiting in the ditch & the man thought he said "That you may throw up your eyes liver and lights" & he told him to say instead "Whats down may it never come up" & then he met two men sowing oats & they got out on the road when they heard him & they kicked him & told him to say "As much as we have this year may we have twice as much next year" so he went on shouting this & he met a funeral & he said "as much as we have this year that we may have twice as much next year". They kiced him around the road & told him to say Lord have mercy on all the souls of the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 20:45
ceadaithe
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the hip a tore the hip out of her. When she seen she was over taking by the hounds she turned into a women.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 20:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Late one night two men were coming home from a fair. They were on horseback. They were in great haste and in order to shorten the way to their they made a shortcut through a thick wood. No sooner were they in the wood than the horses began to tremble. Then they stopped dead and would not go another inch. The younger man began to beat them but the older said "Stop that; let us see what made them shiver." One of them looked up and what should he see but a horrible figure up on a tree its arms writhing. The man who saw it fell in a faint. The other got his Rosary and blessed himself with it. The thing immediately disappeared.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 20:10
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
shot there and another man was found lying dead by the roadside. On another night a man was coming home from a fair and as he was late his relations began to get anxious about him. Just then they heard a noise in the yard and on looking out they saw a man on horse-back. The man tapped at the window with his whip and this alarmed the people of the house. They set out to look for the man who was coming from the fair and they found him dead on the road.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 20:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was once a man who committed suicide by hanging himself from an oak tree. When the body was found on the tree the people cursed the place and many people who passed the place died or were killed there. One night a man was
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 20:04
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
"Well, if you do not believe me, go up to the tree," said the younger. The brother obeyed. He went up to the tree but stepped back almost at once with an awful look on his face. Then he fell to the ground unconscious. The object, which was the Devil, rushed towards the younger brother, but he blessed himself. The Devil gave a frightful roar and then disappeared. The younger brother rushed to the nearest house and roused the people in it. They went to where the man was lying and carried him to his home. There was a horrible mark on his neck. He never recovered fully from the wound and died a few years after as the result of it, to the bitter grief of his brother and his friends. It was the Devil's left horn that gave him the terrible wound.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 19:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time there lived two brothers who used always stay out late at night. One night, later than usual, they were coming home from a circus. As they were passing a tall oak tree which grew on a very lonely stretch of road the younger brother saw a huge, dark figure with horns, hooves, and a tail. The younger brother asked the elder what was the object, at the same time trembling with fear. "What object," said the man looking around him. "The object standing at that tree," said the younger brother. The man took a step nearer to the tree but still could see nothing. "You are only fooling me," said the elder man.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 19:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time a man was coming home from a pub. The night was very dark and there was a fog in it. He heard something coming along the road after him. It was making terrible noise and there was a chain rattling. When it drew near the man the man started running. He did not run far when he fell and he started to shout for help. It was only a fox hound and a kettle tied to his tail. The man stayed alongside the roadside that night.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 18:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In September 1905, Patick O'Neills house at Glenidan was burned to the ground. The chimney caught fire first & gradually the flames spread.
About 45 years ago there was a man killed by a fall off a horse at Plunketts boreen near the school at Glenidan. He was only seen on Saturday evening riding the horse & next morning. When the people were going to first Mass they found him dead opposite the boreen at the big stone & the horse was standing beside him.
About 65 years ago, a man named Hoy was drowned in Lough Lene. He was a herd in Windtown. He was crossing in a boat from the Collinstown side of the lake on his way to Windtown. He was accompanied by two other men named Joseph Francis & James Reilly. It was night time & he accidentally fell out of the boat. When found he had a match in one hand & a pipe in the other as if he was in the act of lighting his pipe when drowned. The banshee cried from the time he was drowned till his funeral near Killallon graveyard. About 44 years ago there was a very severe spell of frost & snow which has not been witnessed ever since. There was tow men coming from the fair in Oldcastle.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 18:46
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was the teacher. The pupils used to write with quills & slates.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 18:45
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
5. There was a hedge-school between Kells & Nobber. Master O'Reilly taught there. There were 100 pupils going to it. Each pupil paid a guinea a year.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 18:41
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hang them up to dry. When dry, they dipped them into grease and then they were ready for use.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 18:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago it was the custom to get married on Shrove Tuesday. They would have a feast all day and get married about seven o'clock in the evening. They went on horseback when the journey was long. The bride wore a plaid shawl which covered her head and a red petticoat down to her ankles.
Some people used to go to the blacksmith to marry them. He would give the anvil three tips of the hammer and they would be married.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 18:20
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
always get married in the morning. Sometimes they used to have no ring at all but the key of the door which would be given to the bride.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 18:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
People named Cahill that live beside us, have a cradle. It is made of wood
It is a very old one noe They got the lend of it when the first child was born, as some say it is very lucky to borrow a cradle when the first is born. There are rockers on the bottom of the cradle on each side.
They have a horse shoe nailed to the head of the cradle, to bring good luck to the child.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 18:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
We have a settlebed at home It is made of wood. And it is painted red. There is a big broad board on the top of it. It is used for holding polish, and brushes, and soap, and many other things Sometimes we sit on it . It is at the back wall beside the table. It is not very old yet My two brothers sleep in it at night. It is very useful.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 18:08
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are two sugan chairs in Thomas Mac Mahon’s house of Petersville.
There were three in it at first, but one of them was broken
The two of them are different
One of them is a folding chair with a sugan in the back of it. There is a sugan in the bottom of the other one.
They are an out 60 years of age.
My great grandmother bought them on the street of Bailieboro.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 18:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Story 13 February 1938
Told by Beth McKeague
There is a woman who lives beside us, and whose name is Cassie Doherty. One day, she picked bluebells in a fairy hill, and she broke some of the stalks. She went to bed that night, but in the morning there was not any hair on here head. Its grew again, but it was never the same colour afterwards.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 17:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago when there was a big house in Hampstead there lived a man and his wife in the house. One day a rat came in and sat beside the fire and they were afraid to put him out.
After some time he opened the door and went out. Another night there was a dance in the same house and a motor car came in one door and out the other door In the car there was a man who owned the house one time and was dead.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 17:39
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
greatly rejoiced with what they had for themselves.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 17:39
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
He started to think what was best to do, but he thought if he told anyone that they would play a trick on him, and deprive him of his fortune. At last he strolled across the fields to where men were just beginning their work. He breathlessly revealed the whole story. They at once went to where the flag was lying, and the three men set to work but all in vain. The poor man was very troubled to know what could be the meaning of his dream.
The next day he came to the same place. When they were close to the stone they saw an old man sitting on it who tole them that he owed a small amount of money in two different places. Then lifting up a small stone he disappeared. Under it was a jar full of money. Peter was sorry to have told his neighbours, but they did as they were commanded, and they were
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 17:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time Peter Slattery lived in Grange. He had as he often told a great dream, but he would not relate it to anyone, fearing that they might find his luck. This was not enough, until he dreamt the same story on the third succeeding night.
On the third morning he arose very early and finding the place where he dreamt the money was, there was a large flag and knowing by no means he would not even stir it without some aid or another. If I had only a pickaxe he thought to himself. All he could do was return to his house and get something that would raise the flag. He stole into his yard and noiselessly bringing with him the crowbar and axe. When he reached the spot again he was tired, carring the tools, and he sat down to rest. With all his strength he tried to remove the stone but failed. Sitting down again
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 17:29
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
further, they looked around and saw another piece of her dress on a hawthorn bush. This was their guide until they came about ten yards of the old fort. They saw her lying on the ground unconscious, and they brought her home. After three days she revived, and spoke those few lines :-
"For everything spoken
Or acted untrue;
For promises broken
And broken anew;"
She lived for two unhappy years. It is said that the fairies brought her to the fort in revenge for breakin her promise. When she died, it is said that she was seen and heard [?]round lamenting and sobbing around her house.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 17:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One time there lived in Shangarry a woman named Ann Maloney. She got married twice, before her first husband died he told her not to get married again. Time went on and at last she married the man that was working for the. As usual she went often to the town of Loughrea. This evening it was rather late, and as they were coming up the Shangarry road she was taken suddenly of her seat, and was swept east through the bog and on and on until she was quite near an old fort, that is still to be seen in Shangarry. Nobody went to search for her the first night, as she herself was very energetic and courageous . Not returning they started off through the bog and found pieces of her cloths attached to the top of the yellow furzes that were then in bloom. Very doubtful to go any
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 17:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
592(F) (11)
Drumandoora N S
Chriss Brody V1Class

8 pages
Caher ,Feakle ,Co. Clare.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 17:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a protestant man living one mile from the village of Shangarry. His name was Patrick Kenny Nobody liked him, because he was a very mean man. On his farm, there was a blessed well, and it was called Chickens well. He hated for anyone to bring water out of it, or to be praying there. One day he compelled to close the well, and filled it up with stones. There was a beautiful ash tree near the well, and all the water left the well, and went up in the trunk of that tree, so that not a drop remained. The following day the man got very bad, and was not able to walk or stir. Then he begged the people to open it again, and they did, but the water remained in the tree. The man died very shortly after that.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 17:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
37 country.
The rabbit is very destructive to the crops and present the grovenment is paying a bounty on their skins for the purpose of getting rid of them.
The hare is most harmful all and makes good sport for the hounds its flesh is of little use but the broth is very good.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 17:14
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
36
24th March 1938.
Folklore .
Wild animals are not as plentiful now as what they were some time ago.
The commonest wild animals in this district at present are the bager ,the fox ,the deer the rabbit and the hare.
Those animals are not very harmful on the whole but still they do damage enough.
The badger and fox kill fowl ,young lambs and kids but they make good sport for the huntsman and beagles.
Very seldom the deer is to be seen in this part of the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 17:08
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
airs of different music. She was a grown up woman then with no toes, and it is said that she danced them off with the fairies.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 17:08
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
35
in Flagmount 2 miles distant.
Terror of it still lives in the minds of those who witnessed it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 17:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Mary Carlon lived with her parents in a place called Powerliska. It is in the Parish of Dunary. This story is told down since the time of our forefathers. In those days it is said that the fairies brought a lot of people. However this little girl was taken from her parents, and no one could ever trace where she went too. Nor even herself could not relate what had become of her in all those years. She only knew that she was in a beautiful place dancing and listening to lovely
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 17:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
34
22nd March 1938
Folklore.
About 35 years ago there was a terrible storm in the month of February which lasted for 24 hours.
During that period many houses were left roofless and stacks of corn and cocks of hay were knocked.
A house in this locality had been newly thatched and all one side of ot was lowed to the ground and had to newly fixed again.
It is supposed that some car was swept from this side of the parish and landed over
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 17:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
46
7th April 1938
Folklore
Long ago when the old people were measuring any kind of crops such as potatoes, turnips,mangolds wheat they uses an as and baskets for measuring potatoes a basaketfull was counted as one cwt-weight and four big bucketfulls filled a basket.
And a creel weighed a ton .When measuring milk or water long ago the old people said a cupfull was a halfpint and two cupfulls one pint.When the people made coats of their own long
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 16:54
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
side Kinsale, the old town they knew was Bandon, where they sold twigs for basket making. They might have attended political meetings for they hated England, landlords and castle catholics. So they spent their lives up to the years when they became too old to work on the Rock" among the neighbours and neighbour's children.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 16:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Like most of the farming class of the time this was how they spent their few hours of leisure after slaving from dawn to dark, recounting again and again the same old stories, as for instance, that such and such an apple tree was brought from Compass Hill by their grandfathers, or that it was from their gardens the Abby was bombarded by "Cromwell the ruffian not judging him". They knew nothing of concerts or circuses, and as for excursions to places out-
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 16:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[-]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 16:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The people used not be very rich long ago. They used to swop a lot those times. The rich people used to give tea and sugar and other things in payments for a days work.
Sometimes travellers who used to be selling along the roads used to stand near where there would be a meeting and the people used to buy all their goods from them.
It is said that on one occasion near a chapel in Dooras a women set up a tent on a Saturday evening to be selling on Sunday. During the night a tinker passed and went into the tent. When the woman came with the things for selling she found the tinker snoring. She was afraid to waken him so she had to go home again without selling anything. She said she would only make all the tinker had in his pocket, and he had only 3d.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 16:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Many years ago there was a man who went to a funeral, which took place to the Carmelite Abbey Kinsale. While he was standing at the grave side waiiting for the coffin to be lowered into the grave, he saw skulls and bones in the earth. One of the skulls rolled over near his feet and with disrespect kicked it into the grave. When the funeral was over, the man returned home. That night he went to bed and about 12 o clock the skull rolled into the man's bed - room, it had light coming from the eyes. This happened three nights and the man got bad and died shortly after
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 16:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The people used not be very rich long ago. They used to swop a lot those times. The rich people used to give tea and sugar and other things in payments for a days work.
Sometimes travellers who used to be selling along the roads used to stand near where there would be a meeting and the people used to buy all their goods from them.
It is said that on one occasion near a chapel in Dooras a women set up a tent on a Saturday evening to be selling on Sunday. During the night a tinker passed and went into the tent. When the woman came with the things for selling she found the tinker snoring. She was afraid to waken him so she had to go home again without selling anything. She said she would only make all the tinker had in his pocket, and he had only 3d.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 14:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a man who lived a few miles away from us who was a great cow Doctor, and also the Delaney's of Feerigh who were famous "bone Setters and their was
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 14:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One poor crippled and innocent creature used to be wheeled in a barrow from one neighbour's house to another and there was always a "cead- mile-failte" before her others would be around selling wares and those would be sure to have all the news of the country for miles around.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 14:20
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
was near us. Her Aunt showed her where the Stations were in the church.
A that time a lot of poor people would be seeking alms around the country and most of the people would give them a nights lodging.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 14:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
On certain feasts my mother would make the round of Stations of the Cross in the ruins of a church that
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 14:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
On St Patrick's Day we would all have Patrick's Crosses and my father would blacken a sally rod and mark the Sign of the Cross on our shoulders with it on.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 14:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
When the potatoes were all dug and in the pits we would have what was called "A grating night". A Michael-mas goose, would be killed and selected potatoes would be grated in the raw state then squeezed and baked on a griddle. Starch would also be made from potatoes on May Day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 14:13
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
great diggers and spoke mostly Irish. The old people around here have many old Irish words got from the diggers.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 14:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
On Hallow Eve people had great feasting. They used to have boiled boxty that is little cakes made four or 6 inches in width, and two inches deep. These would be eaten hot with sugar and butter. They also had nuts they gathered in the woods, and apples they stole or bought in the market. Many games were played such as diving, hanging up apples to catch them in your mouth without touching them with the hand. These customs are still here the only difference been that currant cake and fancy bread is added to the boxty. A very old woman told me that it would not be right to let Hallow Eve pass without boxty, and no one ever does in this district.
Games at Hallow Eve
---------------------------
---------------------------
The young people used to each gather nine grains of wheat. Each would leave eight down on the ground, and keep the 9th to be put in her stocking under her pillow with these words:- {said when sowing the eight}
''Hard grain I sow you
True love to know you
Black or white appear to me this night
In the way that I will know you.''
He or She then dreams of the one God has left out for her or him to marry.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 09:37
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhí Séipéal in Cillcateirine fadó agus do dineadh é in aon oidhche amháin mar san am san bhí alán Protostúnaig timcheall na háite sin agus bhí alán Séipéil acu agus ní leigeadh síad do na Catlaide aon Séipéil a dhéanamh agus sin é an fá gur dheineadar an Séipéal san oidhche.
Bhí an sean séipéal déanta i dtalamh Phadraig Uí hUrdail ar an dtaobh theas den bóthar agus an ainm a tugtaí ar an bothair sin anois ná Seana-Shéipéil.

Fúair Máire Ní Shéaghda an sgéal so o'n a áthair Pádruig Ó Shéaghdha, Leithead.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 09:29
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bí fear ann fadó agus do connaich se girrfhiadh ag teacht amach as na mianaig i mBéara tráthnóna amháin. An madain na diag sin an cead fear a chuaidh isteach na mianaig do fuair sé bás. Agus deirtear gur girrfhiadh Bandraoí aba í.

Fuair Tomás Ó hUrdail an sgéal seo ó Seóirse Ó hUrdail Clonee
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 09:21
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Jim Foley says 'twas a bream Our Lord caught at the miracle of the loaves and fishes. Every bream caught since has the mark of one thumb on one side and of four fingers on the other.

Seán Ó Súilleabháin
(see op. page)
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 04:55
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bacon, money and clothes. The people often give them flour or milk or bacon or clothes and some people give them nothing at all.
The travelling folk are poor and they do not wear very good clothes. We see the children going about bare-footed in the winter -time. Some times they come in pairs to our houses, or just one person and often a band of them come together.
Some of the travelling folk have a great deal of donkeys and ponies. A great deal of the travelling folk come to our houses in spring and at the beginning of summer. They go to fairs also.
There is a large fair held in Ballymagovern about half a mile from my school twice each year on the twenty third of November. We see plenty of the travelling folk there begging for alms and they go to most of the fairs.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 04:21
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Only three holy wells are in the locality.
They are: Saint Briget's; Saint Senan's and Saint Martin's.
Saint Senan's well is situated in Killiane about three miles from the school. It is owned by Mr. Cullen of Killiane, Drinagh.
The field it is in is known as the Common's field. The well is about two feet square and is fenced around with bushes. It has a healing property which is a cure for sore eyes. About two years ago a woman who was blind washed her eyes with its waters and was cured the next morning.
About one hundred yards from the well the ruins of a church is standing. This also is dedicated to Saint Senan. Four walls remain. Inside the church is a tomb. A plaque on this tomb is dated 1807. The only writing which is decipherable on it is: Elizabeth.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 04:12
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Johnson, aged forty five years. 1807".
Saint Martins well is just below Piercestown Chapel. It is dedicated to Saint Martin who was Bishop of Tours and Patron of Piercestown. This well too is said to be cure for sore eyes.
No particular cure has taken place there however during the past few years. A pump is now erected over it, and the water is used for household purposes.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 04:06
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continued like that until the players are tired.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 04:04
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
piece of string. The tail is attached to the bottom strings.
A large ball of twine is procured and tied to the nail which joins the the the laths together. The kite is then complete.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 03:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Dandelion is a small plant which is found extensively in Piercestown. It grows about five or six inches in height. It had a golden coloured blossom and soft toothed leaves.
The leaves are plucked off the plant and boiled in water for about half an hour. The juice in the leaves is extracted by other means, and mixed with water. The water when drank by a persom suffering from consumpton is able to care for it.
Canavonbeg is a small plant found in fields and on ditches. It does not exceed three or four inches in height, and has a thin wiry stem, and purple blossom. The leaves are plucked off the plant and boiled in milk .
When the milk is drunk for nine successive mornings it cures worms.
The Common Plantain known as "cocks and hens" is a cure for cuts, The leaves are plucked and chewed in the mouth. They are then taken and placed on the wound which is cured in about twenty minutes.
When stung by a nettle the affected part becomes covered with a white rash
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 03:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In this district there are a great deal of poor people travel-ling about. They live in tents along the main road or in fields. Some of them live in caravans with wheels on them which are drawn from place to place with horses.
The people that live in those houses are called the travelling folk. They are so called as they are always travelling about from house to house. Some of them sell articles such as [?], needles, delph, laces, mirrors and all sorts of household things. Some people buy things and others do not.
When they go to a house they ask alms such as bread, flour, eggs
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 03:53
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Farland Bank.
After the Farland Bank was made and shut. A lump fell out of the side towards our house. John Mc Grory was walking along the bank and he heard the shot, he was in a field when it busted. It was a hundred years since it was made. The priests had to come in boats and some of them had to ride over on horseback. Trady bank was the first banck was made Newton bank was the next. There was a railway on to the Farland Bank......
Pupil May Robinson
Baylett Inch
told by (Mrs) Annie Robinson
Baylett Inch
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 03:42
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
which is extremely painful. A dockleaf is then procured and placed on the rash. The pain gradually disappears as well as the rash.
A well, known as Saint Bridget's well is situated in Rathaspeck in Piercestown. When its water is applied to warts it cures the.
Another well in Killiane has curing properties.
It is called Saint Senan's. The waters when rubbed on sore eyes cures them.
Fresh milk taken from a cow and while still hot, if it is placed in an ear which is paining cures it.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 03:37
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
and lit the roof [?] in and some in some cases they would dig out the foundation with problems and let the walls fall down. They had men with them for this purpose called the crobar Brigade.
If there was not a vacant house for these families convenient to them. The people of the nearest parishes would gather and they were known in some cases to erect a house in one day and leave it almost ready for the evicted man and his wife to live in that night. There was a house built for one man in the townland of Crea.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 03:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Travelling folk are not as numerous now as they were a few years ago and in consequence it is hard to acquire any exact account of these peopl. To gain a living they go from house to house selling thimbles, needles, thread, laces, tiepins and various other articles.
About sixty years ago a travelling man known as Johnny Kavanagh used to come to Alywards of Ballyfinoge. The night before Saint Patricks day was his time for coming.
A comfortable bed used be erected in the barn for him to sleep on.
When he arrived word was sent around to the neighbours who gathered in the barn to hear him telling stories of his travels. He used to mend all kinds of crockery. This was his way of repaying the farmers for his food and lodging.
Another man going around at the same time was known as "Stonyeen Radh." No one in the locality knew his name. One peculiarity about him was that he could eat almost anything. He seemed to bare no sense of taste. He used stop three nights in every
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 03:31
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
it was turned into a priest's residence and a new church was rected by Rev. Fr. Hugh McGovern.
During this time the people were very poor and they used to work for three pence for clay. By this way they made a road and a cupla bridges in the parish.
Some time ago the greater portion of Glan was owned by a landlord whose name was Lord Ainsely. He lived in the No. Down and he had an agent to collect the rent for him who lived in Cavan town. The people of Glan would have to go to Cavan town to pay the rent which is a distance of thirty miles. I heard it told [?] them was [?] woman who used to walk to Cavan town and she would be home in time in time to milk her cows that night which is a distance of sixty miles to and from it.
As usual some of the landlords were very cruel and bad. If any of the tenants did not pay their rent which had to be paid once a year. The landlord would send the Sheriff and a certain member of police and some times the horse soldiers came to Gl[?].
But they never left the road unless they were needed.
There were twenty three house in this neighbourhood which was diminished because they could not pay the rent. They cut the [?]
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 03:28
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Erection of the Farland Bank.
The Farland Bank was built about ninety years ago. It was Lord Brassey who built it. There was a man called Logan working at it, and he got killed quarring stones by a landslide. There is a short story connected with it.
When the men were working at this bank, each week or each month, there came a man with their wages, So this day he came and he always came on horseback. Anyhow on his journey he men(t) this old man breaking stones along the wayside, so they stopped and talked. But the man on horseback proceeded onwards till
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 03:19
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
farmer's place.
Every man in Wexford knows Paddy Berry. He earns his living by selling badges, laces, tiepins in Wexford, and by playing a melodian. About four years ago he broadcasted from Athlone.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 03:18
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Boat Wreck.
In the year 1894 a man named Thomas McLaughlin and his son was employed boating up sand to build the Cathedral in Letter-kenny. It was a calm evening when he left Rathmullan with a cargo of sand but he had his boat over loaded.My great uncle Patrick Green was standing watching the boat from Benalt. When he was passing Drum-boe point a heavy storm arose. He fought with the storm two hours and at the end his boat went down and the both was drowned. The son was got a week later but the father was never got.
Pupil. Hugh McGinley
Told by David McGinley
Castle Quarter, Inch.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 03:16
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
During the Penal days there were very few families living in this parish. As there were no roads to get in or out apart one which is still to be seen. This road: was not fit for anyone only those on horseback and it was leading from Piacíar an mbothar to the black river which was a distance of nine miles.
It is also known that during this time the Mass would be delivered on the side of the mountain bordering Cavan and Leitrim. This spot was called "Aoi an t-ságair". It was the one priest that would do four or five parishes. The remainder of the Mass rock is still to be seen and it is supposed to be a very holy place.
As time rolled by and as the people began to grow more plentiful they moved down to the foot of the mountain to Carrick West. Then in about 1796 a small church was built. This church was very simply built and roofed with thatch. Again in about 1856
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 03:04
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Ans: A man sowing crrn.
Q: Genny carrage she sits in her cage a little below you and well and all her children die with age and there she sits herself. What is that?
Ans: A tree.
Pupil. Hugh Mac Ginley
Castle Quarter Inch Island.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 03:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Pupil Hugh Mac Ginley
Told by Patrick Green age 81
Castlequarter, Inch Island
Riddles
Q: Genny Co-rottle she sits in her bottle with her red pettiecoat and her white nose.
What is that?
Ans: A candle
Q: I had a wee poppet. it sat in my pocket. It never ate corn not hay. Up came a swaddle and stole my best poppet away. What is that?
Ans: A watch.
q: The wind blew west and west sailed we. Our sheet been full how could that be.
What is that .
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 02:53
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the house and lies in one corner
Ans: A whisp.
Q:What goes up the hill and down the hill and through the valley and never moves
A: The road.
Pupil Eddie Sweeney.
Hill Bay, Inch Island
told by (Mrs) Hannah Sweeney
Hill Bay, Inch Island
Riddles
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 02:52
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are three grave yards in parish, the oldest of these is Port of the lake. Templeport Church yard is the next oldest. It is a short distance from Port. The other graveyard is Kilnavart. All these gravveyards are still used as the people like to bury in the graves of their ancestors. In Port graveyard can be seen the ruins of an old Church. Another old graveyard is in Newtowngore, it is called Moy and there is a ruin there also.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 02:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Riddles
Q: As I went up a slippery slap, I met a small black bull. He kicked and I flung. If you had have been there you you would have seen the fun, what is that?
Ans: A jag in your heel.
Q: One half dead and the other half living and a tail wagging.
Ans: A dog with his head in a pot.
Q: As round as an apple as plum as a ball, can climb the church over steeple and all.
Ans : The sun.
Q: What goes round and round
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 02:22
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So they asked to be let in and St Peter said that the Pope had just arrived and they were busy. So the Irishman though [sic] of a plan. The Jew was wearing an over-coat and Paddy made him take it off. So he made him take it and wrap it around himself. So Paddy knocked this time and St Peter opened the Gate and asked him what he had got. Paddy said it was the Pope's luggage and St Peter said, Pass in.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 02:18
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
A Jew and an Irish Man arrived at the same time at the Gate of Heaven. So the Jew knocked and St Peter opened the gate.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 00:49
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of peoples' homes. They charge fairly dear for this work. They gypsies have large caravans for travelling around. The common tramps have small vans or carts and some of them travel on foot around.
The best known tramp as Peter Brady or "Big Brady" as he is more commonly known in this locality. The Gilheaney's are a large family who live in Ballinamore. They come from often to this locality and have been known for many years. Patrick Gilheaney's father was called "Daggons Gilheaney". He was a drunkard but his son is quite respectable and honest.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 00:32
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Travelling folk are not as plentiful as they were some time ago. Very few visit this district. In this district they are called "tramps" and considered dishonest and bad. They are usually very poor.
The majority of them gather bottles, potatoes, meal, flour and such things. Some of them sell needles, pins, artificial flowers and various small articles. We do not know where they purchase their supplies.
The "tinkers" often visit us too. They sell tin articles such as porringers and gallone. Others of them have their tool loose with them and can mend cans or gallone in their farmhouses. But they are all decreasing as the tin has to be imported from England and they have no profit making tins.
The "Gypsies" are another tribe which are considered decent. They sell lace which is their principal trade. They say they crochet with a hairpin which the country people think impossible. Some of the Gypsies tell fortunes and read the palm-
duine anaithnid
2019-06-23 00:23
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class in the village they would be rewarded with food and clothes.
The people composed mocking verses in Irish about the turn coats.
At last the Famine passed. Mrs Harris' business went to ruin. She went to England the land of her love and died there.
It was then that Fear na Gruaige settled in Downderry. Finally he disappeared. He was supposed to have gone back to his native Muskerry and to have been drowned in the Suláin.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 00:22
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
I live in the district of Ballymagovern, parish of Templeport, and barony of Tullyhaw. There are sixteen families living in my district. Most of the houses are thatched, except five or six which are slated. The district of Ballymagovern got its name from the clan Magoverns that lived in it long ago. The ruins of an old castle which also belonged to the Magoverns is still to be seen beside Ballymagovern lake. The most of the land is hilly and not good for grazing.
The houses were more numerous long ago than they are now as there are a great number of old ruins to be seen in the district. There is a river running through my district called the Blackwater river. There are all kinds of fish living in it such as pikes, perches, trout, and many others. There are two bridges on it. One of them is built of stone and the other is a wooden bridge.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 00:17
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Is dócha go bhfuil trí fichid bliain ann ó bhí an tAthair Seán Ó Meara mar sagart paróiste san Eaglais,
Is as Gaeilge do labharadh sé lena muintir go coitianta agus bhíodh sois-scéal aige dóibh gach Domhnach. Siad na focail deireannacha a bhíodh aige dóibh i gcónaí ach "go ligidh Dia go mbeidhmíd go léir ar slua na marbh".
Lá dá raibh sé ag tabhairt sean-móin uaidh ar an Eaglais dúirt sé ná raibh aon fháil ag aoinne dul ar Neamh ach iad san a bhí san Eaglais.
Bhí beirt sean-fhear i measc an phobail agus iad ina shuí le cois a chéile. Nuair a chloiseadh ar na focail sin d'fhéachadar ar a chéile. Ansan thug duine acu sunnc dá uillinn don duine eile agus dúirt sé "Ó dar fiadh, a Sheáin, a d'airigh tú cad dúirt sé? Agus cad ón diabhal a dhéanfadh muintir Baile na Páirce anois?" (Baile na Páirce is eadh ainm an cheanntair is giorra don cheanntar eile sin - an Eaglais.)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 00:06
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Sé an t-Athair Sléidin a bhí mar sagart paróiste ar Máigh-Dheilge timpeall leath-chéad bliain ó shoin. Bhí feirm beag ag gabháil le tig-a'-pharóiste agud bíodh ba ag an sagart ar an dtalamh.
Chuir sé an seirbhíseach go dtí Aonach Dúngarbháin le ceann des na ba a dhíol. Níor d'éirigh leis í dhíol agus chuaidh sé chun a thart do mhúcadh agus d'éirigh leis seo a dhéanamh go sár-mhaith. Nuair do tháinigh sé chuige féin bhraith sé an bhó imithe agus bhain san ar meisce dhe.
Nuair d'iniseadh dó go raibh an bó gan díol agus gan tomhais ná a tuairisc le fáil, as go bráth leis ar a chapaillín an bóthar abhaile - agus ar na daoine a bhuail leis d'fiosruigh díobh i dtaobh na bó mar seo :- An bhfeacaidh aoinne agaibh agus mo stríopach - mo stríopach dhearg - mo stríopach dhearg gan páiste - ní fheadar a bhfeacaidh aoinne í".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:43
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i meach na mbó ag cur draoichta áigin agus ag tógaint a mbainne léi.
Creideadh an scéal so ar fuaid an cheanntair sin.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:42
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Is ar Chnoc Mhillerí deirtear gur thit so amach idit trí agus ceithre scór bliain anois ann.
Bhíodh an scéal coitianta go maith ar bhéalaibh sa ndaoine sa cheanntar san, go mbíodh daoine agus droch-amhras ortha ar a bheith ag goid bainne bó na gcomharsan. Go raibh an diabhal féin ag cabhrú leis an dream san agus go raibh a rún ann go bhfuighdís ainmhidhthe do dhéanadh díobh féin.
Ráinneadh go raibh beirt ag fiadhach ar an sliabh agus go raibh péire con acu. Ní ró-fhada gur dhúiseadar gearrfiadh agus as go bráth leis na coin ina dhiaidh. Thug sé a aghaidh ar tigh beag cinn-tuighe a bhí suite ar thaobh an sliabh. Lean an bheirt fhear an cúrsa lena shúil agus bhreathadar ná tabharfadh an gearrfiadh an tig leis. Is ar éigin do dhein sí fuinneóigín ar phinniúr an tighe agus bhí sí ar oscailt.
Bhí na coin agus a mbéal oscailte ar tí snáb do thabhairt ar an ngearrfiadh nuair do scuab sé isteach tré comhla na fuinneoige.
Tháinigh an beirt fhear de shíth-reatha agus go saotharach. Isteach sa tigín leo agus síos sa seomra codlata. Bhí fuil ar na h-éadaigh leabthan ar an úrlár ar an bhfuinneog i.e. mar d'éirigh le madra acu píosa do bhaint as a chromán. Ba shean-bhean do bhí sa leaba. Caitheadar na h-éadaí leaba i leath-taoibh agus ansan nochta da dóibh stiall fada dearg friseálta bainte amach glan as a cois.
B'in í, an tseanbhean, an gearrfiadh a bhíodar ag fiadhach. Bhí sí amuigh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:29
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The chief bread used in the country is soda bread, boxty bread, oatmeal bread and potatoe bread. The way to make boxty bread is to get potatoes and peel them and grate them, and then ring them through a cloth. Then boiled potatoes are bruised through them, and a few handfuls of flour are added. Then they are put on the fire and boiled for about an hour.
Then they are taken out. They are called dumplings. The way to make potatoe bread is to get boiled potatoes and ? them up, and add some flour, and then they are made into cakes. They are fit for use then.
Oatmeal bread is made entirely from oatmeal, soft water and sugar Then it is left along the fire to bake.
The way to make soda bread is with flour, bacon, soda, salt and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:24
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Tá níos mó ná caoga bliain ann ó bhí driofúr liom ag imirt ceoil. Bhuail fear óg isteach orainn agus chuir cluas ar féin chun an ceoil. Chrom sí ar chorn-phíopa d'imirt agus amach leis an bhfear so gan cuireadh gan iarraidh ar an úrlár mar níor d'éid sé smacht do chur ar a chosa bhí an oiread san fúdair fútha chun rince.
Ba mhór an meas a bhí aige ar féin mar rinnceoir ach ba í an fhírinne í nár thuig sé an ceol ar aon chumadh.
Lean sé air agus ní r-fhada go raibh an t-allus ag séideadh amach tríd agus ag rith le fánadh a aghaidh na sruithíní beaga ach níor chuir sé pioc amháin surme ansan.
Sa deire thiar thall thit an ceoltóir cortha agus stad den phort. Stad an rinnceoir leis. Bhuail sé anonn dtí an ceoltóir agus dúirt "nach iontach an leabhracht atá sa phort san".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:23
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The chief bread used in the country is soda bread, boxty bread, oatmeal bread and potatoe bread.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:20
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Long ago when people had sore throats they used to get salt and put it in a pan and put in the fire then put it in a stocking and wear it round the neck. A cure for the whooping cough was to go three times under an ass. A cure for a bleeding nose was to tie a string round the little finger. The cure the mumps was: the person that had this used to be led on a rope to the pigers and they used to rub their faces to the place where the pig rubbed his, 3 times in the name of the father and of the son, and of the Holy Ghost, Amen.
Long time ago if anyone had a bad cold they would take oaten gruel. If they had a bad stomach they would put some salt in a mug of hot water and drink it
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:16
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class in the village they would be rewarded with food and clothes.
The people composed mocking verses in Irish about the turn coats.
At last the Famine passed. Mrs Harris' business went to ruin. She went to England the land of the love and died there.
It was then that Fear na Gruaige settled in Downderry. Finally he disappeared. He was supposed to have gone back to his native Muskerry and to have been drowned in the Suláin.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:13
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The first time he came to the district Father Begley P.P. Clontead had a lot of trouble with the soupers. The ring leader of the soupers was the wife of Horace Harris the owner of the flour-mill at Belgooly. She had a boiler of soup always steaming to tempt the starving people. It is remarkable that the very ground on which the boiler stood became in after years the site chosen for the new Church.
Anyway Fear na Gruaige helped Fr Begley by galloping around on the track of the soupers, who were going from house to house trying to pervert the poor people. If they sent their children to Mrs. Harris' Bible
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:12
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or they would get some sea salt and put it at the bottom of their tongue. If they had a sprained arm or leg they would get the fat of a goose and rub it to it.
The cure for a swelling on the bog was to rub hemlock o it.
The cure for a burn was to grate soap and mix sugar through it and put it on the burn. In olden times the cure for ring worm to put parafin out and on the place where the ring worm was. The cure for pains was to get a weed called cranes beak and rub it to the place where you had the pains.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:11
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Sé an fear céanna - Séamas Thaidhg - a bhiodh ag obair i dtigh na comharsan, ó thig go tig de réir mar a bhiodh obair dó agus dá mbeadh in éileamh air, d'fanadh sé ag áirneán an fhaid agus do sheasóchadh solas coinnle leis.
Bhíodh an mhórdáil ag gabhail leis agus níor dhein sí í dhearmad riamh. D'inniseadh sé scéalta, ceapaithe a n-úrmhór agus leigeadh sé air léig sé iad i bpáipéirí nuachta na seachtaine caite.
Bhí sé ag obair i dtigh áirithe lá agus d'oscail fear-a-tighe an páipéir agus chrom ar a léigheamh. Ba ghearaid gur chuir sé béic iongantais as agus shín an páipéar chun Séamais a chur a mhéire ar an spotta sa pháipéar a leig sé ar a bheith ag léimh agus le fonn go léigfeadh Séamas é.
Bhíos aige go maith na géillfeadh Seamus ná tabharfadh sé le rá ná raibh sé ábalta ar an léimh a dhéanamh.
Léig leis ós árd an scéal is milltidhe is d'airig aoinne riamh ar murder do dhéineadh an t-seachtain roimhe sin i gCo. Corcaigh. Bhí, fad na h-aimsire sin, an páipéar iompuighe síos suas aige agus fear-a-tighe ag féachaint thar a ghuallain ag gáire dó féin agus Séamus ag cur uaidh de réir mar do mheas sé féin.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:08
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When people joked about his long hair he would answer "Má bhfuil ceann mná agam tá croidhe fhir agam".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:08
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sound, and a lot of those ''Mud Wall Houses'' still remain. The door was on the side for shelter, the beds were mostly in the kitchen, and the fireplace was against the west end. It may be often noted that a door leads from the house to the byre or fowl house.
Strange to say those houses were more comfortable than a lot of the present houses.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:07
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swaying with motion of the pony. He looked to be very proud man holding his head high and taking no notice of any remarks that might be passed on him. At that time nick names were common and this strange character was not long in Kinsale when the people gave him the leas-ainm of Fear na Gruaige.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:05
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During the Famine years a curious character made his appearance in Kinsale. He had brown hair which he wore in plaits like a woman, tied back from his forehead with a ribbon and trailing down over his shoulder. He lived in a small house in Dunderrow village on the old road to Shippool the cabin still stands
He used it also for his two ponies Róisín and Buiththín. Old people between 70 and 80 years old remember Fear na Gruaige riding down Bandon Road on one of this ponies, his ringlets tossing in the wind, and a coat slung over his shoulders like a mantle.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 23:05
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When a man went to build a house 70 or 100 years ago his methods were diffferent from those of today. He had no cement, slates, or iles. He merely dug out a trench for the foundation, mixed a heap of mud, and clay and sometimes bog peat and it was from this mixture he made the walls, building them about 3 feet thick. He never built them higher than 12 feet, and they were left for about a week to set, and dry. He then selected a piece of bog oak for the wall plate.
He put on a thick bed of thatch. It was mostly oaten straw that was used for thatch. The windows were only about 2 feet wide, and the floors were all made of clay. The houses had only a kitchen and a room. Those houses were called '' Mud Wall Cabins'' but the wall of those houses were very
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:59
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working at repairs in St Multose Church was suddenly struck blind. For many years afterwards he could be seen standing day after day opposite the door of his house in Church Lane leaning on his stick whistling softly to himself, his eyes open but blank. It was such a remarkable thing to find a man become totally blind in one moment that people began talking about it. Some of the neighbours said that this man while digging, found sacred vessels and kept them with the intention of making money on them.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:58
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The robin lays four spotted eggs and sits on them for three weeks. The crow lays two white eggs. The magpie lays five white eggs. The thrush lays five eggs with blue spots on them. The wren lays fifteen white eggs.
The linnet lays six brown eggs with spots on them. The skylark lays six eggs. The boglark lays six blue eggs. The cuckoo lays one egg.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:55
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the night was turned into day ships like floating towns, lonely coasts where fishermen fished from tiny boats. He saw rich people who were unhappy because they could not gather in more money, and poor people who were contend with their lot.
Donnchadh Dall found himself back in his bed the sight gone again. He described all that he had seen in the vision and it was the same as if he had spent a long life travelling all over the world. After telling of what he had seen he did not pray any longer for sight for he became content with the will of God.
Denis Murray: This man who
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:54
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builds on the ground. The cuckoo builds no nest but the corncrake builds in a meadow and the swallow builds behind ribs in a house or on walls. The robin builds her nest of fog and hair. The crow builds her nest of sticks and lines it with hair inside. The thrush makes her nest of fog and leaves. The blackbird builds her nest of the same material. The linnet makes her nest of hair and feathers. The wren makes her nest of moss and hair. The willow wag tail makes her nest of turf and feathers. The sky lark makes her nest of grass and hair and the bog lark just the same. The corncrake builds her nest of grass. The swallow makes her nest of grass and clay.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:51
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This blind man lived somewhere around Bandon Road. He was constantly praying that God would grant him the great gift of sight so that he could see the world around him as his neighbours did.
One night as this blind man lay in bed a person came to him, raised him up, the roof opened and the blind man with his guide passed all over the world. Sight was restored to Donnchadh Dall while he went over land and sea thousands of miles away from Kinsale.
He saw great cities full of noise and confusion, where
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:48
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cases of terror. In the majority of cases the women supported the men in resisting the Antrims. When they rushed at a delicate priest Fr Carton, a woman was the first to come to his rescue.
She risked her life while the cudgels of the drunken Orange men were flying around her head, to save the priest.
At Market Lane stood a woman armed with a reaping hook. The women of Higher Street piled up stones ready for any enemy that would show himself on the Stony Steps.
After this attempt at wrecking and killing, the townspeople had increased confidence in themselves.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:47
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The birds generally to be found in our district are, the robin, the crow the magpie, the thrush the Blackbird, the Linnet, the wren, the willowwag tail , the skylark, the boglark, the cuckoo the corn-crake and the swallow.
The cuckoo, the corn-crake and the swallow leave us in winter and go across the sea. The robin builds her nest in a hawthorn bush. The crow builds her nest at the top of a high tree. The magpie builds also in a high tree. The thrush and the blackbird build low down in a hedge. The linnet builds in a hedge but not so high up. The wren builds in the eve of houses. The willowwag tail in a bog bank or in a clamp of turf. The sky lark builds in tuffs of grass on the ground and the bog-lark also
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:44
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and cried as she pointed towards Dunderrow "Tis now we'll have it" "This is the way they'll come". She had in her mind the prediction, so called, that in the last great battle which would end in victory for Ireland the English would advance from the west and after fighting two days between Innishannon and Kinsale they would fling away their arms and surrender on the very ground where the Ulster Chiefs lost the battle.
A remarkably tall woman proposed to her daughter that they dig a deep hole in a neighbour's garden drop into it and conceal themselves by pulling a gridiron over their heads. But these are only a few
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:38
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the newspaper reports, When the bell of the Parish Church rang its warning sending its loud, hurried notes pealing out on the air, countrymen from all sides picked up the weapon nearest at hand and marched into town. One man brought a saw.
He was asked did he mean to catch an Orange man by the poll and carefully saw off his head. One old woman started running from her house in Butcher's Row and never stopped till she tumbled in the door of a relative at Leoffney.
Another old woman stand[?] at Bandon Road Cross kept up a constant waving of her arms
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:34
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When the Antrim Militia started the riot the inhabitants were at first terrified especially the older generation who had either witnessed, or heard of the terrible deeds of the Yeos. But after some confusion they struck out and conquered the rioters. Here are a few stories such as are not to be found in
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 22:33
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Bliadhain agus an taca seo ba deas mo chulaith éadaigh
ba luthghmar éasgaidhe aigionta a dheanfhainn bean do bhreagnughadh
Act shantuigh mise an ghibog mar bhí bó no beirt ar spréigh aicí.
Agus d'fhag sí ar an anas mé agus mo chraiceann geal gan léine.
Ma bhí culaith éadaighe ort ní airím gur leat fhéin é
Ní rabh sé ar do chraiceann go rabh fear an t-siopa ag geilleadh
Dhíol tú mo cuid ealaigh-sa le sin agus tuilleadh reidteach
Agus d'fag tú ar an anas mé gan báinne bó le fiachail.
Nuair a théidheann tú amach ar maidín ag obair mar is cóir duit
I n-áit a dhul ag obair théidheann tú fríd cuid tuigthe do chomharsain
Ag rachaidh mar bheadh bacach ann i mbéal thoighe achan ndeanfhaidh
Agus ag fiosruigh do na cailleacha
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:33
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Children mostly started to wear boots at 17 years of age long ago.
There was supposed to be a man about this country who never used boots. Children at present wear boots in Summer. In was said it was unlucky to throw out water of any kind at night. There is one shoemaker in the district.
Clogs used to be made locally and they are still worn in Winter yet.
Leather was tanned in this district in a place called the Tanyard.
Long ago when some people had their children going to Mass with shoes, they were thought to be very rich.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:28
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Everyone, rich and poor, "try" to have something for Christmas. They light big candles in every window of the house. They have Christmas cakes too for that night. It is the night of the twenty-fourth and not the night of he twenty-fifth.
Some people go in the "wren" on St. Stephen's Day. Each person has different clothes on that day. Some people sing songs and more of them tell stories in every house on that day.
All the people go out New Year's night to hear the bells. Everyone "keep" Little Christmas Day the same as Christmas Day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:23
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At the time of the Penal days in Nenagh, the Catholics were thrown out of their own homes and were replaced by Protestants. When the Protestants saw the Catholics starving they gave them soup if they would become Protestants and all those who left their religion were called soupers.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 22:21
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
One time there was a boy & he was very fond of card-playing. One night he was coming home from card-playing & on the road he met a man, a table & a deck of cards. The man asked the boy to have a game with him & he was so tempted that he started card-playing. When they were cardplaying a while the boy thought to go home. The man would not let him go. A blaze of light came out to the man's mouth & the boy fell dead on the road. You see from the Story it was a bad spirit that was in it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 19:49
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1798 The croppies defeated here by the
right of Leinster Bridge on the old
remained (in 1869) of the dwelling in
conflict raged for 6 hours. Only 27 defenders.
Ancient tumulus to be seen within the enclosure.
Clonard Cathedral founded by Finian 520
bestowed Clonard on Finian. Babtised
of Trim. Till 30 years. Then to St David
he founded 3 churches.
The round Tower of Clonmacnoise fell to the ground.
1143.
"The far famed Iona derived its
Pillaged 12 different times - 5 by the Danes.
O'Daly chief poet of Ireland in 1136 was
from Breffney.
1206 Simon Rochford removed the seat
founded the Augustinian Abbey there.
(Sechnal was the patron saint of Meath)
Ruins still standing beginning of 19th Century.
Oaken sloips day
Where is it now? Thought to have been used in the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 19:48
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yeomen under Let. Tyrrell. (11th July) To the
road an ivy manlted wall, a porch, and a turret
which the yeoman held out.
till 21 additional came from Kinnegad.
of the Tyrrell mansion.
It was St Kieran of Clonmacnoise who
by St Abban placed under the care of Forligern Bisby
Menevia, Walls. Remained 30 years in Britain where
ground in 1039 (Four Masters) Library burned
religion and its architecture from Clonard.
residing in Clonard. Insulted by pillagies
of the Bishop from Clonard to Newtown near Trim.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 19:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
At the digging of the potatoes men used to come from Connaught for the season. They would have long narrow spades of their own with them called "fasks". They were
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 19:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
We got very little time for School during the Summer as we had to be working in the fields weeding and binding and laying out the corn after the men cutting it with scythes. The wheat at that time was grown in wide ridges, and a man cutting with the scythe, and two women one Laying out and the other Binding on each ridge, It was the custom for the men to be striving against each other, they would then boast about it for the year. The amount of work that was done in such a field.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 19:33
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
made easy daisy and spelling book. They also had slate and copy books. The Parish Priest would not allow the school to be continued in order that we should attend the National Schools.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 19:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1798 The croppies defeated here by the right of Leinster Bridge on the old
remained (in 1869) of the dwelling in
conflict raged for 6 hours. Only 27 defenders.
Ancient tumulus to be seen within the enclosure.
Clonard Cathedral founded by Finian 520
bestowed Clonard on Finian. Babtised
of Trim. Till 30 years. Then to St David
he founded 3 churches.
The round Tower of Clonmacnoise fell to the ground.
1143.
"The far famed Iona derived its
Pillaged 12 different times - 5 by the Danes.
O'Daly chief poet of Ireland in 1136 was
from Breffney.
1206 Simon Rochford removed the seat
founded the Augustinian Abbey there.
(Sechnal was the patron saint of Meath)
Ruins still standing beginning of 19th Century.
Oaken sloips day
Where is it now? Thought to have been used in the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 19:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Old Mrs Leahy said that her longest remembrance is going to the Hedge School which was near her home and held in a barn. There were seats and desks made from rough planks and blocks of wood about fifteen scholars used to attend for a couple of hours each day. The man would be also teaching in another part of the country on the same day.The scholars would have to bring a couple of sods of turf to make a fire in the winter. The teacher's name was Naughton (he had only one hand) He used to get some herbs in the ditches to make what he called "Insh Tea" The name of the books were "Premier" Reading
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 19:27
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a nail Factory in Rathdowney carried on by Ned and Micheal Fanning, this Factory was adjoining the old National School Rathdowney, now the C.Y.M.S Hall. A man whose name was Lacey Galmoy used to make nails. They were made from iron. Then they were put on an anvil and beaten out with a hammer.Barney Mc Guire, Pound St. Michael Fanning, High St. Edward Carthy, Moore St, Sam Fry, Moore St. Rathdowney used to make nails up to about 1887.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 19:24
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bergin, Ballycoolid were wheel makers about twenty or twenty five years ago. Coaching was also carried on by Kirwans of Rathdowney, and Matt Turbey, Errill. There was also wheel making carried on in Rathdowney by James Fogarty, who died about 1917 twenty years ago. James Dollard also made wheels, he died about 1935.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 16:34
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45
before his death he asked the following requests ,of the Royal family that they should not interfere with the election of his successior . Of his brethern that his successior should be pious , chaste ,and learned and all that that he should be buried deep down in the earth and that his remains should be never be disturbed.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 16:31
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44
17 May 1938
Folklore.
St Flannan is the patron saint of the Diocese of Killaloe. He was born 200 years ago after St Patrick and his feast day is celebrated on the 18th of December. He was very learned and industrious man .his father was a chief and by St Flannan advice he resigned the throne and went to live in a monastery .St Flannan went to school to a monastery and his teacher was St Molua who afterwards sent him to rome where he was consecrated Bishop by John 1 V .Some years
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 15:32
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A story a story I am going to relate,
I met a pretty damsel whose fortune was great,
She strolled out one evening, she strolled out all alone,
She sat beneath a bower a shower for to shu [?]
Young Jimmy strolled out with his gun in his hand,
He had been fowling all day as you may understand,
He had been fowling all day until evening came on,
And he shot Molly Ban,
By the setting of the sun.
And when he drew nigh her and found it was she,
His lips they grew feeble,
And his eyes could not see.
He took her in his arms, and found she was dead,
And a fountain of tears from his eyes down he shed.
Young jimmy rolled home with his gun in his hand.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 15:20
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
And he looking at his daughter.
Agus geóbam arís an crúisgín is bíod sé lán.
ix.
So now my song is ended,
And my pen is weary,
Success attend the gentlemen,
That carried on Cork races,
Many truth and hospitality abound,
Our little nation
And many trade and commerce flourish,
In our towns for future ages.
Agus geobam arís an crúisgín is bíod sé lán.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 15:18
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35
travels.
She was often compared to a snail as she carried her house on her back.
The young boys often vexed her calling her Moll Horse and she used to get very cross.
She ended her life in Scarriff workhouse about 25 five years ago and all Feakle people made up a collection and took her remains to Feakle for internment.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 15:17
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It is there you would see confectioners,
With sugarsticks and dainties,
The oranges the lozenges,
The lemons and the raisins,
There were gingerbread and spices there
To accomodate the o´ladies,
And pig crúibíns for twopence,
To be picking while you´re able
Agus geóbam arís an crúisgín is bíod sé lán.
VII
The bells rang out for starting,
The horses were impatient,
You would think they never stood on ground
Their speed was so amazing,
´Tis there you would see jockies,
And they mounted on most nately,
The pink, the blue, the red, the green,
The emblem of their nation,
Agus geóbam arís an crúisgín is bíod sé lán.
VII
´Tis there you would see gamblers,
Thimblemen and garters,
The sporting wheel of fortune there,
With its four and twenty quarters,
Others without scruple pelting bottles,
At poor Magie,
And her father well contented,
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 15:15
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34
8th March 1938
Folklore.
Mary Egan commonly known was born in the parish of lower Feakle about 95 years ago.
She was a real old beggar and travelled for a radius of 4 or 5 miles around the village of Feakle for her support.
She visited every house and always made herself at home where ever she was and always sat in the middle of the floor telling stories of her
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 15:10
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Balluaneasaig and Kinsale there,
There were Queenstown and Corkcity,
That were loyal true and faithful,
To bring home the Fenian prisoners,
From dying in Foreign nations.
Agus geóbam airís an crúiscín is bíod sé lán.
IV
There were jaunting cars and carriages,
Going to and fro like blazes,
The sidecars back and forward there,
For very little wages,
The steamers and the ferry boats,
Were fit for navigation,
And they ploughing the raging ocean,
For to come to see the races.
Agus geóbam airís an crúiscín is bíod dé lán.
V
The tents were in rotation,
In the middle of the races,
And the stands were situated,
In a beautiful elevation,
There were brandywine and cordial,
And the best of accomodation,
With a drop of Puitín Whiskey,
That got no adulteration,
Agus geóbam arís an crúigín is bíod sé lán
VI
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 15:10
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3
14th .December
Christmas Customs.
the feast of Christmas is generally associated in every country in the world.
The feast of the nativity is the biggest of all the feasts.
At Christmas people decorate their houses with holly and laurel and evergreens,Clare is the only place where candles are lighted on Christmas night.
On Christmas night people generally leave the door unlocked because on Christmas night Mary and St Joseph were locked out in every house in Bethlehem.
It is in the middle of
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 15:03
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I
As I went down the Brickfield road,
To seek for recreation,
I took a tour to Evergreen,
Where sceneries were pleasing,
There were multitudes assembled there,
With their tickets at the station,
That my eyes began to dazzle,
And I going to see the races.
Agus geóbam airís an crúiscín is bíod sé lán.
II
There were passengers from Limerick,
And passengers from Nenagh,
Passengers from Dublin,
And sportsmen from Tipperary,
There were passengers from Kerry,
Where brave Dan was educated,
And the blare renoumed melesiano
That gained emancipation.
Agus geobam airís an crúiscín is bíod sé lán.
III
There were passengers from Charleville,
And numbers from Adare there,
The boys of Ballyancullaig,
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 14:56
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4
Winter we have Christmas it is a time for sending Christmas Cards and presents to our friend.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 14:55
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and his servant was coming home from some races they disappeared and the man and the foal were never seen again.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 14:54
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1
30th November 1937
A Story.
Once there was a man living near the shore of Lough Graney and the Island belonged to him .
He had mangolds and turn and turnips sowed in it and one morning when he woke all the turnips and mangolds were nearly eaten.
The following night he watched the island and he saw a grey mare and foal going into the island to eat the rest of them.
He caught the foal and the foal grew up to be a great race-horse and won a great lot of cups and other prizes.
One evening when he
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago some people never wore shoes, some wore shoes shoes when they were twenty years. I did not hear any story of people who never wore shoes.
It is a custom for children to go barefoot during the Summer that is from May day to September. I never heard any name on water in which feet are washed but, "Uisce cos". It is always thrown out. "If a person is at a fair or out late, the water in which feet are washed is never thrown out until that person is present.
Shoes are both made and repaired locally now. The trade runs in the family. Shoemakers were more numerous long ago. Clogs are worn but very seldom around here. Hides of animals are never
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:28
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[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:27
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One day as a man was lying on hay a lizard jumped into his mouth. After some time he sent for the doctor, but the doctor could do nothing for him, he could not even tell him what was wrong with him. One day a man came along and told him what was wrong with him. The man asked for a cure. The man he met told him to eat salty herrings and after that to put his head over a basin of fresh milk. He did this and after half an hour five lizards were in the basin.
In Caher - evagh people see a stone moving out of a garden and down along the road to a well and is brought back again. People see it moving and hears chains rattling but see no horse. Old people say
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:25
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There are three graveyards in the parish. There is one in Kilconly, and two in Kilbannon. People are buried in two of them yet. They are shaped square. The are level. Trees grow in them. There are old tombs and old crosses in them. There is an unused graveyard in Kilbannon.
There is an old ruin of a chapel in Kilbannon There are people buried in the ruin.
There is a story relating how the Kilconly grave yard was made. The time of the famine people were buried in the fields. One time people were burying a man and the corpse was brought in a gennit cart. While the people were digging the grave the gennit wan away. he did not stop until he came to Kilconly
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:21
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and the man was buried there.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:20
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In the month of December 1839 a terrible storm iverspread Ireland, so terrible it was, that it has been spoken about by all generations since and innumerable stories have been told about it till the present day. The storm rose so quickly that both rich and poor were taken unprepared. The early part of the day must have been calm because people were working as usual, till evening, when lots of them could not reach
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:16
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brush-wood.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:16
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About fifty years ago a crowd of men went looking for a pot of gold which was supposed to be hidden under a rock in a field. When they had lifted the rock they were hunted out of the place by rats. In a few years time another crowd lifted the rock, and they were hunted by rats. The people thought that it must be the fairies that put it there. The place they were is near Headford.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:11
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I'm going back to Cashelard
To Mayo in the Spring
And oh! to hear in wood and field
The little birdies sing
I'm going home for good and all
From sorrow and from pain
And oh! To see my home once more
To see my friends again.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:10
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A few years ago a man was ploughing in a field in Toomonaghy. He found a bell with a date on it. The date was 1661. It is said that the bell once belonged to Friars who lived in Toomonaghy long ago.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:09
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Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
God bless this bed that I on
And if I die before I wake,
I pray to thee my soul to take.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:08
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Flaitheamhail means generous.
Blath means young and healthy
A grád means "my love".
Páiste" means a child.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:07
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Stop do bhéal means "shut your mouth". It is said to a person who says too much.
Póithin means a small potatoe. When the potatoes are dug the "poitheens" are gathered and taken home.
Cailín means a girl, It is usually called a woman who did some good.
Meas a' mhadaidh means the "respect of a dog" that is no respect.
Lán a mala meaning a "Stomach full" is used after meals.
Bradach means roguish. It is usually called to a person who is a rogue such as James Bradach
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:03
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If you pluck a branch off a lone bush you will have very bad luck.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:02
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The most important(s) landlords in my district were Lord Costello and the two Lord Dillons.
One of the Lord Dillons lived in London while the other lived in Loughglynn. Lord Costello lived in the "Bishops Palace"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:01
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"So keep your rents" is my advice,
And stand to-gether all,
We'll put the bailiffs from the door
With pike and musket ball
Stand by the "Land League" every one
Until we see the day
When freedom's sun will shine again.
And land-lords clear away!
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 14:00
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Church-yard clay, or clay from a cemetery in hot milk - then drunk - was a cure for for "falling sickness"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 13:59
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There is a field in Barnaboy near Ballaghadereen and it is called "the Coillean".
It is in the parish of Kilcolman in the barony of Costello. There was a big rock in the field which was surrounded by a number of tall trees. The trees are still there but nobody can find the rock. During the Penal Days a priest said Mass there. After the Mass the priests hid the sacred vessels under the rock.
As he was going to a neighbour's house the soldiers came and shot him. Nobody got the vessels since. Lights were often seen in the field. Many people tried to find the rock but they failed. It is said
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 13:42
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quicker.
Collected by:-
Sara Hogan.
Larkin's Hill.
Puckane,
Nenagh.
Obtained from:-
Mrs Hogan.
Larkin's Hill,
Puckane,
Nenagh,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 13:38
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Castle. I feel that my moments in this world are numbered, therefore I have little to fear in making a disclose that will horrify your soul. Your son, Gerald, was murdered! Ha! so you don't faint, or fume, or wince, or sigh; strange indeed! He was murdered, but not by me, it is true, but by my orders, and I paid the assassin well. I am not sorrow for it."
Then O'Brien turned to Fr. Anselmo; "Hist, thou old fool, the end justified the means."
Now O'Brien became a brute and cursed the priest. He wished from his heart he could stick his dagger into Keevan Connors again. He refused to repent; got his dagger & stabbed himself. He fell a senseless man on the ground.
Now Kathleen enters & fell down in agony beside her husband. When she revived they removed the corpse for burial. Kathleen became a maniac and died walking by the side of her dead husband. Both were buried by O'Kennedy.
Geraldine had not appeared during this scene and O'K. wished it to be held in secret from her. Fr Anselmo was elected one of the house of O'Kennedy. A year afterwards Fr. Anselmo united in wedlock Geraldine O'Brien
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 13:38
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13
February 19
Folklore.
In this district there are a number of days to which special customs are attached.
These days are News year's day,St Bridget's Day; St.Johns Night and May Day.
New year day is a holiday of obligation ,it is said that everything you do on that day you will be doing it for the year, and people do not like to lay out any money on that day.
On St Johns Night large bonfires are made at the cross roads and dances are held near the fires at midnight.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 13:36
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was overwhelmed with joy at the thought of having his son back safely to him.
Geraldine appeared beside the couch on which Keevan Connors lay and told O'Kennedy O'Brien of her love for this man.
After this Fr. Anselmo went to ask the murderer to confess his sins. He said "Send me here O'Kennedy O'Brien; let the lady Geraldine and the woman Kathleen accompany him."
O'Kennedy appeared and asked what this wretch wanted him for.
"Take that torch-light; hold it above my head, look at these features and say if thou knowest me". O'Kennedy took the torch and recognised his brother, O'Brien O'Brien.
"Send for Geraldine; she is my daughter, and the daughter of my wedded wife, Aileen Moroney, who now fills the the office of menial in thy Castle for her daughter's sake!"
O'Kennedy ordered O'Brien's hands to be freed. O'Brien stalked up and down the prison. Suddenly he stopped and faced O'Kennedy.
"O'Kennedy O'Brien", he exclaimed, "I am come to claim my daughter, the lady Geraldine, at your hands. According to our father's will she, and she alone, is the right and lawful owner of Dromineer
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 13:35
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was overwhelmed with joy at the thought of having his son back safely to him.
Geraldine appeared beside the couch on which Keevan Connors lay and told O'Kennedy O'Brien of her love for this man.
After this Fr. Anselmo went to ask the murderer to confess his sins. He said "Send me here O'Kennedy O'Brien; let the lady Geraldine and the woman Kathleen accompany him."
O'Kennedy appeared and asked what this wretch wanted him for.
"Take that torch-light; hold it above my head, look at these features and say if thou knowest me". O'Kennedy took the torch and recognised his brother, O'Brien O'Brien.
"Send for Geraldine; she is my daughter, and the daughter of my wedded wife, Aileen Moroney, who now fills the the office of menial in thy Castle for her daughter's sake!"
O'Kennedy ordered O'Brien's hands to be freed. O'Brien stalked up and down the prison. Suddenly he stopped and faced O'Kennedy.
"O'Kennedy O'Brien", he exclaimed, "I am come to claim my daughter, the lady Geraldine, at your hands. According to our father's will she, and she alone, is the right and lawful owner of Dromineer."
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 13:32
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156
"The Beggar's Drop"
A long time ago there was a woman named Miss Cummings and she was about forty years of age. She lived in a little cottage on Dalkey Avenue by her self. One day a beggar came to her cottage and he asked her for some old clothes. She took pity on him. She said she had no clothes but she gave him some money. He then asked if he could sleep in her house. She said he could not as there was no room. He then took up a piece of rope and began to beat her. She ran out of the house and she ran around Bullock quarry. The beggar followed her. When he was running around he fell over the edge and was killed. After this the place where the beggar
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 13:30
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14.
On May Eve up to recently a number of farmers stuck a branch of quick beam in the ground where he had his crops sown. This was supposed to prevent the crops from being taking by witch craft.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 13:28
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took the paper and read:-
"On Island more there is a young boatman, known by the name of Keevan Connors, the reputed son of Felim Connors. He is not his son, nor is that his right name. He is Gerald O'Brien, heir of Dromineer Castle. So help me God, as this dying declaration is true. Fr. Anselmo knows the rest - Dermot O'Reilly.
Four men now entered bearing a coffin. A grave was dug and this man buried.
Geraldine and her nurse, Kathleen were now watching out for O'Kennedy O'Brien. A boat appeared and they thought it was O'K. A man alighted and played a melody on a harp. Geraldine again fainted and was taken to her chamber by Kathleen.
O'Kennedy & Fr. Anselmo were surprised at the music so they set out at a lively pace across the water. When they came to Dromineer there was Kevin Connors wallowing in gore. A blood-stained dagger was beside a big man, also in the boat. The attendants came down to the quay & when O'Kennedy gave the signal they seized the murderer and dragged him into the dungeon.
The bore the wounded man to the castle & nursed him back to health. O'Kennedy
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 13:20
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the Castle Geraldine took a silver crucifix from her bosom, kissed it and gave it to Kevin. "Keep this in memory of me", she said.
She asked Kevin to go to see her father.
"Before I enter the Castle", said Kevin, "tell me are you O'Kennedy O'Brien's daughter?"
"My God!" exclaimed Geraldine, "this morning I was upbraided with being a castle foundling by a strange woman, and in the evening my identity is questioned by a pilgrim who was mainly instrumental in prolonging my existence. How miserable and wretched, indeed!".
Geraldine fainted and O'Kennedy & his subjects, alarmed by the cries of a matron were on the spot in an instant. O'Kennedy rushed Geraldine to bed, then turned to the matron who explained about the excursion on the lake. She herself had been rescued by Fr. Anselmo, who was now at the Castle.
Fr. Anselmo told O'K. that he had vital news for him. He said his presence was reqd. on one of the islands. Both set out in the priest's boat. They reached the Island and the priest led the way. They came to a house where on the floor were, a crucifix, prayer book and a dead man.
He had a paper in his hand. O'Kennedy
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 13:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I saw Aileen and O'Brien in deep and earnest conversation. I heard her appeal to him to make her his wife before she brought shame on her ould father's head, and he telling her to be patient, and that he could not marry her yet, for if he did he'd have no chance of Dromineer Castle as his brother had an heir. He persuaded her to come in out of the night air and they retraced their steps to Aileen's home.
"But next morning there was nothing but uproar; there was nothing but red coats and naked bayonets to be seen everywhere. The soldiers was in search of O'Brien, for there was fresh proofs of him having murthered Friar O'Flaherty, because he had threatened to excommunicate himself on account of his wicked ways. But O'Brien nor Aileen were to be found. Everyone said their own say, by I knew my own know, which was more than any of them knew, on account of what I had heard under the hedge. Aileen's poor father died soon after of a broken heart, and was buried under a tree which was planted the day Aileen was born. Of Aileen & O'Brien nothing has since been heard, though it is 16 years ago." The fishermen now went on their own way.
When Geraldine recovered Kevin Connors took her to Dromineer in his boat. When the reached
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 13:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
runs into the bog at Cloncrave between Killucan and Kinnegad. The Carrigeen a road that connects the Derrymore road with the Raharney road.
Burns' road sometimes called Kelly's Bóitrín a small road leading from Riverstown to Cushinstown.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 13:03
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
My name is Tom O'Gara.
My age is twenty-eight.
I lived not far from Fairymount,
On Lord De Freynes's estate.
Now for the grabbing of some land,
I was involved in strife.
And soon I'll be transported
For the remainder of my life.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 13:03
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The only roads with names of their own in the district are The Tocar A road through the bog in Derrymore Bóthar Bradaigh a road that
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 13:02
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
footballs were not round because the covers were not round.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About a hundred years ago there was a house in Boherbee near Ballaghaderreen. The occupants of the house could not sleep at night owing to the terrible noise of breaking delph, chairs and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Renolds of Renella was shot dead in his parlour by a man from Templemore in -64. Fetherstonhaugh was shot dead in his carriage at Cnoc Sidhe Bán just outside the village of Killucan by a man named Coghlan who lived at Thomastown Killucan. Fetherstonhaugh was about to distribute notices of ejectments to some of the farmers in the district. A few years ago I saw on an official police form the names of people and amounts they subscribed to give as a reward to anyone who would give information that would lead to the arrest of the man who shot Fetherstone.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About half a mile from Ballaghaderreen in the parish of Kil-Colman there is a cemetery in which there is a monastery founded by Saint Colman
Owing to religious persecution this monastery was deserted by the monks.
There is a legend told about this
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
It is said that long go an old monk lived in Aughalustia, in the parish of Ballaghadereen.
When he was seventy years of age he got all the gold and silver vessels that were in his
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a forge in Curraghboy. The place it was situated in was called the "Furzy Den" beside a stream. It is said that the blacksmith has a curse. Long ago a protestant was on his way to some place. He stopped outside a blacksmiths forge and went in. He said to the blacksmith "if you do not put a curse on me I will shoot you." He took out a pistol from his pocket and told him to do it quick. The blacksmith told him to go his way and he would put it on him.
No sooner had he gone than the blacksmith struck three strokes on the anvil. The man fell from his horse on the spot and broke his neck. The protestant thought it only for a mock. There was also a forge in Kilcar. It belonged to Mr Spoles. One day while one of his men were shoeing a horse a great light shone in, and it darkened one part of the house, and brightened the other. This light stayed for half an hour. Great fear came upon the man,. At last he started Shoeing the horse. When he had a few nails in, he saw a man with a hump on his back standing on the nail. It was said to be the devil.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 12:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
11
27 th.January 1938.
Folklore.
Before the marriage takes place ,the couple that are to be married must first consult their parents.
Sometimes when the parents make the boy or girl get married again'st their will it is said that the marriage would not be lucky.
The usual time for people to get married is Shrove .
When the couple get married they go on their honey moon of a month
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 12:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
12
or so.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 12:40
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
17.
8th February 1938.
Folklore.
There is a Fort in Michael Mac Mahon Farm in Faha ,and it is situated about a quarter of a mile from the public road in the centre of a large field.
it is perfectly round and is nearly surrounded by big stones and furze bushes.
The old people say that it is not lucky to cut away any of the bushes or to make any use of the stones for building or such like or to plough
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 12:31
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
18
or dig the enclosure.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 12:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
2
21st June 1938.
Folklore.
We have a churn at home named the dash churn which is worked by the hands up and own.Its height is about three feet and width on top about a foot and bottom 1.6".There are many kinds of churns namely the dash churn, The barrel churn the end over end churn and many others.In Summer time people churn twice a week and in Winter once a week.If a man came in whilst the churn
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I crossed to gain each distant grove,
A cowslip studded plain
I thought Id meet he queen of Love,
In fair unleavned Jean.
III
Her hair hung down like raven's wings
Down on her neck so fair,
Like new blown voilets in the Spring
Her breath perfumed the air.
V
Like saffron beams virgins snow,
Appeared like vain,
So as the budded roses grow,
So blooms the cheeks of Jean.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 12:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
3
been made he should get a dreas.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 12:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
43
was kept in a house near the Crossroads .There were nine holes about the size of the mouth of a bowl .A hole was in the centre of the dyke and it was surrounded by eight others .The centre hole was value for 9 and the others for 8,7,6 etc.Each bowler got three bowls and he who made the highest score was the winner.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
lifeless form
Beneath the wins he lay
His eyes were closed for evermore.
And he was as clay
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
He bled his lat
On lonely Eighter Hill
III
T'was on a Sunday morning
Poor Sheridan went away
He was at Mass in Ballinlough
On that Holy Sabbath day.
No more was heard of Sheridan.
From that Holy Sabbath night.
'Till a youth roved out that evening
To see if all were right
Twas there he spied a
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 12:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
42
12th April 1938.
Folklore.
Bowling was a favourite pastime with the people of the district about thirty years ago.
It was played generally during the Summer and especially on Sundays when boys came a distance of six miles.The cross-roads at Knockanena was the centre for Bowling.Other games such as card playing and pitch and toss were carried on in the same locality.
In bowling a round stone about the size of two closed fists was used and the stone
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
II
He worked with one James Caffrey.
And I wish he had stayed there still
For he would'nt have me with that and fate
On lonely Eighter Hill
Poor Sheridan was harmless.
As everyone did know
He must have been asleep
When he got the fateful blow.
He must have been lying fast asleep.
When his ionnocent blood did spill.
Though his lot was cast
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:13
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
'Tis of a dreadful tragedy.
I mean to let you know
Concerning John Sheridan who to Co Meath did go
To earn an honest living
As plain as you may see.
But its little he thought the day he left.
It would prove his destiny
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 12:08
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
40
proceeds with his hand outstretched towards the table .
The saucer which he touches is supposed to be an omen of death ,a journey across the water or marriage.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Regard the lonely widow
And be her loyal friend
For soon in grief and sorrow
Her grave will have an end.
And you, you cruel tyrants
That massacred her son
And left that widow desolate
Now think of what you've done.
The scandal you have given
The blood that you have shed
To heaven cries for vengeance
Upon your guilty heads.
Your names you unlucky writches
Not one of yours I'll pen
For the Lord Himself doth witness
The cruelty of men.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 12:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
39
31 st march 1938.
Folklore.
There are special days of the year when customs are carried out .One May Day quick -beams stuck in the garden and holy water is sprinkled on crops and stock.November night a cake is made and a ring put in it .The cake is cut and whoever gets the piece with the ring is the first to get married.
Three saucers are placed on the table,and is filled with clay ,the second with water ,and a ring is put in the third .A person is placed at a distance before the table and blindfolded.He then
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 12:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Tormenting to the bone,
Except in case of Martydom
The like was never known.
The clergy man was sent for
But he was rather late
Poor Cumiskey got speechless
And in a dying state.
In all directions round him
His blood was flowing fast
And in his mothers arms
Poor Bernard drew his last.
Oh may the Blessed Virgin
Cast down her look of love
From that delighted paradise
From where she reigns above
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a man living in Tullygarvan one time whose name was Tommy Nagle R.I.P. One day he was in the bog cutting turf, and he saw a lizard. He had heard that if you licked the lizard you could cure any person that's suffering from a burn. He took up the lizard, and he licked it. After that he cured many people, and the people were sorry when he died.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 11:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
38
29th March 1938
Folklore.
The cures that the people had for diseases in this district were The Hooping cough if you met a man with a white horse and ask him for a cure whatever he would tell you it would be a sure cure.The cure for a toothache is if you put a frog into a persons mouth and leave it there for a while the toothache would disappear.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The scoundrels waylaid him
That being a cruel thing.
Though neighbour might assist him
Who say the fight commenced
But made no preparation
To stand in his defence.
Until his head was wounded
Severly by a stone
And lying on the road side
Poor Cumisky did moan.
His friends got information
And home he was conveyed
And on a lonesome pillow
His acking head was laid.
His wounds kept him in agony
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:50
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
a cuirtear aon duine fágann na daoine rud éigin i n-a ndiaidh.
Tobar beag atá ann, áit i n-a nigh Naomh Pádraig a éadan agus a lámha. Tá crann ann freisin i n-aice leis an tobar agus chrochann daoine paidrín air.
Deirtear gur thug Naomh Pádraig cuairt ar an áit seo nuair a bhí sé ag múineadh an fíor-chreideamh i n-Éirinn.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Tá tobair beannuighthe i n-aice le mo theach-sa i gCnoc na Roise. Tá sé istigh 'san Roilig bhig agus nuair
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Comhnuigheann a lán daoine i gCaisleán Gearr, go mór mhór timcheall an seipéal. Tá sé suidhte i n-áit an deas agus tá radharc mhaith ó'n áit sin ar chuan na Gaillimhe.
Tá a lán tighthe ann anois ach - fadó bhí níos mó. Tá siad leagtha ar fad, beagnach. Tá a lán fothrach de thighthe annseo is annsúid. Teach cinn slinneadh atá ins na tighthe
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago there resided, about five miles east of Bailieboro, in the district of Upper Glassleck a poet named "Fifer" Traynor. He was so called because he played the fife, and taught fife-and-drunm bands.
A neighbour of his named Fildy Halfpenny, who lived beside Dhuish mountain in the next townland, had a jennet which he sold to a man named Montgomery of Bailieboro to draw patients to the old fever hospital in a van.
He wrote a song about the jennet, but
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:45
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
ar fad anois timcheall na h-áite i n-a bhfuilimíd i n-a gcomhnuidhe.

Tá a lán sean-Gaedhealgóir 'sa Cheanntair atá i ndon go leor Gaedhilge a labhairt go maith. Tá an Ghaedhilge go fairsing 'san áit seo mar ní raibh ag labhairt ag na sean-daoine fadó ach Gaedhilge agus níor chualathas aon bhéarla ann go dtí le goirid.

Tá a lán fothrach de mainistreacha agus de chaisleain le feiscint ann fós go mór mhór an cheann ó n-a fuair Caisleán Gearr a ainm. Fadó bhí na de Búrcagh i n-a gcomhnuidhe 'sa gcaislean seo. Tháinig daoine ar chuairt chucha chun an Caislean a dhéanamh leo . Tar éis tamaill d'fág siad an caislean agus ní rainh sé leath-déánta acu. As sin a fuair Caisleán Gearr a ainm.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Tá trí céad tighthe 'sa ceanntair seo anois ach bhí a seacht n-oiread ann 'sa t-sean-aimsear. Tá cuid de na fothracha le feiscint
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
annso is annsúid ar fud an cheanntair. "Sean-Bhaile" atá mar ainm air.
Deireann na sean-daoine go raibh baile mór i n-ár dtalamh (talamh P. Ó Griallais) agus nuair a tháinig Cromuil go ndeacaidh na daoine go Connamara. D'fag siad a gcuid cruithneachta agus a gcuid fataí i n-a ndiaidh.
Bhí sé sgríobhtha 'sa tarrainreacht ag Naomh Mac Dara nach rachadh saíghdiúirí Cromuil níos fuide siar na Droichead na Minne. Bhí fhios ag na daoine fé'n dtarraingreacht sin agus sin an fath gur fhágadar a dtaltaí.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A Tog of War rope
53. As I went through a muddy gap,
O met my Uncle Davy,
I knocked him down, and sucked his blood,
And left him lying easy?
Drinking a bottle of whiskey.
54. Blackie and whitie went up the hill,
blackie came back and left whitie behind?
A hen laying an egg.
55. I went up the little road,
I went down the little road,
And I brought the little road on my back?
A ladder.
56. Why is a pig in a parlour like a house on fire?
Because the sooner he's put out the better.
57. Why does a hen pick the potstick?
Because she cant lick it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
58. What is it that goes from house to house and sleeps out at night?
A path.
59. There is a little round and white house, and it is full of meat but there is neither doors nor windows to let you into eat?
An egg.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
60. In comes two legs,
Sits on three legs,
Down drops one leg and sits on that,
In comes four legs,
Snaps off one leg,
Up gets two legs,
Knocks four legs down and takes one leg back.
A man comes in and sits on a three legged stool, a leg of ham dropped on his knee, a dog came in and snaped the ham, the man got up, he knocked
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Fadó nuair a bhí Naomh Pádraig ag craobhsgaoileadh an creidimh thóg sé a lán teampaill agus Seipéil ar fud na tíre. Thóg sé ceann acu i gCnoc na Roise. An áit i n-a raibh Naomh Pádraig ag guidhe tá carraig mhór ann. Tá comhartha a dhá ghlúin agus a cheann ann ó shoin. Tá leac i n-aice leis agus cuma báisín air. Bíonn uisge salach 'sa mbáisín sin i gcomhnuidhe. Sin an áit a nigheadh Naomhm Pádraig a lámha agus níor tiormuigheadh an t-uisge ann riamh ó shoin.
Tagann daoine ann an chéad Luain de gach mí ar feadh trí míosa agus fágann siad airgead nó rud éigin ar an leic i n-a ndiaidh.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
down the dog with it and took back the ham.
61. As I went over to yonder style,
I met a flock and they were wild,
They were hicket, they were hacket,
They were brown and yellow backet.
A swarm of bees
62. Two feet on the ground,
Three feet over head,
The head of the living in the mouth of the dead.
A man with a pot on his head.
63. Down in yonder meadow there is a bit of fat,
Four and twenty carpenters working at that,
Some with green ribbons and more with strawhats,
Come if you are a scholar and riddle me that?
Bees at honey.
duine anaithnid
2019-06-22 11:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
St. John's Eve
It was a local custom some years ago, for the young people of this neighbourhood to collect a quantity of turf and wood and light a huge bonfire on a high hill, on St. John's Eve.
They passed the night in singing and dancing round the fire, and cheering their loudest. When leaving for home, they always carried away with them a lighted sod which they threw into a corner of the nearest field to avert sickness from cattle during the year.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
dhéanamh ag gach líon thighe i nEanach. Bhíodh an dóib is fearr le fághail i gCoitianta agus í Lisín-Fuarán. Bhí ar na daoine an dóibh a ardú ar dtús. Do chuireadh síad an crot ar an dóib annsin agus do sgaradh siad na bricí annsin. Nuair bhíódh na brící tirm do dhóigheadh síad i dtoirneóg íad le móna. Do díbhladh síad i nGaillimh íad agus théigheadh síad go Gaillimh i mbáid. Deirtear go bhfuil leath cathair na Gaillimhe tóigthe de brící Eanach Cuain.
Tá rían sean toirneóg le feiceáil fós i gCoitianta.

Tá an Riaghaltas ag iarraidh monarchainn brící a chuir bun aríst i nEanach Cuain agus tá súil agam go n-eireócaidh leó.

Liam Ó Chaomhánach
Eanach Cuain
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:15
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
64. As round as an apple,
As deep as a cup,
And all the ,en in Derry could'nt pull it up.
A well.
65. Chip, chip cherry,
All the men in Derry could'nt climb, chip, chip, cherry.
The smoke.
66. As round as an apple,
As sharp as a lance,
And all the men in Derry could'nt carry it to France.
The moon.
67. As I went to the fair of the knives
I met nine men and nines wives.
Every wife had a bag,
Every bag had a cat,
Every cat had nine kittens,
Between cats and kittens men and women
How many went into the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
fair of the knives?
One.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
68. Which is the strongest day in the week?
Sunday, because all the rest are week-day.
69. Why is a pawnbroker like a drunkard?
Because he takes the pledge but cannot keep it.
70. What is in the bolster and not in the bed,
Whet is in the brain and not in the head,
What is in the marrow and not in the bone,
What is in the rock and not in the stone?
The letter r
71. What is that which touches one, but unites two?
A wedding ring.
72. A goose before a goose,
A goose after a goose
A goose between two geese.
A goose before two geese,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Tobar na Caillighe
The name by which the well is known locally. Said to get its name from the fact that the women of the district used to meet here and wash the clothes and gossip.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Oranmore takes its name from the well - Fuarán Mór which supplies water to the people living in the village. Some of the older people say that it (the well) was a resting place for the Fenians when they were out hunting.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The village of Oranmore is situated about 6 miles to the East of Galway City. It is named after the great cold spring called Tobar na Caillighe from which the people got their supply of water. It is said tha the Fianna often drank from this well - hence the name.

The story concerning the well -Tobar na Caillighe runs as follows:
Long ago there was a small house situated where the well is now. There were two old women living in the house and one night as they were sitting by the fire, the water began to come up through the floor and they were compelled to leave their home and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 11:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
seek shelter elsewhere. Another story says that the older women of the village congregated here every evening and spent the evening chatting and gossiping - hence the name.
Now there are some fifty houses in the village of Oranmore. Judging from the ruins of houses there must have been some seventy houses here formerly. Formerly, the village had its own bootmaker, tailor, saddler, hatter, and weavers and carpenter.
There are the ruins of an old mill which was occupied up to fifty years ago.

The people from the various villages within a distance of two or three miles used to gather into one or other of the houses at night and amuse themselves by raffling some animal usually a donkey.
They then travelled from village to village for the raffle. As a rule there was a dance in the house where they congregated. More often than not, when the winner of the raffle went to look for the donkey there was none to be found.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 10:33
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A goose after two geese,
two geese before a goose,
two geese after a goose,
how many geese is that?
Three geese.
73. A wee black person and its house on its back?
A snail.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 10:32
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74. What is the smallest bridge in the world?
The bridge of your nose.
75. Why do you go to bed?
Because the bed wouldn'y come to you.
76. Twenty sick sheep went through a gap, one of them died, how many were left?
Nineteen.
77. What goes from house to house and stays outside at night?
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 10:30
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A road.
78. What is the first thing you do when you go to bed at night?
Pull up the clothes.
79. What is it that has an eye, and cannot see?
A needle.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 10:29
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diúltaithe
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80. What has a hundred eyes?
Soup.
81. What is it that we see and God never sees
His own equal.
82. What it it that goes round the house and round the house with a harrow after it?
A hen and a flock of chickens.
83. A field full of white daisies,
A red one in the middle?
Your tongue and your teeth.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 10:26
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ballot box, and the band box.
36. Long man legless, came to the door headless, keep in your hens and your ducks, but I'm not afraid of your dogs?
A worm.
37. What was Adam and Eve's telephone number on the garden.?
Two ate one apple. (281 apple)
38. Why is a hiss like scandal?
Because it goes from one mouth to another.
39. What is it, you could do, did do, and couldn't do it now?
Put your leg toe in your mouth.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 10:23
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His foot.
30. What is taken from you before you get it?
Your photograph.
31. Why do hens lay in the day-time?
Because at night they become roosters.
32. What is that which has neither flesh nor bone and has four fingers and a thumb?
A glove.
33. Why does a donkey like thistles better than corn?
Because he is an ass.
34. Why is matrimony like a besieged city?
Because those who are in it want to get out of it, and those who are out of it, want to get into it.
35. What four boxes govern the world?
The cartridge box, the jury box, the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 10:18
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50 Hairy all over, and rough in the skin, Two things wagging, and one going in?
A pig eating meat.
51. Head without hair,
Teeth without lips,
A long leg and no hips?
A rake.
52. Ten mens length, ten mens strength,
ten men couldnt tear it, and a little boy walks off with it?
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 10:16
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84. What is the most plentiful thing in a riddle?
Four corners in every hole
85. What makes a shoe-makers shop be compared to Purgatory?
Because there are a number of soles in it.
86. Which side of the cup is the handle on?
The outside.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 10:14
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87. A marble wall as white as milk,
Lined with leather as soft as silk,
Within a fountain crystal clear,
A golden apple there appears,
No doors are there on this strong house,
Yet thieves break in to steal the gold?
An egg.
88. A small white pony, long and slim,
A big white flowing tail on him,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 10:12
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And now a man with brassy hood,
Is driving him all through the wood?
A needle with white thread in it sewing a button.
89. Jenny of age sits in her cage,
A little below the well,
All her children died with age,
Poor Jenny she is sitting there still?
A tree.
90 I have a little sister and she was called Peepidy Peep,
She'd travel the mountain if it was ever so high,
She'd travel the water if it was ever so deep,
And my poor little sister she's blind of an eye?
A star.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 10:09
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91. As I went into a four-cornered room.
I saw a cat sitting in every corner,
and a cat sitting on every cat's tail, how many cats were in the room?
Four, because every cat was sitting on her own tail.
92. How far can a dog go into the wood?
Half-way because the other half he would be going out of it.
93. Why is a dirty child like flannel?
Because it shrinks from washing.
94. Why is B lazyiest letter in the Alphabet?
Because it is always in bed and never in work.
95. Why is the letter B like fire?
Because it makes oil boil.
96. What would a ton of coal come to at two and six a hundred?
Ashes
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 10:04
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97. What is that which is alive in both ends and dead in the middle@
A Man ploughing.
98. A room was full, a house was full and you couldn't lift a spoonful?
A house full of smoke.
99. Two Ns Two Os an L a D put that together and spell it for me?
London.
100. P Porridge in a pot,
P Porridge cold.
P Porridge is a pot
Nine days old.
If you are a scholar spell that for me without a P.?
That
101.
What bears and never blossoms?
The crook.
102. Black I am and much admired
Men wrought at me till they
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 09:51
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fellow can a fellow tell a fellow what a fellow means. How many f's in that
None.
25. Three-sevenths of a chicken;
two-thirds of a cat, and a half a goat whats that?
26. What is always behind the time?
The back of a clock.
27. What would go up the chimney down, and would not come down the chimney up?
A umbrella.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 09:49
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28. What is the worst seat a man can sit on?
Self-conceit.
29. What did Adam first plant in the garden of Eden?
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 09:48
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and I am fourty perch exactly
A door
20. Born at the same time as the world, destined to live as long as the world yet never five weeks old?
The moon
21. What grows in the wood,
And sounds in the town,
And earns its master many a pound?
A fiddle
22. I have a little man above in the field,
When I'll pull his leg his nose will bleed?
A pump.
23. If Jack's father is Pat's brother what is Jack to Pat's mother?
A grandson.
24. If a fellow meet a fellow in a field of beans, says a fellow to a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 07:41
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did not live happy ever afterwards. In wedding Kate Plunkett, the /english officer, who did then feel attachment to her cherished, tho later hoped that she might yet obtain the castle to which on failure of her brothers, she was heiress and might thus reach the whole part of her -------. In present parlance he could see his name over the door at Rathmore. Finding his hope vain, disappointment soured and changed him. He soon perceived fault on his wife to which he had previously been blind - not in her person - temper or disposition - they were above censure but in the native unpolished habits and manners which he complained she had contacted in her peasant life and from her plebeian companion - the poor old nurse. In this respect Mary Cruise had been more formidable for she had the advantage of the society of an accomplished mother. Kate Plunkett found it impossible to please him and although for their mutual peace sake they separate. A provision was however made by him to this woman of vicissitudes and whereas she ended her days let us hope it was in a quiet haven where she found consolation from one more just, more merciful and more ---- his ways than war.
In 1649 Cromwell butchered the Plunketts - on his way from Drogheda. The banks of the Boyne in 1689 were again smeared with Irish blood when Seamus an Capall, as he is still referred to in Rathmore galloped to Powerscourt having shown the white feather. Like the bad ----- he was
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 04:18
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
A tinker met with a priest one day.
The priest knew him because he
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 04:17
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A city man, owning a country place, engaged as a stable boy, a country lad. During his last stay at the place the owner did not see the boy for several days. Finally, however having special need of the lad, he searched and found him. "Where the deuce do you keep yourself "? demanded the master of the place, I do not believe I have seen you since you were engaged; have you been asleep all this while "?
"Yes, sir," was the unexpected response. "I thought that was
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 04:07
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what you wanted sir. What I wanted ! exclaimed the employer amazed. What are you driving at ?
Well, sir, exclaimed the lad, your advertisement said you wanted a boy of sixteen to sleep on the premises.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 04:04
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with the stones so he brought them back to the place from where he had taken the.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 03:56
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to the property. She married Mr. Orpen, and after their death, their son, Mr. Richards-Orpen became the Owner.
Lord Carew, left Castleboro, and went to reside in England.
He died shortly afterwards in London.
Castleboro and Coolbawn mansions were destroyed by fire in 1923. The Irish Republican Army burned both buildings, and now they stand in ruins. The estates were divided into small farm, and given to the farmers of the locality.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 03:46
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the landlords, and bringing them to their senses.
There was a great unrest between the landlords and tenants, until the Land Purchase Act came in 1903. This provided money to purchase the land. The landlords had been so severely tried by the long Land War that they were very glad to sell their lands to the tenants at a good price, and the farmers had unquestioned ownership of their own lands, and felt encouraged to work upon and improve these lands.
Mr. Bruen, after the sale, left Coolbawn, and took up his residence in Oakpark, Co. Carlow. His agent died shortly afterwards. Canon Blacker, was rector of Killanne until his death, and Mr Richards, died shortly afterwards. His daughter, was
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 03:37
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he was boycotted. James Burke is dead but his family are still living in Grange.
Richard Binions died about four years ago, and a son of his owns the place now.
Another very effective scheme was the Plan of Campaign. The tenants joined together in a body to demand a reduction from the landlords in the rents, and if they refused to pay into a Campaign Fund, the total amount of their rents, less the reduction they expected. If the landlords still refused to accept this, they were to use it to fight the landlords in the courts, should they bring proceedings against them, and to support any tenants whom they might evict by way of punishment. This was one of the most effective schemes of worrying
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 03:16
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If a person attempted to speak to him, or a shop in the locality buy from him, or sell provisions to him they were instantly boycotted.
The Land League by means of a collection which they made, were able to erect a Land League Hut, in Ballybawn, for John O'Leary and his aged Mother, so they lived in it, until John purchased a small farm in Kiltealy. John is still living but his mother is dead.
During the Land League there was another farmer named James Burke, Grange, who paid his rent, to the landlord, although ordered not to do so. He was instantly boycotted. He met with the same fate as Richard Binions, and being a Catholic, no one would sit in the pew with him at Mass, and if anyone went into the same pew with him
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 03:03
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as at Peter Whelan's.
About a fortnight later when matters cooled, the bailiff and police came secretly to John O'Leary's house, and seized on all his stock, his farm implements, and entered the house, stamped out the fire, threw out the bed and bed clothes, and the furniture. They put out John and his mother then. They took refuge in a neighbour's house.
John's farm was taken by the landlord and given to a Protestant, named Richard Binions. This land-grabber, was boycotted by all the people of the district. No one would speak to him, work for him, buy from him, sell to him, serve or help him. Still he stuck on to the farm as he had his own family to work and help him.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 02:52
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on their horns hung the bold sign
"Pay no Rent".
The bailiff supported by police from Killanne and Enniscorthy arrived. They were faced by a strong body of men, with their weapons. The goats were let loose amongst them, and they were chased back again, some of them being severely wounded. The police were armed with guns, but did not fire a single shot. They took flight as hard as they could.
Another farmer, named John O'Leary, had a nice snug farm in Rathnure.
He lived happily with his poor aged mother. John was unable to pay the high rent, and was threatened with eviction. The people gathered together the eviction day, and opposed the bailiff who was supported by armed police, so they withdrew fearing the same thing might happen
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 02:39
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Peter Whelan, a prominent farmer who lived in Grange was one of the first who refused to pay the rent.
He had a large farm of land, and spent a great deal of money improving his land, manuring it and building new houses on it, and according as he was making all these improvements, the landlord kept on increasing the rent.
In the end he refused to pay it when the time came. He was then threatened with eviction. A certain day was named for this.
The people of the parish knew about it, and they all congregated together at the house of Mr Peter Whelan to stop it. They were armed with pikes, sprongs, spades, shovels, fire irons, stones, and any weapons they could seize. They brought two male goats with them, led by a long rope, and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 02:28
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Johnson, and James Hughes. They taught the people of the district to resist the unjust landlords and refuse to pay unjust rents, and resolve no longer to be ground into the earth by the heel of landlordism. They had one powerful weapon which was "boycotting".
"Boycotting" took its name from Captain Boycott, a harsh land-agent in Mayo, whom the people ostracised.
They refused to work for him, to speak to him, to buy anything from him, to sell anything to him, to let anyone serve or help him, and by this means they drove him out of the country.
These speeches from the platforms on Sundays, stirred up the people of the parish, and were successful in frightening both the landlords and the landgrabbers.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 02:19
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The landlords were rack-renting the tenants, and when the farmer was unable to pay the exorbitant rent that the landlord tried to extract from him he was evicted.
About sixty years ago Michael Davitt who began the Land War founded the great Land League for the redress of the many wrongs of the Irish tenant farmers. The Land League spread like wildfire through every district in Ireland.
Charles Stewart Parnell joined Michael Davitt in the agitation, as well as other Irish members of Parliament.
There were several meetings held here, in Rathnure, at the Chapel Gate, on Sundays after Mass. There were speeches made by the leading farmers in the district Peter Whelan, James Forrestal, Richard Forrestal, John and Daniel Quigley, James
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 02:13
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Sun
On the going doun if the sun if there are rays from it like Moses’ Horns and it appears pale, rain follows the next day. When Dublin red appears early in the morning we will have rain in the evening.
Moon.
When the moon has a big circle round it rain usually comes the next day. The further the circle from the moon, the nearer the rain.
Stars.
When the stars shine out it denotes frost and if it be a white frost it brings rain. When a star runs across the sky its a sign of rain too.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 02:12
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My father goes trapping birds with birdlime. He gets sprigs and puts the birdlime on sprigs and them then he gets sets of small bushes and blacktops and he puts the sprigs of birdlime on the sets. Then he puts a bird and cage on the ditch. This bird calls the other bird on and they land on sets and if they are "peppered" they will not land on the birdlime any more.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 02:09
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to lodge with him and never built a nest in it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 02:08
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If a person robbed a nest he would would get sore hands. The way they used to catch birds was they used to dig a hole in the ground and put a slate over it and put a sally twig holding it up. Then they used to put a piece of meat into it and when the bird would go into get the piece of meat the slate falls down and the bird is trapped inside.
One day three came lodging to a house and there were three chickens hanging up and the men put them down in a pot over the fire and boiled them and ate them then they got their guns and went out in the rookery and shot three crows and plucked them and hung them up and when the people ate them they said they were lovely birds.
The crows never build their nests in Ballinrudder Listowel because the lanlord evicted the poor people in it to make a rookery for the crows but the crows refused for the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 02:07
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then she kissed her four children and told them to tell their father. She said to them although I love you all dearly I have to part with these word’s she flew out the door and she was never seen more, when the father came home and found no wife to talk to he was grately grieved.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 02:05
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in the rafters under the thatch of the little cabin where they had made their home. Years rolled on and they had four children toe boys and two girls. They were al very happy. One day whist the father was away engaged with other fishermen minding their fishing tackle the eldest boy was searching among the rafters for a ball which had stuck between the beams when he found the sea green hair net which the father had hidden there many years before
He took it to his mother and asked her what it was, when she saw the net she let a cry escape from her and asked the boy to give it to her. He did so. She fixed it on her hair
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 02:00
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When the Willie Wagtail comes outside the door and dips his tail in water it is a sign of rain.
When the crow flies low it is a sign of rain and when the crows fly high it is a sign of good weather.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 01:59
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he made a drive at one of them and killed him. The cat was eating the bird and the Donoghue man saw him and took the bird from the cat and on the bird's leg there was a ring with Central Russia. The Donoghue man cut the leg off the Black Bird. The next day the Donoghue was fixing a fence and he saw a black bird's nest and the young birds had red combs on their heads and green bills and the bird the cat killed was the same and it is said that there he had his nest.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 01:57
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career. He was engaged on a fishing smack too. When he was about twenty five and engaged fishing off the South Coast of Ireland he landed something one night in a net he had cast.
Thinking it was a large shool or fish he had netted judge his consternation to find he had landed a mermaid. She was extremely handsome and over her hair their was a lonly sea green net. He fell in love with the mermaid and she returned his affection.
He took off the net from her hair and told his lady love he wished to keep it as a memento of her. Eventually they both decide to marry but she begged him to destroy the net which he promised to do.
Instead he hid it away
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 01:56
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There is a man in Duagh named Tim Donoghue. About two years ago as he was digging in the garden a crowd of black birds came eating worms. The cat was watching them and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 01:55
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When you want to cure a sick hen get a bit of butter and epson salts and stick it back her throat.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 01:54
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
When a hatching hen picks the eggs you should put a sop of hay in her mouth.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 01:52
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landed with the elusive gentleman as many another had been had before.
Mermaids
The mermaid is supposed to resemble a woman from her head to trunk and a fish from trunk to feet. She is supposed to have long golden hair and beautiful features. Old people say she sings beautifully and converses in any language Mrs Caffery told me she heard of a man from this locality who more than a century ago left this district to seek his fortune Mc Namara was his name he got a job eventually on a cargo vessell and it was then his real adventures began He travelled to many parts of the universe in his
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 01:49
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are in use to the present day. When these were about to be used they were loosened down off the wall and the people sat around them and had their meals. When they were finished eating it was thrown up against the wall again.
They very seldom used any meat but if they did it was nearly always bacon. In Lent they would not eat eggs or butter or milk. During Lent if they would have men digging or harrowing they would have their breakfast and they would not eat any more until they would finish at night. Then they would have potatoes and herrings. On Easter Sunday they would make a big fire in the middle of a field and boil two or three eggs each. They would eat these eggs with oaten bread. A woman of the name of Mrs Kiernan who lived in Tooma Cloone Co. Leitrim was the finest to make tea in our district. She brought it to men on the boh and they were all running to see what it was like. Before cups came in use "noggins" were used. This was made of wood and shaped like a porringer, with a piece of a stick fastened against one end of it for a handle.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 01:39
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In olden times the people had meals three times a day. Breakfast, Dinner and Supper. When they got up in the mornings they would not eat. They would go out and work for two or three hours and then come in and have their Breakfast of stirabout. Then they would go out and work until about two o' clock and come in for their dinner. For their dinner they mostly had potatoes and salt and butter milk. For their supper they sometimes had boiled boxty or boiled potatoes. In Summer when the men would be making turf on the bog, they would go off without eating any thing. After a few hours the women would come with the breakfast of stirabout. It would be in a big wooden dish. Then all the men would have a wooden spoon. They would make a hole in the middle of the stirabout and put a lump of butter in it. They would dip the stirabout in the butter and eat it. Sometimes they would have milk.
In olden times they had a table which was fastened to the wall. This was called a "side table." Many of these
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 01:14
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Christmas no more than an ounce of tea would be bought in any house, and what ever would be left over after the Christmas they would tie it up and put it behind the couple until next Christmas.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 01:12
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Pan Boxty
First the potatoes were washed and the skin taken off. Then they were grated. Next it was put into a little bag called a "boxty bag" and the water squeezed out. While this was being done they had a pot of potatoes boiling on the fire. When these were boiled they were peeled and bruised so as to take all the lumps out of it. This was mixed with the other potatoes, salt and butter were added. When it was well mixed it was spread thin on a pan. After a few minutes it was turned and after another few minutes it was taken up and another one put on. This was continued until all the boxty was baked. They ate that for their dinners.
Boiled Boxty
The boiled Boxty was made the same way only there was no milk added. It was made into little cakes and boiled in a pot for an hour.
Boxty Loaf
It was made the same way as the "boiled boxty". It wasn't made into little cakes but was put into one big cake and baked for an hour in an oven.
All these breads are still made in our district. White soda bread was very scarce because there was not much flour then. If they bought a bag of flour they would hide it as they would be ashamed of any one to see it with them. At
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 00:55
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The bread which the old people used long ago was made from corn and potatoes. They used very little flour. All the old people remember of "querns" and many of them are to be seen to the present day. A "quern" was made with two stones shaped like a wheel of a wheel-barrow only much bigger. They were fices on top of other and a crank out of them. The oats was put in between the two stones and it was cranked with the crank. This made the two stones move up and down against other and it ground the oats. The names of the bread the used were oaten-bread, boiled-boxty pan boxty and boxty-loaf.
Oaten Bread
A few handfuls of oaten meal was put into a wooden basin. Then sugar was added and it was mixed. Next soft water was put in and it was mixed again. Then it was gathered into a ball and it was widened out nice and thin. Then it was put in front of the fire propped against an articles called a "maideraun" (maidearán). This was made of wood. It had three legs out of it, two in the front and one behind. There was a piece of tin in front going from one leg to the other. This kept the bread from the ground. After about a half hour the bread was turned and let bake for another half hour. Then it was taken up. This was what the children brought to school for lunch.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 00:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
put into cold water. This keeps the butter from sticking to the strainer. Then the butter is taken off the milk and put into a wooden pail like a basin. It is washed then in cold water. After that salt is added. An implement made of wood and made in the shape of a plate called a "trencher" is got.The butter is mixed with this "trencher" so that the salt will get all through it. Then two other wooden implements called butter spades are got. The butter is sometimes made with them into little balls called "butter balls" or made into bigger lumps called prints.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-22 00:14
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
We have a churn at home. It is about two and a half feet in height. The top is about one foot nine inches wide and the bottom is about one foot ten inches. It is much narrower in the middle it is about one foot four inches. The most important parts of it are the bottom, the sides the lid the dash and the rattler. The rattler is a round piece of wood with a hole in the middle of it. It is shaped like a saucer. There is a round hole in the middle of the lid. The dash is put down through this hole and the rattler is put down on the lid. This churn is fifteen years old. We churn once a week in Winter and four times a week in Summer. If a person happens to come in when the churning is going on he helps. This is called a "brash". The churning takes about an hour. It is done by hand and the dash is moved up and down in the milk. When the