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Transcripts count: 4
  1. My Home District

    Language
    English

    supply for these works There is an island in the middle of the lake on which numerous water-hens have found a home It is surrounded by a thich belt of trees There are very large trout in this lake but the fishing now somewhat spoiled as Roche were introduceed some few years ago and they have multiplied greatly

  2. Food in Olden Days

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Nora Galvin
    Informant
    Mrs Robert Galvin

    In the olden times our Ancestors though they ate plain food were very particular about it. They generally had three meals a day breakfast dinner and supper.

    As a rule they rose at six a.m. milked the cows and did some other odd jobs before breakfast which they took at about eight o'clock. Then they had dinner at twelve o'clock, and supper at nine p.m. after which they retired to bed.
    At breakfast they had homemade griddle cake, potatoes and salt for dinner and oatmeal stirabout and milk.
    Our Great Grand-Mothers also made a lovely dish called Stampy. They made it by grating raw potatoes which they squeezed by putting them in a clean cloth. Then they mixed it with flour and spread it out very thinly baked it on a griddle and ate it nice and crispy with lovely fresh butter.
    They sometimes had trout or eel

  3. Trades

    Language
    English
    Collector
    May Rogers
    Informant
    Mrs Rogers

    Trades

    Candles were made in the homes boiled fat served as the candle, and dried rushes ( growing by the river )
    were put in the centre while the fat was soft, these were the 'tapers' and provides the light.
    Mr. Kelly ( Weir View ) was called the "soapman". He made all the soap for washing the tweed in the mill. He boiled all kinds of fat and mixed it with chemicals.
    There were great thatchers in Lucan long ago for all the houses in Ballydowd were thatched then. All the houses in Ballydowd were thatched, but they were blown down nearly fifty years ago with the storm.
    Fishing was always carried on in Lucan. In the springtime cars were always seen right down the lower road by the Liffey. Salmon + trout fishing were the most important.

  4. St Assam

    Language
    English
    Collector
    William Redmond

    St Assam.
    Many years ago a great saint lived in the village of Raheny. He was called St Assam.
    Where a great gentry house now stands is his monastery. It is a large type of building with large windows and a huge door. It is built of pure stone and has a large garden attached to it. It lies about one mile from Coolock.
    On the estate is a lake - full of speckled trout and pike and other fish. Along the lake is a river which runs from Santry. If you look in across the wall you can see a bell where the labours were called in out of the fields on the monastery farm.
    At the farm their is a lot of barnes and out houses where the monks hid during large raids on the monastery. Along the wood is a well. In the wood all sorts of wild flowers grow during the summer. There is a long path running from the monastery to Coolock church. Some of the path is blotted out. Before the road was built this was the way the monks went.
    About a quarter of a mile from the garden the well is situated. In this well is a stone with all the monks names on it. It was shifted from the roadside to the hollow.