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Transcripts count: 15
  1. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Michael Harrold

    Hidden Treasure.

    Long ago there was a road across the hill from Kiltanna, a townland in the parish of Knockaderry, and in the Co. Limerick, to Ballingarrry, a village about three miles eastward. A loot of gold was supposed to have been hidden there. At the same time there was a robber for trial in Cork, and he asked if there was any man from Knockaderry present that he would make a rich man of him, but there was none. The robber was supposed to have hidden the gold in Kiltanna hill. At the same time a woman from Knockaderry village had a dream about the gold, and she told four men. These four men went to dig for it in Kiltanna hill, which is now owned by Denis Sullivan of KIltanna. It is said that they dug

  2. A Famous Runner

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Annie O Sullivan
    Informant
    Mrs O Sullivan
    Age
    45

    Long ago there resided in the parish of Clouncagh a man name Darby O'Brien who was a great runner and footballer. The game was played differently at that time to the method used now, as they then took the ball all over the country. In those days there lived a gentleman near Knockaderry, named Evans, his mansion is still there. Another gentleman brought his team to play Clouncagh and Knocknaderry, and he told Evans to send Darby O'Brien away for the day. Darby was working for Evans and when his day was finished Evans gave him a letter to take to a gentleman in Cork by hand because there was no post at that time. Darby started away through the fields after his supper and was back with an answer to the letter, when the people were coming out from Mass in Knockaderry the next day. Darby's team were very downhearted as they considered they would not have any chance against the others. But he told them if they threw

  3. Drought

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Annie O Sullivan
    Informant
    Mrs O Sullivan

    In the years 1918-1919 there was a great spell of dry weather or drought in Ireland. The crops were very poor for want of rain especially the potatoes. The hay crops were light and there was very little after-grass. Springs, pumps, and rivers went dry and people had to draw water great distances for cattle and household purposes.
    In some places they suffered very badly for want of water especially Knockaderry. They had to draw the water three or four miles. Now, there is a reservoir built on the top of a hill near Knockaderry and the water is piped into the village, and Rathkeale is also supplied by it. The farmers also get it piped into a cement trough for their cattle at so much per head.

  4. A Funny Story

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Joseph Murphy

    the white sheets for their midnight serenade. Poor Darby enjoyed the joke greatly and told the tale at many firesides in the village of Knockaderry.

    This story was obtained from.
    Mr. Joseph Murphy,
    Post Office,
    Knockaderry,
    Co. LImerick.

  5. A Famous Runner

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Annie O Sullivan
    Informant
    Mrs O Sullivan
    Age
    45

    him them the ball he might be able to manage, and so they did and Clouncagh and Knockaderry won the match. When Evans heard that Darby O'Brien won the match for his team, he was furious, when Darby went to deliver the letter, he made a cut of his riding whip at him. Darby threw the answer of the letter in his face.

  6. Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Brigid Murphy
    Collector
    Margaret Murphy

    The Buck wheat field which belongs to James Meehan, Knockaderry, so called because wheat grew there long ago.
    Cluan na Closac, owned by Mr. O'Regan, so called because of its gravely nature.
    The Fortified gets its name from a fort that is in it.
    The Horse field so called because horses were kept in it long ago.

    Bridig and Margaret Murphy,
    Knockaderry,
    Newcastle West,
    Co. Limerick.

  7. A Drowning Tragedy

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Annie O Sullivan

    One night when speaking of death by drownings, my mother told us the following story. Long ago in the parish of Knockaderry near Kilmeedy, there resided a man named Mr Keating. He was a gentleman farmer, and kept a great horse, and used to ride to hounds, stag hounds, or deer hounds. One particular deer used to cross the river Deel in Rathkeale. Now, we are told, when a deer enters water, however tired he is, it makes him as fresh as when he started. Mr Keating was close up to him, when he jumped into the water, he made a cut of his riding whip at him, but it tangled in his horns and pulled Mr Keating into the water, and drowned him. The body was not to be found untill the deer was killed, his head cut off and brought to the river. Then the body floated. It is said that the deer was enchanted.

  8. My School District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Josie Harrold

    My School District.
    The name of my school district is Ahalin. It is in the parish of Knockaderry, and in the Barony of Glenquin. In the townland of ahalin, there are fourteen families. The approximate number of persons in the townland is fifty five. The most common name is Meehan. Ahalin got its name from the ford of the pool. The old people in the townland are, Mrs. Hartnett, Mr. McEnerny, David and Mrs. Meehan and Denis Connors. Their addresses are Ahalin, Ballingarry, Co. Limerick. The houses were more numerous in former times. There was a house at the western side of Wall's cross owned by Culnanes, and one near Hartnetts owned by James Cronan, who was a tailor and is now dead. There were

  9. Loch an Rí

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Annie O Sullivan
    Informant
    Mrs O' Sullivan
    Age
    50

    On the flat of a hill overlooking the village of Kilmeedy, is a small lake or lough called Loc an Ríog or the kings lake. It is in the townland of Knockaderry in the parish of Clouncagh near Kilmeedy and goes dry during the summer months. Long, long ago it is said there was a palace or mansion some-where at the foot of the hill and there is gold buried there.
    In the olden times the Fenia used to drill near the lake. An old man named Ned Connors or (Ned the jobber) used to sleep on the hill by night, he had one son, who dies and his father got imbecile after his death, and would not sleep in any house.

  10. Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Catherine FitzGerald
    Informant
    James FitzGerald
    Age
    48

    Fairs were held in Kilmeedy about forthy years ago, but are now held in the surrounding towns. Buyers never transact business in the country except that nowadays calves are bought in farm houses. in some villages in Co. Limerick fairs were held formerly and are now discontinued such as Kilmeedy, Knockaderry and a few others. In Kilmeedy hill the fairs were held adjacent to the village, and the field is still called the "Fair Field". A few days before the fairs the old inhabitants used to make meat-pies and display them on the window and sell them for a penny each. Toll is still paid on cattle sold, fee charged nowadays threepence, and sixpence according to the age of cattle. The money colleected is given to the Town Council. When animals are sold, luck money is given. When they are making the bargain the seller holds out his hand and the buyer strikes to show that the bargain has been made.
    Sellers, when selling horses buy a web halter to put on the horse and is given

  11. Dunganville Fort

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bridie Ambrose
    Informant
    Thomas Ambrose

    on the river wore away its bed, and is now about seventy feet lower than the fort.

    It covers about two acres of land and it consists of an earthen ditch, which surrounds the whole fortress. Inside this are two rings, which are overgrown with bushes and vegetation and in the middle of all, is a large mound, which may have been the foundation of a dwelling.
    The view from this fort is very beautiful and many aspects of scenery are to be found here. The Cnoc na Bhfoch, hills which are a continuation of the KIllarney mountains on the west, and the Knockaderry Hills, in the far distance. Houses bowered in tufted trees and flashing streams and waterfall add to the beauty.
    It is unknown when it was built and no authority can ascertain who its makers were. It may have been a dwelling place for kings, or a stronghold for soldiers. As a large number of small forts surround it, which may have served as outposts. it is also believed that battles must have been fought there, as human bones were found in the vicinity. It is a pity that is it not handed over to the "Archaeological society", as it may contain treasures useful to them.

  12. A Funny Story

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Joseph Murphy

    A Funny Story.

    Many years ago a man named Darby O'Sullivan lived at Knockaderry. he was an ardent lover of game cocks, and his birds took part in many fights. One Sunday poor Darby travelled to the western part of the County to receive a present of a bird. His poor wife biddy waited up all night for him, but he did not return. The poor man was found on a roadside at Grange at Magner's turn and his favourite game cock firmly held by its legs in poor Darby's hand.
    Darby was fond of relating the following ghost story:-
    It was a fair day in Rathkeale and at a time when clocks were rare in the countryside. Darby retired early so as to get his normal number of hours rest, as he knew he should be

  13. Bird-Lore

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Margaret Murphy
    Collector
    Maura Meehan

    for three weeks. Boys are told they get warts if they rob birds nests. The birds that migrate are the cuckoo and the swallow and the corn-crake hibernates.

    When swallows fly low and seagulls come inland, rain is approaching.
    This information was obtained from Margaret Murphy and Maura Meehan, Knockaderry,
    Newcastle West,
    Co. Limk.

  14. All Together Boys!

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Máire Ní Ceanntabhail
    Age
    13
    Informant
    Miss K. O Connell

    All Together, Boys!

    There was a family in ballingarry and there were three brothers in it. There wasn't a year between any two of them, and when they grew up to be young men they were very friendly and united. They played together, worked together, went to mass and wake and dance together, Indeed so united were they that they always began their undertakings with the watchword, "All together now boys".
    Well they were of a big race, and when they were men, they were fine stout fellows, but as often happens, therein was their trouble. Their home was small. The rooms were few, and so the three big brothers had to sleep together in the same bed. So large were they and so limited was their sleeping domain, that willy nilly, when one of them desired to turn in the bed they had to have recourse to their slogan and say, "All together now boys".
    (Miss K. O'Donnell, Knockaderry, Croom.
    Collected by Maire Ni Ceanntabail. 13)

  15. Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Brigid Murphy
    Collector
    Margaret Murphy

    Place Names.

    The names of fields around my locality are :-
    The Glebe, which means Church land owned by Brownes.
    Gluan na Gcapall and the puca owned by Robert Quaid.
    There is a field called the Cluan, owned by Condons of Cnockery. Sgeiltin Mairtin, which means Martin's bush, owned by Mr. Frawley.
    The wheat field belongs to Meehan's, Knockaderry, where wheat used to grow long ago.
    The rick of turf field where a rick of turf was made every year.
    The Black well field, so called because there is a small well in the field, which has water all the year round.
    The Lough field takes its name forma lake which was there long ago.