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Transcripts count: 38
  1. Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    William Kenneally
    Informant
    William Kenneally
    Age
    48

    The Narnahown Road
    This road stretches from Keane's quay-wall to Mauice Pyne's house. it goes through the Corrin Hills and it is about one hundred years old. It was there before the Famine time.
    The Moin an Mionntáin Road goes from Patrick Carey's house, Doon. It is a very hilly road because it runs through the Doon Mountains and it joins the Ballyporeen Road at the Bella Cross. It was made during the Famine time.
    The Doon Road stretches from Jer Mulvey's shop Barnahown to Patrick Carey's, Doon.
    Barrets Bohereen
    This bohereen runs from the Doon Road to the Ballyporeen Road. Why it is called Barrets Bohereen is this - because Mr. Barret lived in a house there long ago. The ruins of the house are still to be seen.
    The Melleray Path stretches from Hennessy's, Doon to Clogheen Road. It goes

  2. Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Teresa Hyland
    Collector
    Margaret Drislane
    Collector
    Mary Flynn
    Informant
    (name not given)

    branch of the Barnahown road. It starts where we call Finn's Gullot. The gullot is in the townland of Barnahown. Then the road goes east through Doon. It then turns north east and it goes along through Foildearg. It meets the Clogheen road near Shandrahan Cross.
    There is an old Mass path from Doon to Ballyporeen. It starts at Martins in Doon. it goes north through the Doon mountains and down through Glenacuna and it meets the Ballyporeen road at Pynes.

    The road which runs near my home starts at Keane's Cross on the Lismore-Fermoy road and meets the Ballyporeen road at the end of Corrin Hill. it is called the middle Barnahown road. It was made in the year 1850. The local men that made it.
    There is a branch of the Barnahown road going off through the mountain

  3. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Thomas Brunncock
    Informant
    Michael Brunncock
    Age
    49

    This field is in our land at Doon, Araglen, Kilworth, Co. Cork.

    The Kiln Field
    This field is in our land at Doon, Araglen, Kilworth, Co. Cork. It got its name because there was a lime kiln in it long ago.
    The Furry Field
    This field is in our land in Doon, Araglen, Kilworth, Co. Cork. It got its name because there are furze growing in it.
    The Bog Field
    This field is in our land at Doon, Araglen, Kilworth, Co. Cork. It got its name because there is a bog beside it where they used to make hand turf there some time ago. They used gather the turf mould with holes and toughen it like mortar and then cut it with a spade like any turf and put it on the high ground to dry and when it was dry it used make splendid firing.

  4. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Brunnock
    Informant
    Michael Brunnock
    Age
    49

    not get at its inhabitants and that is how it got its name. There are thirty one families in this district and there are about a hundred and fifty four people in Doon. Martins is the name most common.
    In Doon almost all of the houses are thatched. There are many old people living in Doon such as Robert Martin, Doon, Araglen, Kilworth, Co. Cork who is 87 years old. Mrs. Kenneally who is 85 years. They have no Irish, but English.
    The following is a local song recalling the escapade of a James McGrath who lived in Barnahown,
    "James McGrath it is my name
    And I live by the Araglen side
    I often take a drop of drink
    And a little two much at times.
    Good news I heard one morning
    And my heart was overjoyed
    I took a notion in my head
    To ramble to Fermoy.
    I saw John Rice going up to Doctor Roche
    And I thought it was

  5. Old Crafts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Brunnock
    Informant
    Michael Brunncock
    Age
    49

    Lime Burning
    As late as fifty years ago every farmer in Doon had a lime kiln of his own. They used to quarry lime stones at the Doon quarry which is situated near the Araglen River. Some of the quarry belongs to Michael Brunnock and the rest of it belongs to Robert Martin.
    They did not pay any money for the stone as their landlord used to give the stone free to all his tenants. No outsider was allowed to take any stone out of this quarry but the tenants. They used

  6. Penal Times

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Thomas Brunnock
    Informant
    Michael Brunnock
    Age
    49

    Doon was a part of his parish at that time.
    He used also say Mass in a deep glen in the Doon mountains. He used hide there from the soldiers but Shannrahan graveyard was his chief hiding place in a vault under the ground 30 feet in height, where he was treated by a man named Griffith. The strange thing is that Griffith was a Protestant.
    His history is too well known to tell any more about him. he was captured at last by the soldiers. Some one related to him named Mary Denehy told where he was. A short time afterward he was caught and taken to Clonmel jail where he was beheaded.

  7. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Brunncock
    Informant
    Michael Brunncock
    Age
    49

    they called it the Cuailín.

    Another field in our land at Doon, Araglen, Kilworth, Co. Cork is called Peg's Field. It got its name because we bought it from Peg Fitzgerald some time ago.
    The Potheen Field
    This field is in our land at Doon, Araglen, Kilworth, Co. Cork. It gets its name because the remains of a dug-out is still there to be seen where they used be making Potheen there long ago.

  8. Churning

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Brunnock
    Informant
    Michael Brunnock
    Age
    49

    into a big timber tub. It gets about three washings and then it is salted and fit for use. Buttermilk is used for baking and as a drink.
    Obtained from:- Michael Brunnock (49 years), Doon, Araglen, Kiliworth, Co. Cork
    Written by:- James Brunnock, Doon, Araglen, Kiliworth, Co. Cork

  9. Local Schools

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Whelan
    Informant
    Mike Connolly
    Age
    71

    About ninety years ago there were a few schools around here. There was one in Túr na Gaoithe near Ballyduff. Mrs Murphy was the teacher. She came from around Tallow in County Waterford. She is dead years now. The people built a small hut for the teacher to teach the children. She used to live in that hut. She taught the children English language because the English Government would not let them speak Irish. They would not pay the teacher either. The pupils had to pay her themselves. Mrs Murphy used to charge the pupils five pence each a week. The pupils used to write with geese quils on paper. Sometimes they used to write with small stones on big flat slates. Mrs Brackett of Túr na Gaoithe went to that school and my great grandmother's grandmother.
    About forty years ago there was a school in Doon. Mrs Carey of Doon taught the pupils in that school. She taught them some Irish and some English.

  10. Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Teresa Hyland
    Collector
    Margaret Drislane
    Collector
    Mary Flynn
    Informant
    (name not given)

    leading from Mulveys to ballyporeen. About a half mile up the Barnahown road there is another road joined to it. this is called the Doon road. This road is leading to Mount Melleray through the townland of Doon. About four miles the road is leading before it comes out on the Clogheen road.
    About a mile west on the Araglen road there is another road branching north to Ballyporeen. It is called the middle Barnahown road. The road was made about the year 1850. It was made by the local men of the place.
    The road that passes Ballyheaffy school is called the Araglen road. A branch of it goes south west through Ballinalukena and Ducarrig and Gortnapeaka and meets the Mocollop road near Ballyduff. There is another branch of the Araglen road going southwards across the hill from Ballyheaffy to Ballyduff.

  11. Local Heroes

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Brunnock
    Informant
    Michael Brunnock
    Age
    49

    is still living used to lift heavy weights and large tables with his teeth for bets.
    Thomas Mór Brunnock or Big Tom who lived in Doon, Araglen, Kilworth, Co. Cork often brought sacks of wheat down to Clogheen. He had to carry it a bad road through the mountains to Flemingstown Hills to ge tit crushed into flour and bring the flour home on his back. He died about forty years ago and he was living in our house and my father remembered him well. He was also a great stone thrower and he used to challenge men from the County Limerick,
    The two Quirkes of Doon, Thomas and James, were noted hunters. Thomas is alive but James died a few years ago. They always kept a greyhound. On one occasion they were poaching for hares and the hound gave up after a long run. The Quirkes themselves took up the chase and caught the hare.
    Thomas Scanlon who lived in Ballyheaffy Upper was once a great mower. He used to go to County Limerick harvesting and he used to cut about three acres of hay and four acres of oats in two days. The people got jealous and told him that they would get a man as good as him in County

  12. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Brunncock
    Informant
    Michael Brunncock
    Age
    49

    The Tinker's Field
    This field is in our land in Doon, Araglen, Kilworth, Co. Cork. The quarry field takes its name from the limestone quarry which is in a part of it. It was thought that there was enchanted money hidden there under a large flat stone. If the stone would be removed at twelve o'clock in the night gold would be found underneath it. Some people who tried to unearth it were frightened away by human voices in the field next to it. That field is called The Tinker's Field as old people say the voices would remind you of the tinkers fighting.

    Iron Ore Field
    This field is in our land at Doon, Araglen, Kilworth, Co. Cork, where they opened mines long ago and dug out Iron Ore and

  13. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Brunnock
    Informant
    Michael Brunnock
    Age
    49

    My home is in the townland of Doon and the parish of Ballyporeen and its Barony is Iffa Offa. It is surrounded by deep glens and was therefore a fortress where the enemy could

  14. Local Schools

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Whelan
    Informant
    Mike Connolly
    Age
    71

    The parents used to pay for their children. They used to give her sixpence a week. The pupils used to write with chalk on slates. Elen O'Mahoney of Doon went to that school and she died last year at the age of eighty.

  15. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Brunncock
    Informant
    Michael Brunncock
    Age
    49

    it to the Araglen Furnace where they used make pots and kettles. They also found some sort of clay in the field which was brought to the Furnace and converted into all kinds of earthen ware:- Pans which were used for the setting and skimming of milk as people had no separators or creameries.

    Another field in our land is called Jimmy's Field because it was from a man named James McGrath we bought it as late as thirty years ago.
    The Three Oaks
    These fields are in our land at Doon, Araglen, Kilworth, Co. Cork. The Big Oak, the KMiddle Oah, the Little Oak. I suppose that there were three oak trees of different sizes growing in those fields long ago.
    The Cuailín
    This field is in our land at Doon, Araglen, Kilworth, Co. Cork. It is a very small field and I suppose that is why

  16. Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick Buckley
    Informant
    Patrick Buckley
    Age
    41

    It stretches from Con Leddy's to Michael Cahill's. This road was there sixty years ago.

    Lyre Road
    It stretches from Tom Donovan's, Lyre, to Tom Clancy's. This road is there for eighty years.
    Donovan's Bohereen
    This road stretches from John Gorman's to Con Donovan's. Liss. This road is not much used now.
    Doon Road.
    This road stretches from Kiely's to Mr. Baldwin's, Doon. This road is not much used now.

  17. Old Crafts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Jeremiah O' Mahoney
    Informant
    John O' Mahoney
    Age
    60

    Over two hundred years ago the Furnace of Araglen was known for its pottery throughout the British Isles. It was founded by the Earl of Cork who was a prominent member of the Roche family of Fermoy. The material called Iron Clay was got in Mr. Casey's land of Gortnaskehy and in Mr. Michael Brunnock's, Doon, Araglen. A material known locally as red mine of which a large quantity is still in the Condon's land, Knockbawn, Araglen was imported from England to mix through the local Iron clay. The sand used at the present day in moulding was not known at that time. Wood was used for making the moulds which was burned out by each article moulded causing heavy expense which was the chief cause of the project being a

  18. Local Games and Toys

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kitty Kearney
    Informant
    Mrs A. Kearney
    Age
    60

    would have that colour would go with the angel. Then the devil would come and call a colour and the girl that would have that colour would go with the devil and so firth until all the girls are called out. The the angels would have to beat the devils.

    Obtained by Kitty Kearney Doon, from her Mother Mrs A Kearney aged about 60 years.