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Transcripts count: 48
  1. Local Fairs

    Language
    English

    the twenty-fourth of September, the eighth of November, the fifteenth of December and the twenty ninth of June. There are special fairs for pigs on the eves of these days, but there is no special horse fair.

  2. The Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Stasia Lanigan
    Informant
    William Lanigan
    Age
    45

    now. Egg money is supposed to be very lucky so it is generally given when buying anything. People talk Irish in some parts of Kerry at fairs but English is spoken in Tarbert.

  3. Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Éamonn Ó Catháin

    seller's hand. This is done to show their agreement.
    When the animals are sold they are marked in various ways such as, marking the cow's back with puddle, cowdung and car grease. Also some of the hair is snipped of their backs with scissors and sometimes they are marked with raddle. The big fairs of the year are 13th of May, twenty-fifth of July, and the twenty-eight of October.

  4. (no title)

    When I was a boy about 40 years ago there was a well known character in Listowel, whose real name was Patrick O'Conner but who was popularly known as Patsy the Cuttoner.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    William Keane

    When I was a boy about 40 years ago there was a well known character in Listowel, whose real name was Patrick O'Conner but who was popularly known as Patsy the Cuttoner. The cottoner figured in many an escapade and many a wild prank. He lived in Church St., Listowel. His father was a brogue maker. At the big fairs in Listowel and Abbeyfeale he used have a table on which these brogues were exposed for sale. These brogues were stitched by the hand and a good tradesman could make at least

  5. Local Crafts - Weavers

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Miss O Connor
    Occupation
    teacher
    Informant
    Mr O Connor

    Sometimes the weavers bought up the flax thread and wove the cloth, selling it afterwards at a profit. These weavers or their wives could be seen at all the local fairs with great rolls of cloth, which they sold usually to shop-keepers or town inhabitants.
    For measuring the cloth they used a piece of stick about 3' long which they called a bandle. The cloth was usually sold at 1s 4d or 1s 6d per yd.

  6. Travelling Folk

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Pádraig Mac Síthigh
    Informant
    Pádraig Mac Síthigh

    Others make nice paper flowers for which they get ready sale; others sell lace, and tell fortunes, for which you must cross their hand with a silver coin. They make a lot of money through the country in these transactions.
    The men make tins, saucepans, gallons, and other articles, and sell them. They also deal in donkeys and mules. The Sheridans are noted at the horse fairs, as they are keen judges of horses, and many of the big dealers would not buy a horse until a Sheridan

  7. Buying and Selling Long Ago

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Fitzgerald
    Collector
    Daniel Keane
    Collector
    Elizabeth O' Connor
    Collector
    Mary Finiucane
    Collector
    Thomas Hanrahan
    Collector
    Catherine Dunne
    Collector
    Eileen Hanrahan
    Informant
    Denis Dunne
    Age
    50
    Informant
    Thomas Hanrahan
    Age
    50
    Informant
    Denis Hanrahan
    Age
    50
    Informant
    Richard Fitzgerald
    Age
    45
    Informant
    Michael O' Connor
    Age
    50
    Informant
    Daniel Finiucane
    Age
    40
    Informant
    Michael Keane
    Age
    45

    filling of firkins. They used take it to town and one would get the value the week and the other next week. Drink was very cheap that time, porter was sold for 4D per pint. It was also very hard for the poor farmers going such long journeys to fairs getting up at 2 o'clock and driving their cattle with the aid of lamps, and then having to wait several hours before the buyer would come to them. They used have money made out of leather. There was once a man and he took a load of Oats to Killarney to pay his rent. Once there lived a man and he carried a small black cow with very big horns, when asked by the jobber "how much for the frame", the owner answered "handle bars and all going together". Another man had a very big cow and when asked "how much for the hearse" answered, "all according to how for you have to carry the corpse".

  8. (no title)

    Long ago people used to fight with blackthorn sticks.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Joe Walsh
    Informant
    Martin Kennelly
    Age
    58

    Long ago people used to fight with blackthorn sticks. About twenty men united and they met twenty others in a certain place, and they fought until the most of the people were killed. That fighting used to be going on in Newtownsandes between people called the Cooleens and the Black Mulvihills. They fought after Mass on Sundays, and when they met at fairs and markets they fought also. The parish priest of Newtownsandes often tired to stop the fighting but it was of no use. One Sunday they met in Newtownsandes to fight a terrible battle. They were fighting from about nine o'clock in the morning untill about five o'clock in the evening, and at that time one of the Cooleens was dead. That ended the fighting in Newtwondsandes. Every other Sunday

  9. Travelling Folk

    It is seldom that a traveller calls to our home now.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Culhane
    Age
    45
    Informant
    Mrs Lizie Culhane
    Age
    45

    It is very seldom that a traveller calls to our home now. The same people have been calling for the past ten years. Most of these people are very poor. Some of those people sell small things and some people buy from them. Some of them stay for a night and more of them stay for two or three nights. The people who have not caravans sleeps in huts. Any of them do not carry food with them. They ask for flour and eggs and many other things. Some of these travellers go about on foot and more of them travel in cars. The travellers go singly and in families and every way. The O'Briens and McCarthys call around here very often especially before races and fairs and for every feast day. When ever they stay a night they tell plenty of stories

  10. An tAonach

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Cáit Ní Floinn
    Informant
    Tim Flynn
    Age
    50

    Long ago the chief fairs held for the people of this district were the Nountanane fair, the Kilgobnit fair called the Pattern, and the Cloughaveen fair. The Nountanane fair was held on the 6th of July in Scullys seana geata field. The Pattern fair was held in Sullivans field, Kilgobnit. The Cloughareen fair was held on the 6th of May. Cloughareen is about three miles outside Killarney. It was noted for its dearness. The largest amount of money that was paid for a cow amounted to twenty pounds, and the largest that was paid for a pig amounted to eight pounds. Many pick-pockets attended the fair. The Nountanane fair was changed to Milltown, the Kilgobnit fair to

  11. Tales of a Grandmother Born 1830

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bridget Mc Loughlin
    Age
    57
    Occupation
    teacher
    Informant
    Mrs Johanna Crowley
    Occupation
    teacher

    There were at least two National Schools in the parish (Ballyheigue). Boolinshare and Kerry Head before 1840.
    The tailor came to the house of his patron to do his work. He received lodging and food and some farm produce on his departure.
    Marriages and christenings were usually performed in the evening, the priest coming to the homes for the ceremony. There the latter partook of the feast. Then a dish was passed before each guest to make an offering to the priest.
    Faction fights were of common occurrence on Sundays at fairs and at markets.
    At fairs there were tents where sweets, cakes, and fancy handkerchiefs with the slogan 'Vote for Daniel O'Connell and Repeal of the Union,' were sold. Coin exchanged hands pretty freely for these.
    Farm produce was cheap - four or five eggs for a penny was average price. 'As dear as two eggs for a penny' was a common saying. [Veal?] was sixpence per quarter.
    The houses were built of stone cemented with clay, or all together of mud. Most were innocent either of plaster or whitewash inside or outside. Many had only wooden windows.
    The hearth was open. About six feet from the ground and at the same distance from the fireplace

  12. Care of Feet

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary O' Sullivan
    Informant
    Mr Patrick O' Sullivan
    Age
    76

    wore those when they had occasion to go to fairs or markets. In a certain house there were four brothers. One of them got a pair of shoes when he was getting married. Whenever any of his brothers wanted to go to Mass or to town on any business he wore the same shoes. He carried them in his hands to the outskirts of the town and there he put them on. When he came out of the town he again took them off him and carried them home in his hand. There were no shoe-makers at that time but cobblers who went around from house

  13. Folklore - The Local Cures

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bridie Flaherty
    Informant
    Mrs Ellen Foley
    Age
    74

    the patient.
    Tooth-ache was cured. A piece of alum was put into the hole in the tooth. If any of the family had thrush or 'craos-collar' in the mouth, the woman of the house put in the gander at night, and kept him fasting till morning; the sick child was also fasting; the gander was brought in, and the child's mouth was opened, and his beak was actually put into the child's mouth till he breathed there.
    When a child was very bad with whooping - cough, the man of the house went to the fairs, and watched

  14. Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Éamonn Ó Catháin

    The local fairs are held in Listowel. They are held on the streets of the towns. Toll is paid on the cattle that are sold. This toll is given to Lord Listowel. Everyman that sells a cow must pay a custom of sixpence. A custom of twopence is paid on pigs.
    When a very good cow is sold luck-money of about ten shillings is given by the seller. Sometimes luckmoney of five shillings is paid but usually a half-crown is given. When a bonham is sold luck-money of sixpence is given. The luckmoney given depend on the amount paid for the cattle.
    When a bargain is made the seller holds out his hand and the buyer brings his fist down on the palm of the

  15. Faction Fighting

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John O Connor

    Faction Fighting was general about eighty years ago. A parish was divided into two factions and leaders of these were supposed to be the strongest men in the district. They were always bitter enemies and fought with blackthorn sticks which were seasoning for months. The fights usually took place at fairs, races and markets.
    In this parish the factions were the Cooleens and the Mulvihills. The leader of the Mulvihills was Daniel Kean, Libes, Duagh. On one occasion the Cooleens decided to prevent the Mulvihills of going to Mass so they lined up along the road. Sean Burns happened to be absent this morning and Kean and his men fought their way through them.

  16. The fairs held in Listowel are held in the street and in the square. A penny each is paid for pigs and sixpence for every cow.
    When an animal is sold "luck" is given in money and is called "luck money".
    When a bargain is made the parties concerned show their agreement by hitting the animal on the back. When an animal is sold the halter is kept.

  17. Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bridget Lyons
    Informant
    Patrick O' Mahoney

    There was only one local fair. It was called Beale Fair. That fair is unknown to the young people. It was usually held on the 21st of September and if the 21st happened to fall on Saturday the fair would be put back until Monday. It is said that cattle and sheep were sold there at that time and toll was received. Buyers did attend the fair. As time went on and other fairs were there no cattle or sheep were sold at Beale Fair but at the same time a pattern of the day is kept. Races and sports are carried on at Beale Fair. Luck money was paid. It was called a luck-penny. It is said the animal sold wouldn't be lucky if the luck money wasn't paid. When a person would be making a deal the seller may ask 10 £ for an animal and the buyer would offer him eight pounds. A man standing by

  18. Local Heroes

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Catherine Dunne
    Collector
    Mary Finucane
    Collector
    Thomas Hanrahan
    Informant
    Denis Dunne
    Age
    50
    Informant
    Daniel Finucane
    Age
    40
    Informant
    Thomas Hanrahan
    Age
    45

    The best footballer around Kerry is supposed to be Johnny Walsh from Ballylongford. The best swimmer around here is supposed to be Maurice Flavin from Sallowglen. The best weight thrower around Ballylongford was Willie Finucane from Asdee. The best jumper around Lenamore is Michael Neville. One day I saw two men fighting whose names were, Timothy O'Sullivan, and John Bambury from Lenamore. It was all over football. The best, and quickest walker around this direction is John Martin O'Connor. The best smoker around Lenamore is Pat O'Mahoney. The strongest man around Ballylongford is Robert Cox, from Lisloughlin. The quickest walker around Newtownsandes some few years ago was Con Brosnan, when he was training for the Kerry team. The best singer around Lenamore is Margaret Hanrahan from Moher, and the best player is her brother. Long ago people used to walk a long distance to fairs. There was a fair one time in Dingle and Pat Shine wanted to buy cattle from this special fair. So what did he do, but to send two men to Dingle to buy cattle and lost one coming home. They walked from Tralee home and they were not able to get up

  19. Travelling Folk

    Travelling Folk

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Michael Mulvihill
    Informant
    Mrs Curtin
    Age
    67

    our house when they come around. Their names are the O'Briens. They are not so very poor because they have a van. Some times people buy small things from them. They are never welcomed. Some times they may stop for a wek and more times they would only stop for a night. Some of them sleeps in vans, others in tents and others in barns and elsewhere. You would find them sometimes having food. Flour and bread are nearly always the alms they get. Most of these travel on foot and the others travel in asses and carts. They nearly always travel singly. The best known family of travellers that comes around to our parish are the O'Briens. With them comes the McCarthys. If there is going to be a fair they will come around a couple of days before it. They comes around before St Patrick's Day to sell harps and brooches and they come before fair days. Some times they would tell stories of fairs and things.