Text search

Transcripts count: 81
  1. The Local Landlord - Baron Hussey of Galtrim

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Owen Reilly
    Informant
    John Tumulty
    Age
    58

    sympathy with the poorer tenants on the estate and did not understand their difficulties and how hard it was to pay the "rack rents" imposed on them. The result was that there was a great bitterness towards the new agent.. On one occasion he threatened to clear all the tenants out of Clogher and said, "I will have the district planted from Hussey's to The Covert by May Day". An old woman who heard his say this answered, "A great many things could happen between this and May Day" Her words were indeed prophetic for Bund was shot before May Day.
    After the murder of Bund the Hussey family lived no longer in Rathkenny. They returned to their estate in Wales. The agents who came after Bund were much kinder; they built houses and had the rents lowered. The estate was sold to the Irish land Commission in the year 1906.
    The Hussey family burial place was in Rathkenny Graveyard. The Hussey family were Catholics but in the middle of the eighteenth century they lost the faith.

  2. Pisreoga

    Language
    English
    Informant
    James Rourk

    On May Day a garland was made of Collie Caoiris (Caortha Caorthan) Mountain ash? and the garland put round the churn dash.

  3. May Day

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Roisín Ní Gabhann
    Informant
    Micéal Mac Gabhann,
    alternative name
      Smyth
    Age
    66

    Roisín Ní Gabhann a fuair an cúnntas só ó na h-athair, Micéal Mac Gabhann (Smyth) Grange Mór, aois 66 mbliadan, Dairig sí an scéal ó ná athair.

    We out up a May bush now on May Day but long ago instead of putting up a May bush they used to throw flowers around the stables and on the top on them. They used also throw around the house and on the top of them. They not only did that on May Day, but every day in the Month of May. He used to do that when he was small.

  4. (no title)

    There was once a Squire names Squire Allen who lived in a house in Clondalee More now known as the Malt house.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kevin Keegan
    Informant
    Michael Keegan

    on Hansel Monday or on May day something would happen to them. The Squire gave milk to his workmen both on Handel Monday and May day. It so happened that the cows were giving less milk and the Squire thought somebody was stealing it. When the milkmen used to go out to milk they used to see a hare among the cows. They told the Squire about this and he determined to kill it. Next morning he brought his two greyhounds out and set them after the hare. The chased her round the bottoms and were tightening her up when she leaped through the hag's window just as she was going through the window the dog took a piece out of her leg. When the Squire got to the house he saw the hag and her leg bleeding and two feet of milk on the floor. It was the hag in the form of a hare that sucked the cows.

  5. Lore about May Day

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Lillie Mc Namara
    Informant
    Mrs Conlan

    Lore about May Day.

    One time not very long ago a woman in this parish gave away milk to a little girl on May Day. The next day the woman was churning and no butter came on the milk so she churned the second day and no butter came. So the third day she sent for another woman to come and help her and they churned and still no butter came on the milk. Then she sent a message to the Priest to ask him to say a mass. The Priest said if the mass did not do she could ask for any favour she liked. The Priest said the mass and she churned the next day and butter came on the milk as usual.
    People in this parish do not give away milk May Day because they say they would be giving away all the butter of the year.
    Lillie McNamara, Castlejordan.
    From Mrs Conlon, Castlejordan, Co. Meath.
    April 28th 1988.

  6. Pisreoga

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Séumas Ua Ruairc

    It was an old custom on May Day, too for the maidens to look into the well. There, it is said, they would meet their future partner in life.
    Another custom is when the maidens were returning after milking the cows to drag a briar after them. Then another custom was to bring home the May bush or to gather "suricins" or primroses.
    Though it is dying out now, but still surviving in this district, a custom was to scatter primrose or cowslips outside the front door on May Day.

  7. May Day

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick Gearty

    May day
    On May day, we make a May alter for the Blessed Virgin. We pull May flowers and put them in a vase and put it before the picture of the Blessed Virgin along with a little lamp, with a red globe.
    Patrick Gearty, Druminiskin

  8. Emblems and Objects of Value

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maggie Morgan
    Collector
    Peter Doyle

    honour of the sun, when he comes to his full strength on June the 24th. On May-Day when the "May bush" is put up the children gather flowers to put on it. It is said that if a person lit a "May-bush" and let it burn before the house on May-Day that house would be saved from lightning for a year and a day. It is also said that on May morning if a person got a snail and put it on a plate and sprinkled the plate with flour and left it there until sunset and then look at the plate the letters they would see on it would tell the name of the person whom they would marry also if the snail was in the shell the person would be rich and if out of the shell the person would be poor.
    Bonfires used to be lit on every crossroads in June in

  9. May Day Customs in Old Duleek

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Ronan Brennan
    Informant
    Anthony Wall
    Age
    50

    One of the oldest May day customs in Duleek was to light a very great May-fire.
    For about two weeks before May day the older boys of Duleek would go round the country robbing fenced gaps. If you were caught at this you would be put in jail. They would take gates off their hinges, and would rob all the gaps in Duleek.
    They would light the fire in the middle of the Commons where nobody would see them. They would be up all night at the fire. They would dance and sing round it all night. They would burn all the gates and hedges and gaps. About twenty boys would be round it. They would start the fire at about 12 o'clock when nobody would see who they were. The next morning the farmers would come to look at the gaps, but to their surprise, there would be not there.
    The women also make a May bush, and have all sort of flowers and presents and ribbons. They would be gathering flowers, all sorts of flowers, for it. It would be laden with primroses, violets, Cowsslips, and Wall flowers, and would have coloured candle on it.

  10. May Day Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Rosie Connell
    Age
    14

    May 4th, 1938.

    On May-day the children cut a small white thorn-bush, then they make a hole in the ground with a crow bar. They go off through the woods and fields to gather wild flowers such as :- cowslips, primroses, daisies, bluebells, wild hyacinths and they also gather some garden flowers.
    They make the flowers into little bunches and tie them with string. They make a loop on the string which they hang on each branch of the tree.
    When they have the bush nicely decorated with flowers and ribbons they go round from house to house carrying the May-bush. One carries the May-bush in front, and another carries after him with a little box and shouts : - "A penny for the May-bush."
    Any pennies they get they share them with each other. After May-day the May-bush is stuck in the manure-heap to rot.

  11. On May Eve it is a custom among the people to put up a "May Bush". A branch of a "sgeac" bush is but standing in the yard, and the children decorate it with egg shells, which they have been gathering for some time before. They also put bunches of primroses and other flowers on it. They leave it there until after May Day and then it is taken down.

  12. Feast Days - May Day

    Language
    English

    It is a custom for people on May Day to make a may bush and decorated it with flowers and egg shells and other things. They make this bush at night and when the people get up in the morning they see the nice may bush, then during the day the children gather flowers and hang them on the bush.

  13. Emblems and Objects of Value

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Joe Duignan

    the custom for people in this district not to eat meat on that day, to keep sickness out for the following year. On May day ity is a custom for the people to make a May bush; they get a bush with a lot of branches on it and hang flowers and egg shells on it. The May bush is made in honour of the Blessed Virgin.

  14. Shrove Tuesday

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Liam Snow
    Informant
    William Allen
    Age
    45

    On shrove Tuesday it is the custom to make pancakes with a ring in them. The person who gets the ring will be married before the year is out. On May day the children light candles and hang ribbons on the may bush and every one has to give a penny. It was the custom that the first person to the well on may morning and got the first can of water no body could take the butter of the churn for the year.

  15. On May-day the children make a may-bush They get a white-thorn bush and put flowers and ribbons on it. They also put candles on it. They stick the tree down in the ground and light the candles. Then they go around the tree singing hymns. The tree is put up in honour of the Blessed Virgin. The tree is taken down that night.

  16. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maureen Lenehan

    and eat them. On Easter Sunday morning the locals rise at cockcrow to see the sun dancing in water

    May-Day
    On May Day the local people make a May Altar in honour of Our Blessed Lady as May is Mary's month. In making this altar the statue of Our Blessed Lady is used. The children make a May-bush First of all a green bush is decorated with flowers and candles. All the children then dance and sing round the May-bush. Usually the bush is left out during the night and the big people do away with it.
    Hallow-E'en
    In this locality the people have nuts and apples for Hallow Eve. They tie apples to the ceiling and see who will get the first bite. They also put 2 or 3 apples into a tub of water and whoever takes a bite out of one of them without putting his hands near it wins the game. Another game is to put get 4 saucers and put water in one, rosary-beads in the 2nd., clay in the 3rd and a ring in the 4th. Now all the players are blindfolded in turn, and led over to the table with the saucers on it. The one that tips the water will cross the sea, he who tips the clay will die soon, he who tips the ring will be married and he who tips the rosary beads will be either a priest or a nun. This is a very old game.

  17. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Josephine Gallagher

    is also "hunting the wren".

    New Year's Day
    An old custom connected with New Year's Day is on that day that people should keep good and if so they will be good all the year round. If they are bad on that day they will be bad all the year round.
    Ash Wednesday
    The custom connected with Ash Wednesday is that people go to the Church to get the holy Ashes placed on their foreheads.
    May Day
    There is still and old custom kept up in the district and that is the making of the May bush. First of all the children get a nice little bush and decorate it with lovely little wild flowers, coloured papers and candles. When they have it decorated they sing and dance around it. Another custom connected with May Day is the making of the May altar. First of all a statue of the Blessed Virgin is put on a small table. Next the little altar is decorated with flowers and candles and hymns are sung in honour of the Blessed Virgin.

  18. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maureen Brady
    Informant
    Annie Brady

    There are local customs connected with many feasts. they are observed on certain days, such as, May Day, Shrove Tuesday, Halloween, Saint Stephen's Day and many others.
    On May Day a number of boys father together and go around from house to house with decorated bushes singing the following song
    "A long life,
    A happy wife,
    A penny for the May Bush"
    On Shrove Tuesday people make lots of pancakes and they put a ring in one of them. there is great fun in trying to get on with the ring in it.
    On Halloween the people do different things. Some put apples in the tub of water and sometimes a sixpence coin or some other coin and they have great fun putting their

  19. Festival Customs

    Language
    English

    On St. Stephens Day the boys dress themselves and go around with the wren. They play music at each house and get a couple of pence. When evening comes they buy sweets with the money they collected.
    On St. Patrick's Day all the Irish people wear a shamrock in honour of St. Patrick who planted the faith in Ireland.
    Shrove Tuesday is the day before Ash Wednesday. It is an old custom to make pan-cakes on that day.
    May day is the first day in May. On that day a May bush is cut and dressed with flowers.
    On May day the people put flowers at the door step.
    On St. Peter and Paul's night the people light a bonfire.

    A lot of marriages take place on Shrove because it is the last day before Lent. If they don't they would have to wait

  20. St Brigid will pray for the household.

    May Eve and May Day -
    Being on of the famous feast days of the Pagan Irish many customs have down to us which used to be practised on May Eve and May Day. The one that is practised in this district at present is the decoration of the May Bush. On May eve the youngest member of the family goes out and cuts a nice green bush and carries it home. It is then set up in front of the house and bunches of lovely flowers are tied on it with many coloured ribbons. Sometimes painted egg-shells are also put on it. When it is finished the children dance and sing around it and when night falls they light candles on it. Some years ago when the May Bush was decorated the children used to carry it round from house to house looking for money and singing "A long life a happy life"
    And a penny for May-Bush.
    The old people say that the young girl who goes out and washes her face in the dew at sunrise on May morning will always be beautiful.
    Lucky and Unlucky Days -
    The old people had strange beliefs about