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  1. which means Kennelly's quarter, are two townlands in the neighbourhood of Kilnaughtin Church.
    Kilnaughtin Church was the old parish church of this parish, but it is now in ruins.
    The church was dedicated to St. Naughtin, (Neachtain) who is supposed to be a nephew of St Patrick. Some people believe that it was from Kilnaughtin Church the monks were fleeing who were shorn of their ears by the Cromwellian soldiers in Glouncloosagh.
    It is said that when Kilnaughtin Church was knocked, there was another church erected with a thatched roof only a short disstance from Kilnaughtin Church.
    In confirmation of this, a cross, some rosary beads and some bones were found there a short time ago.
    There is a blessed well about 1/4 of a mile south of Kilnaughtin Church. This well is called Tobernaughtin. The well dries up during the Summer but some water comes in i during Winter. The cause it dries up is, someone washed

  2. Old Graveyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Elizabeth Musgrave
    Informant
    Miss A. Musgrave
    Age
    51

    There are two churchyards in the parish, one is outside Kilnaughtin church and the other is also called Kilnaughtin and is on the lower road. It is about two miles and a half from Tarbert. They are both in Tarbert and they are both used. One is round, the churchyard in Tarbert and the other is four sided. There are no trees growing around the churchyards unless an odd one.
    There are a few old tombs and a few old graves in Kilnaughtin erected in the years one thousand seveh hundred and ninety six and some in the years one thousand eight hundred. There are a lot of people buried in Kilnaughtin in the ruin of the church. There are a great many graves not ever used. Some graves are covered with a concrete slab so that the graves could never be used.
    There are a great many wooden crosses in the graveyards. There are

  3. The Old Graveyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    M. O Connell
    Informant
    William O Connor
    Age
    63

    Thirty years ago, the plot adjoining the local R. C. Church was first used as a cemetery. The "chapel-yard" to-day holds about graves, and the P. P. receives ten pounds for each grave.
    The only old grave yard in use actually in the parish to-day is Kilnaughtin. The grave yard surrounds the ruins of Kilnaughtin Church, of whose history we are ignorant. This grave yard,

  4. Ruins

    Language
    English

    In Tarmons, there are no ruined churches, but there are still to be seen the walls and sites of many old huts, cabins and farm-houses.
    Years ago there was only one slated house, owned now by Mrs. Nolan. Lately all the houses are roofed with slates.
    In Tarbert there are two or three ruined churches. Kilmurley is now a disused graveyard. Kilnaughtin and Lislaughtin Abbey are the burial places for the people of the parish.
    Kilnaughtin was pulled down by the Ironsides, who pludered the Abbey and murdered the monks. Some monks tried to escape but they were captured. Their ears were cut off at a spot since then known as Gleann Cluasac.

  5. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Elizabeth Musgrave
    Informant
    Mrs Musgrave
    Age
    48

    The name of my home district is Ralapane, near the town of Tarbert, in the parish of Kilnaughtin and in the barony of Oighracht Ní Conchubhair.
    There are two hundred families in our home district. There are over one thousand people in our district. The most common family name is O'Connor.
    There were all thatched houses long ago and they are all slated now. There are seven people over seventy in the district of Tarbert. They do not know Irish but they can tell stories in English and not in Irish.
    Their addresses are; Mrs. Fitzell, Carhonakilla, Tarbert, Co. Kerry. William Young, Wesleyan Chapel, Tarbert, Co. Kerry. Mrs. E. Fitzell, Carhonakilla, Tarbert, Co. Kerry. Mr. and Mrs. Carraig, Kilnaughtin, Tarbert, Co. Kerri. Jach Shannon, Ardmore, Tarbert, Co. Kerry. Jack Riardan, Tarbert Village, Co. Kerry.
    Houses were more plentiful longago than now. Very few are now in ruins. A great many people emigrated from here to America

  6. The parish of Tarbert has two names. It is called Tarbert and it is also called Kilnaughtin.
    Kilnaughtin is the Civil name of the parish and Tarbert is the Ecclesiastical or Church name of the parish.
    he following are the townlands in this parish:-
    Doonard which means High fort. There is no trace of this fort now.
    Shanaway "Seana bhotha" which means old booths or huts.
    Tieraclea "Tír a' Tsléite" meaning Land of the height.
    Kilpaddoge "Cill Pacdóug" which means Church of the rush light.
    There is a tradition that a church formerly stood on the hill overlooking the Shannon where a rush light Páideóg) was kept burning every night to serve as a beacon for mariners hence the name Kilpaddoge.
    Coolnanoonagh "Cúl na nlongnadh" Corner

  7. In Penal Times

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary O' Connor
    Informant
    Mrs O' Leary

    were looking for a certain priest who resided at Kilnaughtin. When the Yoemen came to the priest's house they asked his clerk if he knew where the priest was. The clerk answered "As you were coming up the avenue, he passed you out, why did you not arrest him if you wanted to?"
    This is another story of the Penal Days: -
    Lord Kitchener's mother who lived in Ballygoughlin was one day sitting on a stile. Presently a priest came up and wanted to cross the stile. She asked him where he was going and he told her he was going

  8. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary O Connell
    Informant
    Mrs Quill

    graveyard known as Kilnaughtin, near which is a well known as Tobernaughtin. Naughtin is supposed to have been a nephew of St. Patrick's.
    Tarbert sprung up when the Br. Navy was a familiar sight on the R. Shannon. The harbour was known as a berth, and the sailors were known as tars, and so - the berth of the tars - Tarbert. That tarbert was named from Tairbeart is the most probable, and is the general opinion.
    Kilpadogue (Cill páideóg) adjoins Tarbert townland on the bank of the Shannon. A páideóg is a light of tow tipped in tallow. These were kept lighting day and night in an old church here. These rushes showed light to ships coming up the Shannon

  9. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary O Connell
    Informant
    Mrs Quill

    Tarbert (Tairbeart) meaning a peninsula, may have derived its name from the peninsular shape of townland bearing that name. The River Shannon washes its three sides. This townland is the demesne of the local landlord - Major Leslie. And old people tell us that Major Leslie's ancestors were brought over from Tarbert in Scotland, and settled down in this spot. They called their house Tarbert House. In time the village which sprung up was known as Tarbert. The parish was formerly known as Kilnaughtin.
    Two miles west of Tarbert is a

  10. The Old Graveyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    M. O Connell
    Informant
    William O Connor
    Age
    63

    Tarbert parish, Co. Kerry. Its rates are paid to Kerry Co. Council, but its owners pay dues in Glin, Co. Limerick.
    And most of us have our family graves in the graveyard which surrounds Lislaughtin Abbey, and is usually spoken of as "The Abbey". "The Abbey" is in the parish of Ballylongford to-day, but our claim to our graves goes back to the day when Tarbert and Ballylongford were one parish. It is larger than Kilnaughtin graveyards, and contains many tombs, and monuments of imposing appearance. It slopes towards the West. The

  11. We do not know who St. Murghal was as there is no local tradition of that saint now extant. The peculiar thing about this townland is that though situate in the County Kerry and subject to the administration of the Kerry County Council and is under the jurisdicion of the Bishop of Limerick since the 13th August 1807 during the episcopacy of Dr. John Young who recovered it from the See of Ardfert and attached it to the parish of Kilfergus.
    Unbaptised children only, are now buried in Kilmurrily though formerly most of the people of Tarbert found their last resting place there; till funerals were stopped by Col. Kitchener father of the late Lord Kitchener of Omdurman, who apparently owned the land in the vicinity of the church over which the people had to pass when conveying their dead for interment there. Many of the inhabitants of Tarbert then chose the disused Church of Kilnaughtin as a burial place though the greated number preferred the old Franciscan Friary at Lislaughtin.
    There is a wide-spread tradition

  12. here that when the Friars were driven from Kilmurrily they cursed Leslie, the leader of the priest-hunters, and his descendants to the seventh generation. As evidence of that curse the crows since then have avoided Tarbert woods and never has a crow been known to build a nest there. In confirmation of this it is related that in memory of people still living, when the wife of one of the Leslie's of Tarbert House was buried in the grounds of Kilnaughtin Protestant Church where grew a number of trees on which the crows had hitherto built their nests, the birds immediately after the interment set to work and tore down their nests, since when they have avoided those trees also.
    The road leading through Kilmurrily is known as "bóthar bruighne" "Road of the healing or hospital" shows that the Friars had a hospital or "place of healing" attached to the Friary where they ministered to the sick.
    Carhoonakilla, (Ceathramhna Cille) and Carhoonakineely, (Ceathramhna Cinnfaoileach)