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Transcripts count: 9
  1. Queen Scotia's Glen

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Thomas Higgins
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    80

    About two miles from this school there is a place called Queen Scotia's Glen it is said that Queen Scotia was buried there. Many people go to visit the place. There is a large flat stone with Ogham signs along its edge, which is believed to mark her burial place.
    She was the daughter of King Phaorah of Egyept. Her husband's name was Miled. He was killed fighting the Dedannans and she took his place and was killed also. The glen is called Gleann-Scoithín.

  2. (no title)

    About two miles from the present town of Tralee there is a beautiful glen, known as Gleann Scoitín.

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Liam Evans
    Age
    75

    rode madly on. Her aim was to jump the glen, but she underestimated her horse-power, and the horse tumbled into the middle of the glen, killing the gallant queen, and breaking its own neck. The Milesians having seen the wonderful courage of their queen gave battle to the Tuatha De Dananns, and defeated them. The battle is known as the battle of Slieve Mish. In the evening they returned and buried the queen in the Glen. This glen has since been called - Glen Scoteen, or Scotia's Glen. Her grave is there to day and may be found by walking along the river which runs through the Glen, until a "meeting" is reached. A little up this little [?] may be seen and huge stone with many strange markings on it. This stone marks the resting place of the famous queen Scotia.

    In the same neighbourhood is another glen called Glenofaisi, also called after another Milesian named Fas.

  3. Queen Scotia

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Sheila Curtin
    Informant
    Mrs T. Curtin

    but failing to subdue them she fled to the stone and with a loud cry went underneath it. All the men were badly wounded and soon after reaching their homes they died but the woman never appeared there afterwards. She is said to have been Queen Scotia who was killed in battle there when the Milesians first came to Ireland. Her motive for killing all these people was to revenge her death.

  4. Local Monuments

    Language
    English

    There is a monument in the district called the Gullaine stone. This is how it got its name. Long ago when Queen Scotia was building a castle at Gleann Scotínn she sent her men out in search of square stones. She had a bell in her house and when she rang the bell it could be heard over the length and breadth of Ireland. Then her men knew they were in danger. They got a stone in Lerrig. When her men heard the bell they threw the stone away and ran to the castle. They never returned to it

  5. Queen Scotia

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Sheila Curtin
    Informant
    Mrs T. Curtin

    In olden days a woman appeared, near Queen Scotia's Grave, which is south of Tralee, after night fall. She was very fierce and strong and always attacked those who passed by in the darkness. She strangled everyone, even the strongest men round about, and left them there lying dead on the ground. The people became terrified and one night a group of men gathered together and agreed on going to the grave on that night. They had taken their places round the grave before dark and when the sun had gone down the woman came up from underneath the stone singing a song in some language which they could not understand. When she saw them she immediately attacked them

  6. The Ghost of Slieve Mish

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Peggy Kavanagh
    Informant
    William Hanafin
    Age
    70

    Old people in this district still talk of the ghost which haunted the pass of
    Gleann Scoheen or Scotias Glen
    which contains the grave of Queen Scotia, on the Slieve Mish mountain.
    There is not a shadow of a doubt that such a spirit haunted this lonely pass.
    The spirit would come in various shapes, and not alone struck terror into the hearts of the people for miles around, but actually killed some of them. At one time it would appear as a cow, at another time as a horse, sometimes again as a sow surrounded by a litter of bonhams, but always it changed into a fierce and terrible woman.
    Sometimes people escaped her wrath by being very civil and obliging, but others lost their lives on the spot, or got a severe beating from the effects of which they died. Let us take for instance the case of a man named Bryan Connor, a native of Tralee.
    Being out late on business and in a hurry home he had no option but to ride his horse through this pass (it being a shortcut through the mountain from Castlemaine to Tralee). Seeing a feeble old woman on the road he offered her a ride on horseback. The old woman instantly sprang on the horses's back to the surprise of the rider.
    They had not gone very far when the horse

  7. Cathair Conraoi

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Timothy Cournane
    Age
    13
    Informant
    Mr John Mc Kenna
    Age
    85

    Cathair Conroi
    To the north of our parish lie the Sliabh Mish mountains, where in the early times the Tuatha de Dananns and the Milesians fought for possession of Ireland. It is said that the attendant of Queen Scotia was a very beautiful maiden named Mish, and the mountain afterwards was called Sliabh Mish.
    One of the highest peaks of Sliabh Mish is Cathair Conroi about which the following legend has been told..
    Long ago, there lived a prince - Conguilbon in the north of Ireland. Anxious to procure a wife, he journeyed eastwards and at last reached an island, in which he found a castle surrounded by magic wheels. In the castle was a beautiful princess, but Conguillon was helpless as he was unskilled in Magic. He was about to return for a magician but one of his soldiers offered his services, stating that he was practiced in magic.
    Conguillon then asked his name, to which the young man replied - "I am Conroi, from the South of Ireland". Conguillon then ordered Conroi to stop at the wheels, offering him his choice of all within.
    Conroi then ordered all the men to move nine paces backwards - when the wheels immediately stopped.
    Upon entering, Conroi claimed the princess as his reward. Upon their return to Ireland Conroi

  8. The Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Nora Greaney
    Informant
    Charles O' Connor
    Age
    42

    Tonevane Road.
    There are four by-roads namely:-
    Annagh.
    Curragrague.
    Ballyard.
    Ballydunlea.
    The main roads lead from Tralee to Dingle.
    The men long ago used work for a few shillings a week. The men who were building the canal worked for two and sixpence per week, and a man named, Bill Culloty worked there for that pay.
    There is a short cut from Tralee to Castlemaine called the short mountain crossing by Foley's wood where Queen Scotia is buried. There is a short cut also leading off the public road from Tralee to Dingle called the Mamshurla road leading into Heel.

  9. An Exile's Longing

    Language
    English

    he knew
    All, all he observes would excite his emotion,
    The friends of his childhood may be but a few
    I would go to Killarney so far famed in story
    The wonders of nature to feast to mine eyes
    I would hasten to Muckross whose monastic glory
    Weigh back in the ages no sceptic denied.
    III
    The grave of Queen Scotia far up in the mountains
    Well named "Gleann Scoithín I would ramble to see
    I would then wander back and I'd sip at the fountain
    And stand on the "Beautiful Vale of Tralee"
    The scholar and pilgrim have oftentimes prayed there
    'Tis where gold St. Brendan now peacefully lie