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Transcripts count: 19
  1. Doon Lake

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maire Scanlon
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    50

    Not far from this school is a lake called Lough Doon and at this lake many accidents occurred. A woman who was coming from Mass one Sunday named Mrs. Reynolds of Carrickfad was passing by Lough Doon when she fell and she had to be carried home and afterwards she died. Also at this lake a man committed suicide and when he was found he was three weeks in the water and he was almost beyond recognition. This man's name was Jack Byrne a workingman of Mr. Whyte. One morning this man went into a boat on the lake and took with him one oar and when he was in the middle of the lake he threw himself into it and was drowned. Lough Doon is situated between two hills namely Doon hill and Banagher hill. It got its name from this hill. This lake was made for sport by Colonel Whyte. Long ago races were held around this lake and tenants were evicted to make this race course and the track of two old

  2. Local Happenings Long Ago

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Nan Scanlon

    Local happenings long ago.
    Doon Lake is supposed by many to be very unlucky because many accidents occurred at it. A man named John Kelly was killed at this lake one time he was coming home from sligo with a load of timber and when he was passing Lough Doon his horse went into the water to get a drink. The mans foot got caught in the wheel of the cart and he shouted for help but nobody came to his assist. Once for a long time. A man from ‘Drumkeerin’ was passing by and he cut the rope that was the tying the timber and the timber fell down and killed him. When two men came to his assistance he was dead.
    One night in the year nineteen hundred a man named John Boylan who lived in the townsland of Cornalaughta was coming from Sligo with a donkey and cart and at Lough Doon he fell from the cart and he was badly injured. He was carried to a house beside

  3. Old Crafts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Gorman
    Informant
    Mrs Hunt
    Age
    85

    Told by Mrs Hunt Jamestown
    About her birthplace, Doon Boyle.
    She rememberes, as a child, seeing Paddy Regan of Doon going across Loch Key on a float, made by himself, out of bulrushes - a wooden frame - with bulrushes woven on it. And she often saw him come back in the evening, his float loaded with bulrushes and osiers that he got on the Rockingham side at Cloonthakilla.
    He built the reeds up around himself on the float, and paddled back to Doon Luay. She saw just the top of his head showing. Then during the winter, he was busy, weaving baskets, sugán chairs

  4. (no title)

    There is a big hole near Kilmactranny - a botomless one we called it "The Soom-ur-yeh".

    Language
    English

    Next to Doon Quay is Trinity Island, I always heard that Conyers Clifford was buried on that island in my young days.
    Doon Quay leads into the King's Palace. The King is supposed to be buried on the Corran on the tip-top of Shee-gore-ya. Goor-ya was the King's name.
    There's only a stone here and there now (she means when she left Doon- teacher) in the track of the King's house - we called it a "Coshel" - only sloes, blackberries and briers.

  5. Doon Lake

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maire Scanlon
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    50

    old houses are still to be seen on the shore. When the races were being held around the lake people used to go to the top of Banagher hill or Doon hill and they had a fine view of the races. Also on this lake a man carted turf across it one time when there was ice on it. It is said that this lake is very much like another lake called "Lough na Suil" in County Sligo because "Lough na Suil" disappeared one time and it is said that Lough Doon has an underground channel to Lough Gill and there is a tar barrel in it and if it burst the water would flow down to Lough Gill. This occurred to Lough na Suil and some people thought that it was the good weather that dried it up. There is no fence on the road side of this lake but if there was it would be much safer for everybody.

  6. Jones' Folly

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Betty Kelly
    Informant
    Francie Flanagan

    More than a hundred years ago in the townland of Boeshill there was a mill for bleaching linen. This mill was owned by a man names Jones. (This man is a native of Drumard).
    The water he got to bleach the clothes came from Doon bog. (Doon bog is in the parish of upper Drumscilly.)
    He put leather troughs from hill to hill, and got the water into this dike which was the border between Ulster and Leinster which was made before the time of Christ's coming on earth.
    This dike or border got it's name from Jones. People thought it was a very foolish action and called it a folly, and it is known for many years as Jones's folly.
    A man named Jeriot[?] got the mill after Jones. This man owned the townland of Lisloughy and th eyear of the famine he had the "red field" in turnips and all the country side came and ate them. So the mill was working until the year '41 anyhow.
    The story is told that this man was in this part of the country until '47.

  7. Hedge-Schools

    Language
    Mixed
    Informant
    Mrs Hunt
    Age
    85

    Her father went to a hedge school to Thady Winters, on the top of the Curlews near Lough Key (Doon). He taught the pupils in his own kitchen. They were Irish speakers. They paid him 1d per week and gave turf, milk, butter etc. as well. Whatever way he taught them to count by short methods, her father could do a sum mentally quicker than we can do it on paper now.
    This is how he taught them the English alphabet: -

  8. A True Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Gorman
    Informant
    Mrs Hunt

    Long long ago, when the Mail Coach used to run from Dublin to Sligo, through Boyle, there was a great runner in Boyle named Jimmy Hanagan. He belonged to Boyle and lived out the Doon road. He could walk nearly as quick as the coach could go, and if he were sent to Dublin on a message, he would be there, between running and walking before the Coach would arrive and back again at the "Rockingham Arms" Hotel in Boyle before the coach.
    When he died, wings were found growing on his heart- that was the secret of his fleetness!

  9. (no title)

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Hunt
    Age
    85

    I read in the school books now, that Una ban was McDermott. She was not. She was McGreevy - a daughter of McGreevy of the Rock Castle. That's what the old people told me 80 years ago.
    From the Corran above the house where I was born at Doon, Boyle, you can see the 4 provinces.

  10. (no title)

    Beyond in Doon - near the lough - there was a poor beggerwoman - she took the fever...

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Hunt
    Age
    85

    Beyond in Doon - near the lough - there was a poor beggarwoman - she took the fever - everyone took the fever that time.
    When she got sick, she went into her little hut and lay down on whatever bed she had. She brought in with her a canteen of water. She had nothing else and she had no one to attend

  11. (no title)

    The "line" and the other new road at the back of our house in Doon Boyle were blocked out for relief work in famine times.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Gorman
    Informant
    Mrs Hunt

    The "line" and the other new road at the back of our house in Doon Boyle were blocked out for relief work in famine times.
    There was a poor woman with a baby working, breaking the stones. Well she died of the fever, or the hunger, sitting at work on the heap, and when she was found the baby was drinking at her breast - the breast of the dead starved woman.

  12. Local Happenings Long Ago

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Nan Scanlon

    this school which is occupied by a man named John Johnston but he died after a short time. There was another man Jack Byrne who drowned in Lough Doon. One morning he went out in a boat on the lake with one oar and when he in the middle of the lake he threw himself in the water and he was drowned. He was in the water for three weeks and when he was found he was almost unrecognisable.
    There was a man named Mc Ternan to manorhamilton driving a cow. A short distance from where Gortnaskeagh school at present he was killed by a motor car. This accident occured abou the year ninteen twenty eight. There was a priest drowned in Lough Gill one day. He was out in a boat on the lake fishing and he was drowned. A woman named Mrs Reynolds was going home from mass and she fell from her bicyle and she was badly hurt she was carried home but she died shortly after.

  13. Old Crafts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Gorman
    Informant
    Mrs Hunt
    Age
    85

    There was a candlemaker in Boyle named Cook. The candles dripped and dripped - tallow candles - 1/2d each. The wick was double thread - so there was a loop at the top, you could put your finger in. If you bought a dozen to bring home - and put your finger in the loops to carry them, they'd be gone again before you'd arrive in doon - they were so soft.

    Rush candles.
    I saw nothing in my early youth only rush candles and "Cooks dips" (described above). You pulled the rushes in September - the good weather anyway - cut the

  14. Rhymes

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James P. Kellegher

    full of rye four and twenty blackbirds were baked in a pie. When the pie was opened the birds began to sing wasent that a dainty dish to set before the king. The king was in his counting room counting out his money. The Queen was in the parlour eating bread and honey. The maid was in the garden hanging out the clothes when out jumped a blackbird and snapped off her nose.

    There is a chap called Donald Duck. Whose antics are so queer But no one dares to stand and say that Donald will show fear. For when faced with any danger he stands up like a man and never thinks of running unless of coarse he. can. He rides and hunts, and skates, and swims. And even plays a tune upon his piping piccolo. Although he cannot [doon?]. He's strong and kind and sweet. In fact he is apel

  15. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Informant
    F. Kelly
    Age
    53

    A stream running across Leganamer and Drumaringna is called "Jones' Folly,' because long ago it turned a Linen Mill for a man named Jones.

    In olden times it was called the "Wall of Ulster" It was then ninteen feet wide and had a ditch along it seventeen feet wide. On top of this ditch there were three rows of poisoned sticks to keep out men who would attack Ulster.
    The Mill was established more than 100 years ago. The water used for bleaching the linen came from Doon bog in the parish of Upper Drumreilly. Jones put leather troughs from hill to hill and got the water into this dyke. People thought it was a very foolish action and called it a folly and that is why the dyke is now called Jones Folly. The man who got the mill after Jones was a man called Garret.

  16. Weather-Lore

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bridget E. Martin
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Informant
    (name not given)

    wet day follows. When Killery is "capped" in the morning bad weather comes after. When the birds on Lough Doon can be heard quarrelling a long distance away rain is expected. When the curlews are calling as the sun is setting rain follows. When the sky is red over Sligo in the evening the next day is always good. When cement floors get damp good weather is generally expected.


    Bridget E. Martin
    Cartron
    Fivemilebourne P.O.

    I received the above information from my parents.

  17. Further Sayings

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Hunt
    Age
    84

    Don't tell "the face of clay" - (a living being).

    If you want to get anything done - go to a busy man.

    I heard the old people say it was the Freemasons 'rose' the Big Wind to destroy the Irish people and do away with the Catholics. They had only to ask the devil for anything they wanted done. They had a great meeting in Sligo Town that night - and Master King (of Rockingham) travelled home from it to Rock quite safely on horseback. The devil saved him.

    Told by Mrs Hunt
    Born at Doon
    Boyle
    (overlooking Loch Cé)

  18. County Leitrim

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Willie Farrell
    Informant
    Phil Mc Goohan
    Occupation
    weaver
    Informant
    Mr Thomas Creamer
    Age
    54

    Farewell I must cross o'er the foaming Atlantic,
    To the land of a stranger , an exile to roam
    Far away from the green hills,
    The lakes, and the wild woods
    Of my sweet Co. Leitrim,
    My own native home,
    Where the lordly bright Shannon,
    The prince of our rivers, runs ripling along over woodland and ?
    After forming the lakes of Binbo Derg and Bofin,
    It smiles and runs onwards to join with the sea.

    II.
    Farewell to the shores of the mighty Lough Allen,
    Your waters reflecting a heavenly blue,
    Whilst the mountains arise like bright spears in the distance,
    A scene for the tourist,
    Most charming to view.
    III.
    Then there is great Sliabh-an-larainn
    So tall and majestic,
    And famed Bencroy, Glenfarne, and Doon,
    Weird Mullaghusk, lofty Benbo, and Lacka

  19. Murtagh Mac Sharry's Revenge - A Leitrim Tale of 1641

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Mc Dermott
    Occupation
    student

    "The madman's flees gie chase, ye knaves,
    Gin ye miss the Bedlam loon,
    The Carney curs shall hae lapped your bluid
    Ere the morrow's sun gae doon"
    With a hissing oath the leader springs
    On the bounding quarry's trail;
    The started troopers thunder nigh,
    How their blood soaked bosoms quail!

    "Away! Away!" O'er bank and brae
    In headlong rout they fly,
    Hard on the rear they think to hear
    The slogan's gathering cry.
    Now, Murtagh, on for life's dear sake
    For ne'er had sooner need
    The stag that ranges Screeny wood
    Of his fleet limbs' lightning speed.
    This night, you must hear the streamlet plash
    Deep in Lurgan's hazel glen
    Or stay the howl of the wolves that prowl
    Round Hamilton's ogre den.
    But the level heath spreads wide beneath
    Soon the horsemen close around
    His race is run! His doom is spun!