Líon iontrálacha sa taifead staire: 311574 (Taispeántar anseo na 500 ceann is deireanaí.)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 19:30
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the bargain or ''make the deal'' by ''splitting the difference.'' Suppose the owner asks a pound more than the buyer bids them the neighbour says to divide the £1 and settle the bargain.
The animal is marked with coloured lead or sometimes by clipp-ing the hair in a certain spot. When an animal is sold, especially a horse, the halter is given away with the animal.
The usual fairs are held monthly on certain dates. But in Swanlinbar There are Special Fair Days on the 29th June and the 27th November. The 29th June is usually a very big fair as it is also a Church Holyday.
The 14th July is usually a great fair for selling lambs.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 19:24
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The local fairs are held in the village of Swanlinbar, Bawnboy and Ballyconnell.
In olden times there was also a fair held in Glangevlin. Some-times dealers come around to the houses to make purchases-usually young calves, pigs and horses.
The cattle and sold in the Fair Green in the villages. There is no toll paid.
When an animal is sold a ''luck-penny'' is given back. The amount given back depends on the price paid and sometimes on the generosity of the seller. It is also usual for the persons concerned in the sale to go to a ''public-house'' for a drink.
When a bargain is being made the buyer spits on his hand and strikes the owner's hand. Manually a neighbour or friend helps to complete
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 19:13
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both wished to return home. When they opened their eyes they were both back on the ''sraicis'' along the river and the cart returned with them. That was the first cart ever seen in this district.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 19:12
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
than the calf sprang from the hilltop and with one bound leaped over the moonlit waters of the rivers Shannon flowing just ten miles from the foot of the hill. A second later she kicked up her heels on the distant bank, flinging Larry on the turf. Larry sat up scratched his head and looking and looking at the calf said "Arach, but that was well done - not a bad leap for a calf".
You're a bold fellow Larry Hoolahan" says the Queen changing into her own form "and will you be going back the way you came" says the Queen "That i will if you let me says Larry. She again changed into the form of a calf and Larry leaped on her back. Another bound and they were on the hilltop.
"Much courage have you shown" said the Queen changing into her own form "And never more shall you be troubled by me or my fairies while you keep your herd on hilltop
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 19:11
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great party in the King's palace in London.
They invited the boy and he agreed to go.
The ''King of the fairies'' gave the boy a waistcoat and told him to put on the waistcoat and button it on him. Then he was to wish to be in London and immediately he arrived there. But he warned the boy that at twelve o' clock he must have the waistcoat buttoned and wish to return home - else, he must remain in London.
All went well. They enjoyed the wonderful party. But just as the clock struck twelve the boy stood listening to the clock and forgot to button the waistcoat . All the fairies disappeared and the boy was left alone in London.
The poor mother was very annoyed.
But the ''bean-side'' gave her a kind of shawl and told her to put it around her and wish to be in London. The mother did so, and arrived beside her son in London. She found him sitting in a cart in a London street. She told him all and put the shawl around them and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 19:09
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of them saying "What another rash man upon our fairy ring, Go Queen make him repent". Then Larry felt the fairies flying past his face like a swarm of bees, and looking up he saw a great black cat standing between him and the moon. Pretty soon the cat swelled up toward the sky turned round on its left hind leg and mewed with the voice of a water mill
"Come along there" says Larry, "dance and I'll pipe" Then he began to play as well as he knew (who) how, while the fairy Queen changed from one shape to another.
At last she lost all patience and turned into a gentle calf, milk white as the cream of Cork, and her eyes were like those of a loving girl. She came up to Larry friendly and gentle, and the moment she came near Larry he dropped his pipes and leaped on her back. No sooner had he done so
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 19:05
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nothing and who played on the pipes better than any other player in all Ireland "Shure an if that is what ails you" said Larry "just make your mind easy. Where there are as many fairies there as potatoes blossom in Tipperary I would not fear to face them. A quare thing it would be if I, who never feared anything should run away from a fairy that not the size of my thumb"
"Whist Larry" says the farmer "Don't be so bold" "But if you watch over my herd on yonder hill for a week you shall sup from my broth until the sun has burned itself to the size of a farthing rushlight.
After striking a bargain Larry hurried to the hilltop just as the moon was going to peep over its brow. Seating himself on a big stone with his back to the wind he began to play the pipes. Presently Larry heard the voices of fairies on the breeze, and one
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 19:05
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The first cart ever seen in this district is supposed to have come to Althbrean, Swanlinbar.
A poor widow and her son lived in a poor little house near the (Cladac) Commas River. The boy was very good and quiet and every evening in summer he went down the ''Sracis'' along the bank of the river and played a fiddle.
Very often on bright nights he didn't return for hours.He was often very tired the next morning and he told his mother he always spent the night with the ''good people'' down at the ''Sracis.''
One night he didn't return and next day his mother went to look for him. She met a little fairy woman who told here that her son was in London. The
''bean-side'' explained how the boy had come as usual the previous night.
All the fairies were preparing to go to a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 19:00
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nights. After holding a meeting they appointed their Queen to frighten away the herdsman and his cows. Night after night while the moon danced on the hill the fairy Queen would suddenly bob up before the lovely herdsman, now in one frightful shape and now in another. Sometimes she would take the shape of a great beast with a lion's head and a fishes tail, then as quick as a flash she would change herself into some horrible creature with a horse's body and eagle's wings. Then the fairy Queen would go away as soon as the sun began to rise.
Never a night passed but the same thing happened. The cattle half mad kept tumbling into pits and falling into rivers and no herdsman would tend them at night no matter how much money the owner offered.
One day the owner of the cattle told his troubles to Larry Hoolahan a man who feared
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:57
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In Tipperary is a hill shaped very much like a peaked night-cap. Near the top of it is a pasture where once upon a time a herdsman herded his sheep. This hill had for a long time been the playground of the fairies, but the little people grew very angry when the cows trampled on it and ate its green grass.
Something had to be done about it, or the fairies would have no place to play on moonlight
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:55
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the meadow". Well seeing that you have quiet enough of it drank already throw your portion on the ground. He looked with surprise at the Priest and said "Begor Father my share is in the bottom"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:54
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There was a man living near Callan who was very fond of drink. Father Carrigan who was P.P. at the time was a very cross man. Once day he met this man going to a meadow with a jar of beer to the working men. He had met with a number of friends in the public house who treated him to plenty of beer, and made him almost drunk. Just outside the town on his way along he met the Priest who noticed he was very fond of drink. The Priest accosted him and said "Well John what have you in that jar" Begor beer for the men in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:51
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Once upon a time a man went into the asylum to see his friend. There was a clock hanging on the wall, and when he saw the clock he said to the lunatic "Is that clock right" and the lunatic answered If it was right it would not be here.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:50
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As a drunkard was returning home from Mullinahone one night he met a priest who said to him, drunk again Johny, and the man answered, so am I Father.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:49
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came he was ill. His friends had to send for the doctor. He had to remain in bed for three months. No body ever tried to find the gold after that
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:49
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There is a fort near Cloneen and money was supposed to have been hidden there. Some time ago a man went into the fort with a pick and shovel and started digging in the spot where he thought the money was hidden. He gave the day digging and when the night came, he said he would leave and continue it the next day.
When the next day
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:48
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her, and when the men were hanged, she was thrown into the Suir in Clonmel one night, when the river was flooded and the body was taken out to sea.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:47
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he refused to do. Then they set fire to the house which was a thatched one, and the whole family was burned.
The perpetrators were arrested after some time, and two of them - brothers named Maher were hanged publicly in Cloneen. The third O Gorman was hanged in Clonmel later on.
The principal witness for the prosecution was known as Jude the Cuneen. She kept a Shebeen on the mountain side where she sold poteen.
The men that committed the crime were drinking there that night, and she over heard the conversation, and followed them. She saw them set fire to O'Shea's house. She was of course well paid by the Government for her information.
There is a tradition that when the government had all the information they required of
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:44
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In the early part of the nineteenth century, a family named O'Shea who reside at the foot of Sliab-na-mban near Cloneen.
Mr. O'Shea acquired a middle mans interest in land joining his own. From there he evicted tenants which of course made him unpopular and he was threatened by many people.
He had several men and women employed, and on one particular night a bank of men surrounded the house and called on Mr O'Shea to come out. This
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:42
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The first cart ever seen in this district is supposed to have come to Althbrean, Swanlinbar.
A poor widow and her son lived in a poor little house near the (Cladac) Commas River. The boy was very good and quiet and every evening in summer he went down the ''Sracis'' along the bank of the river and played a fiddle.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:42
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but put a spark into it and keep it inside.
If you see a white horse whilst going on a journey, it is a sign of good luck.
If two people wash their hands in the same water, it is said that they'll fight before the day is over.
Cutting the Nails
Cut them on Monday, cut them for wealth.
Cut them on Tuesday, cut them for health.
Cut them on Wednesday, cut them for news.
Cut them on Thursday, for a new paid of shoes.
Cut them on Friday cut them for sorrow
Cut them on Saturday you'll have a good day to-morrow
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:39
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To throw out ashes on Monday is supposed to be unlucky.
If one eats a piece of a wedding cake it is said that he or she will never be married.
To meet a red haired girl when going on a journey is supposed to be unlucky.
If a black cat crosses the road when one is going on a journey it is supposed to be the sign of good luck.
Friday is supposed to be the luckiest day to move into a new houses while Monday is supposed to be an unlucky day.
April, May, keep our of the sea,
June, July swim 'till you die,
August, September, if you swim you'll slumber.
If one washes one's feet on Saturday night, one should not throw out the water
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:35
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as they say
If you put on a garment inside out it is the sign of luck, and if you change it you will loose your luck. It is said that if a person spills salt or breaks a mirror, it is the sign of ill luck for seven years.
To open an umbrella inside in a house, it is also a sign of bad luck.
It is supposed to be unlucky to bring Hawthorn or Woodbine into the house
"See a pin and pick it up, all the day you'll have good luck"
To drop a glove on a spoon is said to be the sign of a coming disappointment.
To drop a fork fortells the coming of a lady visitor.
To drop a knife fortells the coming of a gentleman visitor.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:32
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Hallow E'en is a great festival among the people. They [?] nuts, have a game called snap-apple and a lot of other games.
When a cow is going to calve, three drops of candle grease are sprinkled on her back so that the calf will be good.
If you eat a crust of bread on New Years Day it will make your hair curly.
If you fast from meat on St. Stephen's Day you will have good health all the year.
Butter. The churning of butter takes about half an hour. Most of the churns in this district are worked by hand. There are no dash churns in this district. When the churning time is nearly up, they look at the glass in the round hole at the top, and they known by the cream which is on the glass if the butter is made. The butter is lifted out with butter bats.
The butter is put into a big basin, and water is poured on it, then prick and pat it with the butter bats, to clean it
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:28
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St. Stephen's Day is the day following Christmas Day. On that day, all the young boys of the district dress in very dilapidated clothes and go around to the houses of the district begging for the wren.
St. Patrick's Day Everyone wears Shamrock or a harp on St. Patrick's Day.
Marriages take place on Shrove Tuesday. Pancakes are made on that night, and lots of eggs are put in them on account of the fast from eggs for Lent which follows immediately after.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:26
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walked into ground in course of picking, are dug out by harrowing with a special harrow for the purpose.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:25
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Names of Potatoes
Epicuses, British Queens, Sharps express, Flounders, Early Rose, May Queens. All of these are early varities.
Kerrs Pinks, Golden Wonders, Pressidents, Up-to-Dates, Successive Champions, Skerries Champions, Shamrocks. All of these are late varities.
Families help one another to pick potatoes. Skeek is the local name for baskets in which potatoes are picked. Potatoes are dug out by means of a potatoe digger. The potatoes which get
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 18:22
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When a calf is born, salt is sprinkled on it to make the cow lick her dry.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 17:51
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58. (Contd)
(b) Fox - harrow.
A piece of straw rope about fifteen inches long - thick and well woven is obtained. Nine or ten boys, seat themselves on the floor. The boy holding the rope - the fox as it is called - stands in the middle of the ring of boys who are seated. He passes the fox to one of the boys who shouts "Fox harrow & passes it round under their legs. The fox is kept going - all shouting. Fox harrow- narrow ?? and at the time giving an occasional stroke to the boy standing on the floor. The boy on the floor is continuously turning on all sides & grabbing down among the boys - between their legs to try & get the fox. Finally he succeeds & boy on whom the fox is found is the next victim.
This is continued until the boys are all fairly well exhausted. The game has been practised for generations & is still practised at the wakes of old persons.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 17:50
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58. (Contd)
(b) Fox - harrow.
A piece of straw rope about fifteen inches long - thick and well woven is obtained. Nine or ten boys, seat themselves on the floor. The boy holding the rope - the fox as it is called - stands in the middle of the ring of boys who are seated. He passes the fox to one of the boys who shouts "Fox harrow & passes it round under their legs. The fox is kept going - all shouting. Fox harrow- narrow ?? and at the time giving an occasional stroke to the boy standing on the floor. The boy on the floor is continuously turning on all sides & grabbing down among the boys - between their legs to try & get the fox. Finally he succeeds & boy on whom the fox is found is the next victim.
This is continued until the boys are all fairly well exhausted. The game has been practised for generations & is still practised at the wakes of old persons.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 17:50
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58. (Contd)
(b) Fox - harrow.
A piece of straw rope about fifteen inches long - thick and well woven is obtained. Nine or ten boys, seat themselves on the floor. The boy holding the rope - the fox as it is called - stands in the middle of the ring of boys who are seated. He passes the fox to one of the boys who shouts "Fox harrow & passes it round under their legs. The fox is kept going - all shouting. Fox harrow- narrow ?? and at the time giving an occasional stroke to the boy standing on the floor. The boy on the floor is continuously turning on all sides & grabbing down among the boys - between their legs to try & get the fox. Finally he succeeds & boy on whom the fox is found is the next victim.
This is continued until the boys are all fairly well exhausted. The game has been practised for generations & is still practised at the wakes of old persons.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 17:49
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58. (Contd)
(b) Fox - harrow.
A piece of straw rope about fifteen inches long - thick and well woven is obtained. Nine or ten boys, seat themselves on the floor. The boy holding the rope - the fox as it is called - stands in the middle of the ring of boys who are seated. He passes the fox to one of the boys who shouts "Fox harrow & passes it round under their legs. The fox is kept going - all shouting. Fox harrow- narrow ?? and at the time giving an occasional stroke to the boy standing on the floor. The boy on the floor is continuously turning on all sides & grabbing down among the boys - between their legs to try & get the fox. Finally he succeeds & boy on whom the fox is found is the next victim.
This is continued until the boys are all fairly well exhausted. The game has been practised for generations & is still practised at the wakes of old persons.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 17:19
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58 (contd)
The wake
Large wakes were common. Boys usually came five and six miles to a wake. At one time girls assembled at wakes also. A notable at the wake acted as a priest and marriages were performed.The full ceremony & the words according to ritual were gone through. So great was the abuse that the church had to put it down with a firm hand, and it was a reserved sin in this diocese for any girl to be present at a wake house after the candles were lighted. Now - a - days wakes are smaller and are confined to the near relatives & a few neighbours.
The following are some of the games practised at wakes :
(a). Slapping - one boy puts his hand on his hip - leaning forward at the same time while another boy gives him two slaps as hard as he can draw with his hand. This boy then stoops & hips/ lifts? his hand while some other champion performs on him. This is continued until they are all fairly exhausted
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 17:18
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58 (contd)
The wake
Large wakes were common. Boys usually came five and six miles to a wake. At one time girls assembled at wakes also. A notable at the wake acted as a priest and marriages were performed.The full ceremony & the words according to ritual were gone through. So great was the abuse that the church had to put it down with a firm hand, and it was a reserved sin in this diocese for any girl to be present at a wake house after the candles were lighted. Now - a - days wakes are smaller and are confined to the near relatives & a few neighbours.
The following are some of the games practised at wakes :
(a). Slapping - one boy puts his hand on his hip - leaning forward at the same time while another boy gives him two slaps as hard as he can draw with his hand. This boy then stoops & lifts his hand while some other champion performs on him. This is continued until they are all fairly exhausted
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 17:11
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stacking the corn and one of the binders was a woman who had a young baby with her and she laid the infant down to sleep near a stack of corn. One of the men who was reaping the corn saw a woman coming out of the fort who took the baby that was sleeping near the stack and put an old witch baby there instead. The witch baby began to cry and the woman came to feed her baby and the man would not leave the woman feed the baby. He told the woman to place the baby behind the fire and burn it and when the woman was about to do so the old fairy walked out of the fort and gave the woman her own child again.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 17:08
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In the townland of Rathcahill, in the parish of Monagea, in the Barony of Glenquin, and in the County Limerick there is a fort locally known as "[?]". About ninety years ago Owen King had a garden near this fort and he had corn grown in the garden. He had people binding, cutting and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 17:07
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
In former times people used several remedies for their ailments. If a child had the thrush the gander would be kept in for nine mornings and he would be taken to the child the first thing in the morning for nine successive mornings. The child's mouth would be opened so as to let the gander's breathe into his mouth, and the child would be cured before the ninth day.
When children used to get whooping cough their parents used to watch until they would see a man with a white horse and they would say - Man of the white horse any cure for the whooping cough and whatever he would say was supposed to cure it. If a person sprained his wrist or his leg or any part of his body the skin of a black cat was supposed to cure it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 16:47
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I got the following little song from Mr. Hubert Forde, farmer, of Dernageer, Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim. It is a spinning-song, which he heard from his mother whose maiden name was Kitty Cullen of Glenfarne, Co. Leitrim. She died about the year 1916 and was then over 70 years of age. She used to sing this song as she spun - holding the roll of wool in one hand and working her finger up and down the thread, like a person, as he described it, "playing the fiddle". Hubert Forde is now (1938) 69 years of age.
As it is a long time since he heard this piece and, not having repeated it often since, he naturally felt it difficult to remember it. I have endeavoured to write it down as he said it but it seems to be corrupt in places.

Chuaidh mé fhéin is mo bhean go teach tórra'
Fothún ann do buidhe
Bhí siad ag cur fear a' toighe ins a' gcómhra clárach,
Is oró rath mo chroidhe
Dubhairt mo bhean liom lá thar n-a bhárach,
Fothún ann do buidhe
"Má luighidh tú síos agus bás d'fhagháil annsin
Is oró rath mo chroidhe.
Cuirfidh mé cómhra airgid ort má's bocht a' rádh sin,
Fothún ann do buidhe
Nó cómhra órdha má's mór a rádh sin
Is oró rath mo chroidhe."

(ar leanacht leath. 8)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:41
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while the mother is away the Thief comes along and steals one Little Butter Ball or child. When the servant hears this she becomes afraid of her mistress so she goes ahide.
When the mother came home she counted the children and found that the servant and one of the children were missing. She then goes in search of the servant and having found her accuses her of not taking care of the children. The servant always finds an excuse.
London Bridge is a form of tug-of-war where the opponents catch hands and pull until one party gives way
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:40
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Cont. from p. 119
The following are a few from my home district: Benada, Co. Sligo.
"Fios agus fiafruighe,
Agus míle d'fhan (h iarraidh) fiafruighe
A Fhiafruighe
Said when a person knows just as well as yourself - the matter you are questioned on - just to find your opinion,

2) Also shorter: "D'fhan h-fhiafruighe ort",
Should be fiafruighe but pronounced h-iarraidh.
Such an angry way this was said; I used to think it was a curse.

3) When a person didn't wish to answer a question they would say
"Nach cuma dhuit", but not everybody could be rude like this. As children we used say to each other "Isnt it aiqual (equal) to you", ( a direct translation).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:38
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Cont. from p. 119
The following are a few from my home district: Beanda, Co. Sligo.
"Fios agus fiafruighe,
Agus míle d'fhan (h iarraidh) fiafruighe
A Fhiafruighe
Said when a person knows just as well as yourself - the matter you are questioned on - just to find your opinion,

2) Also shorter: "D'fhan h-fhiafruighe ort",
Should be fiafruighe but pronounced h-iarraidh.
Such an angry way this was said; I used to think it was a curse.

3) When a person didn't wish to answer a question they would say
"Nach cuma dhuit", but not everybody could be rude like this. As children we used say to each other "Isnt it aiqual (equal) to you", ( a direct translation).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:37
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
hunts each of them to a certain place and if they reaches it before him he has to seek again.
Caps is played by boys. Each boy places his cap near the wall and one boy is selected to throw the ball first. He is called the "Pitcher". He rolls the ball along the ground in the direction of the row of caps with the intention of putting it into some person's cap. The boys stand around in a circle watching the ball and if the ball goes into a boy's cap that boy rushes for the ball and throws it at the boy nearest to him. If he strikes a boy a stone is put into that boy's cap. The game continues like that for a half an hour and the boy with the least number of stones in his cap a the end of that time wins the game.
Butter Balls is played by girls. About nine of them sit in a row. One goes away and is called the Thief. The remaining ones are called Little Butter Balls. They have a mother and a servant over them. The mother goes away on a message and the servant is left in charge of
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:30
ceadaithe
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"Tá a fhios agam,
Tá a fhios agam,
Tá a fhios agam
Rud - cailíní óga ag ithe póirthín na muc"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:30
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Another poet was Miss O Sulliva, Knocknageehy who was a farmer's daughter. She went to America where she died a short time afterwards. She made several verses of poetry one of which was "The Scelig List". She made this in joking the people who were to get married that year in Shrove but whose matches were broken. These verses were he cause of geat trouble among the neighbours.
Another great poet was Father John O Brien who was parish Priest of Rossmore when the new Church was built there so he made a poem for the new Church which was "The Chapel of Charming Rossmore".
Another poet was John Manx a travelling man who made his living by singing songs and playing on the fiddle. On one occasion he made a verse called "The Creamery Laws". He made this when the creameries were built thorughout the country because the people thought the cream laws were very hard.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:27
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In the river Laune near Beaufort there is a place called "Scarbh an Cuilinn" or the ford of the holly tree. It has a legend of a hermit who forgot to say "Glory be to God" when he looked out at the storm from his cell. As a penance for his neglect he picked up a holy stick and went into the river and vowed to stay there till the stick should begin to grow. Soon a noted thief came drawing cattle over the ford and he also repenting of his sins determined to follow the hermit's example. The thief's stick sprouted at once while the hermit's sprouted more slowly. While he was waiting for it to sprout a flood came and he was drowned. Since then the place has been called "Scairbh an Cuilinn."

Ainm an duine a thug an t-eólas
Bean Uí Laoghaire
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:23
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As we went at the rate of a wedding
Into Sgairbh na gCaorach Fair.

(II)
As we went across the near-cuts
We call the market house hill
A hundred horny animals
Around me there stood still
I thought my goat I could not sell
I offered up a prayer
And sold her for half-a-crown
In Sgairbh na gCaorach fair.

(III)
She had hardly a pint of milk
In a warm Summers day
And I'll tell you at the present time
She would not cream (crame) your tea
She'll be seen no more in the corn stack
Where she used to wag her tail
Or going up and down the garden
Plucking lovely heads of kale
She'll be seen no more on the kitchen floor
Where she used to wag her tail
For I parted with my fanny dear
In the Sgairbh na gCaorach fair

Owne Skinnader
Lougher

Got from
Miss Susan McKenna
Bracagh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:22
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Poets of The District.
Got from
Mr. Jerome O Sullivan (70)
Carrigroe, Clonakilty
1-1-1938
In this district there lived several poets long ago but they are nearly all dead. They all composed their poems in English.
Mrs. Maggie Hayes, of Paddy Hayes's Cross is a farmers wife and is still alive. She made several verses of poetry one of which was 'Lament for my Dead Friend'. She made this on the occasion of the death the death of a friend of hers.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:17
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this request and he won every game he played from that on. On the eastern side of this fort is a big stone which is supposed to be an entrance to som underground place. There is a great bank of earth all arround the ford. Forts are never ploughed up as it is believed to be unlucky to interfere with them.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:16
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Me and my goat along the road
So taper on did steer (taper = straight)
The people had to leave
They hurry my boys for fear.
Her horns they were so long and sharp
For battle well prepared.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:14
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Nettles are used as food for pigs and fowl. Long ago a man named Daniel O Leary of Ardfield made use of herbs in curing people from certain diseases.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:12
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204
Hedge schools.
(1) There was a hedge school in Derrygola about eighty years ago. The master was a native Irishman and taught all subjects through Irish. He was from Carrickroe and his name was master Treanor. He was paid by cattle and these he sold. In this way he made a little money. The children had no seats but they brought turf with them and sat on them. They had no books but they wrote with a slate and slate pencil.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:11
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(2) There was an old hedge school in Crushe's (Treanor's) barn (Davagh) It is said to have existed about ninety years ago. The subjects were taught through Irish. He was paid with grain and potatoes which he sold. Stones were used for sitting on and slate and slate pencil for writing. The teacher did not lodge in this house but in various houses in the district. There was no blackboard used. The mas (No 1)
Mary Skinnader
Davagh
Emyvale
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:07
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The following is a list of the names of the fields in the townlands of the school district.
Ardnasalem
The musc páirc, páirc na bromaigh, the talamh íseal. Páirc an tobar, the páirc fada.
Tonneyfinnegan
The big knave, The black hill, The Ringstone field, The forge field, the Carrick, The well field, the meadow, the bottom, the back bottom, Wallace's field, the pond, Terry's garden, the crooked piece, the Sagarrah meadows, Martin's garden, Caldra, the road field, the threecornered field, the back garden, the long hill, the big hill, Mary Ann's home.
Davagh
The mullagh, lios buidhe, garradh an t-Sagairt, the Knowe, the Carrick, Tum na h-Eorna, pairc a' sgaha, The Forth, pairc bán, garradh sidhe, Curran's hill, the long field, the threecornered field, the bush field, the drain, the meadow, the hilll, the stony field, the big field, garradh na h-abhann, an sraith
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:03
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Páirc na gCloch, lone field.
TAMLETT
The carrick,
the meadow
Garradh na h-Abhann
Cul-Calm
The Giarrfiadh
the ree
the srath
the bottom
the back garden
the well field
the rye bottom
the wee piece
Doogan's march
the dam field
the Fear Bearting
Crock-cor
the hatchet field
the bog field
the barley bottom
Mullach Bán
Garradh Buidhin
Cnoc-an-Tobair
Tír-na-Mór
Garradh Mór
Garradh Fada
Cnoc-an-Arc
Carraig-Iota
Beanamhain(?)
the Boile
Tonnadh-na-Mónadh
Páirc-Dubh
Páirc-Glas
Pairc-a'-Tuaire
Sah
the Mullach
Mullach Bán
Mullach Garra
LOUGHER
Lios Buidhe
Páirc Bhán
Mullach
Garradh
the Carraick
the glen
the Crocan
the parkness
the bog meadow
the well field
the big bray
the long field

TONYCOOGAN
the KNOWE
the Park
Campbell field
the Binnseach field
the bull's field
Mohans field
The field behind the barn
the front field

DERNASHALLOG
the Lough field
the bulls Park
the back field
the pinnacle
the middle field
the far field
the hay field
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 15:01
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[-]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:57
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Churning
Long ago it was not as easy to churn as it is nowadays. Most of the churns long ago were dash churns. But now the greater part of them are "Turn Over" churns, which are worked by a handle which is kept turned round and round until the butter is on the milk.
The churner knows when the butter is on the milk because the milk makes a heavy sound. When the butter is on the milk, the lid is taken off. Then the lid and the churn are rinsed down by pure clean water.
Then the butter is taken out and put in a clean dish, afterwards it is salted and made up in half pound one pound and two pound weights.
Butter is a very good food we put put in our bread and put it in sweet cakes.
All that is not needed is sold in the market and good prices are got for it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:52
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Oats-making
Long ago it was not as easy to cut or save oats as it is nowadays. Long ago there were no mowing machines or reapers. Th e people had to cut the oats with a hook. Now they cut it a mowing machine and tie it with a binder which is attached to every mowing machine. What is cut each time is called a squart. There are people in the field who take out the oats and tie it. When it is all tied it is stacked up in small stacks with sixteen sheaves in each stack. After a fortnight it is put in big stacks with twenty small stack in each big one. When there is room for it in the hazzard it is drawn in. Then it is threshed with a threshing machine. In this machine the oats is seperated from the straw. Then the oats is send to another machine and flour or meal is made from it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:48
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An old Song.
I am a donkey driver, The best in
all the place, I thought my donkey fast enough, To run in any race,
I brought him to the Derby,
And backed him for a place.
The signal it was given and away the asses flew, and the very first ass that came in the race, was Jerusalem's Old Cuckoo.
I brought him up to Briton,
To walk on Briton's sand,
A lady she got on his back,
To pass the German band,
My donkey he began to kick,
And off he lady threw,
And around about the band was heard.
The voice of my Old Cuckoo.
But his Colour's rather pale,
His ears are long and slenderly,
With a lovely curly tail,
But when he kicks the bucket,
Shor he'd tell you what to do.
So leave me down and let me die,
Beside my rattling Old Cuckoo,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:43
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brings it to the mill to get it made into meal for feeding purposes.
The straw of the oats is used for thatching by the farmer.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:43
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Oats-making.
Long ago there were no machines out as there are now and people had to work very hard with their crops.
Oats is a very hard crop to save and farmers who sow it, do their very best to save it, and from weeds destroying it. In the end of Summer when the oats is ripe, the farmer employ's many men to help him to cut it, and also several men to bind it.
Then the oats is cut with very sharp instruments called scythes, and the other men that are employed bind the oats into small bundles and leave them in rows on the ground.
These bundles are called sheafs.
This is continued until all the oats is cut and binded.
Then they are made into sticks with ten sheafs in the stuck every time. Then the oats is left in the stucks for about two weeks and then they are made into big stacks.
Then the oats is left in stacks till whenever the farmer gets it thrashed. Then when its thrashed the farmer
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:40
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hundred of yellow meal and two shillings a week to each man.
The Baile na Roíste road is the oldest road in the district and extends from Byrne's forge up the east side of Sliabh Chairn to the top of the hill. When the Baile na Roíste road was being made the same pay was given as was given for the Stirabout road, and several women worked on it too. Those roads are used yet and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:38
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are being improved gradually. There was a path between Balla and Bohola in days gone by, but it is done away with since the roads were made. Part of it went across the top of Sliabh Chairn.
There is a heap of stones on the north side of Kiltimagh in memory of a woman who died coming from market. When people are passing, they
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:35
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each take a stone and throw it on the heap and while so doing they say "The Lord have mercy on the Dead".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:35
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There are about four tailors in our district. They do not visit the houses to do their work now, but they did long ago.
They used to go from house to house to make suits and used to stay in the house while
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:35
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Games I play.
There are a certain number of games which I play with my comrades every day. The games I play mostly is tig, four corners, playing ball, and blind man buff.
Tig is a very easy playing game and and any number of children can play it. Tig is a very warm game of a cold day. Four-corners is a very nice game. Five children can only play that game. A big square room is chosen to play this game. One child has to stand in the middle of the square room and she is called the fool in the middle.
The four children goes to each of the four corners of the room and one starts to run from one corner to the other. Then the fool tries to get a corner and if she does, the child in whose corner she went to, would have to take the place of the fool. There are a great number of games which we play every day, and one particular game which we all like is hide-and go seek.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:34
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doing so, and have their food in them.
They used not sell cloth but the people had their own home spuns. It was called frieze. The wool was dyed in copprice and alum and was then spun , sent to weaver and made into cloth. The people in the district do not wear homespun cloth now.
The implements he used were a "goose", thimble, scissors, thread, pins, chalk,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:31
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and thickened and were then fit for use. Out of this leather they sometimes made a seive which they used for winnowing oats. This leather was not used for making shoes.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:30
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The "Corkscrew" or "Stirabout" road extends from Comderry to the main road between Balla and Kiltimagh. When the Corkscrew road was being made, the pay given was a half a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:29
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That is why the people of long ago were stronger and more healthier than the people now.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:29
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Food in olden times.
Long ago there was no kind of food out like what the people now eat.
There was no tea to be had like what is sold now.
The tea they had long ago were hayseeds which they saved every year from their meadow or grass, these they use to store away in boxes for a year.
By the end of that time the hayseeds are as brown as the tea we buy.
Then they would it into a drink like the way we make our tea but in very different vessels towards the ones no. This they would drink every day.
Porrage was their usual diet every day, at morning for their breakfast and for their supper.
Long ago before their breakfast the people would work for two hours before starting to eat.
People say now that the people of long ago were the healthiest people that ever lived.
They would arise every morning at six o'clock and they would work two hours before starting to eat.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:29
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made ropes if bog-deal
A man called a cooper made churns, tubs, and barrels. A nailer made nails. Other men made whips.
The people used to burn lime as they do to the present day.
They used wooden vessels called noggins instead of the cups we use now.
They are made leather out of a sheep skins. They spread them on the floor and put quick lime and salt on them. After a few days they had shrivelled
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:26
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bend.
The old people used to make baskets. A man who lived in Comderry named Pat Delaney and another named John Walsh from Laragan used to make them. They boiled the rods and peeled them and then weaved them into baskets.
Long ago the people used to make wooden ploughs. They did all their own spining and weaving. They had a spinning wheels in every house. The people
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:23
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The chain is brought through a hole in the manger so that he could not pull the block up When the horses needs to be shod he is brought to the forge and the blacksmith puts shoes on him.
The cows are called pruggy, and the horse is called preouc many times, the pigs are called deoch Deoch, the hens are called Tuk, Tuk, the turkeys are called Bee Bee, and the chickens are called Birdie, Birdie. the goats are called Kiddie, Kiddie, and the sheep are called Mazzy.
When the horse is working in the Spring, or when he is shut in in the winter, he is given hay and oats to eat. The sheep is given turnips and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:20
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What need I make a moan,
I'll go my way and draw my pay,
And smoke my pipe alone,
Human heart must know its part,
Though bitter be its load,
So God be with old Ireland,
And the Old Bog Road.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:19
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Her eyes were soft and sorrowful,
Like sunbeams on the sea,
Her name was Mary Dwyer,
But that being long ago,
The ways of God are wiser still,
And things that man may know.
She died the year I left her,
With broken heart atone
But we best forget the days we met,
By the Old Bog Road.
My mother died last Springtide,
When Ireland's fields were green,
The neighbours said her waking
was the finest ever seen.
There was snowdrops and primroses
Piled up all around her bed,
And Fern's church was crowded,
When her funeral was said,
But here was I on broadway,
Building bricks bu load,
When the carried out her coffin,
From the Old Bog Road.
This life is a weary puzzle,
Pass find the out for man,
I take the day for what its worth,
And do the best I can,
Since noone cares a rush for me,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:17
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There are thirty farm animals and one hundred domestic animals at home. There are four cows, and they are tied with a chain around their necks to stakes.
They are called the black cow, and the grey cow, and the two shorthorn cows. There is one cow tied with a chain from her horns to her legs. The house is built of sand and stones, and it is white washed. It is called a byre, and there are four stakes in it. There is also a manger in it.
There is a horse at home. The stable is a rather large house with a manager in it. The way in which he is tied is, a chain is put around his neck and a block on the end of it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:14
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An old Song.
My feet are here on broadway,
Here this Blessed harvest morn,
But oh, the ache thats in them,
For the place where I was born.
My weary hands are blistered,
From working cold and heat,
But oh, to swing a scythe today,
Through fields of Irish Wheat,
Had I the choice to wander back,
Or own a King's abode,
Tis soon I would see the hawthorne tree,
Beside the Old Bog Road.
When I was young and restless,
My mind was ill at ease,
From dreaming of America and
gold beyond the sea's,
Sorrow take their money for tis hard
to find that same,
And what's the world to any man,
That no-one speaks his name.
For here I am in broadway,
Building bricks by load,
A long three thousand miles away,
From the Old Bog Road.
There was a decent girl too,
Who used to walk with me,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:13
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Unless you strive you can't succeed.
Vain and vulgar oft go hand in hand.
Words of kindness cost us nothing.
Zealous be in service of the right.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:12
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It is cruel and unprofitable to overwork the willing horse.
To be conscious that you are ignorant is a great step to knowledge.
Bury the hatchet but don't mark the spot.
Two things are required to write a successful letter - pains and brains.
Never despise the bridge that carried you over
Square your shoulders and turn a brave face to the weather.
More than one man killed the goose that laid the golden egg.
Borrowing and lending among friends is a calamity.
Better to be fortunate than rich.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:09
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would put it on a piece of brown paper and put it to their jaw and put a bandage round it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:08
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Suspicion always haunts a guilty mind.
When clouds are seen wise men put on their coats.
There is no disgrace in being poor, but it is very convenient.
Hurry is the work of a weak mind, dispatch of a strong one.
waste is a crime.
Only the foolish never change their opinion.
Little things often lead to big results.
If a man does not know to what port he is steering no wind is favourable to him.
A man who thinks he can do without others is foolish but he who thinks others cannot do without him is a fool.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:08
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Local Cures
Long ago the people used not to bother about doctors because they had special cures of their own.
Every seventh son or daughter was looked upon as having cures for toothaches and other ailments.
To cure sties in their (in their) eyes they would point a gooseberry thorn to their eyes nine times. When they would have warts on their hands they would get a black snail and rub it to them, and then they would hang the snail on (on) a gooseberry tree and if the snail would be gone in the ninth day the wart would be gone.
Holy wells were also visited for cures. St Brigid's Well in Collen More was visited for diseases and the older people say that St Brigid fetched water from that well in her childhood.
To cure a toothache they would put a poultice of oatenmeal to it. First they would boil the (ot) oatenmeal in hot water, and when it would be thick they
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:07
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for throwing a stone. "The Fear Down" was his nickname
Timothy Long. Nohival was a great high jumper. His apponent was John Murphy. The test was which of them would jump his own height and Timothy Long did so.
Timothy Long who still lives gave this information
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:04
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James Cronin flourished about A.D. 1830. He lived at New Quarter near TureenCahill and was a noted Caster.
Jack Leary Clydrough is reputed to have Carried 17 cwt. of timber baulks up the hill leading to the Butter Exchange, Cork. This was done for a wager of £20. After the feat it was found that a new pair of nailed boots he wore were worn to the uppers.
A woman left Ballydaly one morning and walked to Cork transacted some business and walked home arriving early in the evening.
It is said that a man from the Kerry Border on being told that no safron was sailable[?] for the butter (the cream being already on the churn) ran barefooted to Cork and arrived with the safron in time to have it used on the butter.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:03
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it will be ready to be taken off the churn.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 14:03
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Churning
Churning means changing sour cream into butter and buttermilk.
The milk is strained up when fresh and skimmed into a crock or churn until it sours and thickens.
It is then churned.
Some churns have a dash or a beater, others have it on a stand and is turned end over end.
Sometimes the churning lasts over an hour and in cold weather a little hot water is added but great care must be taken not to put it on too hot or the butter (milk) will be real white and very soft and as the people say it would be scalded. The first part of the churning is hard as people have to work hard until the milk comes to a certain heat or until it cracks.
The butter cracks means the butter separates from the milk. It is like little cruds first then when the churning is kept on longer the little cruds get bigger and bigger until the churn is covered with butter and soon
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 13:59
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A man named John Herlihy who lived in Nohival was going to have a Meitheall one day. On the morning of the Meitheall he went out to the corn field, and reaped ten sheaves of wheat, and scotched it, and ground it into flour, and made bread for the men's breakfast before the arrived.
Patrick Leary Hollymounts was a great runner and jumper. He use to run and jump at Knocknagree and Ballydesmond. His apponents were : "The Mountain Hare" Hussey. Patrick Leary's son is living in the house now
Denis Kelleher Sinnagh was a great runner. He ran at Headford. OHara and Desmond were his apponents. They were from Glenflesk
Denis Leary Hollymount, was a famous caster. He used to cast at Newquarter Bridge. Jeffery Ring and Andrew Sheehan. Tureencahil. Denis Leary was the best man
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 13:25
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The harp that once through
Tara's hall.
The harp that once through Taras hall,
The soul of music shed.
Now hangs as mute on Taras walls,
As if that soul had fled.
So sleeps the pride of former days,
So glorious trill is oer.
And hearts that once beat high for praise,
Now feel that pulse no more.
II
No more to chiefs and ladies bright,
The harp of Tara wells.
The chord alone that breaks at night,
Its tail of ruin tells.
Thus freedom now so seldom wakes,
The only throb she gives.
Is when some heart indignant breaks,
To show that still she lives.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 13:22
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The potato crop.
Potatoes are one of the principal foods of man.
They are a very wholesome food.
When the potatoes are to be soed, the farmer opens the drills with a plough.
Then the potatoes are cut in slices with an eye in each slice. Then manure is put between the drill. Then the potatoes are soed over the manure and the drills are shut.
After a month or two small buds begin to appear above the soil.
They they are second moulded.
Shortly after this weeds begin to grow up between the drills.
These have to be taken away or they will not let the potatoes grow. When the potatoes stalks are a foot, small blossoms begin to appear.
In about three weeks after the blossoms have appeared, the potatoes can be dug for use.
But they cannot be all day togeter until all the stalks are withered. Then they are all dug and put in a hole in the field or brought into the hayyard or barren.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:42
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28.
Anthracite was mined in the Slievardagh district about two hundred years ago. This coal was carted to Dublin (portion of it)
The wheels were made of wood and were not iron shod. The axle was made of crab wood. When Dublin was reached, sale was made of the coal. The carts, wheels and axles were then disposed of for firewood and the drivers rode back on the horses, to procure fresh loads.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:39
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bottles and ask money and he sold tin cans and porringers and spoons and forks and knives.
He was rich farmer's son from Lavey and when his mother died his people at home began fighting and he chose to go around travelling rather than stay at home.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:36
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People began to wear boots if they were poor when they earned them and if they were rich from they were able to walk.
There are accounts of people who never wore shoes or boots. There was a man in Virginia and his name was James Stomers and it is said that he never wore a boots or shoes in his life.
Some children go bare-footed during the Summer months but the poorest of them wear boots or shoes during the Winter.
It is supposed that water that would wash feet should be thrown under a lone bush. Boots are not made
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:36
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Carrick or distribution among the poor of his town. At his death in 1782 he bequeathed a sum of £2000 for the building and support of an alms house of Carrick. It would appear that he made one Joseph Tucker his executor, for it was through this gentleman the trustees appointed were made aware of the bequest. By Wadding's will the Bishop of Waterford, the Parish Priest of Carrick for the time being and three respectable laymen of the town were appointed to administer the charity. The number of inmates was not specified. The house was built in 1783 and further endowed by James Sausse Esq. a local merchant with £30 per annum for the support of 5 persons which he made a rent charge on his property in Carrick and a few years later the charity had another bequest made to it of two and a half acres of land at Biel by a Miss ONeill.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:36
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Carrick or distribution among the poor of his town. At his death in 1782 he bequeathed a sum of £2000 for the building and support of an alms house of Carrick. It would appear that he made one Joseph Tucker his executor, for it was through this gentleman the trustees appointed were made aware of the bequest. By Wadding's will the Bishop of Waterford, the Parish Priest of Carrick for the time being and three respectable laymen of the town were appointed to administer the charity. The number of inmates was not specified. The house was built in 1783 and further endowed by Jamess Sausse Esq. a local merchant with £30 per annum for the support of 5 persons which he made a rent charge on his property in Carrick and a few years later the charity had another bequest made to it of two and a half acres of land at Biel by a Miss ONeill.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:34
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locally but they are repaired locally.
There are five shoemakers in the districts at present but twenty years ago there were twelve. The names of the ones in the district are Sam Preston, John Boylan, Patrick Hopkins, and the two Smiths of Cornasesk. Some of them died and as the trade got bad they left this place and they went to other places to work at the trade.
Long ago clogs were worn and made locally. Clog makers the people who made them were called. They are worn now but not as much as ling ago.
There was leather made in this district in olden times
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:29
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In 1760 a cavalry barrack was erected for two troops of horse. It stood in Barrack Lane off Main Street leading to the River and was removed during the progress of the works connected with the New Bridge. The site was supposed to have been a grant from Lord Arran though as it terrys and next no information can be hazarded.
1775 Wadding's Charity established.
The Alms house was built in 1783 and taken down in 1878 for the purpose of enlarging the Parish Church. It was several times before the Master of the Rolls who confirmed the present trustees and sanctioned the removal of alms house to a suitable locality. Thomas Wadding the founder resided in Carrick a little over a century ago. Though very meagre information has been transmitted it is beyond his name. Before his death he lived for some time in Spain and forwarded an annual grant of money to the Parish Priest of
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:28
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At about eighteen years of age the people began to wear boots in former times. Many people that were poor never wore boots or shoes.
Boots are both made and repaired locally. There are four shoemakers in the town, namely John Boylan, Pat Hopkins, Matthew Rodgers and Sam Preston.
Shoemakers were far more numerous long ago than they are now because long ago there were not many shoes or boots sold in the shops and shoemakers made nearly all the shoes and boots. Repairing boots is generally the work that they do now.
Clogs with wooden soles were worn about nine years ago during the Winter but they are
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:23
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not worn now.
There are two shoemakers in the district. Their names are John Gillic and Brian ORielly. They do not make shoes now but they repair them. This has been a tradition in their families for hundreds of years.
There used to be ten shoemakers in this district. Most of them gave up their trade because the people bought their shoes in the shops and because the leather got dearer.
Sheep skins were worn instead of shoes over a hundred years ago. There was a man living about three miles from Virginia in the townland of Kilmore who used to make these coverings. His name was Pat
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:22
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supplied the timber to make up the broken bridge over the river Suir to carry the army and carriages to reduce Waterford and when he was honoured with the king's (William III's) presence at his house divers times when he had opportunities to beg but needed mot, The petition bears date 19th November 1697. and we find the Newports from this date enjoying the honour of knighthood as well as bounty from the Crown.
1725 The Red house built by Roderick Brazil Wall Esq who it would appear belonged to the branch of the Coolnamick family. The three trees opposite the bank are the remains of an avenue planted in front of his residence by this gentleman and though several Vandalic attempts were made towards their removal from time to time sufficient antiquarian spirit was displayed to prevent an act of needless spoilation. This fine old residence is at present occupied by the Sisters of Mercy.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:18
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Smith
People began to wear shoes at the age of fifteen. There is a man living about five miles from Virginia and his name is Michael Smith, and he never wore shoes on account of him having crooked toes.
There is another man living near the town of Bailieborough and he never wore shoes, because his feet are turned backwards. He is a tailor.
Some children go barefoot in Summer but the poorest of them wear boots or shoes in Winter. There were two women in the district about three years ago the last woman of them died, and they used to go barefoot every Summer.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:12
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are three grave-yards in which the Catholics of the parish are buried and three in which the Protestants are buried. The Catholic grave yards are Castlerahan, situated in the townland of Cormeen, and Ballyjamesduff situated in Ballyjamesduff town, and Munterconnaught in the townland of Knocktemple.
The grave-yard in Castlerahan is sloping towards the Curragh bog. There are trees growing round it. It contains very old tombs and monuments and crosses. The oldest stone bears the date 1716 and bears the date (is) on it is Daniel
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:10
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1783 In this year the Town Clock was erected by James Galway who came to reside in the Castle about 1760. Mr Galway was in the wine trade and also carried on salt boiling in one of the buildings in the courtyard at the rear of the Castle which was afterwards removed by Mr Wogan. This historic old clock which has stood through the years like the good 'genie' of the place was very much improved in 1874 by the Town Commissioners.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:07
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The graveyard contains headstones of all shapes - some flat on the ground, some slabs standing, crosses of different shapes in stone and a few celtic crosses. Their dates show of burials from 1407 to the present day.
There are some "unknown graves" - no exhumations have been remembered - except one. The body of Leo McDonnell was changed from one grave to another about 1924 owing to disagreement among relatives.
An iron frame of great strength covers the grave of John Devlin. This was placed to prevent the stealing of the body after burial for medical purposes. A car known as the "Dead Coach" visited cemeteries here + a watch was kept over graves for about three weeks, usually by near relatives, so that their friend's bodies would not be stolen away.
Near the Cemetery are crab trees. These are said to have been apple trees n the garden of the Priest's residence at one time. No trace of the residence now remains + the present residence is two miles away.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:06
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it to 'steep' in the barrel; then he gets a bucket and he fills it with hot water and he puts ten pounds of washing-soda in. When both substances are dissolved he mixes them together.
The spray is put on with a sprayer which is strapped to a man's back and carried on his back, so that it can be put on and taken off easily for refilling. There is a handle on one side of the machine which is used to pump out the spray through the long tube on the other side. There are two nossels attached to the end of this tube and through these the spray comes out on the potatoes.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:02
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He was a curate under Rev. Christopher Chevers for several years in Grangegeith. Rev. Christopher Chevers was born at Kilbeg in the 17th century. He was a curate for a time in Grangegeith. In 1767 he was made P.P. of Kilbeg and he became V.G. of the Diocese. He was known as "Thar Chevers Mor" to distinguish him from his cousin. He was buried in Staholmok. On the headstone of Rev. Laurance Chevers is written "Beneath this monument lie the remains of Rev. Laurance Chevers, Parish priest of Grangegeith and Monknewtown for 55 years. He departed this life on July 3rd 1818 in the 73rd year of his life." Rev. Thomas Finnegan was P.P. of Grangegeith in 1842. He completed the schools and chapel of Grangegeith. He purchased a bell in Grange and made it a present to the parish. He died in 1862 and he was buried in Nobber. Rev. Patrick Kealy was born in the parish of Grangegeith. He studied in Navan and Maynooth. He was ordained in 1831. He was a Curate in Kells, Navan and Mullingar and he was A.D.M. in Castletown from 1844 to 1846, then he was the P.P. of Castlejordan.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:02
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
He was a curate under Rev. Christopher Chevers for several years in Grangegeith. Rev. Christopher Chevers was born at Kilbeg in the 17th century. He was a curate for a time in Grangegeith. In 1767 he was made P.P. of Kilbeg and he became V.G. of the Diocese. He was known as "Thar Chevers Mor" to distinguish him from his cousin. He was buried in Staholmok. On the headstone of Rev. Laurance Chevers is written "Beneath this monument lie the remains of Rev. Laurance Chevers, Parish priest of Grangegeith and Monknewtown for 55 years. He departed this life on July 3rd 1818 in the 73rd year of his life." Rev. Thomas Finnegan was P.P. of Grangegeith in 1842. He completed the schools and chapel of Grangegeith. He purchased a bell in Grange and made it a present to the parish. He died in 1862 and he was buried in Nobber. Rev. Patrick Kealy was born in the parish of Grangegeith. He studied in Navan and Maynooth. He was ordained in 1831. He was a Curate in Kells, Navan and Mullingar and he was A.D.M. in Castletown from 1844 to 1846, then he was the P.P. of Castlejordan
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 11:01
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to man to hear the moans
Some sensible people did not believe it was a Ban-Sidhe so two or three courageous men lay in wait. Again the moans were heard and as they approached the men, instead of a Ban-Sidhe, saw two young men aged about twenty, approach under cover of the hedge with bits of straw which they stretched across their mouths while imitating the Ban-Sidhe. The men who were lying in wait recognised the two as two of their comrades. They soon put them to flight and the others never attempted to do it again. The two men are alive to day
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:56
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In 1690 King William's army encamped on the Green of Carrick 21st July 1690 while here the King issued a royal warrent for Commissioners of Quay. The original document was in the custody of the Right Hon. the Lord Newport Lord Chancellor (1749) It includes_"Queen at our Royal Camp near Carrick 23rd July 1690 in the second year of our reign" By his majesty's command Robert Southwell. William III being very warmly received by the people of Carrick his majesty was very pleased to grant the town immunity from local taxes in consequence of which no "country cess" was levied on Carrick until about 1850. During his stay the conqueror of the Boyne was lodged as a guest with the Mandeville family at the "Villa Mantilla de Verde."
In 1697. John Newport petitioned the Lords Justices for the grant of some houses in Carrick he was a native of Carrick and supplied the sick and wounded when the hospital was there, he also
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:50
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In 1668 Carrick was visited by the Duchess of Ormonde, and in a letter written at Nilkenny on June 9th 1668 she informed her husband that since she wrote last she had gone to Carrick where was a very ruinous house in the onward appearance of it but preserved from any greater or more dangerous decay as to the falling of it. The orchard was not fine but were planted with good fruit but the park was the finest in extent that could be seen anywhere and the deer wall was the best her ladyship had ever seen.
Sausse's Quay supplied the place of the jelly or landing place opposite the merchants stores.
In 1685 King James II granted a patent to the Walls of Coolnamuck.
1686 The Earl of Clarendon who visited Carrick in this year declared it to be the nicest place he ever saw.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:46
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When a person had a cold he goes to the nearest stream and gathers some of the watercress, steeped it before using it. A sick stomach was cured but a few spoonfuls of bread soda, disolved in hot water
Chilblains + corns were cured by mustard and ointment mixed.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:45
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out at full length in repose. The astonished rustic took "The full of his eyes of him" and then ran off to call his friend my 'deponent' who was not far away at the time. The proceeded at once to the spot but when they reached it the strange being was gone yet the dint he made in the heath was still plainly visible.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:44
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often had a duck egg or a hen egg if it was to be got. The people never found any fault on this food, as they thought it good enough to set before a priest. This food produced fine, strong, healthy men and women who never knew a days sickness.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:43
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Searching for a needle in a bundle of straw.
Your as tight as twopence, or a limpet on a rock.
If death was a thing that money could buy, the rich would live and the poor would die.
You cannot whistle and eat meal.
A watched pot never boils.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
Every dog has it's day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:42
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There are three graveyards in this parish:- Rathkenny, Stackallen and Grangegeith. Grangegeith graveyard is in the townland of Grangegeith. They are all still in use. There is a laneway leading into Grangegeith graveyard about three hundred yards long. It is situated in a valley. A wall of the old church remained there until lately and then some of the stones were taken to build a wall round the cemetery. Thus through ignorance the ancient sanctuary has almost disappeared. The old church measured sixty three yards by sixteen and a half yds. There are a few big trees round the graveyard. There is a stone wall around it also. The churchyard is level and three are paths through it. There are many people buried in it. In it lie the remains of four priests:- Rev. Thomas Boyle, Pastor of Skryne, Rev. Fr. Johnson, P.P. of Donore, Rev. Fr. Keighan, P.P. of Grange, Rev. Laurence Chevers was born near Navan in 1785.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:42
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own faces. The Irish fought with undoubled bravery to the very gates of the town which they set on fire and burned to the ground. Behind each entrance however great piles of stone had been raised for the double purpose of strengthening the gates and also it would appear for economising amunition.
Down came the loose barricades chauching many of the besiegers while the troops from within "pelted" off the rest with considerable loss of life.
Upward of 1000 of Lord Inchiquin's men were slain in that ill conceited attack.
In 1664 the duke of Ormonde received a patent from Charles II to hold a Manor Court at Carrick in which any sum not exceeding £10 might be recovered. Proceedings in this court were after a time discontinued but in 1812 the Marquis of Ormonde appointed Jon Wogan Esq. Solicitor Seneshall for a few year since when it fell into abeyance.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:41
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A noisy brook is always shallow.
A burned child dreads the fire.
Constant dropping wears away a rock.
They seldom think who think they do.
Time and patience will bring a snail to America.
Smooth waters run deep.
He's as daft as a half-penny watch.
No news is good news.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:38
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mountain side. As he turned round he saw a man standing behind him, and the man with the horse said to him where in the world did you come from, as he thought he was one of his neighbours.
He began to get afraid, as there was no reply from him, but stood there like a wooden post. The old custom long ago when people were haunted like this was to turn their coat, and they would become all right, so he done this and the man disappeared and he was out on the right road again.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:36
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
I.
The Yankee's fat bacon
If I'm not mistaken
Is fit for no man
But a wild mountaineer,
And less for Pat Markey
Or the old Benix Bartle,
Or the Parnellites,
It would just them in cheer.
II.
When Markey McGuire
Clapped the pan on the fire,
In walks Benix Bartle
Saying "that's my delight."
When in comes Para Ruadh (Padraig),
The old wirre-sthruggh
Saying dip in the gravy
My gay Parnellite.
III.
Well now Micky Reilly,
I will warn you highly,
Though your head is as big
As a steeple,
For I'm told of late
You made wooden weights
For the Yankee to
Baffle the people.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:36
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once there was a man going to a fair about three oc in the night with a mare, and a foal. He had a very long way to go to the town, and he did not know the road so good eighter.
As he came to a cross road, he turned the wrong road, which did not lead to the town at all. He continued his journey on, and when he thought he was gone as far as he should have reached the town he found himself going along on a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:34
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The enemy having observed our army marching on the other side of the river took that advantage to draw together a considerable body of horse and foot with which they marched with all diligence to Carrick and stormed it, not doubting to carry the place wherein there was nothing but horse and only with swords and pistols to defend the walls of great compass. Yet did our men manage their defence so well making use of stones and whatever else might be serviceable to them that the enemy was beaten off with loss.
The walls were manned and the garrison stood upon its defence. On came the Irish troops with impetuous haste and attacked the town with vigour but with such blind fury that they killed their own trumpeter when bearing to the camp the answer to their summons A mine which was dug under the walls by the assailants only flew into their
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:34
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had so much of it." He continued diging all day long but his work was in vain, so he was so sure of the gold, that he would almost dig all night in order to find the treasure quickly.
He kept diging (all) for about a fortnight and by this time he had all the garden dug and as he did not succeed in finding the treasure he stood up in the middle of the garden scratching his head, and said a Dream will come to a man quicker than gold.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:33
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Old Cures
Burn - Bees wax.
Kidney suet.
Mix both well together. Add sweet Oil.
______________________
Scurfy.
2 glasses of white wine vinegar
1/2 lbs of salt butter
3 a prepiciled powder (poison)
Boil butter and vinegar together.
Allow to simmer for 1/4 hr.
Put into jar to cool All off vinegar.
Mix prepiciled powder well through ointment.
Spread on old piece of cloth and apply ever second day. ( A good dose of salts - Spirits avoided)
___________________
Mrs O Donnell
The Paddock
Co.Tipp.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:32
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At Kilgabinet there are 2 Holy Wells St. Cabinets and St. Coulons at Kill and Newtown near Kilbarry Maiden is St Bernards. Kilmacthomas has Holy Wells St. Johns.
St. Bernards is also called St Ita's Well and there is also Tobar Carra Meidin Rounds and patterns were made to the these over 80 years ago.
At Ballypatrick Co. Tipperary is a holy Well Tobar Naoim Manarain St. Koronnors Well.
In the townsland of Knockgomaun near Madeligo is a holy Well which is still the scene of a Pattern.
In Portlaw is the Angels Well at Kilmofegue.
J J Healy,
Carrick
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:30
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is nothing more pleasant on a cold winter's night than to sit round a good turf telling stories about Ancient days. An old man from the vicinity told me a story about the miser, and the crock of gold.
Once upon a time an old miser who had bags of money, dreamt that a crock of gold was buried in a corner of his garden, and one morning he began to dig for the treasure, "I guess he was dreaming about the money he
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:26
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are two holy Wells in the parish of Mothill one is the celebrated holy well of Saint's Quann and Brogain the scene of the 'ratteen of Mothill" The other is in the townsland of Park beside the 'cillin' or early church site and is known as St. John the Baptist.
The Mothill Well is famous as is dedicated to The Blessed Virgin Mary. Saints Quann and Brogaun were there in the early part of the 8th century. Several cures are reported from the use of the waters of the well.
Near Mamstown is a Holy Well called Toberessy "Tobar losu" at which offerings were formerly made.
In Poulmaleen in the same townsland is 'Clarin an Aiprinn' a quarry like depression.
There are five in the district of Clasmore St. Mochan, St. Bartholemer, St. Bridget at Ardsallagh. Tobar Udacra The Well of Penance.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:26
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17. Its a long road that has no turning.
18. It is better to be fighting than be lonely.
19. A burnt (fire) child dreads the fire.
20. The hand that rocks the cradle rules the world.
21. He laughs best who laughs last.
22. The more the merrier.
23. While the cats away the mice can play.
24. If you cant do a good turn dont do a bad one.
25. Constant rubbing wears a stone.
26. Its an ill wind that blows nobody good.
27. There is no use crying over spilt milk.
28. She would steal the cross of an asses back.
29. She would take the starch out of your collar and come back for the blue.
30. It would freeze the Danes.
31. A closed mouth and a wise head.
32. A blind man is a bad judge of colours.
33. There is no help or cure against death.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:21
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Cross field,
The yellow field,
The rotten field,
The flax field,
The kilnfield
The coalfield,
The panfield,
The crosspark,
The redbarn field,
The Drombuidhe,
The Burrow,
The Basket field,
The Crock Mainntac,
The Well field,
The quarry field,
The shop field,
Tenant's House field,
Glenageag,
Bawn Hill.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:20
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Mills were a very respectable family and connected with Daltons by marriage
When the Ormonds settled down in Carrick they established the linen woolen and blanket industry in the town. The raw material coming from Belgium Italy and France.
From the year 1500 to 1800 weaving and flannel were important industries and about 11000 men were employed in the work.
The Malchomsons established a cotton factory in 1775 employing about 1000 people but after some years it declined. In its place a large creamery arose whose butter and cheese making flourished until 1922.
In 1767 Arthur Young the celebrated English traveller and author visited Carrick and found it one of the greatest manufacturing towns in Ireland principally for "ratteens. The manufacture was on the increase and flourished there, he found between 3000 and 4000 people employed by it in the town and neighbourhood.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:19
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The Island field
The Rubble
Shreag- (sleeping flax)
Croppinger
Cloughrea
Parknaleen (flax)
Kingearth
Longishthan
Relongishehan
The Drain field
The Black field
The Garryagh
The Garrybeg
The Molly
The Commons
The Crogh
The Bunfield
The Forge field
The Curragh
Paircanaoidh
The Bleach
The Planting
The Angle
The Slang
The Lane
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2019-11-15 10:15
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The Paddock
The Forest field
The Aule field
The Moate field (moat)
THe Turnpike field
The Crooked Corner
Cup + Saucer Hill (shape)
Millrace field
Turn field
Orchard field
Night field (sheds)
The twelve acres
Loughandubh
Parkaform
Shraghwee
Tubbarlubbar
Growbeg
Crockgarroch
Reask
Lugadhor
Sasan
Cloverhill field
Paircnapisha (vetches)
Ballinacreag
Splinknacuarca
Ganderfield
Gattymore
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2019-11-15 10:08
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and so do suit and service to the courts-keel and court-baron of the said Charles Earl of Arran for his heirs and assignees to be held for the manor of Carrick when and as often as duly summoned there at shall and will from time to time and at all times hereafter do service and resort with all his and other corn, grain and grist which shall be spent on the premises or any part thereof to the Manor Mill of Carrick and there grind the same.
On the 7th November 1723 Redmond Norris conveyed the Mills and its appurtances to Sir John Osbourne of Sir John's Road and on July 18th 1724 Sir John conveyed it to James Dallon of Passage in Co Waterford It remained in the possession of the Salton family until 1863 and was worked until recently as cornmills by the late James Wallace.
Another Mill of these was owned by the Kennedy family and was purchased from the late Mr Charles Dowley clerk of Carrick Union by Mr John O'Connell Lough Street. The owners of the above
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:06
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Bull rushes were (made) got and skinned. The pith was then dipped in grease which was in a Grisset and were left to dry for two or three nights in a Lasset. One was then taken out and put in a crow's bill and only a little was let burn at a time. A small bit of skin was left on the bottom of the rush.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:05
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Every farmer had a griddle and on it bread was baked and wheaten straw was burnt under it to bake it and the cake was so big it was cut in two and turned.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 10:03
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If you want to see football around County Meath,
By a team that's untrained but not lacking in speed
Well you know where's Dunshaughlin and from that its three miles
To see Pelletstown 'Reds' 'would be well worth your while.
II
They can also play hurley you need not be surprised
But somehow the lately got disorganised
The cancelled the croskie for football instead
With "Hawkins" in saddle they have nothing to dread.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:59
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Bull rushes were got and skinned. The pith was then dipped in grease which was in a Grisset and were left to dry for two or three nights in a Lasset. One was then taken out and put in a Crow's Bill and only a little was let burn at a time. A small bit of skin was left on the bottom of the rush.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:55
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turned.
Long - ago a fair was held in Warrenstown where Mr. Shaw public house is situated and the fair-green is still to be seen. The fair green at that time was owned by Mr. J. Closkey. The fair was always held on a New Year's Day. My father was at the last fair in it, and it is forty years ago. There were very few in the last fair, there was a sale for pigs, sheep, and cattle. He was let in free but he had so much on every head of cattle when he was coming out.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:51
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Every farmer had a griddle and on it bread was baked and wheaten straw was burnt under it to bake it and the cake was so big it was cut in two and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:49
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1. The cave is closed and nobody will interfere with it. A few years ago a bullock of Mr Leonards fell into it and was killed. None of his workmen would get it out, so the roof in which he fell through was re-fixed.
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2019-11-15 09:49
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The churn used in olden times was very different from that used at the present day. It stood on the ground and was shaped like a creamery can, but was made of timber with a hoop around it.
There was a hole in the cover, and a timber stick was stuck down through this hole. This was worked up and down to churn the butter. What the butter was made, it was washed, and salted, and if
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:49
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wound up the ball again, the man kept the end caught until he was quite near her. Then she confessed that it was she who had being taking his butter all along and in payment she gave him tow of her cows.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:48
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use of stones and slates for other buildings. The steeple still remains.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:47
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There was a Catholic church in Knockmark the foundation of which is still to be seen. It was destroyed by Cromwell. A Protestant church and school for boys was built soon after. All the boys from Drumree both Catholic and Protestant used to attend the school. The Church Body sold the church because there were no Protestants to attend service there Mr. Thomas Leonard bought the church and demolished it, and made
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:47
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Riddles.
It's deep and it's damp and it's wet on the bank and its fit for the lord of the lady. Turf.
Aunty Naughty built a ship an' on that ship her daughter lay. An' I'd be blamed to tell her name. An' thats three times I've told it _ anne.
I know a man with a long tail. He goes in and out the gap 40 times a day. Each time he leaves a bit of his tail after him. Needle & Thread.
It flies high, hops low, wears shoes and has none _ A football.
Under fire, over fire and never -tough- touches fire. A cake in a pot-oven.
A cake with all the crumbs around it (moon & starts)
Four legs up and four legs down: soft in the middle and hard all round - (a bed)
As I went up the boreen I met my uncle Tony
He had an iron and steel Toes and upon my word he'd frighten the crows _ (a gun)
As I went up the boreen I carried the boreen on my back _ (a ladder)
It's as black as ink and ink it isn't
It's as white as milk and milk it isn't
It hops on the road like a marble stone
And a marble stone it isn't (A magpie)
Na trí rudaí is luaithe san bfairrge _ rath rón agus ronnach
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:43
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by and as it was passing a drop of blood got on his breast.
The reason why the owl never comes out only at night is because
One day the birds said they would choose a king. The owl won to be king but the other birds did not agree to it and the pecked his feathers off and that is why he says hoo - hoo with the cold
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:40
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builds no nest at all but lays its eggs in another bird's nest. The wren builds in a low bush. The lark makes her nest in the grass or in a low wall. The corncrake makes her nest in a meadow. The thrush builds on a bank or in shady trees.
The weather is going to be wet if swallows fly low.
When the curlews are crying we are also going to have bad weather. It is said the reason the robin has a red breast is because when our Lord was dying the robin passed
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:37
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up a little party dance.
The customs that are followed redarding St Brigid are. On this Saints feast day the people make a cross called the "Saint Brigid Cross" and put it on the roof of the houses, and by doing this the cross is supposed to keep away all misfortunes from the place.
On St Patricks Day the people wear harpes and shamrock to honour this Saint, and they hold dances and Patterns to honour him too.
The custom that is connected with Shrove Tuesday is pancake making. All the people make panmake on this day and put a ring in them, and boy or girl who is lucky enough to find it is supposed to be married by
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:33
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When the wild geese fly from the North towards the South
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:33
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Whatever points the wind blows from on November Day, it will come from that point the greater part of the winter.
"The wind form the east
Isn't good for man or beast"
"When the north wind does blow
we shall have snow "
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:32
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away.If goats are up the hills.If the fog goes out the hill in the morning.Cattle turned with their heads to the wind.Swallows flying high.If Keeper Hill is clear.
Signs of Fine Weather from the conduct of Animals..
Swallows flying high, Robins on the top of a bush.Goats going up the hills.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:32
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Some girl has the "Tig" and runs after all the rest. Whoever she tips will then have it.
In "Hide and Seek" one girls blinds in a corner and the others hide. When everyone is hid the girl goes to look for them. The last one who is caught has to go into the corner to blind.
For "High Gates" all the children get in a big ring with their hands up in the shape of gates. One counts and whoever the count falls on has to run after her in and out through the same gates. If she is able to catch her she will be counter next time.
In "Stuck" on child runs after all the others and where she tips anyone they will have to stand until another tips them and releases them.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:32
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A clear sky. A red sky when the sun is setting.If the hills seem far
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:31
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A circle round the moon.Soot falling down the chimney. Smoke in the kitchen. A new moon on its back. A red sky in the morning near Borrisoleigh. Lines out of the sun in the evening.The wind blowing strongly from Borrisoleigh or Garryglass. A fog coming in over the hills of Glenbreeda. A fog on Keeper Hill.If the hills appear to be near.If the clouds look black.
Swallows flying low.Seagulls flying inland.Dogs eating grass and drinking water.Bats sitting with their backs to the fire. Goats coming down from the hills. Cattle turned with their backs to the wind.Frogs coloured black.Dogs sleeping during the day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:29
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Once upon a time two men made a bet that they would walk round a church-yard at midnight on All Souls Night when the ghosts of the dead are supposed to be going about.Then the night came on which they were to do it. So they started from the gate of the churchyard, each was to walk all around the graveyard and meet at the gate again.
One of the men was only gone half ways when he fell over a big white man as he thought.He was very frightened and he got up and began to run.Then he looked back to see if the fearful
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:29
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for the resurrection."
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2019-11-15 09:26
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special colour. Two are picked out the angel and the devil as they are called. They have to guess the colours in their turns. Whoever the colour is will have to run and the angel or devil after her.
When all are out the two sides pull.
Clock is much the same as Colours but it is the time you have to guess. If anyone guesses the correct time they will have to run after the clock and if they catch her they can be the clock themselves.
In "Steps" one goes a considerable distance away from the rest and turns her back. The others try to come over as far as her step by step. If she turns around and catches them moving they will have to go back again. Whoever catches her first without she seeing them will win.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:21
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of sores.
Hemlock is a cure also for the yellow jaundice.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:21
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Long ago the people had no lamps as we at home have at present, but instead they used rush candles. Rushes were peeled and dipped in grease. When peeling from top to bottom every second piece of the green skin was left on so that it would not
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:19
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a cure for reducing swelling.
Buachaill a tighe grows on the sides of houses and it is a cure for sore eyes.
"Cumphrey" is a cure of the Cumphrey is cleaned and scraped and applied to the sore.
White Clover is said to be a cure for the yellow jaundice.
Crubh Phádraig grows in any kind of land, and it is a cure for any kind
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:17
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potatoes by peeling and scraping the potatoes and sqeezing the juice out of them. That juice was boiled and put into boiling water for starching clothes.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:16
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Thistles, docks, and nettles grow in the best of land. Clover grows in bad land. Fearbán, Moss, Vetches, Seamsógs, in bad land and wet land.
Chicken-Weed grows on the tops if houses and it is
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:14
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with clay from the dikes.
The potatoes sprayed to keep the blight away.
It was old custom in the village to use a wooden plough. It was made of wood except the coulter and sock.
The names of the potatoes we grow are Dates, Kerr Pinks, Aran Banners, Aran Chiefs, Golden Wonders, Flounders, Paddy Regans.
Long ago people made starch from
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:12
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Ploughs that are mostly used in our district at present.
The farmer sets the potatoes in ridges and sometimes in drills.
The land is ploughed into ridges first. Then there is a hole made with a spade on the ridge, and the slit is placed into it. Then the manure is put on it and after that they are covered
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:10
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is believed to cure the disease. Another cure for Whooping Cough is to go to a ferret and bring milk. The milk undrunk by the ferret is taken home and is given to the patient to drink and it is said he will get all right.
To boil nettles and drink the juice is a cure for measles.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:08
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the best day of all. Thursday for losses, and Friday for crosses, and Saturday no luck at all.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:07
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these are some old cures I heard from my grandmother.
Whooping Cough - If the parent of friends of the child meets a man on a steel grey horse, he asks him for a cure and whatever cure the man gives is the cure which
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:04
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couple to walk in the door of their home together. It is said that if they did not one would die before the other.
After the couple came out of the church it was the custom to throw flowers and rice at them for luck.
May is an unlucky month for marriages. This is an old rhyme in connection with marriages. "Monday for health, Tuesday for wealth, Wednesday
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 09:01
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When a boy or girl were going to get married some one used to throw the tongs or an old shoe after them for luck.
They used to ride on the horses to the church, the bride used to ride on the same horse as the best man, and the bride groom used to ride with the bridesmaid.
It was the custom for the married
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 08:59
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rain.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 08:59
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blows from the east it is a sure sign of rain, From the west storm or hailstones, from the north frost.
If the smoke from the chimney soars straight from the chimney it foretells fine weather.
If the cat sits with his back to the fire and when the dog eats grass it is the sign of rain.
When the cattle stand with their backs to the wind it is a another sign of
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 08:56
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When the sky appears to be like a mackeral we are sure to have rain.
On a fine day if the hills are "looking" near it is the sign of rain.
If the floor is damp in bad weather it is the sign of long drying
If the clouds are dark it is the sign of rain.
When the wind
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 08:54
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fluich.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 08:54
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gcruth taoibhe aille
"Garradha - phortcaigh" a tugann ar an bpáirc seo mar portach do bhí ann fadó.
"Cloch an t-sagairt" a tugtar ar páirc eile, mar dubradh gur shuidhe Naomh Pádraig ar cloich innte thar-éis a bheith ag teacht ó Coillte-Mac. Tháinin sagart a dearchadh air annsin.
"Stang" an t-ainm atá ar páirc eile atá againn, mar gheall ar an méidh talamh atá innte agus bíonn sé bog
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 07:43
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Paper.
This in the corner twice and in the room once. The letter R.
Why is a shoemaker's shop like hell. With bad soles.
What is under and over the fire. A cake in an oven.
I went into a wood, I got it, I sat down to look for it and could not find it. A thorn.
A car of people went over a bridge and not a single one in it. All married.
What is the strongest animal in the world. A snail because he carries his
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 07:39
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thread on? "Carpets"
What smells most in a perfumers shop? "The nose"
'Tis red, 'tis yellow 'tis valuable green the king cant come at it nor neither the Queen? "A rainbow"
Corrections
emerald green,
Weather Lore
If the sun goes down red in the evening it is a sign that the next day will be fine.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 07:35
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but the English thought they would run home. If they ran home the english would kill the people in the house. When the lambs ran there is a little stream of water running there now into the sea. When the people heard it they said it must be a miracle.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 07:33
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago when England was ruling Ireland England allowed no priest to say Mass or any person who would go to hear Mass would be put to death.
In west Kerry among the wild places where no body lived then were three young lambs eating grass. A priest and about twenty people went to hear Mass in the wild place. When they were just ready to hear Mass they heard a great noise coming towards them. All the people ran away home because they knew it was the english coming to kill them.
The three young lambs ran when they saw such a large number of people. The English followed the three young lambs. The lambs ran to the sea
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 07:28
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a man long ago and he went to a dance. It was late when he was returning. On his way home he had to cross a fort and he heard beautiful music inside in the fort and he sat down on the fence to listen to the music. After a while he began to play the tunes. When he went for going home he could not go. In the morning he was allowed to go. When he went home he went to bed. They went for the priest and the priest said that he would die and after a week he died.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 07:24
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but went again and told the priest. The priest asked two of the fellows to come to the forge with himself. They went and the priest stayed walking outside the forge. The ghost appeared and asked the two boys in, which they did. The priest keeping watch outside. The ghost gave the sledge to one of the boys and asked him to knock out a stone in the wall, which he did. When the stone fell out there was a box hid inside and it was full of gold and silver. The smith told them that he was coming there for a great number of years and he got no one to take this trouble from me. All I want to do is to pay something I owe to people out of this money and to get two Masses offered for my soul and my trouble will be over me then and when this much is done the remainder of this money to be divided
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 07:03
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between you both as reward for you kindness.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 06:00
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago a smith lived near Abbeyfeale. He had a forge near his dwelling house. He died and another smith bought the forge. Some time after the smith dying he appeared outside the forge door every night with a sledge in his hand. Anybody would not go near the forge after dark they were so frightened of him. They went to the Parish Priest and told him of the Ghost of the smith and how all the neighbours had been frightened by him. The priest laughed and said it was all only imagination. After a time some fellow was passing the way half drunk from Whiskey. He had courage and asked the ghost what was keeping him there and the ghost said "come into the forge with me". Again he got frightened and would not go into the forge
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 05:54
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
One night three men dreamt of a crock of gold being under the ground. The following morning when the men got up they got ready to dig for the gold. After they digging for three days they found a big flat stone and it took three days more to get up the stone And there was another big flat stone under the stone they took out. It took three more days to lift that one. They could only see a big hole then. The next night they dreamt that they should dig ten feet more to get the gold. So they dug away till they met another flat stone. One of the men "we will never lift that stone". After three days they lifted the stone and got the crock of gold. They divided the money and became rich men.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 05:49
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brought a butcher from Listowel and he took away the cow. The cow was seen going into the fort in the land and often came out milked.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 05:47
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
A farmer was living in Behins some time ago. His son lives there still. He had twelve cows. In Summer time his butter got bad and could not get anyone to buy it from him. When he could not get the butter right he sent for the priest to say Mass in the house and told him about his butter. When Mass was over the priest examined the dairy where he kept his milk and butter and he found out it was very bad. He ordered the cows to be stalled. He went into the stall and began to read a book. He remarked one cow and asked him how long had he that cow. "Only this year" said he "and from my uncle I brought her". The priest said "When you milk the cow throw away her milk where anything couldn't come at it and do away with the cow as soon as you can". Next fair day in Listowel he went to the field to get the cow but she was crippled and could not stand. Out in the day he went to see the cow and she was as lively as any other cow in the field. The next fair it was just the same. He
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 05:40
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Three comrade boys on Xmas Eve decided to go hunting on Xmas day the weather being frosty and very suitable for hunting. Two of the boys having gone to Mass called to their comrade he having home work to do did not go to Mass. After Mass the three went hunting. They were not long hunting when they started a hare. They followed her until evening. Two of the boys turned home and the third boy continued on and would not come home with them. He said he would hold after it until he would kill it. The hare went into a dis-used house in the mountain and he followed it. His comrades searched for him the next day and they found him in the house dead. The day of the funeral as they were nearing the churchyard the hare jumped up on the coffin and squeaked three times saying "you are damned you gave up Mass for sport". People should always go to Mass no matter what their work is.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 05:39
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up into a lake and drowned her.
There is a wood near my townland, in the townland of Shannow, and there is a big stone in it, and it is propped up by two little stones, and it is said that if you hit it with another stone you will be turned into an animal.
I got these stories from Mrs R E Smith,
Clarebawn, Cavan.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 05:32
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was once residence of a noble gentleman named Bell, who is now dead. There was a strange story told about this residence. It is that a coach, known as The Dead Coach, leaves from the back gate of the residence, every night at 12 o'clock. It is drawn by two horses, and it is said that the horses have no heads and the coachman is dressed in full uniform, and the coach is beautifully lighted up. It goes about two miles, and turns back, disappeared at the same gate from where it started.
A strange story is told, about an avenue in my district. Known as Corrakane Avenue, and it is said that a black dog walks this avenue every night, with a ball of fire in his mouth.
There is a lake in my district called Cormseer. It was once a small well, and there is a story told, that a woman was washing clothes on May Eve. When she was leaving to go home the well sprung
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 05:32
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
was once residence of a noble gentleman named Bell, who is now dead. There was a strange story told about this residence. It is that a coach, known as The Dead Coach, leaves from the back gate of the residence, every night at 12 o'clock. It is drawn by two horses, and it is said that the horses have no heads and the coachman is dressed in full uniform, and the coach is beautifully lighted up. It goes about two miles, and turns back, disappeared at the same gate from where it started.
A strange story is told, about an avenue in my district. Known as Corrakane Avenue, and it is said that a black dog walks this avenue every night, with a ball of fire in his mouth.
There is a lake in my district called Cormseer. It was once a small well, and there is a story told, that a woman was washing clothes on May Eve. When she was leaving to go home the well sprung
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 05:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
was once residence of a noble gentleman named Bell, who is now dead. There was a strange story told about this residence. It is that a coach, known as The Dead Coach, leaves from the back gate of the residence, every night at 12 o'clock. It is drawn by two horses, and it is said that the horses have no heads and the coachman is dressed in full uniform, and the coach is beautifully lighted up. It goes about two miles, and turns back, disappeared at the same gate from where it started.
A strange story is told, about an avenue in my district. Known as Corrakane Avenue, and it is said that a black dog walks this avenue every night, with a ball of fire in his mouth.
There is a lake in my district called Cormseer. It was once a small well, and there is a story told, that a woman was washing clothes on May Eve. When she was leaving to go home the well sprung
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 05:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I live in Clarebawn, the same townland as Kathleen Hyland who gave an account of it in the previous composition. I heard most of the stories she related, but I can tell another couple. One is that there is a lake near my townland and it is said that there was a ghost settled in the lake, and each year a white foam forms over the lake, and settles into one corner where the ghost is supposed to be.
Another strange story is told that when anyone is dying in the neighbourhood, a large white bird visits the lake for about three weeks, and at its departure someone dies.
There is in my district a place known as Drumheel, which
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-15 04:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One day he took leave of his parents and started inland. He was walking through a wood one day and he met a dead sheep, and a rook, and a hound were arguing about it. They asked the boy to divide the sheep between them. He did so and as a reward for his kindness the rook pulled a feather off his back and gave it to him, saying that if he was ever in trouble this would help him. The hound pulled a hair off his tail and gave it to him saying "If you ever be in trouble this will help you.
He then struck himself with the feather, and he turned himself into a rook, and flew off to Cork. All the people were amazed to see a rook perch upon the windows, and they tried to catch him but failed. One rich lady opened the highest window in her house, and laid crumbs on the window stool. When the bird saw the bread he pitched on the window stool, and when he found that the window was open he went in, no sooner did he touch the floor than he turned into a man again
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-15 03:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long, long ago there lived in Hare Island, a very very poor fisherman. He hadn't any way of supporting himself and his wife but by fishing. He fished day and night, but caught no fish. One day he went out fishing, but caught none and when evening came, he said that the best thing he could do was to drown himself. He spoke it out loud, and all of a sudden a mermaid rose up out of the water, and spoke to him. He told her his story, and she told him to come again on the following day, and that he would catch a salmon, and to take it home to his wife to cook and that the two of them should eat it. She also told him that a son would be born to them, but that she would claim him at the age of twenty one. Everything happened just as she had said, and when he was growing up, everyone told him and when he was nearing twenty one years, he resolved to run away from her.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 03:31
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
away as fast as he could. Then another man that was keeping in the stock saw him and he put a stick in under the horses two front legs and he didn't. He rode around the fair three times and he could get out and every one trying to stop him. There was a man at that fair and he had a coach and and four horses pulling it and his name was Minor Young. He was going out of the fair all the people were trying to stop Thomas Quinn and Minor Young shouted "clear the way clear the way" and then all the people had to get out of his way. Then Thomas Quinn went out one side of Minor Yound and he never stopped until he went into Ballinlough. Then the cattle were sold and the rent was paid and the rest of the cattle were sent back to the land again. That night he put his horse back again at the hour of twelve o'clock.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 03:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
It was first an old sand pit and a last no sand was taken out of it. Then the people decided to make a fair-green of it. The first fair that was ever held in it was a sale, and the owner of the land hadn't the rent paid for his land and he [?] had a hundred and fifty cattle grazing belonged to other people. Then when he hadn't his rent paid the people that he was paying it to made him. He had horses and cattle, sheep and goats grazing and they were to be sold. They had people paid to keep in the cattle so that any man couldn't bring his own stock away. There was a mad named Thomas Quin and his little mare was to be sold. He went near her and he pretended to be going to buy her and he began to praise her. Then the man that held her began to talk to another man, and he became careless. Thomas Quinn the jumped on the horse and rode
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 03:22
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time a man was going to a fair at three o'clock in the morning and he had two bashets on the ass and he had a lamb in each bashet be they wouldn't be able to walk to the fair. He was passing by a fort and two little men came out of it and they frightened the ass and the lambs fell out of the baskets and they brought the ass and bashets with them. He they drove the two lambs to the fair and he sold them. He was telling his story to a man and then the two men came up the street with the ass and bashets and one of them said "thanks" and the other said "thank you". That happened at the fair of Ballinlough in the County Galway.
About sixty years ago a fair was held in a big hole in Peter Poone's hill about two hundred cattle would fitt in it. That fair lasted a hundred years and two fairs every years one in Summer and one in Winter.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 03:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The best time of the year to sell pigs is in April or in May. When a man would have a saleabale cow he would go to the fair to sell her. He would say that he would want ten pounds and the buyer would give only nine pounds then a man would come and he would divide the difference and the man would get nine pound ten shillings for his cow. The buyer would keep a shilling out of the money the man would get as a luck-penny. When the man would be buying a beast he would mark the beast so that no other man could buy that beast. This is how the dealers do mark a beast, they do cut the hair off their flanks with a scissors. When a country man would be buying a cow he would dip the tip of his stick in mud to mark the cow and so that anyone couldn't take the butter off her
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 03:13
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
In Williamstown every year there are many fairs held, pig fairs, and cattle sheep and horse fairs.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 03:11
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
to the forge visiting and if they would bring a horse-nail from the forge and to put it in a horse shoe it would be luckey if you would have a black cat in the house. There was a forge on the road from hear to Danmore owned by Patrick Tully. This man used to work very late every night and very early in the morning. One night as he worked late a man came into his forge and told him to shoe his horse. The blacksmith made four shoes and cut the horse's hooves. When he was cutting the hooves of the horse he cut his finger and when he did he put a piece of cloth on it. When he had the horse shod the man stayed a while with him and when it was twelve o'clock the man said that he would come home. He told the blacksmith not to work so late any other night in the forge and when he went he stood out side and the smith looked after him and the horse had only three legs.Written by Michael Tarmey Clomahara Williamstown
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 03:06
ceadaithe
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There is a forge in Polea owned by Peter Noone. It was a dance hall first where the people of the village used to be every night telling stories. At last they got tired of going to this hall and they stoped. Then Peter made a forge for his son of it and he is working in it yet. Some people say that it is luckey to bring a horse nail from the forge. There was a forge in Kilmore long ago and every Summer the blacksmith used to go to England and before he would go he used to leve the bellows in the barn. Every night when his wife used to be giving hay to the cows she used to see a man sitting on the bellows until he would come home in the Winter. He thought some-one would steal the bellows if he left it in the forge although it was not hight to take it off. The blacksmiths used to make spades and ploughs and harrows and used to put tines on the wheels of carts. The blacksmith has a lot of tools he has three hammers and three sledges and a two knife to cut the hooves of the horses and donkeys. He has two rasps also. He is a very strong man because he has a fine pair of arms. Long ago the people used to go every night
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 02:59
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are many forges in the parish of Williamstown but the nearest one is James Shally. His forge is made of big stones and roofed with slates. This forge is very big and there is a big bellows in it. Just at the end of the fire. There is a cure in the water of it for warts. There was a forge in Polredmond some time ago owned by John Roche. When the people used to be walking to Dublin from Mayo they used to rest there and tell stories round the fire-side of the forge. Then they would go the rest of the way next day. There was a forge in Cloomahara owned by Michael Joyce. The people of the village used to call him an [?] and they used to call his wife Maire an [?] and she had chrams. If any body would come to the forge and if they had any thing to do or to fix in in the forge she would she would give them charms for a headake. This forge is made near a stream and near a crossroads. Long ago the people used to shoe the cattle. This shoe was not the same as a horse shoe it was made of steel. There was three pieces of steel in the bottom of it and it would not let them slide.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 02:38
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Maire Ní Sheibhlin a d-aithris an ceann seo (7) ar leanamuint - agus í ar freastail scoile na Breacadh. Ó bhean Phaidí Uí Dhomhnaill (a fuair Máire í) atá na chomhnuidhe ar Sceadaman, baile ar chois na scoile.
(ó'n bhun-shruth céadna uimhreaca 10 agus 12)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 02:30
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VII
‘Se do bheatha na tíre seo a Chití bheag álainn óg
Is gur bean de d’ainm a bhí tamall san ait seo rómhat
Bhí fial flaitheamhail san nidh a ghlacfas do láimh go deo
Bí do cheann mhaith do na leinbh tabhair na mathara dóibh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 02:30
ceadaithe
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IV
A dhearbhrathair dhílis dá bhfeichfea san teampall í
Bhí ríbíní uaithne anuas fa’ an cheann oirthi
Bhí ‘ach dlaoidh dá gruaig ‘na dualach ‘na [triopsigh?] bhuidhe
Ach is sé ma sgéal truaighe nach bhfuair mé cainnt aicí
V
Nach mór mo thuirse a’s mé coimhéad an árdain dúinn
Mar i n-iúl go [bhfeifinn?] mo Chití [no?] scáil a cinn
Cúl trom triopallach feadhmannach dealrach donn
Siúd mo thriall chugaibh ní fhuil Cití Ní Ghadhra liom
VI
Cuirimid tharainn an tSamhain go néadtrom caoin
Is gearr uainn an Nodhlaig ní fhéadaim a bheith gan mhnaoi
Tá an lá beag oirid a’s is fada liom féin an oichche
Pillimid ‘na baile ionnsair ár gcailín beag féin airís
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 02:28
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Cití Ní Ghadhra
Tá an Éirne ar buile a’s an tSionainn go léir faoi smúid
Ó d’éag sí an bhruinneal bhí cumasach lán de’n stuaim
A leithéid níor geineadh ó Dhoire go hÁrainn Mhóir
‘Sé mo léan mar d’imthigh sí Cití Ní Ghadhra uaim
II
Tá dá thaoibh an tighe gan caoi a’s a lár gan dóigh
Ó d’imthigh mo nighean ‘sé sílim go [deachaid?] oirthi fóid
Gruaidh dhearg mar grísg ná dteidh oirthi smál go deo
Tá an arraing dá mo chlaoidh, ní saoghalach mé ráithche beo
III
Cití gheal mhín nach aoibhinn duit-se gach lá
I bhFlaithis na Naomh an áit ab ‘fuil na mílte anam gan smál
Ní mar sin a bhím ach ag íoc mo chortha gach lá
‘Gus ins an talamh ‘na luighe tá mo mhian a’s mo charaid thar mnáibh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 00:32
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
For to day was the day of the contest
Between the Campile boys and Taghmon
We smoked and we joked on together
For two or three miles of the road
We came to a racked looking mansion
Which was called Gort Tighe Lin Ól
Twas there we got whiskey and brandy
And
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 00:30
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
(3) Long ago football and hurling were played in a different way to what they are played to-day. Instead of playing from goal to goal as they do nowadays they played from ditch to ditch.
Thirty years ago one of the roughest matches of the day was played in Foulksmills between a team from Taghmon and another from Campile. The match which lasted for two and a half hours was supposed to be the roughest ever played in the district.
They fought and hurt each other until there was only two men were left on the field. Campile taking the victory by four "overs" to three. The following is a song composed in rememberance of the match.

"Last Sunday morning as the birds in the trees they did sing
I bundled my old brogues together and made my way down to Foulksmills,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 00:22
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The Pound
The Field above the pound
The hill
The plant Garden
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 00:21
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The follwoing are other names of fields in Brownsford:-
"Hill of Howth"
Strong a Lis pro. laize(?)
Cruictín
Bán-a-Mhuillinn (pro. Bán a William) there was a mill on the stream at end of this field
Bán a Milis
Leath-Ghleann - called also Leath Ile (Leathhile)
The Ráth
The Ráth Muilín

In the West of Ireland - townland of Benada, Farm owned at present by Peter McGloin, " called Oileán Bán, along river Moy,
Crucán (meaning cnucán hilly) a Cháite, (Katie's hilly field)
Machaire Lín
Sraith
Páirc Bán (contained small daisies and clover)
Garraidhe Dubh
Garraidhe Aire Curcán ( Cúrcán is Irish Name for Durcan)
Garrana Stoughithe (I dont know meaning)
Lúbach
Other fields had English names:-
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 00:10
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Then there is the story of a poor couple who had to live on the milk of one cow.
In order to be kind to the husband the wife boiled the milk into whey, and gave the curds to the husband, drinking the whey herself. She tried to fill him, and so satisfy his hunger: but the curds killed him as nothing can be more indigestible than curds.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-15 00:08
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
I dont known why people look on poverty and want as a disgrace, but people do so even now: it used to be common to hear "I always had "me(?) nough to ate".
And New Year's night was called "The night of the big 'nough", and they said if anybody had enough to eat that night, they would have enough during every night of the year.
But as children we were told that if we did anything such as to cry on New Yrs Day we would cry every day until the year was over.

During the Famine Period in this district I've been told that a strange hunger was on all the people: even those who had plenty of food to eat. Their food was mainly oatmeal porridge, they grew oats and got it ground into meal, and often they could not wait for the porridge to boil: they used often have it eaten out of the pot before it was boiled. A dread of starvation had seized them I expect.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 23:55
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
It was an old custom in this district to go round the fields on May morning and gather all the young rowan tree quicks. Out of each quick a ring was made. One of these rings along with a piece of red rag and a horse-shoe nail was tied to each cow's tail. This was done to prevent the cow being "blinked" by the fairies or by people with an evil eye. Evil-minded people used to walk through the fields on May morning carrying a "Sugan" or straw rope and by saying certain magic words they could take the milk from their neighbours' cows or the butter from the churn. It was necessary therefore to make use of the rowan trees and other things to prevent this.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 23:49
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
It is said that if a person washed his or her face in "south-running water" and then dried it with a towel while looking into a glass he or she would see their future husband or wife.

Yarrow is also pulled on this night and placed under the pillow to dream on. From the time of pulling the person must not speak again before sleeping. During sleep he or she will have a dream in which the future wife or husband will be seen.
Yarrow is the name given locally to the plant called Milfoil. The following verse is recited when pulling the Yarrow.
"Yarrow Yarrow tell to me
Who my future wife will be"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 23:42
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a well ag Glennan still called Tobar Padraig and it is said that it flows over every Easter Eve. St. Patrick is supposed to have baptised the people of this district in this well at the time he founded the church in the old graveyard at Donagh.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 23:38
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Supplied by Margaret Furfey, Annabeg Glaslough. Told by her father Edward Turfey aged about 65 yrs who heard it from his grandmother, a native of Tyholland parish.
This story was current about 80 years ago.

There was a very remarkable fort in the townland of Tirravera near Glaslough. It was called Dubh Fort and was the home of the fairies who were seen on several occasions by the neighbours who say that they were very small little people.
Once upon a time there was a man named Brian Hickey who lived beside the fort. He was a stone mason. He started one day to cut a "lone" bush which was growing in the field near the fort. It was very hard to cut and he only got half way through it the first day. After dark that night as he was going to the well for water there
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 23:37
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
came a shower of stones on him and he ran home shouting "if you let me off this time my son and I will build a wall round the bush and leave in as good a way of growing as it was before". The next day Hickey did as he promised and the bush remains there still with the wall around it.
On then next night when the potatoes were boiled for the supper they were put in a shallow basket (Scrag) outside the door to cool. After a few minutes Mrs Hickey went out to take them in and she found that the basket potatoes and all were gone. She was very angry but Brian said "let the good people take them and say nothing". Next morning to their astonishment they found the basket back in the same place full of gold and silver.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:53
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhí fear ann fadó agus rug sé greim ar Lioprachán agus dubhairt sé leis cróca óir a tabhairt do no go marbheóchadh sé é. Ceangail an fear an lioprachán go dtí a leabaidh ar feadh cúpla lá, acht ní thuibradh sé an cróca óir do. Lá amháin tosuig an lioprachán ag gáire agus bhí an fear ar tí é a mharbhuigheadh, nuair a dibhairt se go raibh an cróca óir faoi'n doras. Fuair an fear é, agus bhí áthas mór air annsin mar bhí go leor airgid aige.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:49
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[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:49
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CBES_0137E_01
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:48
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[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:48
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Bhí fear ó Cheathramhadh_An_Yisge, agus oidhche amháin bhí sé ag imirt cártaí i dteach comhursain. Nuair a tháinig a dó dhéag a chlog d'Fhosgaileadh doras an tighe, agus chonnaic na fir do bhí ag imnirt Fear Dubh Faoi'n mbord.
Tháinig Faitchios mór orra, agus chuaidheadar abhaile. Bhí fear aca ag dul ar a bhealach leis féin nuair a chonnaic sé ganndal ag rith 'na dhiaidh. Rith an ganndal 'na dhiaidh gur sroic sé a theach féin. Bhí sé scannruighthe, agus on oidhche sim amach níor imirt sé cártaí. Ta an fear seo beo fós i gCheathramhadh_an_Uisge, agus ta sé ochtmogha bliadhna d'aois.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:41
ceadaithe
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hours the storm stopped and the men returned to the shore very wet and tired.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:41
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Some years ago when the large steamers used to come into Westport Quay the men had to work at night.
One night there were two men coming home from work about twelve o'clock at night. They had to pass through a wood on their way home and they were half way through when they got a fright.
They saw a beautiful woman dressed in white walking towards them. They knew at once this was not a human being so they stood.
At last one man picked
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:37
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up his courage and said, "Good night", and as he did this woman disappeared. The men got frightened and went home quickly.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:36
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different way. Some of the old people say that if he had waited for these men to come as far as him they would have made him carry the coffin with them. When they would go some distance they would have him carry the coffin by himself.
That man lived over twenty years afterwards but he never went that way again either in daylight or dark, because he never wanted to see the three men again.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:34
ceadaithe
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This story was told to me by an old man that lives in our village. About thirty years ago an old man who lived in the village of Cloona was going visiting to his neighbour's house one night. He had to pass through a wood on his way to the house.
When he was half way through the wood he saw three men carrying a coffin, these men were ghosts. He was so frightened at first that he did not know what to do.
At last he got back his courage and turned back, but he went to the house by a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:29
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The birds that are commonly found in the district are the robin, the Jackdaw, the swallow, the cuckoo, the wren, the lark, the corncrake, and the thrush.
The cuckoo, the swallows and the corncrakes migrate to us in April and remain here with us for about three months.
The robin generally builds in a low bush or in a hole in a low ditch. The jackdaw builds in a chimney.
The swallow builds in the eaves of houses or sheds. The cuckoo
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:26
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In "Ghost in the Garden" one girl is the ghost and sits down a distance away. All the others are children with one as their mother. The mother sends them to the garden to bring in the clothes but when they see the ghost they come running back. The mother does not believe them and sends them out again. They come back a second time and this time the mother goes with them. She asks the ghost what does he want and he says a bag of sand. What do you want the bag of sand for? To sharpen my knife and fork. What do you want the knife and fork for? To cut your throat and with that he runs after them. Whoever is caught will have to be the ghost next time.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 22:22
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The games I play are Blackman, Colours, Clock, Steps, Tig, Hide-and-seek, Highgates, Thread the (neddle) needle, Stuck, Skipping, Ghost in the garden and Here we come gathering nuts in May.
I amuse myself in special ways at certain times such as cycling or at music.
All the games are played with groups of children such as in "Blackman" one child runs after all the rest and whoever she catches has to join hands with her. Then these two run after the rest until there is a third caught. She also joins hands and the same thing is repeated over again until they are all caught.
In "Colours" everyone gets a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:36
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Irleand". It was a true prophesy as after fifteen centuries the fire of the faith which Patrick brought is still burning brightly.
St Stephen’s Day.
On Saint Stephen’s day it is a custom for the people in this district to dress themselves in old clothes and put false faces on them. They gather a good deal of money, going from house to house. They sometimes dance of the door step and when they have finished they ask for money. They have a rhyme made:
The wren, the wren, the King of all birds;
St. Stephen’s Day he was caught
In the furze.
Although he is little he’s familys
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
apple in their mouths. Then late in the night the big people take down gates, and hide them.
St Stephen’s day.
On St Stephen’s day, the children of my district go around with the wren, and gather money. They play music and sing songs at every house.
The day before St Stephen’s day, the people go around and kill the wren, then they bring him round in a match box. When they are done going round they divide the money.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
On hallow eve night the people in my district eat apples and nuts. They put an apple hanging from the ceiling, the children have to put their hands behind their backs, and try to catch the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Easter a Sunday is the day Our Lord rose from the dead. On Easter Sunday the children of my district light a fire outside, and make tea, and boil eggs. The people eat more eggs on aeaster Sunday than on any other day. All the children gather sticks on Easter eve. And then on Easter Sunday evening they light the fire. Then after a while they play football.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
On Easter Sunday all the children in this district light a big fire out-side the house and they boil eggs at it and then they tell stories around it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the people make another plum- pudding for that day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:22
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The last night of October is called Hallow Eve. The boys in this district have great sport on that night. They go around taking down gates and hiding them. The children have great sport also. They put three basins on a table. Then one child puts a handkerchief on his eyes. Then the children put a ring on one basin, water on another, and clay on the third. Then the blind-folded person goes to the table and if he puts his hand on the ring he will be married first, and if he puts his hand on the water he will cross the sea first, and if he puts his hand on the clay he will be dead first.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:21
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
They used boil cabbage and put oatmeal gruel and salt on it.
In 'Tobar" Doobally, Co. Cavan, oatmeal gruel was boiled for the poor. The boiler is still there. If you denied your religion you could get an extra allowance.
Francis Early (age 75 rs)
Eden,
Dowra,
3rd Dec 1937 Co. Leitrim
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The feast of the Epiphany is called Little Christmas Day. Nearly all
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About '47 , a man coming from Ballinamore to Ballinaglera by way of the mountain, took a hare from a weasel. The weasel followed him a distance of 3 or 4 miles and he had to throw the hare to it.
In 1847, a farm of 15 acres in Upper Annagh, Ballinaglera, was sold for 1 cut of meal.
In 1847, a farm of 12 acres was sold by a person for his "fare" to America.
People died in great numbers. One man named Keegan died in the townland of Kilgariff. There were only a few men to carry his remains to the grave. On their way to the grave-yard they became exhausted and were unable to proceed any further. Eight men who were digging saw them. They abandoned their work and carried the remains of Keegan to the grave.
Food:
Some people used to bleed the cattle, boil the blood and add oatmeal to it. They killed all the cattle they could spare.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Proverb was made, “There is no to-morrow for the sinner.”
Mind the pence and the pounds will mind themselves. You can bring a horse to the river but you can’t make him drink. If you don’t speculate you won’t accumulate. Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise. A child must creep before it walks. It’s a long road that there is no turn in. Wilful waste brings woeful want. I’ll got I’ll gone. An old thief is a good tracker. Eaten bread is soon forgotten. As the rod is bent so shall it grow.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:13
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are many different proverbs and wise sayings used in this district and each saying contains very deep meanings: Here are some of the old sayings:-
A man is a man if he was corked in a bottle. You can’t expect an old head on young shoulders. A good sum is better than a bad stand. By mistakes we learn.
There was once a man who lived in Staholmog named John Smith who was a herd with Mr Cruice of Drakerath and he was a man who used to curse very much. This man would not go to confession and when he would promise his neighbours that he would go, he would say, “I will go to-morrow.” Then the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This parish of Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim was very thickly poplulated then.
How the potato-crop failed. It was believed a light frost came in July '46. The potato decayed in the ground. All that were left in the ground wereonly about the size of beads.
In '47 the potato seds were sown broadcast like grain.
In '48 there was a "double"-crop. The oatcrop did exceedingly well.
A man named Kerrigan, who lived in Derinawillan used dig an Englihs rood for oats in a day. (March ?47) He used get a pound of oatmeal for his labour. He used boil the oatmeal , make porridge in the house of his employer before he'd go home and eat his supper there.
Kerrigan's wife used to take a hen to sell to her "opulent" neighbour. The neighbour used not take the hen but give her alms as far as he could afford to do so.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One of the feast that occur in the district is St Stephens Day on 26th Dec.. All the boys gather togther, and they dress themselves up in funny costumes wearing a mask on their faces. They go around from house to house with music, and they dance and sing, and recite the wrens song, and gather money. The actual words of the song are
The wren, the wren, the king of all birds,
St Stephens Day he was caught in the fur.
Altough he is little,
His family is great,
Rise up land lady and give us a treat.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 21:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
And if your treat be off the best
I hope in heaven your soul will rest
And if your treat be off the small
It wont agree with those little boys at all.
So up with the kettle, and down with the pan
Give us our answer and let us be gone.
My coat is tore, my boots are wore.
Following the wren three days or more,
So money he wants, and money he prays.
And if he does not get money, he will go down in the grave. The money they gather is divided evenly on all the boys, and with it they make
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I got the following little song from Mr. Hubert Forde, farmer, of Dernageer, Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim. It is a spinning-song, which he heard from his mother whose maiden name was Kitty Cullen of Glenfarne, Co. Leitrim. She died about the year 1916 and was then over 70 years of age. She used to sing this song as she spun - holding the roll of wool in one hand and working her finger up and down the thread, like a person, as he described it, "playing the fiddle". Hubert Forde is now (1938) 69 years of age.
As it is a long time since he heard this piece and, not having repeated it often since, he naturally felt it difficult to remember it. I have endeavoured to write it down as he said it but it seems to be corrupt in places.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
that day twelve months.
On ash Wednesday the people eat their fill of concannon and this is a most local costum.
It is said that on good Friday if anyone made bread, or churned, they could cure any disease.
On Easter Saturday the costom carried on is egg eating. All the people eat four or five eggs on this day. On Easter Sunday at four o'clock all the people get up to see the sun dancing with joy, because our Lord arose from the dead. On this day the people eat a lot of eggs too.
On the twenty-ninth of June bondfires are lighted. On Hallow Eve nuts, apples, and bracks are eaten. On Christmas Eve holly and ivy are hung on
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
What is it that has never been seen, felt nor heard, never existed and still has a name?
Nothing

Why is a candle-wick like Athens?
Because it is in the middle of Greece
Why is a book like a prisoner in the states of Barbary ?
Because it is bound in Morocco
As I walked down by yonder meadow,
I met my uncle Davy,
I took off his hat and drank his blood,
And left him lying easy
Bottle of Whiskey

As I looked out of younder window,
I lost my golden ring,
I saw the dead carrying the live,
And wasn't that a wonderful thing
A boat
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
If death was a thing that money could buy, the rich would live, and the poor would die.
Dont judge the book by the cover.
Looking for a needle in a pack of wool.
There is as good a bird, in the air as ever was caught.
Time and tide waits for no man.
When every house is on fire mind your own.
A small lake will sink a great
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A leaper of ditches,
A clipper of thorns,
My bonny brown cow,
With a pair of leather horns
A hare
I have a grey goose,
And she's of a large size,
And any man buys her,
He needs to be wise,
She's far from her dwelling,
And seldom comes home,
With feet in her body,
And walks upon none

A ship
The support of old age,
And where the river is shallow
Makes up a man's name,
That lives in the hollow
Stafford
The King of Morocco built a ship,
And in the ship his daugher sits,
And I'll be blamed for telling her name,
And that's three times I've told it yet
Anne
What looks most like a cat looking in a window?
A cat looking out
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
ship.
Wilful waste, woeful want.
A small spark, makes a great flame.
Take the ball at the hop.
As open-handed as Saint Bridget.
Learning is not a heavy load.
Every dog is a pup till it hunts.
I would not trust him (her) as far as i throw him (her)
Half a loaf is better than no bread.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A little pot is soon hot.
A watch kettle never boils.
Be ware of the man with the soft talk.
A cat of your age would not play with a tráithnín.
Your as rich as a Jew.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Get a little salt, put it into a saucepan and hold it at the fire until it is warm.
While it is warm put it into the hole in the tooth. Leave it there for about an hour, and then the salt will begin to melt.
When this happens all the bad water will leave the gum.
Spit out the water and your pain will be gone.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I washed my face with water,
That never was rain or ran,
And I dried it with a towel,
That never was woven or spun
The dew and the sun
Long legs father and big fat mother,
With three little children the same size.
A Pot
Two feet under and three feet overhead,
The head of the living and the mouth of the dead,
A man with a pot on his head

What is in the marrow that is not in the bone;
What is in the rock that is not in the stone;
What is in all sorts of timber but is not in the wood.
The letter r
Long legs, short thighs, little head and no eyes.
A tongs
How many cows can reach to the moon.
One if it is long enough
What man in the world wears the biggest hat
The man with the biggest head
How many sticks go to the building of a magpie's nest
None, they are all carried
Londonderry, Cork and Kerry,
Spell me that without a K
- That
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:37
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago there was a tax to be paid to the Landlord called 'Penalty Rent' It had to be paid either by money, or by giving grain.
There was a few neighbours living in a backward village, and they were poor, so they thought it too much to give anything to the Landlord but to keep it for themselves, and they resolved to kill him.
It is said a Rogue will always watch his chance, so they watched and they succeeded in killing him.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
race horse.
Because both are high bred.
What's half the moon like
The other half
How is a flea like a train
Because both run on sleepers
A bonac of bread, a fist of crumbs, riddle me that and I'll give you my thumbs.
The Moon and Stars.
There are holes in it and it can hold up water.
A Crook
I inhabit the palace, the taproom and cot,
It's a beggarly residence where I am not,
And if monarch is present- I will tell you no fable,
I am sure to be placed at the head of the table.
A Chair
From a flock without number,
I once killed a wether,
With lies and with truth I did him boil,
I turned him right quick,
With a neat little stick
That I cut from a tree off no man's soil
Ans: A salmon is the wether.
Newspapers are the lies and (h) truth
A tree that grew in a ditch between two neighbours is the stick.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Spell enemy in three letters
Foe
A large old father,
A hard working mother,
And twelve children all of the same colour
A Clock
What is the centre of gravity
The letter V
What is the difference between a school master and a train master
One minds the train and the other trains the mind
Two arms two tails a neck and no head
A shirt
Thick at the bottom,
Thin at the top,
Hair at the bottom,
And none at the top
A Cow's Horn
What goes through wood,
And through the wood,
And never touches the wood.
A Knife in a man's pocket
I have a little horse and he'd eat all the hay from this to Donegal,
But if I gave him a bucket of water he'd die
A Fire
Why is a loaf on the roof of a house like a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 20:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In former days people resorted to quacks, herbs, animals, birds, and piseógs to cure various ailments.
Goose-grease was rubbed round the mouth, externally and internally, to cure thrush.
Bread and milk left behind after feeding a ferret, is a great cure for chin-cough.
In Emly graveyard there is a well called the "Wart Well". The infected member is dipped in the water to cure warts.
In former times, children born suffering from Rickets had to make the journey of nine miles to Kilfinane. There a blacksmith named Halpin lived and worked at the High Bridge. Being the seventh son of a seventh son, the curing of rickets was handed down to him. The formula for the affected child consisted in crawling under a white mare asse's belly several times, while the smith struck the anvil with a sledge. This was repeated for several visits and then the cure was pronounced. I believe the present blacksmith discarded the charm when he took over the business.
Elm bark stewed before a fire cures evils (cancer, ulcers, etc.)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 19:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
iad. Chuir sé na seasamh deireadh a rabh na luighe sa seomra. D’imthigh sé annsin leis abhaile airís. Níor mharbhuigh siad an sagart I nÉirinn ó’n lá sin go dtí an lá bhfuil indiú.
Deireadh.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 19:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
do léim síos un na seomra. Ní rabh aon duine a gabhail síos ar doras an ------- nach rabh a tuitim marbh. Nuair a bhí cuid mór saighdiúirí ina luighe marbh ní rachadh an cuid eile ní b’fhuide. Rinne sé réidh cúir sé an úm ar an chapall agus d’imthigh sé. Lean an chuid eile de’n’ gárda annsin é. Nuair a chuaidh sí píosa maith an bealach mór agus iad ina dhiaidh stop sé an beathach agus d’fhán sé annsin go d’tháinig siad fhad leis. D’fhiafruigh sé daobhtha ca rabh siad a’ gabhail. Dubhairt siad nach rabh siad a’ gabhail a bhaint dó ach é pilleadh airís ach an péire a d’fhág sé na seasamh ins an seomra a chuir ar shiubhal agus an bunadh a d’fhág sé na luighe a fágailt ina seasadh. “Ní dheánfhaidh mé sin agus béidh siad annsin go lá an breitheanas mar dtéigh sibhse ár bhur ngluainn agus bhur bpárdún a carraigh I lathair Dé agus geall tanas a thabhairt nach marbhan sibh an darna sagairt”. Chuaidh siad ar a ngluainibh agus d’iarr siad párdún ar Dhia agus ar an Easbuic agus thug siad gealltanas. Chuaidh sé airís annsin ‘un toighe agus an péire a thug sé aníos chuir sé airís
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 19:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
ceannpuirt de léim amach as an leabaidh. Rith sé go doras an tseomra. Bhuail sé ag an doras ach ní bhfuair sé freagar ar bith. Nuair a bhí an t-easbuic réidh leis an Aifreann d’fhosgail sé an doras. D’iarr sé air teacht anuas anois. Chuaidh sé síos. D’fhiafruigh sé an sagart a bhí ionnsan.
Dubhairt an Easbuic nach bheadh ach gur Easbuic a bhí ann. “Is amhlaidh is fearr agus is amhlaidh ‘s mo gheobhas mise ar do chionn”.
“Ó,” ars an sagart, “sabhalfhaidh mise mo chionn fhéin ort”. “Dthiocfadh leat innseacht damhsa ca dtheachfhaidh beirt de daoine móra fuair bás. Caidé d’éirigh daobhtha? Ma innseachann fhéin ní sabhalfhaidh sin do chionn”. “Sabhalfhaidh mise mo cheann fhéin agus gabh thusa suas ar feadh chúig bomaite”. Tháinig sé aníos I gceann 5 bomaite. D’fhosgail an t-easbuic an doras agus d’iarr sé air gabhal síos. Nuair a chuaidh sé síos ‘un t-seomra an beirt fear a rabh sé a fiafruigh fa daobh daobhtha a bhí marbh le seall fada roimhe sin bhí an beirt na seasadh I gcomartas ag an teine. “Sin anois iad agus fiafruigh fhéin caidé d’éirigh daobhtha”. Thuit sé marbh. Nuair a mhóthuigh na saighdiúirí sin chuaidh siad
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 19:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhí Easbuic annseo I Rath Bhoth an am a bhíthear a leanaint na sagairt. Thíar annseo ins na Cealla Beaga a bhí sé in chomhnuidhe. D’imthigh sé leis a’ tarraing ar an áit a rabhadar a marbhadh na sagairt. Bhí an t-airm uilig go léir cruinnighthe ins an áit seo. Beat-capall iasc air. Culaidh Aifrinn agus deireadh eile isteach I mála. D’imthigh sé leis mar sin. Nuair a chuaidh sé fhad leis an teach a rabh na saighdiúirí ann d’iarr sé lóistin.
Ce bith miricle a rinne sé fuair sé lóistin. Fuair sé seomra do fhéin ins an oidhche seo. Nuair a tháinig na saighdiúirí isteas a bhí amuigh a cuartughadh an sagairt istaech bhí “roun” eile réidh le gabhail amach agus d’éirigh an cailín le na gcuid a dheánadh réidh. Chonnaic sí solas aníos ar pholl na h-eocra agus d’amharc sí síos. Bhí an easbuic a léigheadh Aifreann. Rith sí le sgéal chuig an maighistear go rabh sagart aca I dith na h-oidhche agus go rabh sé a’ léigheadh Aifreann anus. D’éirigh an
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 18:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
he would give him anything that he asked". The little man took a small rope from round his waist and said "just the full of that". The farmer said that "That was very little wages, and that he would give him more". The little man said "that, that was enough." and he commenced at reaping, and in the evening, he had the field finished. he then spread out his little rope on the ground and began to fill it with corn. He never stopped or couldn't be stopped until he had every blade in the field put into his rope and put it up on his back and walked to a lake nearby, where he flung it in, and himself and the corn disappeared. The family died away and there isn't one family by that name in the Parish today.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 18:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
with them. One day the Priest came to the house on stations, and the mermaid was very offended, but she didn't say anything. The Landlord was going round to every house collecting the rent, he went to their house, and the man entertained him. That was the second promise broken.
One day he went out fishing and he caught a seal. He killed him, brought him home, and put him in the middle of the floor. When the mermaid saw him, she began to cry and said that it was her oldest brother. That was the last promise broken. She ordered him to take her to the sea shore, but when she was leaving the house, she cursed the house and said "That the day would come when there wouldn't be a Glavin family in the Parish."
Shortly after, he was reaping a field of corn, and he hadn't any help. All of a sudden, a small man stood beside him, and offered him his help. The farmer was delighted and said "That
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 18:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A mermaid from the waist up looks like a woman. She has long golden hair, and her face is like a woman's face. Fishermen long ago wouldn't want to see them, because they believed her to be a token of bad weather. Long ago a boat of people from Gunpoint and Ballybrack were fishing near the Fastnet. They saw a mermaid up on a rock combing her hair. They rowed home, and before they were home a big gale blew. That made them believe that she was a token of bad weather.
Once there lived a man in Kilmoe parish named Glavin. One day when he was fishing he caught a mermaid, and brought her home with him. She spoke to him and told him, that she would remain with him if he granted her three favours. The first favour was never to kill a seal. The second was never to bring a Landlord to dine to their house, and the last was never to bring a Priest to dine to their house.
Years went by and they were very happy an everything prospered
duine anaithnid
2019-11-14 18:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the island. He was at one time head of the pagan sanctuary but he adopted Christianity.
At the command of an angel it is said he left the island to St. Columba who died in the year 545. After that Inis Cealtra passed on to St. Caimin. Under him the school became of the most famous of our seats of learning. It drew scholars not only from the remotest parts of Ireland but from mountains as far as France and Germany.
Inis Cealtra was plundered many times by the Danes and again by the English. There are the names of seven churches, a round tower, five high crosses, and a holy well to be seen on the island.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 18:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
boast how much more she made that year than the previous year. The increase in his own corresponded with the increase of the neighbours and he arranged there and then in the presence of the culprit to pay the woman what he gained out of her butter and the culprit had to do likewise.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 18:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Cullen graveyard.
duine anaithnid
2019-11-14 18:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Inis Cealtra is an island situated close to the northern short of Scariff Bay and not far from the village of Mountshannon. The name Inis Cealtra means "church island" but it has always been known as Holy Island.
It is about fifty acres in area and its soil is exceedingly fertile. Before the year 1849 it was part of Clare but in that year it was transferred to the Galway. In the year 1849 however it was restored to Clare and so remains since.
Originally Inis Cealtra was a pagan sanctuary but of that phase of its history nothing is known. St. Mac Criche was the first to establish Christianity
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 18:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
chiefly of the satirical type. He was held in estimation even by learned men and was feared by the people, who at that age, dreaded any thing in the nature of a lampoon. Died A.D. 1860. A poet drove away the rats from Cullen graveyard by repeating a rhyme which he composed. The rats were seen going away in a body leading the patriarch of the tribe who was blind by placing a stick across his mouth the ends being held by two young rats. They entered the farmyard of a Protestant Minister at Clondrohid, whose 30' stacks of different kinds of corn were being stored the result of the tithe collecting. The minister surrounded the stacks with sheets of tin or iron and setting the whole corn on fire destroyed the corn and the rats together. This is supposed to have happened in the early decades of the last centuary No man now living has ever seen a rat in
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 18:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
listen and heard her incantations re her neighbour's butter. To satisfy himself if she would get it he said to himself "That I may get half of it."
A year passed by and he called the stations for the neighbour whose butter was looked for. At the breakfast table he asked the woman of the house about how much butter she made during the year, and she said "she made nothing in comparison with what she made the previous year" "that everything went against her." He asked this woman in the morning to ask her neighbour to have breakfast with them so she was listening to the conversation. He asked the neighbour about how much butter she had she was able to
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 18:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the colour was not very good it was dyed. It was then firkened and the firken was topped. If one farmer ha not sufficient to fill a firken a couple of farmers filled it between them. They measured the amount of butter each put into it by sweet gallons, or as they were called (Jack Shea's) a kind of a tin vessel with a handle called the above name on account of being got from a tinker called 'Jack Shea'.
There was a Parish priest in Caheragh once called Father Wall. He was going to the Stations one May morning and as they were not far off he went across the fields. As he approached the fence of one field he saw an old woman a farmer's wife and heard the talk. He stood behind the fence to
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 18:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Jumper
Dancer
Denis Linehan of Clondrohid Co Cork was known to jump over three horses placed side by side.
Dancers
(1) Andy Tadgh Hickey known locally as Andy Taidhg was a famous Dancing master. He was born about 1815 and died in 1895
(2) A travelling woman named Buckley was known to dance a jig and Hornpipe with a glass of whiskey placed on her head. The whiskey was not spilled. (She died about 1890)
Poets:
(1) Sean Peadar Murphy lived at Nohoval-Daly in the house now owned by Mrs Carroll. He made many songs and poems in Irish
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 18:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
bread, milk, money or a nights lodging.
The Driscolls are a family from Dunmanway. They go from place to place by horses and carts and sells laces, studs tie-pins and all kinds of ware. Sometimes they ask for alms but they never ask for lodging as they sleep on the side of the road under the carts. Horneybrook is a woman who travels all alone and looks for a meal or a nights lodging. She goes walking from place to place. Long Callaghan is a man who goes from place to place riding on a donkey. He looks for any kind of alms that he could get. He also buys donkeys and horses hair. Joe Burns also travels alone looking for work. Johnny Polly goes from place to place walking and begs for money. All those people are very thankful when they get alms and they usually say "May God have mercy on the last soul that left the house" but if they are refused they curse the house and all that is in it.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 18:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
wound up the ball again, the man kept the end caught until he was quite near her. Then she confessed that it was she who had being taking his butter all along and in payment she gave him tow of her cows.
[-]
The churn used in olden times was very different from that used at the present day. It stood on the ground and was shaped like a creamery can, but was made of timber with a hoop around it.
There was a hole in the cover, and a timber stick was stuck down through this hole. This was worked up and down to churn the butter. What the butter was made, it was washed, and salted, and if
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 18:09
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
which he should say when he saw the woman coming. The woman came and she said the same words as the man said. Then she took a ball of thread out of her pocket. She caught the end of the ball left the rest of it fly away with the wind. The unknown man told the agent if he could catch the thread without moving from where he was he would be able to make his own butter from that out. He also told him that if he did not catch the thread that day he could not go again until that day the following year, but if he caught the thread that day the woman would be compelled to pay back what she had got through the devil.
The woman spent about two hours in the field throwing out the thread and winding it back again. In the end the man caught the thread. When the woman
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 18:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
It often happened long ago that some people could make no butter. There was an agent living in Goleen whose name was Mc Carthy. He had a lot of cows and yet he could make no butter. There was another woman living in Dunkelly and she had only three cows and she had an enormous amount of butter. One day an unknown man came into the agents house and he told him that every night at twelve o clock there was a woman in his dairy taking his milk and every day at twelve o clock she was in the field with the cows. Next day he went to watch and at twelve o clock the woman came and she walked around the field and put her hand on every cow. After that she went away. That night the unknown man visited the agent again and he told him to go away and get a big white stone and to put it in the middle of the field and to go sit there at twelve o clock the following day. He also told him some magic
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 18:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
4
distance from the school in the townland of Legland and now occupied by a farmer named Michael Gallagher was the residence of Rev. Charles McLaughlin P.P. Killygarvan about 129 years ago according to local tradition. This Father McLaughlin seems to have been a very accomplished and energetic clergyman and taught the Classics to young students for the Priesthood. These Students during recreation periods were wont to amuse themselves 'by putting the weight' in the "hollow of the Buck Brae", about a mile from this School. Father McLaughlin had a brother named Maurice who once displeased his Rev. brother through performing servile work on a Sunday morning. The morning gave indications of an approaching storm and Maurice collected a crowd of men who were coming to the Sunday Mass in Oughterlin Church and had them working in the hay field when the Priest came out of the house to go to the Church.
Another Parish Priest named O'Friel is still dimly remembered in the district. He was either the predecessor or the immediate successor of Father McLaughlin and resided in the townland of Mín na Sróna. A family named McMearty resides in Mín na Sróna. There is no other family of that name in the Parish and tradition has it that Father Friel brought their ancestor who was a nephew of his , with him to Mín na Sróna when he
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 18:01
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
58 (contd)
The wake
Large wakes were common. Boys usually came five and six miles to a wake. At one time girls assembled at wakes also. A notable at the wake acted as a priest and marriages were performed.The full ceremony & the words according to ritual were gone through.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 18:00
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
(Cont. from p. 37)

It is bordering Curraghlane townsland.

"Carraig Uí Néill" is the name of another district in Brownsford. It is very rocky but a picturesque spot rising perpendicularly over the river Nore; the windings of the Nore can be seen - a horse-shoe at one place. It is planted a few years, and it contains a lead-mine, but the mode of transit is too difficult to have any lead extracted there, an attempt was made about ten years ago, and an engine brought there, but it was abandoned.

* * *

"Baile na Carraig" is an official name on part of Ballykenna townsland. It is owned at present by a man named Richard Walsh. It is a rocky or stony part of his farm, and another part of same farm is called the "greenlands" and is the best of land.

* * *

Part of Curraghmore townland is called "the back of the hill"; it is at the back of Currach Mór hill - from this direction.

* * *

The top of Currach Mór hill - owned by Thomas Egan is called "The Plebishes"; I dont know meaning, but people lived there at one time,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 17:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Seeing a crow pass through the window of the house is considered an omen of misfortune.
Breaking a mirror or looking glass is also considered a sign of ill luck.
When a person goes astray at night or at any time - the turning of his coat inside out is supposed to get him the right way.
When children have the whooping cough the following superstitious remedies were adopted,
(a) The woman of the house - mother - was to communicate the trouble to a man leading a white horse & ask for a cure. The man usually gave some simple remedy, which was easily availed of.
(b) The sad story of the sickness was to be told to a poplar tree. The disease was then supposed to begin to abate.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 17:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
as follows.
It is said that if a person got a disease on Good Friday he or she would be sure to be soon cured. It is also said that Friday is an unlucky day to see a sick person. It is said that if a person reddened a grave on Monday some one of that family would die before a week. It is considered unlucky to get married on Mondays or during the month of May. It is also considered unlucky to remove from one house to another during Lent and Advent. It is said that people when removing from one house to another should not take the cat with them. If an old cow lived th last three days of the month of March it is said that she would live for the rest of the year.
Tramps of the Road.
18'8'1938
From time to time beggars visit the house of this district usually the Summer time. Some of them have goods for sale and more have nothing but looking for alms such as
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 17:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
(Contd)
On the way home from the last meeting held in the country by Parnell, from the village of Creggs in September 1891 and the party missed Jimmy in or about Ballyglass Bridge within a mile of home. Jimmy of course had the usual copious supply taken. The party searched for a considerable time and finally found Jimmy in the Ballyglass river almost suffocated - yet he had sufficient voice to say "twas all for the Cause "
"twas all for the Cause".
That is all he was able to say on the occasion.
Jimmy's favourite tune "The Bantry hunt" is now known in the locality as Jimmy's tune or Séumasins tune.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 17:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
See p. 20

There are Monument Sceachs at Glynn cross-roads, on the top of Brownsford Hill, at Brownsford near castle gate, in Killeen, in Curraghmore.
These are called simply "The Monuments". There are no other monuments in the locality except "The Giant's Grave", called also "An Cloch Fhada". The man buried there was named O'Dea - called the Tomb of the Long O'Dea also. It must have been in pagan times probably in time of na Firbolg as stone implements have
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 17:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
"Tá sé ag fearthainn" ars an capall,
"Tá beagainín ars an bhó
"Tráthnóna bog aoibinn" ars an chaora
"Tar san gclaidhe liom" ars an gabhar

These lines describe the effect of hard or wet weather on animals mentioned, the goat feeling it the hardest (a perishing creature)

* * *

When we hear seagulls "whistling or crying out" and flying up towards the land, it is always the sign of a coming storm.

Where people burn turf they rake the ashes or Gríseach over a few live coals, and so have "kindling" for the fire in the morning. If the Gríseach (red embers) are a blue colour it is a sign of rain.

The cat sitting with its back to the fire is a sign of bad weather. Or to see the cat scratching a stick or anything else is a sign of bad weather too.

* * *

The Sean-Riabhach days are the two last days of March and the first day of April, when a very hard cold wind blows. The story of the "skinning of the old cow" is well known. But some people say the date of these days is about 11th 12th April (owing to the arrangement of calendar by Pope Gregory I presume).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 17:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
of odds. If it took A 30 shots to finish the score and B 29 shots, then B would win by a bowl of odds.
Another pastime of the district is making what is called a Leaca Tinne for catching birds. It is made by putting a slate on the ground and putting crumbs on the slate. Then another slate is got and put over the last one with one end of it risen by a stick. A cord is tied to the stick and a person goes a good distance from the Leaca Tinne with one end of the cord in his hand. Then when the bird comes picking the crumbs the cord is pulled and the slate falls down on her and kills her.
Lucky and Unlucky Days of the Year
Got from
Mr. James O Leary (62 years)
Carrigroe, Clonakilty
11 3 1938
There are several Piseógs about certain days of the year being lucky or unlucky for doing certain things. Some of these superstitions are
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 17:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
"Tá sé ag fearthainn" ars an capall,
"Tá beagainín ars an bhó
"Tráthnóna bog aoibinn" ars an chaora
"Tar san gclaidhe liom" ars an gabhar

These lines describe the effect of hard or wet weather on animals mentioned, the goat feeling it the hardest (a pershing creature)

* * *

When we hear seagulls "whistling or crying out" and flying up towards the land, it is always the sign of a coming storm.

Where people burn turf they rake the ashes or Gríseach over a few live coals, and so have "kindling" for the fire the morning. If the Gríseach (red embers) are a blue colour it is a sign of rain.
The cat sitting with its back to the fire is a sign of bad weather. Or to see the cat scratching a stick or anything else is a sign of bad weather too.

* * *

The Sean-Riabhach days are the two last days of March and the first day of April, when a very hard cold wind blows. The story of the "skinning of the old cow" is well known. But some people say the date of these days is about 11th 12th April (owing to the arrangement of calendar by Pope Gregory I presume).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 17:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
continued from p. 128

A child was called "Bradach" if mischievous (in Co. Sligo) and here in Kilkenny a cow is called "braddy" if she is constantly getting into a field or corn etc., and so doing mischief: it must be Bradach is meant.

I often heard my grandmother call one of us when children "Graithe gan iarraidh" for interfering with things not our own, or for doing a thing we hadn't been asked to do. Another expression - used of grown up people too fond of giving advice to others was that they were too fond of putting in their "Ladair (speech or opinion) gan fheadar gan iarraidh,"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 17:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Pastimes of this District
4-3-1938
The chief pastime of the youth of this district is a game called Bowling and which is mostly confined to the County of Cork and one or two districts in Antrim. Every Sunday if you walk along the road from Milltown to Gahanive you would be certain to meet a score between some two or four opponents. A round iron ball called a bowl is used. This varies in weight, for adults it is 28 ounces and for children it is from 16 to 24 ounces. The length of the local scores is from Mrs. Mac Carthy's corner to Mary Footmans Cross which is a distance of about two and a half miles. The opponents start at one mark and if A threw the bowl 100 yards and B 80 yards then A would be "fore bowl" by 20 yards and B would be "hind bowl" by the same amount. Another point of the score is "The Loft". This arises when the opponents are throwing from near a corner. They then throw the bowl high into the air and from where they throw to where the bowl strikes the ground again is called "The Loft". The loft is very important and a first class bowler is likely to have a loft of from 70 to 80 yards. The winner may win by fore bowl or may win by a bowl
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 17:02
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
However their ugly deed did not work for them, as they were captured, and put to death in an (ugly) cruel way, so if they paid the tax, and lived up to the law they would have enjoyed life longer.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 17:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One night last winter an old man from the village told me a very interesting story about long ago. When he was a boy his father told him a story about a cave near the house which was haunted by fairies, as they were very common in them days.
One day when some hunters were passing by this cave one of them said "let us go in till we see the inside," of course they did not know it was haunted. As they
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:59
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
so called because when Lord Carbry was living there he bulit a kennel in a corner of that field in which to keep his pack of hounds.
A field on the land of Mr. John O Sullivan of Gahanive is called the "Cill". It got this name because it was used as a graveyard long ago. There are little humps in the field which marks where the bodies are burried. It was never ploughed up because it is too rough and humpy, and moreover it is unlucky to have anything to do with that kind of a field. There is another field on the lands of Mr. John O Sullivan of Gahanive called the "Fairy Field". It is said that a strange light rises out of this field and if anybody sees this light when out at night he cannot find his way home that night.
Wild Animals of The District
18'2'1938
The most plentiful wild animals found in this district is the rabbit. The hare is also found but is not as plentiful
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
so called because when Lord Carbry was living there he bulit a kennel in a corner of that field in which to keep his pack of hounds.
A field on the land of Mr. John O Sullivan of Gahanive is called the "Cill". It got this name because it was used as a graveyard long ago. There are little humps in the field which marks where the bodies are burried. It was never ploughed up because it is too rough and humpy, and moreover it is unlucky to have anything to do with that kind of a field. There is another field on the lands of Mr. John O Sullivan of Gahanive called the "Fairy Field". It is said that a strange light rises out of this field and if anybody sees this light when out at night he cannot find his way home that night.
Wild Animals of The District
18'1'1938
The most plentiful wild animals found in this district is the rabbit. The hare is also found but is not as plentiful
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:57
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:56
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
entered it, suddenly the fairies began to sing and dance round them, and soon they forgot all about their hunting, as they were content enough to stay there in the beautiful palace as they thought.
When they thought they were about fifteen minutes inside in the cave they came out again, but to their great surprise they had spent the happiest part of their life there, as they were twenty years watching those enchanted
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:52
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
creatures. As I thought over this story I said to myself it is a good thing I did not live the time of those fairies, or I might be haunted like the hunters too.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:51
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
full of it daily before meals with a little pepper on it, and soon you will find your cold will disappear
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
all dead but one man. This man left this old house, and got a new house, and the house he got was supposed to be the luckiest around the place. When he had this story finished I said that never happened, and he said with a fierce curse devil a word a lie in it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
An old man told me a very interesting story one night last winter, and I shall describe it to you. There was once a very old house about a quarter of a mile from our house, and about ten or eleven people lived there.
This house was unchanted because the people of the house used to go to bed safe at night, and one or two of them would be dead in the morning. The same thing happened the next night and the next and so on till they were
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:45
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:44
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
His names are interred on the Epistle side of the altar in Carrickallen church.
A story is told of a man who was suffering from severe pains in his arms for a long time.
This man assisted in carrying the remains on Father Anthony to the chapel and the pains disappeared completely out of his arms.
This cure was said to be a miracle and the miracle was attributed to Father Anthony.
Great devotion sprung up in the district to Father Anthony after this and people came long distances to visit his grave.
About the time of Father Anthony Smyth's burial there was a clay floor in Carrickallen chapel and it was customary with the people of the district to carry home some of the clay from the grave for cures.
Although Father Anthony was born in Carrickallen the parish of Lavey has a claim on him as his forefathers came from Lavey.
There is a niece of Father Anthony Smyth's still residing in the parish of Lavey.
Fr Anthony Smyth's grave is still visited for cures particularly for skin diseases for example warts
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:37
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
and sank to his saddle "Where" said Coote " is that rascal who said there is a bottom to this"? The bottom's there alright said Tarara but you havent come to it yet.
The locality called Pulty between Latully and Toneyhall, informant thinks got this name from the waterfall in the river there Tarara is said to have got his nickname from the refrain of a song he sang.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
a man named John O Sullivan who was supposed to be the best weaver in West Cork. There was another weaving mill at Fishers Cross owned by a man named O Donovan Búrde. There is a tucking mill and a carding mill at Newmill owned by Mark Tobin. Long ago these mills were used for tucking and carding the wool but they are not used now. There was a forge at Milltown about forty years ago owned by John Lane. There was another forge at Camus owned by James O'Donovan. In these forges they made everhting the same as they make in forges nowdays except that they made croppy pikes for the Fenians.
The Marriage Customs of the District
got from
Mr. James Spillane (60 years)
Kilkerran, Clonakilty.
27'1'1938
The usual time of the year for marrying in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Another giant came to see Finn Mac Cool long ago in "the giant age" in order to fight him. Finn's mother wished to prevent the fight. She baked a griddle in a cake of bread and showed the cake to the giant who had come on a visit and explained to him that Finn required to eat a griddle each day to keep him right. Finn was sleeping in a bed and the visiting giant went over to look at him. "Who is this" said he. Oh that's Finn's child said the woman. Then the giant took his departure not wish
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:29
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
to the townland of Mollin (Mullan) in the parish of Drumgoon from Co Tyrone after the battle of Benburb. After putting in a crop in "Mollin" they went back to Tyrone, but soon returned and remained
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:29
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
A pot of potatoes
I have money in my pocket,
To spend it I am willing,
If I had as much and half as much,
I would have a shilling.
- 8d
If a man got sixpence for walking a mile,
What would he get for thirty
Sore feet
If a man had ten patches on his coat,
What time would it be
Time to get a new one
Why is A like a honey-suckle.
Because it is followed by B
An old red cow, lying by the well eats all,
She gets adn drinks none at all
Fire
It sweeps round the house,
And round the house,
And lies at the back door.
A broom
Ink, ank, under the bank, ten drawing four.
A woman milking a cow
What is deeper than hell
A tailor's thimble
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As red as a rose,
The longer it lives,
The shorter it grows.
A Candle
A house full,
A room full,
And could not get a spoon full
Smoke
Round the wood,
And round the wood,
And leaves a rag on every bush.
Snow
Over the fire,
And under the fire,
And never touches the fire.
A cake in the oven

Black and white and red all over
A Newspaper
As black as ink,
As white as milk,
It hops on the road like hailstones
A Magpie
As round as an apple,
As deep as a cup,
All the men in Derry would not lift it up.
A Spring Well
What is full and can hold more
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Ten men's length,
And ten men's strength,
And ten men would not put it standing up.

A rope.
The wind blew, the cock crew,
The gates of Heaven struck eleven,
Through a rock, throught a reel,
Through an old spinning wheel,
Riddle me that or else let it alone.
Thunder and lightning.
As round as an apple,
As flat as a pan,
One side a woman,
And the other side a man.
A penny
As round as an apple,
As sharp as a lance,
If you were on top of it, it would carry you to France.
The Moon
A head, a foot and four legs
A Bed
I have a little horse with an iron throat,
As fast as he gallops, he swallows the rope.

A Spinning Wheel
As white as a lily,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
horses out of a hole and he ran to them and said, " I wish you a gradle of joy" and they began to beat him and he said, " And what will I say?" "You have one out and that you may soon have two out". He went on then and he met a man with one eye and he said, " You have one out and that you may soon have two out" and he began to beat him. "And what will I say?" he said. "You have light on one side and that you may soon have light on the other", he replied. He went on then and he met a priest's house and one side of it was on fire and he said " I see light on one side and that I may soon see light on the other".
This story was collected by Brighid Nic Pharthalainn from her father, John Mc Partlan, of Aughrim, Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim. The title , " And what will I say?" is my own.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 16:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
did not know what to do with the two shillings.
He went to a fair in the nearest village to him. When he went to the fair he could get nothing for the two shillings. He saw a butcher's stall and he went to it and he saw livers and lights in the stall and he asked how much for them. The butcher said "two shillings". Then he bought the livers and lights. He got a stick and he hung the livers and lights on the stick. The livers and lights used to strike on his heels and he used to say "livers and lights come up on my back; livers and light come up on my back".
He went on then and he met a woman and when he was going by the woman he said "livers and lights come up on my back". She began to beat him and he said "and what will I say?" and she said "What goes down that it may never come up". He went on then and he met men sowing oats. He said "What goes down that it may never come up". They began to beat him, " And what will I say?" he said. " Lord have mercy on the dead" they said.
He went on from that place and he met a man hanging a dog. He said " Lord have mercy on the dead" and they started to beat him. "And what will I say?" he said. "Two men going to hang a dog" , they replied. He went on from them and he met a bride and groom and he said, "Two men going to hang a dog" and they started to beat him. "And what will I say?" he said. "I wish you a gradle of joy", they said. He went on from that place and he met a crowd of men taking out two
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 16:02
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
should be put to God's weather, "that means that children should be allowed to go barefoot summer and winter." Another old saying is, "that the beauty of an old shoe is to polish it."
Olive Barber,
Cartronmore,
Drumcliffe,
Co. Sligo.
Told to me by,
Alex Barber, (60)
Cartronmore,
Drumcliffe,
Co. Sligo.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 15:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In former times people did not begin to wear boots until they were big men and women. Around here there is nobody living at present who never wore boots or shoes. At the present time some children but not all children go barefoot for a couple of months during the summer.
There are no boots made locally but there are are a number of cobblers int the district. There is a shoe factory in Sligo but they only make house shoes and ladie's dancing shoes. In former times nearly man was able to repair the shoes for his family but not so nowadays. Clogs were never made locally and very few people wear them. Leather was never made in this district but most of the local shops sell it.
A superstition connected with other shoes is that they are supposed to be lucky, that is the reason when there is a wedding in the district that a pair of old shoes are tied to the bride and groom's motor car. They are supposed to bring them good luck. Old people say, God's leather
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is story which tells how pigs, rats and mice first came into this world. Once St. Martin was to fat and lard was taken out of him. He put his lard under a barrell, the servant girl was looking on and she stole some of the lard. She put it under a barrel for herself. In a few days she saw St. Martin lifting up the barrel and out ran a lot of pigs from under it. Then she lifted up her barrel and instead of pigs, rats and mice ran out from under it. That is how pigs, rats and mice first came into being.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
come down it is a sign of storm.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The goat is in a little "cro" every night for herself. She is out in the fields in day time. She gets hay to eat, she has a kid every year. When goats go up towards the mountain, it is a sign of good weather, but if they
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
St Patrick threw his sword after it Again he missed and the sword cut one of the two stones in two.
Tired by his exertions St Patrick lay on the stone which was not cut and slept until morning. The mark of his ribs and his fingers is there yet
Next morning he set out in persuit of the serpent. He overtook it and killed it at Lough Derg
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The donkey is put into a stable at night in winter time, but he is left out in the fields in summer. He gets hay and oats to eat.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The stable is a house with an iron roof. There is a window on the back through which the manure is put out. There is a door on the front and a "rack" in the stable for the hay. The "rack" is about three feet high. It is a foot or fourteen inches wider at the top than at the bottom. The horse gets hay, oats and bran to eat. When he wants shoes, he is brought to the forge and four shoes are put on him. The horse is clipped once a year. He is always clipped in Winter with a clipping machine.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
sunset, they would have to put salt on it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The cowhouse is known locally as the byre. The cows are tied in the byre to stakes. They are tied with chains or a "spanchil". This is made from an old bag. A long piece is cut from the bag, it is twisted and made into a rope. Then a loop is made at one end and it is put on her horns, a loop is made at the other end and put on her foot. A side lang is used to keep a donkey or a goat from thieving. This also is made from a bag. It is put from the fore foot to the hind one. All these tyings are home made. A piece of blessed palm, medals, a sacred heart badge or holy water, is hung in the byre to bring good luck on the stock. If a person borrowed milk after
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About a quarter of a mile from our school (Dromore) there are two lakes adjoining. The near is called Lough Peter from time immemorial. The farther one is called Lough Patrick is in the townland of Drumlougher Crossmaglen Co., Armagh. The "Border" goes through Lough Peter.
In a field owned by John mc Cooey and on the shores of Lough Patrick there are two large stones about which this story is told
St Patrick was on his way to Armagh and was passing Lough Patrick when he saw a large "serpent" (snake) sometimes used) From Tir Island he threw two big stones but failed to hit it The stones are about 30 feet from the water both is about four feet by two. feet. The serpent was escaping when
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
it is doubled and twisted. There is a little hole left to put in her foot and the other part of the "crimeasc" is fastened to her horns. Then another small part of the bag is put into a hole which is left when the horns are being tied and this is knotted on her horns.
(Brigid Mc Grail, from her father, Francis McGrail, of Slievenakilla, Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim aged 66 years)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are many homely remedies which if known would alleviate pain.
A good remedy for a gumboil is a stupe of poppy.
This stupe is made by boiling two or three poppy heads in a quart of water for one hour.
There is also an excellent remedy for toothache.
It should be sued just before going to bed and on no account should any of the liquid be swallowed.
Salt will also give relief
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The farm and domestic animals we have are four cows, a donkey, three calves, two bullocks, four heifers and thirty sheep. The old people used to say to the cows " teara slán" when they were driving them. Now people say "prú caile" or "gersh" to the cows. They say "suck, suck" to the calves when calling them.
The cow house is built of stones and there is an iron roof on it. It is divided into two parts inside by a sink. Each part is called a "stand". This house is called the cows byre. The cows are tied to stakes and the stakes are sunk in the stand. Each stake is nailed onto the beam at the top. The beam is across the stakes. There are chains on the stakes, those chains are bought in a shop. The chain is made of links and the "gad" is round and made of iron. This "gad" is put on the stake, the chain and "gad" is put on the stake, the chain and "gad" are joined together. There is also a roller on the chain so that the cow will not be choked. The cattle are tied by putting the chain round their necks. When cattle are thieving they are tied on the horns and on the feet. This is called a "crimeasc". The "crimeasc" is made from a bag. The bag is cut in a long strip, then
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
"The Cucks". This name was given to Crossans of Drumnaveil because at one time they traded in eggs. Informant thinks "Cucks" - eggs
"Langan" Dermotts of Drumnaveil got this name from a great English boxer called Langan
A Dermott fought with an other man in Drokagh bog and when he won he addressed himself. "Oh me bowl Langan" Hence the name
McGorrys of Ceisban (Coskemduff) were called Redmon's
No reason known.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Four Crossan brothers came
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a tradition that the cattle belonging to the person who labours a fort, will die and the crop will be a failure.
The old people say that on certain nights of the year lights used to be seen on this fort and that the fairies went to an adjoining meadow to play football and that they would have green jackets and red caps and blue trousers on them.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
and never left from home.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are many forts in the vicinity of this school.
One of these forts adjoins my fathers land and is in the townland of Carrickallen.
It is on the land now occupied by
Mrs Casserly
Carrickallen,
Mountain Lodge,
Cootehill,
Co Cavan
and is known as Casserly's fort.
It is said that when a fort was made long ago it was made in such a place as that the inhabitants had a view
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:22
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
They can repair pots, kettles and pans, or a pair of scissors.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:21
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:21
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
purpose theyw ent down to the limestone quarry of
Mick Higgins,
Kilnagarbey
Stradone,
Co Cavan.
with horses and carts and carted up the raw limestone and burned it in the limkiln.
In those days the burned lime was used for enriching the soil, and for building purposes, and for whitewashing the houses.
The inside of the walls were whitewashed as well as the outside of all dwelling houses, and out offices.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago there was a limekiln on every farm in this district.
There are very few limekilns now, because they fell into disuse, and many of them were tossed.
These limekilns were usually constructed against the base of a hill, so that it would be easy to fill them with limestone, and fuel.
These kilns were built of earth and stone.
There was a hole at the base of the limekiln for draught purposes.
When the farmers required limestone for any
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
will be the first to die.
St. Patrick's Day
The people used to go out with the band on St. Patrick's Day. They used to hold National Land League meetings in this day.
Ash Wednesday
On Seraft Tuesday night the people used to have bacon. They used to make pan cakes on this day also. It is called Pancake Tuesday for this reason. Ashes should not be put out on Ash Wednesday.
Halloween
The people have apples on Halloween. They hang up one at a time out of the loft with a piece of string. Then they try to catch it in their mouths. They also get a tub of water and put in one apple at a time. They then try to catch it in their mouths. Whatever person catches the apple wins it.
St. John's Eve
On St. John's Eve, the people make bonfires in honour of St. John. They gather sticks and hay and rushes. The fires are made on the hills. Some people make a fire out of turf and sticks. All the young people dance, cheer and sing around the bonfires.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The late Margaret McDonald Clifferna, Stradone, Co Cavan could card and spin wool.
She could also knit the wool into stockings.
Her husband's name was John McDonald who spent all his life in Knockateggart.
John McDonald died a young man leaving her to rear a large family of young children.
She lived to be over weighty years of age and died in may 1936.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As black as soot. As black as the Ace of Spades. As black as a crow. As white as snow. As red as blood. As yellow as the skin of an orange. As white as a swan. As green as grass. As grey as a badger. As brown as a berry. As black as a nigger. As stiff ad a poker. As still as a board. As stiff as starch. As short as grass. As long as a woman's tongue. As thin as a whip. As fat as a fool. As fat as a barrell. As lazy as sin. As lazy as a dog's hind leg. As round as an
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
her. Then they made the rush crosses. They plaited the rushes together. Then they put the crosses behind the "couples" of the house and some were placed in the cowhouses to bring good luck on the cattle.
Good Friday
It is lucky to plant or sow on Good Friday. It is usual to plant some potatoes on that day. Potatoes planted then will grow well and there will be no "blanks" in them.
May Day
If you give away anything on May Day, you will have no luck that year. On May Night, Rowan branches are put in the byres to save the cattle. May Day is dangerous for cattle. The ashes should not be put out on May Day.
St. Martin's Day
On St. Martin's Day a cock is killed in honour of the saint. When the woman is killing the cock, she lets a few drops of blood fall on the four corners of the house for good luck.
Easter Sunday
On Easter Sunday morning, people get up early to see the sun dancing. It is said that the sun dances three times on Easter Sunday morning. On Easter Saturday children go out collecting eggs. They bring turf to a selected place adn made a fire and boil the eggs and have a feast. This is called "prochogs".
Twelfth Night
On the Twelfth Night each person in the house lights a candle at the same time and the person whose candle quenches first
duine anaithnid
2019-11-14 15:09
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Riddles.
It's deep and it's damp and it's wet on the bank and its fit for the lord of the lady. Turf.
Aunty Naughty built a ship an' on that ship her daughter lay. An' I'd be blamed to tell her name. An' thats three times I've told it _ anne.
I know a man with a long tail. He goes in and out the gap 40 times a day. Each time he leaves a bit of his tail after him. Needle & Thread.
It flies high, hops low, wears shoes and has none _ A football.
Under fire, over fire and never -tough- touches fire. A cake in a pot-oven.
A cake with all the crumbs around it (moon & starts)
Four legs up and four legs down: soft in the middle and hard all round - (a bed)
As I went up the [?] I met my uncle Tony
He had an iron and steel Toes and upon my word he'd frighten the crows _ (a gun)
As I went up the [?] I carried the [?] on my back _ (a ladder)
It's as black as ink and ink it isn't
It's as white as milk and milk it isn't
It hops on the road like a marble stone
And a marble stone it isn't (A magpie)
[?]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:08
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As bitter as gall.
As black as the hob of hell.
He was old when Adam was a toddler.
As yellow as a kithis claw.
As sick as a dog
As light as a feather.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As wise as the hills
As grey as a rat.
As fat as a fool.
He would lift the cross of an asses back.
He is as ignorant as a céisa bróga.
He is as mean as Luicifier.
That you may never die until the skin of a gooseberry makes a coffin for you.
As slow as a coach.
As thin as a whip.
As white as snow.
As cure as a fox.
As green as grass.
As crooked as a ram's horn.
As mad as a march hare.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As stupid as an ass.
As quite as a lamb.
As cols as ice.
As red as blood.
As happy as a bird.
As gay as a lark.
As slow as a snail.
As slippy as glass.
As busy as a bee.
As good as gold
As brown as a berry
As sly as a fox.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 15:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As thin as a whip.
As fat as a fool.
As white as snow.
As for as a fiddle.
As black as soot.
As mad as a march hare.
As wicked as a bull.
As bitter as gall.
As firm as a rock.
As old as the hills.
As sweet as honey.
As crooked as a ram's horns.
As far off asa lighthouse.
As straight as an arrow.
As quick as lightning.
As grey as a badger.
As wise as a fox.
As green as grass.
As hard as iron.
As bad as a witch.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
and wattles. The very old houses had the fire in the middle of the floor but there was no chimney and the smoke used to come out the door.
In Mary Stanley's there was no glass in the window's she had a board in the window.
Of clay the floors were made long ago
Half-doors are not common in the district but they used to be.
Turf and wood were used for fire long ago.
Rush candles were used long ago and also tallow candles were used Candles are not made locally in the district.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
holding the money divides it equally among them. Then they buy sweets or "cakes" or anything they like with the money.
New Year' s Eve
On New Year's Eve, a crowd of young men go around to the houses. They dress themselves with old coats, straw-hats, and false faces, and they carry sticks with them. They are called "mummers".
One of them gives commands and he is called the "captain". There is another person who dresses himself in women's clothes and he is called "the Mary Anne".
When the "mummers" go to a house they demand admittance. Then they are let in and the music starts and "Mary Anne" and a few others begin to dance. Then the captain calls the other mummers to dance a turn. When they have finished dancing, the treasurer asks money. Then the man of the house gives them money and they thank him and wish him a happy New Year and then they depart. Then they have a dance in a certain house and they buy bread and jam with the money. Sometimes they buy drink.
St. Brigid's Day
On St. Brigid's Day, the people used to make crosses from rushes. One person went out to get a bunch of rushes. He came back and knocked at the back door and asked if St. Brigid was welcome to come in. A person within answered and said she was.
She came to the front door and the people within welcomed
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There were a lot of old mud wall cabins that poor people had to live in long ago.
These houses were all tatached and some were covered or roofed with flags.
When oats and wheat were cut they houses were tatched with the straw.
There was a bed in the kitchen in the old houses and in some houses there is a bed in the kitchen yet. The name of this bed is a settle bed.
In most houses the fireplace is against the gable end and in some houses the fireplace is in the corner. The front of the chimney was made of clay
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
some were made of mortar and wattles.
There are some houses in Dunderry which have no glass on the windows. It is glass that is used instead of glass. The old houses had floors made of clay and stone.
The half-doors are not so common in the district now as they were formerly.
There was wood and dried cow-dung and turf for fire.
There were candles, Rush lights and dipped lights used for giving lights.
The candles were made locally by the Foxes of Rathmore.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
holding the money divides it equally among them. Then they buy sweets or "cakes" or anything they like with the money.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In former times most of the houses were roofed with thacht and rushes. The walls were made of stone and clay and they are white-washed inside and outside. There were no ceiling in them only big blocks of wood called rafters.
There were some roofed with thacht and rushes, and others with felt, wood and Zinc.
The thacht straw was procured from the people who had their oats and wheat threshed.
The old houses a had a bed in the kicthed called a settle bed. It was placed beside the fire. The front of the chimney was made of clay and stone and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
It is a custom with the young boys in this district to go out on St. Stephen's Day from house to house gathering money. They gather together on Christmas Night and search for wrens in the eaves of houses. On the next day (St. Stephen's Day) each one gets a stick to the top of which he ties a piece of holly. Then he puts a dead wren into a match box and ties the box beside the holly. If they have not wrens for all they put feathers in the boxes instead.
Then they start to travel about from house to house gathering money. When they go inside a house, they repeat the following rhyme:
" The wren, the wren, the king of all birds,
St. Stephen's Day she was caught in the furze,
Although she is small, her fasnily is great,
I hope you will give us the price of a treat,
If you treat it be small it will not please the wren boys all,
So up with the kettle adn down with the pan,
Give us the money to bury the wren
Money we want and money we crave,
And if we don't get money we will send ye all to yer (your)
grave"
When they get the money they continue their journey and do the same in every house. If they get a penny or two in every house, they are satisfied. When they are finished travelling in the evening, they go to some house and the boy who is
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
sheets, quilts, and long stripes of linen for underwear. The linen at first was a bad colour but when it was washed and blacked it would be white. Neddy Carolan's trade was weaving the flax into coloured materials. He lived on McGuinness's lane about a quarter of a mile from our school.
The linen from this district was sent to The Linen Hall at Drogheda and when that was closed down the industry ceased to be carried on in Grangegeeth.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Flax growing and weaving was an extensive industry carried on in this district long ago. The flax was grown in several farms in this district. It was put through several processes, before it was linen. The flax would be fit for pulling in August or September. There was a flax hole on every farm and when they pulled it they threw it in and left it there for a certain number of days. Then they took it out and spread it to dry. When it was dry they beatled it with beatlers that is to beat it to and fro with long sticks and flat sides on them. Then they hackled it with hacklers. The hackler is an iron grating which the flax is pulled through to break the knots and fine it. Then it was put through a spinning machine and the threads came out wound round on spools. They bought the dyeing and they dyed each spool of thread any colour they liked. Then they wove it into tablecloths
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
a battle in Glentogher. This battle was fought between the Southern and Northern fairies near where Niall Kearney lives now, at the head of Glentogher.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The following happened one time on the side of Cruinnlive to people who were very kind to the fairies. One night they heard great talking coming up the hill. The girls thinking that visitors were coming began to clean up. But as soon as the fairies got by they began to laugh at the girls.
As these people were kind to the fairies, anytime the cows would go near the corn they were hunted back by the fairies.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Noggins were mostly used as eating vessels long ago. They were made of wood, and some of them were scooped from the wood into shape. Others were made in parts, one part for the sides, and one for the bottom, and one for the handle. These were joined by stays. We cannot find any noggin in this district now as the last we heard of at the home of Mr. Jow Halton of Phoenixtown, were taken by American visitors only a few years ago.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One time my Grandfather was going along the roads. He saw a small woman sitting at a fire. As he drew near to the place where she was sitting, she arose, walked through the fire and nothing was seen after that.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:37
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:37
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a fort called the Shescan at the foot of Cruinnlive in Glentogher. A man cut grass over it once. The fairies turned his head back to front. When he went into the house the people told him to go and plant the grass where he had got it. He did so and his head was turned the right way again.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Some people had forges in earlier days. There was one of the oldest of them used by Richard Farrell until lately in Grangegeeth. He used to make all form of utensils. He would make spears, gates, ploughs, horse-shoes and fire-cranes. He had a fire, a large bellows, an anvil, a vice, shovels, hammers, punches, pincers, and a drill in the forge.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One time the fairies fought
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
them until they came to the door.
In about ten minutes one man came to the other man's door and said "In God's name" we will return to the glen".
When they arrived they spoke out loudly and said, "if we are let alone we will never come back again," so nothing touched them from that time on.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One Hallow Eve night a long time ago there was a woman passing a holly bush alongside the main road in Glentogher when she heard the nicest music imaginable. She stood and looked about her but nothing was to be seen. She drew nearer to the bush and the singing and dancing continued. Some were playing fiddles, others melodions and others were dancing and singing. Then she moved onward and the music ceased.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
fairy lunking about the house. On examining the spot where they were building he found, that they had been building on top of the fairies chimney.
They flitted away to another spot and they began to build there. Each morning there was twice as much built as when they had left it the evening before.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:29
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Between sixty and seventy years ago two men were making Whiskey in a glen convenient to where we live. They worked steadily for a few moments when all of a sudden the stones began to bounce off the still and off themselves also.
The men ran home greatly frightened and the stones bounced off
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A couple of centuries ago there lived a happy family at the foot of a hill called Cruinnlive in Glentogher. Every night when they were all in bed and sound asleep the wee folk came into the house and played tricks on them. One night when they were all fast asleep two or three fairies came in and pulled the blankets off the people. They took them as far as the door. The people wakened up greatly frightened and they placed the blankets over themselves again. They all fell asleep again. The fairies came back and tried the same trick on them, but failed to take them away.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once there were some men building a new house near a glen in Cashel, Glentogher. The amount they built one day was knocked down next morning. This went on for some time till at last one of the men saw a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
le déanamh acht imtheact na bhaile agus nuair a chuaidh sé isteach ar an doras agus d- amharc sé ní rabh an mach le feiceal aige. Thug an fear beag ribeach ruadh an capall leis na bhaile agus chuir sé isteach a mbhoitheach é a fhéin – agus cupla capall eile agus bhí teine ag tuitim ar dhruim mhac an tseanduine agus bhí a druim uilig dóighte agus nuair a bhí sé tamall maith ann tháinig cailín a bhí ar fastódh ins an teach isteach na bhoithig agus d’iarr an capall uirthí uisge a caitheamh ar a dhruim.
Fuair sí uisge agus caith ar a dhruim é diarr sé annsin uirthí an t adhastar a tharraingt do na chionn bhí truaighe uirthí ag amharc air agus tharraing sé an t adhastar do na chionn agus rinn sé eascon dó fhéin, agus dimthig sé amach ar an doras leis an uisge a chaith an cailín ar a dhruim agus cuaid an t uisge isteach a sruthan agus
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Beag ribeach ruadh na fiche notá do annsin. Tarraing an seanduine an t-adhastar do chionn an chapaill agus dimthig sé leis na bhaile agus nuair a cuaidh sé isteach ar an doras cé a chonnaic sé na suidhe ag an teinidh ach an mach. Chuaidh said annsin agus ceannu siad biadh daobha fhéin. Seachtmhain indiaidh sin bhí aonach eile ann agus rinn an mach capall do fhéin araist agus thug an seanduine unaonaigh é agus dhíol sé é an dóigh céadna ar díol sé é an iarraidh roimhe sín agus an iarraig seo rinn siad an rud céadna agus nuair a bhí an fear beag ribeach ruadh ag díol ar shon an chapaill thug sé na fiche punt do na airgead bhriste agus bhí an seanduine ibfad a cunntas an airgid rinne sé dearmad an t adastar a tharraingt do chionn an capaill agus nuair a damharch sé thart bhí an fear beag ribeach ruadh agus an capall ar siubhail agus ní rabh aige
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:08
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This poem was written by Richard Halligan:-
You feeling creatures as you draw near,
All my story I will let you hear
About a phantom that appeared to me
From thy dark tomb of eternity.
The other night and I going home
I met the spectre as he did roam,
It is the eleventh hour the spirit said
When all are silent and long in bed.
And you are a rambler without a cause
Don't fear coercion or martial laws.
He stood before me with fiery glare,
And with blood shed eyes at me did stare
I grasped my cudgel and held it tight
For I was intended to have a fight,
My guardian Angel stood by my side
To win the battle once more I tried.
But I bid farewell to the fairy ghost
And never again shall I bray or boast.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time there was a man named Richard Halligan who lived on the blaidhe Stoca. He was a blind man and was a basket-maker by trade. He would make fancy baskets and pelicks for feeding cattle. He was a gifted man at poetry also. He could find his way anywhere around the country and carry baskets with him. The people used to bring him sally rods of which he made them. The baskets he made were very big, they were two feet by one and a half. He found out even a lark's nest which he showed to another man. He would carry water from a deep well twice a day and never miss his step and had to cross a stile and walk on top of a ditch for about one hundred yards.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 14:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago the people had no lamps but they made their own candles. The way they made the candles was to get some rushes and take the green skin off them. Then they would dip the white part of the rush into resin or tallow. They would leave it out to dry for some time and when it would be dry they would take it in and they would have candles. They would go round selling them at 4d per dozen. The candles showed very little light. The people would hang them in bundles beside the fire. They were called rush candles.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 13:13
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
on any day except on Friday.
More people think it is unlucky to throw out water in the night time.
Vincent Flanagan,
Kate O'Donohue(86 years), Glasha
Ballysallaugh, Doolin
Doolin.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 13:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Superstitions
Once there was a man who had seven cows and in the morning when he went out to milk them he found that they were milked before. This continued for some time and at last he decided to watch, so he took his gun and lay down to watch.
In the middle of the night he saw a hare coming to one of the cows and sucking it and so on until he he milked all the cows.
The he turned to go but the man fired a shot at him and broke his leg. Away with the hare over mountains and bogs until it came to a cave in the mountain. It went in and the man went in also and on the bed lay a woman with her leg broken, it was she that had come in the form of a hare to milk the cows.
Some people considered it unlucky to begin a journey
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 12:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
24. Children and chickens are always picking
25. What a good wife spares, the cat eats
26. All me not thieves that dogs bark at
27. After dinner sit a while, after supper walk a mile
28. Wide will wear but narrow will tear
29. Never throw out dirty water until you bring in clean water
30. A goose cannot graze after her
31. A quiet tongue shows a wise head
32. Age is honourable but age is valuable
(Collected by Brighid Loughlin from her grandmother, Mrs. Brigid Mc Gourty, Tullynaha, parish of Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim aged 74 years).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 12:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
12. As you make your bed, so you must lie in it.
13. Giving or taking, sleeping or waking,
Whenever you are, whatever you do,
Whether at home or whether you roam,
God's blessing rest on you.
14. God never wets anything but he dries it again.
15. A wilful man will have his word.
16. A word before is worth two behind.
17. God help the sick, the poor can beg.
18. God send you more wit (sense) and me more money
19. Never fall out with your bread and butter
20. Old bees yield no honey
21. The handsomest flower is not the sweetest
22. The weakest must go to the wall
23. The cobbler's wife is the worst shod
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 12:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1. " Round as the world that goes upon wheels,
If death was a thing that money could buy,
The rich would live and the poor would die".
2. You are better "your lone" than in bad company.
3. A light purse is a heavy curse.
4. A little pot is soon hot.
5. You are never late a bad fair.
6. A nice wife and a back door often make a rich man poor
7. You are a fool and it is a fault.
8. A man without learning and wearing good clothes
Is like a gold ring in a barrow pig's nose.
9. A small spark makes a great fire
10. A penny saved is a pound earned
11. A clocking goose gathers no fat.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 12:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1. " Round as the world that goes upon wheels,
If death was a thing that money could buy,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 12:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The district from which the oral traditions in this book have been collected is situated on the east shore of Lake Allen in the Co. Leitrim and is practically surrounded on two sides by the Sliabh an Iarainn Mountains.
It is certain that iron was extensively worked in the district in bye-gone ages more especially, it would appear, near the present village of Drumshanbo.
There is clear evidence, however, that smelting was carried out in this parish of Ballinaglera as heaps of cinders and ashes, coupled with oral tradition, testify.
In the townland of Druminalass in Charles Mc Gourty's land, there are the remains of what was once a smelting furnace.It is said that it was started by Sir Charles Coote about 300 years ago. A geologist who visited the district some years ago could tell by the cinders which remained after the smelting process how long since the furnace was worked.
The workers, it is said came from Holland and England. The Irish were given no work at the furnace, their duty was to carry the non-stone from Sliabh an Iarainn and work in the corn-mill which was attached to the furnace. Their pay consisted of meal from the mill.
It is said that the Simpson family (of whom there are now about four families in the parish) originally came here as iron-workers.
(From Mr. Sylvester Maguire: see note on bottom of page 113.)
duine anaithnid
2019-11-14 12:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Fairy Forts
Collected from Michael Brady Lisatoo Laragh Cavan
Written by Michael Reilly Castletara Castletara Cavan
There is a fort in the townland of Creeveland. It is on a farm own ed by Robert Rowntree. It is a round shape with a whiney deyke round it. There is an enterance through a gap. There are three forts in view of it. There is no enterance in the centre.
There was nothing remarkable ever seen about the fort. Long ago Robert Rountrees father used to labour the fort and their cows used to die without cause.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 12:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Potatoes were often used instead of starch. The potatoes are grated and the water that is left over when the grated potatoes are wrung in a cloth is allowed to settle at the bottom of a vessel. A kind of starch forms on the bottom of the vessel. The younger the potatoes the more starch they will yield.
(Cáit Nic Réill, pupil in the Slievenakilla National School, parish of Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim.)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 12:14
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
for hens.
The local names given to the various kinds of potatoes are Aran Banners, Kerrpinks, Blue Eyes, Champions, Epicures, Flounders and Dates. Champions and Kerrpinks grow best in this district.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 12:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
When the farmer is going to make a heap of potatoes, he selects first a suitable place. He levels the ground - usually a portion of the garden he has dug. Then he spreads rushes on place that he has levelled. He places the potatoes on the rushes. Each creel as it is full is carried to the new heap and the work is continued in this way until the garden is dug. When he has all dug he puts rushes on the top of the potatoes. Then he gets a shovel and he places clay on top of the rushes to keep out the frost and snow. The children come in the evenings and they pick the "poirins" (small potatoes) from the earth. They bring buckets with them for this purpose. The small potoates are placed in a bag and carried home. These small potatoes are given to pigs or boiled
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 12:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
piece of wood to which a digging iron is attached. The blacksmith makes the iron and any handy man can join the handle and the iron together.
When the farmer begins to dig, he stands in the furrow between two ridges. Then he turns the sod into the furrow and he sees the potatoes embedded in the soil. He picks the good potatoes into the bucket and he leaves the small potatoes on the ridges to be picked up later and carried home.

These small potatoes are called "poirins" (pronounced pó-yeens). When the farmer has the bucket filled he places them in the creel. When the creel is filled, he takes it to the place where he intends to make a heap.
duine anaithnid
2019-11-14 12:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
when they spoke of the Burning of Churchtown “As dead as Benlap”.
About midnight on the first of February the Whiteboys surrounded the barrack and those on the eastern side threw a volley into the barrack from a nearby wall. The boys on the western side threw sods of lighting turf on the roof which was thatched. Most of the police were killed and three private houses destroyed.
Next morning Colonel Gough came with soldiers intending to burn the whole village but only for “Sherriff Crofts” who lived near the place and a Father O’Brien who was in Churchtown at the time, the whole place would have been burned out. Three Whiteboys were killed and their bodies were taken to Carrigeen Bog and hidden in ricks of turf until later when they were buried. Two other Whiteboys named Brosnahan and Lillis, two important men, escaped to England but were followed by detectives and a friend of their own who gave them away.
They were hanged on Peggy’s Rock about half a mile from the village on the Buttevant Road. Another Whiteboy, names Singleton, was hanged on Knockardbane Hill near Liscarroll and the grass has never since grown on the place.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 12:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
working in conjunction all, one going in and one going out ,thats the way they play about?
From knitting needles knitting
What turns without ever moving ?
Milk turning cows.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 12:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
piece of wood to which a digging iron is attached. The blacksmith makes the iron and any handy man can join the handle and the iron together.
When the farmer begins to dig, he stands in the furrow between two ridges. Then he turns the sod into the furrow and he sees the potatoes embedded in the soil. He picks the good potatoes into the bucket and he leaves the small potatoes on the ridges to be picked up later and carried home.

These small potatoes are called "poirins" (pronounced pó-yeens). When the farmer has the bucket filled he places them in the creel. When the creel is filled, he takes it to the place where he intends to make a heap.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 11:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Why does a cow look over the ditch?
Because she cannot look under it.
What is cut and packed and never eaten?
A pack of cards.
What is always in a river and never in a flood, tis always in timber and never in a wood?
The letter R.
Betty inside the ditch and Betty outside the ditch and if you touch Betty she will bite you?
A briar
A sound as an apple, as flat as a pan, one side a woman ,the other side a man?
A penny.
Ink,ark,under a bank ,ten drawing four?
A woman milking a cow.
As I was running one day I found something ,when I found it I looked around, if I got it I'd throw it away and when I didn't I kept it all day?
A thorn in my foot.
Four little men both thin and tall
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In Autumn, the farmer digs the potatoes. When he is about to dig he gets a bucket, a creel and a little laighe. This laighe is known as a "potato-laighe". It is a short
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Then he sprays the stalks. He buys the bluestone in the shop in five-pound packets. He fills a barrel with water and he steeps the bluestone in it during the night. Twenty - five gallons of water go to every five-pound packet of bluestone. He buys washing-soda in six-and-a quarter pound packets. He dissolves one packet of washing-soda for each five pounds of bluestone. Then he fills a spraying machine with the mixture and he starts to spray. He ususally sprays the potatoes three times with an interval of about three weeks between each spraying.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
When the stalks are in full bloom, the farmer weeds the ridges. He stoops down in the furrows between two ridges and he picks the weeds out carefully from around the stalks and he leaves the weeds in the furrows. Afterwards he makes a fire of the weeds.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 11:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
away.If goats are up the hills.If the fog goes out the hill in the morning.Cattle turned with their heads to the wind.Swallows flying high.If Keeper Hill is clear.
Signs of Fine Weather from the conduct of Animals..
Swallows flying high, Robins on the top of a bush.Goats going up the hills.
Sayings about the wind
Whatever points the wind blows from on November Day, it will come from that point the greater part of the winter.
"The wind form the east
Isn't good for man or beast"
"When the north wind does blow
we shall have snow "
Signs of Snow
When the wild geese fly from the North towards the South
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
He gets a laighe and he digs the mould in the furrows and he breaks it into fine mould. Then he gets a shovel and he puts the mould on the ridges. This moulding is done only once.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
When the stalks begin to peep above the ground, the farmer moulds the ridges. He
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
a wooden tool called a "scíbín". It consists of a long piece of wood pointed at the bottom. With this tool she makes holes into each of which a "split" is placed. There is also a peg on the "scíbín" for her foot to enable her to make the holes easily. The girl stands on the ridge if it is lea ground. She makes a hole in the ridge with the "scíbín" and the child who carries a basket of "splits", places one "split" in hole. Then the girl bushes down the "splits" in the holes. This operation is called "setting". The girl who plants the potatoes is called a "setter" while the work performed by the child is called "guggering". She continues this work until she has the garden planted. Then the farmer comes and he closes the holes. In soft ground the farmer drops the "splits". This means that he puts the "splits" in the manure before he turns up the sod. He can also plant them in soft ground with a little "scíbín" called a "bucán".
The people help one another in digging up the ground. All the young men around the district come and help their neighbours. This is called a "meitheal".
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 11:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A circle round the moon.Soot falling down the chimney. Smoke in the kitchen. A new moon on its back. A red sky in the morning near Borrisoleigh. Lines out of the sun in the evening.The wind blowing strongly from Borrisoleigh or Garryglass. A fog coming in over the hills of Glenbreeda. A fog on Keeper Hill.If the hills appear to be near.If the clouds look black.
Swallows flying low.Seagulls flying inland.Dogs eating grass and drinking water.Bats sitting with their backs to the fire. Goats coming down from the hills. Cattle turned with their backs to the wind.Frogs coloured black.Dogs sleeping during the day.
Signs of Fine Weather
A clear sky. A red sky when the sun is setting.If the hills seem far
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 11:37
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time there were an Irishman an Englishman and a Scotchman working together. Funds were very low. Among them they only had the price of one loaf which they brought. They decided on going to bed hungry and the one that had the best dream doing the night was to get all the loaf in the morning.The Englishman told his which was a wonderful one, the Scotchman told his which was more wonderful still and Paddy dreamt he was hungry during the night and that he got up and ate the loaf-which was true.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
When my father is about to dig old garden, he levels the old ridges into the furrows. In "old garden" scoring is not required. He spreads manure where the furrows were last year. Then he digs in the same way as in lea ground.
Potatoes are sown in ridges in this district. A stit of spade called a laighe is used. Wooden ploughs never were used. However iron ploughs were introduced by some people about ten years ago. The laighe consists of two parts, namely, the shaft and the iron. Sometimes the iron is bought in a shop and sometimes the local blacksmith makes one. Sometimes the shaft is bought in a shop or any handy man or the local carpenter can make it. Any handy man can join the iron and the shaft together. Usually the iron is about eighteen inches in length while the shaft varies from about four to five feet in length.
When the farmer is about to plant potatoes he procures an amount of potatoes suitable for seed. Then he gets a knife and he cuts the potatoes into parts called "splits". Every "split" must have two "eyes". Then the "splits" are takne to the garden where they are planted. A girl and a child plant the potatoes. The girl carries
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 11:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
looking ghost was following him, but to his surprise the ghost was standing on four legs and he raised up his head and began to bray. That was enough for the man with one bound he was over the wall of the churchyard. When the other fellow came out he had a good laugh at the first fellow for running away -from a donkey.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2019-11-14 11:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
for the resurrection."

Once upon a time two men made a bet that they would walk round a church-yard at midnight on All Souls Night when the ghosts of the dead are supposed to be going about.Then the night came on which they were to do it. So they started from the gate of the churchyard, each was to walk all around the graveyard and meet at the gate again.
One of the men was only gone half ways when he fell over a big white man as he thought.He was very frightened and he got up and began to run.Then he looked back to see if the fearful
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Potatoes are grown on our farm at home. About three roods of land are sown under potatoes each year. The amount varies very little from year to year.
My father prepares the ground. Potatoes can be sowed in two kinds of ground, namely, lea and "old garden". Lea is untilled grassy land or pasture. "Old garden" is the place where potatoes were planted the year before. When my father is about to dig lea ground, he selects a suitable place for planting. Then he gets a long rope called a "scoring rope". This is a long rope to each end of which a pointed stick three feet long is attached. He puts one stick in the ground and he stretches the rope and he sticks the other stick in the ground. Then he gets a laighe and he scores along the rope. Then he measures three feet from the other scoring and he scores another line. There are two reasons why he scores, namely, so that he may have the ridges straight and so that he can turn the sod easily. Then he puts out manure with donkeys on the ground that he has scored. He gets a laighe and he digs the right side first and then he digs the "back-sod" and he spreads moulds on the top.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:23
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And in a letter he sent to her
These are the words he said
Farewell, Farewell my own true love
On earth we will meet no more.
But I hope to meet you in that land
The land beyond the sky
Where we will never be parted from
Your faithful sailor boy.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:22
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On a cold and stormy winter's night.
As the snow lay on the ground
A sailor boy stood on the deck
His ship was outward bound
His true love standing by his side
Shed manys the bitter tear
And as he clasped her to his heart
He whispered in her ear.
Fare-well, fare-well my own true love
This parting gives me pain
You'll be my hope and guiding star
Till I return again.
My thoughts will be upon you my love
When the storms are raging high
Farewell my love remember me
Your faithful sailor boy.
The ship returned twas sad to say
Without the sailor boy
For he died at sea all on his way
When the flag was half mast high.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:10
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time there was a large family living at the head of Glentogher and they were very poor. One night there was nothing for the supper and no money in the house either. Next day one of the wee-folk placed a half-crown under a bowl. This went on for over a week, till at last the master of the house wanted to know where the money was coming from.
The wife would not tell him, so he tormented her and at last she told her secret. The next day when she looked she could find no money.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:08
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Proverbs (from page 118) and Sayings

"Tá croidhe cruaidh na Nairí (Neary's) agat"
A story was told of a man who got drowned in making a short cut home - he had to cross a stream or river on the short cut. (This happened in the Co. Sligo, and the people (wife's) were Neary's or Neary was their sur-name. Náirí as Gaedhluinn.
and lived about Drimina, Tubbercurry, I think.
The son made this remark to his mother when the anniversary of his father's death occurred: "It was this day twelvemoth that father got drowned." "Well", said the mother "how many times could he have walked around the road?" "Around the road" was the long way, and safe way home.
"Ó a mháthair", said the son, "ta croidhe cruaidh na Nairí agat", so "croidhe cruaidh na Nairí" was often used towards heartless people.

* * *

In olden times when journey-men tailors went around to people's houses to make men's and boy's suits of clothes - there was a woman so stingy - "hard" was the word used for stingy people, there was a woman who grudged the tailor the amount of butter he used
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:06
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else five and six. The old man not yet awake did not answer. The conductor said loudly to him five and six, and he woke up and said "eleven."
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:06
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There is a main road leading from the village of Dowra to Drumshanbo boardring Lake Allen in many places. The upper portion of this road is known as the "Drumshanbo road". while the part near the village of Dowra is called "the Dowra road". The parish church of Ballinaglera, (co Leitrim) is situated adjacent to this road and about 3 miles from the village of Dowra. There is another main road leading from the Ballinaglera church outh through the mountain towards Ballinamore, that is out through the portion of Sliab an Iarainn which is called Sliab na Cille., It is known locally as the "mountain road" and was constructed in the year 1846 as a "relief road". There is a branch of this road leading out through the mountain in another direction. It was made in 1846 also and is known locally as 'George's Road". A man called George Hamilton made it. There is
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:05
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There was once a protestant man who put up a great building and he wanted no Catholics to enter it, and he wrote up on it "No admission for Roman Catholics". Paddy was one day passing by and he saw this and he wrote below it, "The man who wrote this wrote it well; the same is written up on the gates of hell."
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:04
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There was once an old man on a bus and he fell asleep. The conductor came up to him and asked him had he a ticket and he half woke up and said "wha". The conductor said again "your ticket please or
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 11:02
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taken away to the forts. The old people used to see crowds of people with coffins on their shoulders at the forts. It is supposed that the "Danes" built the forts to protect themselves from attack. The "Danes" were supposed to live in them. There used to be cats seen frequently about the forts. They were called "wild cats". Any owners of the land who would interfere with the forts would have some mark left on them that would never be cured.
Lights used to be seen in the forts. Music used to be heard also in the forts. The music used to sound like that of a flute-player.
(Collected by Cáit Nic Réill as on page 114)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:58
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There are "Fairy Forts" in the school district. They are called forts. There is a fort in the townland of Slievenakilla beside the Lodge River. The forts are within view of one another. This fort is circular in shape. There is a fence of stone around the fort and there are "lone" bushes. There is an entrance hole in the centre. The old people used to be afraid to go near the forts at night because some people were
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:55
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horses hair from the people and they made brushes from the hair. Then they sold the brushes in the shops. In this way they made money. The people had more welcome for them long ago than now. They remained for a night in every district. They had no food with them. They got flour and meal from the people. Sometimes they went singly and sometimes in bands. The Connolly's were the best known in this district. They came mostly in the Summer. The people gathered around them and they told stories and they brought news from distant parts. They sang old songs also.
(Cáit Nic Réill as on page 114)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:53
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This place - Tullogher - is not very far from Carraig Seabhac where the "tithe-war" made a great stir in 1934 as History tells us. The following incident is related locally: A bull was driven by a crowd of Boys from Carrig Seabhac to Rosbercon; the bull had a placard on his forehead with the words "No bidder, alas!" printed on it. The young men were kicking a ball in front of them at the same time. The ball represented the tithes, and they buried it in front of the parson's house in Rosbercon. The bull must have been taken by bailiffs in lieu of tithes, but they could get nobody to buy the animal.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:52
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"Travelling Folk" come to our house now but they are not as numerous as long ago. They were poor. They sold little articles. They carried bags and they sold pins, combs, needles and brooches and other things. The people bought from them. They got
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:51
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a scattered funeral was a sign there would soon be another funeral in same family. And I heard the advice "Never be the first or the last at a funeral" - some spirit - a woman I think had a scarf in her hand which she waved to hit somebody - and that person would be next to die, and the first or last were more likely to be struck (these are Co. Sligo customs and sayings)

In Co. Kilkenny it is the custom to give a suit of clothes which belonged to the dead person to some relative, who wore them three Sundays in succession to Mass in the church where dead person attended Msss, and to receive Holy Communion on the last Sunday. An old woman died here, her daugher was appointed to wear clothes. This daughter was a married woman with a big family, and as dead woman had been bed-ridden for years a suit of clothes - costume, hat, shoes and stockings etc. were brought for her, and she went to Mass in Tullogher for three Sundays in succession etc. and of course prayed for dead person. It is a good and a charitable custom, as often when there is no member of family right height etc. to wear clothes they are given to a neighbour who perhaps may need them. This was done so that if
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:51
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the dead person "came back" he or she would have clothes to wear. Sometimes the dying person said "Get "so and so" to wear my clothes." Here is a story in connection with this custom:-

Robin Quinn of Ballyfoyle, Tullogher father of the present Pasty Quinn of same townsland died about 50 years ago. Some time previous to his death he had left his own house, so he died in the house of his son-in-law, Tom O'Neill of Strarlán, which is only a short distance away from Ballyfoyle.
Shortly after Robin's death Tom O'Neill overtook a few men on the road late one night as he was coming home from Cuairtuigheacht (coordtheechimh it is called). One of these men was Robin Quinn and Tom quite forgot that he was dead. They all talked a little while until they came to Tom Neill's house when the latter said "Wont you com in Robin?" "I'll go there no more" Robin answered, but send my stick down to Patsy, I never wanted it worse. Patsy was the brother or rather the son who got HIS (Robin's) clothes to wear. Tom O'Neill went in home, and only then he remembered Robin's death, and needless to say he got a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:50
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On the 1st February the people think it lucky to plough. The 28th of May is lucky to change from one house to another.
Friday is a lucky day to being to cut turf. It is unlucky to begin any work on Saturday. The Cross-Days of the year are known in this district. They are the Riabóg Days, Easter Sunday, Palm Sunday and the 1st. of May. The people used to keep their cattle tied in on those days because they were very cold. It is lucky to plant potatoes on Good Friday. Potatoes should be planted before the 21st April. It is unlucky to borrow anything or to put out ashes on 1st. May.
(Cáit Nic Réill pupil in Slievenakilla National School, Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim, from her father, Francis Mc Grail of Slievenakilla, aged 66 years).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:45
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There is another mass rock above John Kearney's. It is shaped roughly like a heart. There is no mark on this rock. Neither is there any path about it. It is turned on its side a little on account of how long it has been there.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:43
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There is another mass rock over in Neilly Diver's field in the Whinfield but there is not much word about this one.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:41
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His is dead this two and
twenty years said the
Turf man from Ardee.
VI.
He spoke about his country cause
And how we were oppressed
We have learned men in
Parlement
Our wrongs to redress
But they are all a blumen
hum bog said the
Turf man from Ardee.
VII.
I heard a cheery voice which
I knew very well
Asking this old man his load of turf to sell.
I shook this noble hand of his
Then bowed respectfully
For I hoped to meet some future day with
The turf man from Ardee.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:41
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There was an old gentleman one time and his wife living very happily near the plantation at the head of Glentogher. They had twelve sons and no daughter.
One day the wife was standing at the window. The snow lay deep on the ground and a raven was scraping it. The wife sighed and said, "I wish I had a daughter as white as snow and her hair as black as a raven. A fairy women. heard her saying this and she said that her request would be granted.
About a year after that a daughter was born just as she had
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:41
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We'll hurl them to damnation,
Oh! where is the chap would be so slack,
As not join our combination.
A dollar a day, it is my pay,
My master likes me well, Sir,
I have good luck in America,
Since I shot Parson Bell, Sir.
Two Peelers came in one day,
Saying "Dolan now you're taken"
Pop, pop went my pistol
They found they were mistaken".
Dolan lived to be an old man in California. A cousin to my father worked with him for a number of years out there. His name was Edward Dolan. From him I heard the story.
Living relatives of Padrey Dolan are Patrick and Ellen Dolan, Druminafinnla Barr, parish of Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim and Katie Clancy, townland of Corralubber, same parish.
( I am indebted to Mr. Sylvester Maguire of Urbal Barr, Ballinaglera, Co. Leitrim for this story as well as for many other pieces of folklore in this book. Mr. Maguire is now aged 68.)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:40
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After a time Paddy arose and drank it and went back to bed.
Awhile after that the other two arose to look for the bottle. Paddy heard them and pretending that he was only awaking asked them what they were looking for. They said "nothing". Well said Paddy "If you are looking for "nothing" you will get it in that empty bottle on the table"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:39
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III
Your cart is wreat and worn friend
Your ass seems very old
It must be twenty summers
since the animal was fooled
Yoked in a trap when I was
born in September forty three
He canted for the midwife said
The Turf man from Ardee.
IV.
My cart must be made
out of the best of wood
I'm sure it must be in use
at the time of Noes flood
The axle never wanted grease
Save one year out of two
Its a real old Carrack
Axle said the turf man from Ardee.
V.
In truth I never drove
old Jack unshod.
Though oft I did abuse him
with this old hasel rod.
The harness upon his neck
was made by John Magee.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:39
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[/]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:39
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coming with the door. He scolded her for taking it and she said "Sure you told me to pull the door after me" and said she "it will come in useful yet".
Then they came to a plantation, and they put the door up on the trees and lay on it for the night. At dawn the woman heard talking, and she made so great a fuss that she fell down on top of a fire. These people whom she heard talking were robbers and they ran away leaving all their money behind. Johnnie and his wife for the money and were rich forever.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:38
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The woman everything about God and Adam. Then he asked her did she hear of the "Fall of Adam" and she thinking it was her own husband said "Yes and a good splashing he got".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:37
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and a donkey's cart. "I say Paddy its a better job you should have been in said the Yank and he slunk away.
"Good-evening ;" said Paddy
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:35
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There is another poet living in Slane called John Gallaher. He is a labourer and works with the minster in Slane. He write poems about fairies and fairy-land. His poems be often in the Drogheda Independent.
There was another man that used to make songs called (?). He made the song "The turf man from Ardee." This is the song.
For sake of health I took a walk at early dawn
I meet a jolly gentle man as both we walked along
The greatest conversation passed between himself and me
And at last I was acquainted with the Turf man from Ardee.
II
We chatted very freely as we walked along the road
He said my ass is tired and I want to sell my load,
And we were weary of our journey said
The Turf man from Ardee.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:35
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pistol and walking over to the gate he saw the person having to get out of his car to open the gate. Dolan advanced towards him, bade him good night, and asked the Parson what time it was. The Parson stooped to take out his watch. Then his little son shouted "Oh! Dadda, he is going to shoot you!"
The warning was late. Dolan had fired and the Parson was rolling on the ground mortally wounded with a bulled through his head. He died in a few minutes.
Hoever the authorities got to know Dolan was the man who shot him the whole countryside was surrounded by military, horse and foot. The police scoured every inch of the country, all around but they could find no trace of Dolan although he was near enough to his enemises for three days. He was during that time in Crossdoney Lough with his nose just over water. His friends came at night with food and drink.
In this way he baffled the forces of the crown until he was smuggled on board ship at Drogheda and finally landed in America.
Two police followed him and came to where he worked for a farmer out west. They met the same fate at his hands as Parson Bell as the following verses show:-

" Molly's sons with drums and guns, with pikes and pitch forks flancing,
They dread no steel but came to the field, where thousands they were dancing,
It was to Crossdoney I repaired not fearing Parson Bell, Sir,
It was at his brain I took close aim and hurled him down to hell, Sir,
With my ring a dom do away with the crew,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:31
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it would kill all the young birds in the eggs. The pheasant is mostly used as food.
The sparrow builds in the eaves of houses. She builds with hay mud and feathers. The sparrow is a small bird and she lays about five eggs. She stays mostly around the houses. If you robbed her nest she would forsake it and never build there again.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:30
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the walls and pictures to decorate the house.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-11-14 10:30
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one could get up to it. If the crow builds her nest on the second of March their is going to be good weather that year.
The pigeon is of a brighter colour than the hawk. She lays two eggs. It is said that the crow showed the pigeon how to build a nest, she put a few sticks across and the pigeon put a few more on it. Ever since she has a flat nest.
The hawk is a slate gray bird. She kills chicken a wild birds she flys suddenly down on their backs and takes them away and kills them when she is far off. It is said that it is unlucky to kill a hawk.
The pheasant is a very big bird. She builds in a tuft of rushes. She lays fifteen eggs. The cock has lovely coloured feathers. It is said that if the cock crowed beside the nest