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  1. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Edna Killeen
    Age
    12
    Informant
    Michael Killeen

    My native town is Claremorris. It is the parish of Kilcoleman and in the barony of Claremorris. Some time ago there were ten families of Killeens living in James Street. The street was called "Killeen Street". About forty years ago there were fifty Killeen girls attending the Convent School. The most of the houses are slated in Claremorris. At the end of James Street there is a river. There was a man living where the Bank of Ireland now stands named Maurice De Prendergast. He put planks over the river. Everyone that [crossed] it had to pay the tolls. Then the people called the town "Clár-Chloinne-Mhuiris" - the bridge of the family of Maurice. There are four old women living on James Street - Mrs. P.J. Killeen, Mrs. O. Killeen, Mrs. Gannon and Mrs. Flanagan. Mrs. Gannon is about seventy five year. Mrs. P.J. Killeen is about eighty years. Mrs. Flanagan is about ninety years of age. Mr. James Heneghan is about eighty five years. He lives in the Square. He was one of the Fenian leaders in Claremorris. My grand-aunt named Mrs. Killeen lives in Mayo-Abbey. She is over eighty years. She can sing Irish songs and tell stories. About fifty years ago the[re] was free emigration and a great many people emigrated to America from this district. The land is mixed both boggy

  2. Daoine Cáiliúla

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Josephine O' Shea
    Informant
    Mr M. O' Shea
    Age
    52

    There was a man named Michael Killeen and he lived in Bealatha. He jumped from one wall of the bridge in Bealatha to the middle of the road and from that into the field at the other. These words were printed on the side of the bridge :- "Michael Killeen.Two leaps". He had a sister named Bridgt Killeen and she owned a shop.
    One morning she got up and she started off to Limerick walking. She came home that night with two stone of tobacco and she went off to a dance immediately. She came next morning. She had an uncle named Michael Killeen. Some people at Johnny Downes' made a bet with him if he ate three grinders of bread with his hands tied behind his back while a young boy was running down and up.

  3. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Josie Ryan
    Age
    17
    Informant
    Patrick Ryan
    Age
    72
    Occupation
    labourer

    About two miles west of Newport there is a place called Killeen. The old people tell us that there is money hidden there under a white torn bush. Some years ago, a woman in Nenagh dreamt three nights in succession of this place, although she had never heard the name Killeen, before that. In her dream she saw a white thorn bush and was told that there was money hidden under it. On a certain day after, she was in Nenagh and asked somebody if he knew of any place called Killeen. He told her where it was, and the way to go there. She got a car and went there without delay when she was

  4. Graveyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Rita Maguire
    Informant
    Michael Needham
    Age
    90

    In this parish there are three graveyards, Killeen Kilgeever, and Doogh Mór. There are people buried in Killeen and Kilgeever but none are buried in Doogh Mór.

    Kilgeever is a sloping and square graveyard, Killeen is also a square one but it is level, and Doogh Mór is round. There is a lot to be told in connection with Kilgeever, it is called after the patron Saint

  5. Names of Places - Killeen

    Language
    English

    Killeen is a village in the parish of Ballycastle, Co. Mayo. It was called Killeen on account of the little church. It is thrown down now and only the ruins are left. Black nuns lived in the church.

  6. Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Thomas Gaule
    Informant
    Mr William Gaule
    Age
    55

    The Killeen road leads up by the Woodstock domain from Inistioge. It brings you to Killeen cross. The road to the left of the cross will bring you to Tullogher and New Ross. The one to the right will bring you to Ballyshane.

  7. The Old Graveyards

    Language
    English

    The Old Graveyards.

    How many Church-yards are in this parish? - There are two.
    Give their names and the townland they are situated? - Castletown and Killeen. Castletown is situated in Castletown. Killeen is situated in Killeen.
    Are all still in use? - Castletown is in use. KIlleen is seldom used.
    Are any of the Church-yards round in shape? - No.
    Is there still a Church ruined or otherwise in any of them? - There is a ruined Church in Killeen.
    Is the Churchyard level or in what direction does it slope? - It slopes towards the south.
    Are there trees growing in it? - There are.
    Does the Churchyard contain any very old tombs, monuments or crosses? - It contains tombs and crosses.
    What are the dates if any on these?
    Are the crosses ornamented?
    Are there crosses made of wood or iron? - They are made of stone.
    Are the people buried within the ruin in the Churchyard? - They are buried within the ruin in Killeen.

  8. Old Roads

    Language
    English

    at Killeen. There is another going in the oposite direction from Killoscully to Clonagheen. There is another path through the fields from Killeen to Killoscully & another from the main road at top of Crisanágh Hill to Coolrea. And at Maunsells height there is a mass path leading to Shallee and Cuighlea

  9. Other Local Places

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Gleeson

    North of Birdhill there is a townsland called Lackinavea this means the hill side of the deer. About a mile from Newport there is a townland called Killeen this means the little church. Alongside Killeen there is a townland called Barna which means the gap. About a mile from Barna there is a place called Riascwaile it means the marshy place where the village was.

  10. Graveyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen O' Malley
    Informant
    Tim Toole
    Age
    82

    but to their great astonishment what, when they awoke in the morning they saw what had happened. There are many other graveyards in this district. There is one in Doughmakeon another in Kilgeever and our native one in Killeen. Killeen is so called because it is situated on the remains of an old Church. There is a new Church built opposite it.

  11. Graveyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kitty Peppard

    When a child dies without baptism it is buried in a place called a Killeen. There is a Killeen not far from our place. It is a round hole with a circle of bushes all round it. Nobody hardly ever had anyone buried there.

  12. Place Names

    Language
    Mixed
    Informant
    Thomas Hunt

    The names of our fields are; Killeen's field, páircín Jack, the hilleen, cnoc beag, páirc an tobair, the new meadow, the river meadow, páirc na h-abhainn and gaírdín
    Long ago a man named Killeen lived in a field and ever since it is called Killeen's field.
    Páircín Jack got its name from a tinker whose name was Jack.
    There is a big hill in the field

  13. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Loretta O' Malley
    Informant
    Michael O' Malley

    Killeen is the name of the village in which I live. It is situated about 3 1/2 miles south of Crossmolina, 1/4 mile west of Lough Conn, 4 miles north of Nephin and about four miles east of Nephin beag.

    There are eight dwelling houses in Killeen, namely, James Gallagher's, Michael Gaughan's, John Water's, Pat Waters', Pat Browne's, Pat Canavan's, Pat Loftus's, and or own.
    All the houses are slated except one which is thatched and that belongs to Pat Browne.
    There are about 300 acres of land in Killeen. About

  14. The Landlord

    Language
    English

    The Landlord

    The local Landlord was a Mr. Briscoe Eyre of London. He spent most of his time in London and had several agents and clerks to see about his property in Ireland. He was one of the "Eyre" family who have been living in the district since the days of Cromwell. Another Landlord of lesser possessions was a Captain Cowan who lived near the town. Neither of these were regarded as exacting landlords.
    There were two families of "Lynhams" evicted from their homes in Fearmore. Martin Killeen, father of the Killeen family of Ballyhue was also evicted. The Land League build huts for them at Mayour Cross. Martin Killeen's home from which was evicted was in Keelogue, Meelick. A man, called John Horsman, got all the Lynham property for nothing it is said, but as this procedure was naturally resented he had to have police protection, day and night for several years. The

  15. Penal Times

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Pat Moahony

    East of our school over in Killeen there was a little church and priests used say mass there. People of the neighbourhood used attend the mass. The ruins of the church can still be seen in Timothy Mc Carthy's field.
    One morning while a priest was saying mass he heard soldiers coming so he ran away and finished his mass in Kilcummin. Another story was told that a priest was saying mass in Killeen church he was hunted by soldiers. He hid his chalice near Killeen house. In the spot where the chalice was hidden a spring well sprung up.

  16. they erected over the graves may still be seen. They are however too old to be able to read the writing on them. St Eadaoin who lived in this district was buried there.
    A story is told about this place. When the place fell into ruins a farmer used to put his cattle in there (out) on wintry nights. One night a thorn bush grew up in the door and blocked the way into the church.
    Killeen. There was a church and convent at Killeen. There were a great number of nuns in this convent. They used to cross from Killeen to Ardcarne. There is nothing left to commemorate this church except a small heap of stones and a