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Transcripts count: 33
  1. Preparations for Christmas

    Language
    English

    About a week before Christmas the people are very busy. The woman clean up the house and decorate them with holly and ivy and coloured papers.
    About a week befrore Christmas the boys go off and gather holly and ivy to put over the pictures. Last I got plenty of holly in Mr Byrnes field. I kept half of ut for our own house and I gave the rest to friends in Dublin. I went for it with Jackie Sheedy and we brought a saw and

  2. Hanging up the Mistletoe

    Language
    English

    Mistletoe is got and hung out of the middle of the ceiling. It is said that if you walk under the mistletoe that you will have to kiss the girl walking under it at the same time. I never went under it at any time because I was sitting at the fire when the dance was going.
    Many people keep the holly for pancake night. If you burn the holly when you are baking the pancake it is said that you will live a long time.
    Another custom is getting the straw out of the crib. Last year I got a bit and I was never without money. I got a bit this year and so far there was only one day in which I had not got any money. If you get a piece of straw. You can get a piece of holly or ivy from the crib and keep it in your pocket and if you lose it within a week time you will have bad luck.

  3. Festival Customs

    Language
    English

    back, and the apple soap and holly are made to go round. And each person tries to snap the apple with his mouth, but it often happens that it is the holly or the soap he snaps. For this reason this night is often snap apple night. On that night also boys and girls get nuts and each puts a nut on the red cinders, then if a boy's nut and a girl's nut jump towards each other, it is said that the boy and girl will be married.

    St. Patrick's Day the people wear the shamrock and those who have friends in other countries send the shamrock to them
    Shrove Tuesday. This is the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, and on that night pan cakes are made in every house, and used for tea. The pan cakes are made of flour, cream, eggs, butter, and sugar. It is said that in olden times the fast during Lent was so

  4. Christmas Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Brendan Nolan
    Age
    13

    Every year about a week before christmas the nuns build a crib. First of all they put up the boards for a frame, then they put the 'stone paper' over the boards to make it look like a rock cave. Then they put varigated holly all around it. They get straw then and put the child Jesus in it. Then they put up statues of the Blessed Virgin and Saint Joseph, and the three wise

  5. Other Christmas Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Kelly
    Age
    13

    About a day before Christmas the crib is built and it is taken down on the twelfth of January. It is built on a frame and covered with stone-paper, and in the crib where Jesus lies is straw; it is said that if you get a bit of this straw and carry it in your pocket you will never be in want of money throughout that year. It is also said that if you get a bit of holly or ivy out of the crib and keep it in your house you will have luck and comfort in it throughout the year.

  6. Christmas Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eileen Finn

    Christmas is a very joyful and exciting time of the year. It is kept in honour of Our Saviours birth. Most Irish people keep the old Irish customs, - decorating the house with holly and ivy, lighting the Christmas candle and leaving it on the window to show the weary traveller light, making the plum pudding, staying at home and eating the Christmas dinner in the evening with the candle lighting in the table, going to Mass before day break and visiting the crib and wishing each other a Happy Christmas.

  7. Christmas Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Joseph Mahony
    Age
    13

    Christmas comes every year on the twenty fifth of December. The shops in Dublin are very busy selling toys to the children and Christmas boxes to the people such as sweet cakes, boxes of Player's cigarettes and other presents. The real work for the boys is getting holly and ivy to prepare the house for Christmas. There are many sweet things made such as plum puddings and sweet cakes.
    The children enjoy stirring the pudding. People buy the makings it, such as flour

  8. New Year's Night

    Language
    English

    Every mother keeps a piece of the Christmas pudding and does not take down the holly or the ivy until after this day. Some people play this trick on New years Night. If a girl wants to know what kind her future husband will be, she must go out in the garden at twelve o clock that night and pull up a cabbage head and bring it into the house. If it is a long one he will be long, if it is a short one he will be short and if it is crooked he will be crooked. Whatever shape the cabbage is it is said the man will be the same.

  9. Festival Customs

    Language
    English

    tub of water is placed in the centre of the floor and in it are a few apples and a sixpence. The person who wants to get either the apples or the sixpence must get it with his mouth. 2// Three basins are placed on the table one containing clay, one containing water and the a ring. A person is blindfolded and has to walk around the table three times. He then puts his hand into one of the basins. If he puts his hand into the one containing the clay he is the first to be buried, if he puts it in to the one containing the water he will go to a foreign country. If he puts it in to the one containing the ring he will be married. 3// Then there's hung from the ceiling by means of a string, an apple, a piece holly and a piece of soap. Each person's hand's are tied behind his

  10. Starting with New Year's Day. A general custom of that day is that at twelve the night before many fireworks are let off. Nearly everybody makes a New Year Resolution to keep for the whole year to come.

    Then comes 6th January often referred to as Little Christmas and the decorations from Christmas, but not the holly are left up to be taken down on that day.
    St. Brigid's Day, the 1st of February. Straw crosses are generally made on that day, and they are put up over the bed for a month of February.
    Shrove Tuesday sometimes called Pancake Tuesday. A custom is to take the holly off the pictures to make the heat to fry the pancakes.
    St Patrick's Day. 17th March. If it has been a wet spell of weather up to that day, the people say "I hope St Patrick will turn the stone now for fine weather to come.
    1st April called April Fool's Day, because a well know custom is that of making a fool of a person by saying a thing is there when it is not, and then by saying "April Fool" to them.
    1st May called May Day. The chief custom is

  11. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English

    There are several Fairy Forts in my district. They are situated in the following townlands:- The Rath, Mabistown, Holly-wood and Coolquay.
    There is a fairy fort at The Rath, Kilsalleghan, Co. Dublin. The farm was owned by Williams and Woods but now it is owned by Mr. John O'Sullivan. It is round in shape and surrounded by a line of scanty trees. Each night a coach drawn by four black horses without heads come from the rath. Sometimes five or six people without heads sit in the coach. they go up and down the road for about half an hour. Other times at 12 o'clock

  12. Christmas Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Brendan Nolan
    Age
    13

    men, and a star over them. There is a saying that if you get a bit of straw out of the crib you will always have money.
    Another Christmas custom is the Christmas candle. Everybody gets one, they are in all colours. They are lit on Christmas Eve night, and are kept lighting on and off during the Christmas.
    Another custom is to keep the holly till pancake night and fry the pancakes with it.

  13. Shrove Lenten & Easter Customs
    ---

    Patrick Graham, Lucan, Co. Dublin. son of a Sergeant in the Great War. Born and reared in town of Lucan. His fathers have lived here for many generations.
    Shrove Tuesday is the eve of Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent, a season of prayer and fasting. Pancakes are made on that day. It is a custom of the people to keep the holly from Christmas to make a fire with it to fry the pancakes. First the woman of the house gets a dish and puts some flour in it. Then she gets new milk and bread soda and lard and mixes

  14. The Wren Boys

    Language
    English
    Collector
    George Carr

    On St Stephens day many of the local boys go from house to house as "Wren Boys". At each house they recite a poem. Here are some of them.

    Mr is a worthy man
    And to his house we brought the "Wran"
    The "Wran" the "Wran" as you may see is
    guarded up on a holly tree
    A bunch of ribbons by his side
    And the "Wran Boys" to be his bride
    Haray me boys Haray.
    O Dreoilín. Ó Dreoilín where is your nest?
    It is in the wood that I love the best
    Under the holly and ivy tree.
    Where the "Wran Boys" came hunting me
    They hunted me up and they hunted me down.
    And in the wood they knocked me down
    Haray me boys haray.
    On Christmas day I turned the spit
    I burned my finger and I feel it "yit"
    Between my finger and my thumb

  15. Christmas Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Annie Gorman

    191
    Christmas customs
    We all look forward to Christmas and its customs, as it is one of the oldest festivals from the time of our Lord. The week before Christmas the people of this parish begin preparing for this great event, no one ever goes away from their homes on Christmas day. The houses are decorated with holly and ivy. Killing the and turkeys for the markets, and boiling the plum pudding are very old customs in this parish. A lighted candle is put in the window to show light to the people going the road and to invite them in for some refreshment's, and to show light to the people going to Mass at break-of-day. candle is lit by some young person with Mary to her name in honour of the Blessed Virgin. it is lovely listening to the people on Christmas morning wishing each other a happy and holy Christmas. I hope the old Christmas customs will never die out. Annie Gorman.

  16. With the wood which was required for the Altar in the Phoenix Park during the Eucharistic Congress, 1932 crosses have been made. Local people have obtained some of those crosses, and they are erected on their altars in the homes. They were made in 1933 and each cross is about a foot high.

    At Christmas people get holly, ivy and mistletoe, and they decorate the pictures and the homes with it. It is left up till the twelfth day (6 Jan). Then it is taken down and burnt. It is unlucky to take it down before the 6th of January.
    On Palm Sunday palm is blessed and distributed at the churches. Each person brings home a piece of blessed Palm and it is kept on the altar behind the Sacred

  17. Festival Customs

    Language
    English

    Whit Monday:- If you cut yourself on Whit Monday it is supposed that the cut will never heal.
    May Day:- On may morning the sun is supposed to dance, and if a person gets up early and washes his face with the dew he wont get a headache during the year. The twelve Days of Christmas :- On Christmas Day the usual customs are observed, that is decorating the house with holly and ivy and mistletoe. Everyone to be in his own home on Christmas night and Christmas Day, and get Holy Communion and three masses. It is usual to have a turkey for dinner on that day, and a plum-pudding for tea. Young children get presents on Christmas Day. It is also the custom to have a Christmas candle and it is left lighting on the window during Christmas night.
    New Year's Day :- On New year's eve every one tries to be in his own home. It is believed

  18. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Máire Ní Mheanman

    Shrove Tuesday is a morable feast, and the people call it Pancake night because long ago the people used to eat pancakes instead of meat. Now the people keep the holly, and ivy from Christmas until Shrove Tuesday, and then they burn it to cook the pancakes.

    On Ash Wednesday the people in olden times used to keep it a black fast, and they used not to eat any butter or eggs, or cheese or use any milk. But now the fast is not so strict. There are some people who still keep that fast. Ash Wednesday is the beginning of Lent. The people go to the Church to get Blessed Ashes on their forehead.

  19. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Mahon
    Informant
    Mrs Mahon
    Age
    50

    start mumming. They meet at a fixed place and dress up in old clothes and put on false faces so that people will not recognise them. They bring a musical instrument with them such as a French fiddle or a melodian and they act sing and dance in each house.
    One acts so Room Rhyme another as "Prince George" and others are "The Doctor" "The Wren" For Butcher and so on. Each one has a different rhyme. Nearly everybody gives them sixpence or a shilling.
    They go round until the sixth of January and on that night they divide the proceeds equally. Sometimes if they have enough money they get up a party and dance.
    It is customary in this place to burn the holly and ivy which have been left up since Christmas under the pancakes on Shrove Tuesday. It is a custom here also not to eat meat on St Stephens Day. This is supposed to keep away sickness the

  20. Local Christmas Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kevin White
    Age
    13

    All Christian countries in the world have their own pecualer Christmas customs to mark the blessed season of the birth of the Lord, but I am only going to tell our own customs in the district.

    The house is whitewashed and the furniture is scrubbed the house is decorated with holly and ivy and the christmas dinner is a chicken or turkey the christmas pudding is boiled a week before christmas and is boiled for twelve hours.
    In parts of Ireland where old customs are maintained the people leave lighted candles on their windows on Christmas Eve, as an invitation to all who like Mary and Joseph on the first Christmas Eve, may be wandering about unable to find shelter for the night, in every part of Ireland wanderers and tramsp are welcomed everywhere.
    Boys called mummers dress up in old clothes and puts on a false face go around from house to house for forthnight after Christmas they sing dance and play music.
    Christmas is a time of peace because it was