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  1. Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick Mc Monagle

    I know a few holy wells, Doon well, Conwall well and Leck well. Conwall well is in the town land of Conwall, Doon well in the townland of Doon, and Leck well in the townland of Leck. Leck well is in the field beside Leck grave yard, and Conwall well is in the field beside Conwall grave yard. During the Summer months lots of people go to Doon well. You say five Our Fathers and five hail Marys for the man to who built the stones over the well, the same for the Priest who

  2. Doon Lake

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maire Scanlon
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    50

    Not far from this school is a lake called Lough Doon and at this lake many accidents occurred. A woman who was coming from Mass one Sunday named Mrs. Reynolds of Carrickfad was passing by Lough Doon when she fell and she had to be carried home and afterwards she died. Also at this lake a man committed suicide and when he was found he was three weeks in the water and he was almost beyond recognition. This man's name was Jack Byrne a workingman of Mr. Whyte. One morning this man went into a boat on the lake and took with him one oar and when he was in the middle of the lake he threw himself into it and was drowned. Lough Doon is situated between two hills namely Doon hill and Banagher hill. It got its name from this hill. This lake was made for sport by Colonel Whyte. Long ago races were held around this lake and tenants were evicted to make this race course and the track of two old

  3. Local Ruins

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Agnes Noonan

    There are the ruins of three castles in the parish of Aughagower in the county of Mayo. There is one in Mount Brown which belonged to Denis Brown. The castle was built about two hundred years ago. One in Doon which was built about three hundred years ago. It is so old that moss and grass have grown on it and it is covered over with grass. One in Maace which was built about the same time as the one in Doon. There is a story told in connection with the castles in Maace and Doon. Two brothers lived in the two castles and they were both married. The wife of the owner of Maace castle said that the smoke of Doon castle would blind her. So the two brothers fought and killed each other

  4. Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bríghid Ní Ghiolla Riadaí
    Informant
    Mr Hugh McCready

    August to make the turas. A boy from the Ross’as was cured at Doon well. He was lying for seven years before that. It was his aunt that took him to Doon well at first. The first thing that a person notices at Doon well are the two new crutches that he left behind him when he was cured. It is out

  5. Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    William Kenneally
    Informant
    William Kenneally
    Age
    48

    The Narnahown Road
    This road stretches from Keane's quay-wall to Mauice Pyne's house. it goes through the Corrin Hills and it is about one hundred years old. It was there before the Famine time.
    The Moin an Mionntáin Road goes from Patrick Carey's house, Doon. It is a very hilly road because it runs through the Doon Mountains and it joins the Ballyporeen Road at the Bella Cross. It was made during the Famine time.
    The Doon Road stretches from Jer Mulvey's shop Barnahown to Patrick Carey's, Doon.
    Barrets Bohereen
    This bohereen runs from the Doon Road to the Ballyporeen Road. Why it is called Barrets Bohereen is this - because Mr. Barret lived in a house there long ago. The ruins of the house are still to be seen.
    The Melleray Path stretches from Hennessy's, Doon to Clogheen Road. It goes

  6. A Crock of Gold

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Michael Phelan
    Age
    50

    A Crock of Gold 2.
    There was a man who killed a man and he was brought into Clonmel to the court. He was sentenced to be hanged in about a month after and the people of Doon were to be present.
    So when the day on which he was to be hanged arrived, all got ready to go to Clonmel. When all were present and the man was about to be executed. He stood up and said "Is there any one here from Doon"
    Nobody from Doon made any answer to the man. "For there is a crock of gold in Mr O'Kiely's bog in Doon, near Ballinamult" If the men from Doon had made known their presence the doomed man would have told him the part of the bog in which to find it.
    " A closed mouth never caught a fly"

  7. The Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Edmond Murphy

    The names of the local roads in my district are Bilboa road, the Kyle road, the Doon road, the Buffanoka, The Bilboa road leads from Maunsel Cross to Bilboa. The Kyle road leads from Kyle to Cappamore. The Doon road leads from Bilboa Cross to Doon. The Buffanoka road elads from Glasha creamery to Buffanoka.
    The Bilboa road was made about ninety years ago. The Kyle road was made about thirty years ago. The Doon road was made about sixty years ago. The Buffanoka road was made about seventy years ago. The road were made from relief grants during the Famine period. There is a Mass path down Mr Whelan's Kiln field. Before bridges were made rivers were crossed by means of fords. There is a ford near Bilboa bridge where people crossed in olden times. there are not many monuments of the dead in my district

  8. Doon

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Josie Darcy
    Age
    13
    Informant
    Patrick Darcy

    Chaper I - Doon

    The village of Doon is picturesquely situated at the foot of the Lakagh hills which rise some nine hndred feet above sea level. It forms part of the ancient barony of Coonagh and is only half a mile from the Limerick - Tipperary border formed by the Carnahallia river. It is flanked on the North and North East by a low range of hills which were formed as a result of volcanic activity in East Limerick and West Tipperary area. On the South the plains gradually merge into the far famed "Golden Vale! - the great dairy farming area of Ireland.
    The wheels of progress have turned very rapidly in Doon for the past half century. Fifty years ago Doon had little

  9. Local Hedge-Schools

    Language
    Mixed
    Collector
    Donncadh Ó Buacalla
    Informant
    Dáithí Ó Mhurcadha
    Age
    84

    of mud. That district was called Doon "Beag". At that time Doon was divided into two townlands such as Doon "Beag" and Doon "Mór"
    Lucey was from a place called Kilbrin three miles outside Kanturk.
    The pupils brought two sods of turf each morning to school. They brought from their own house. If any scholar took turf from his neighbours rick he would get three or four slaps of an ash plant. Some scholars did this because they did not want to be troubling themselves bring it long journeys, of course the turf nearest to the school paid for it.

  10. Doon Fort

    Language
    Mixed
    Collector
    E. Sweeney
    Age
    11
    Informant
    James Riordan
    Age
    60
    Occupation
    farmer

    The townland that I live in is called Doon on account of the number of forts that are in it. It is sometimes called "fort covered Doon. There are three forts in in this townland. The nearest one to this school is John Ring's/ It is the largest and the most interesting fort in Doon. it is circular in shape and is surrounded by trees. There is a high fence going all round it. Many people say that a king was buried there long ago, and babies who died before Baptism were buried there also. The Danes are supposed to have built all the forts in Doon. There are two forst in John Linehan's land. One evening John Linehan was bringing home his cows about six o clock. He saw a woman combing her hair at the flagstone of the fort. He also heard a clock striking twelce, adn the noise of pans. Another story tells of a nurse who lived in Lomanaugh. Her name was Nellie OConnor. One night a man came for her. He had a white horse and she went up behind him. They had not (far) gone far until they reached the river Araglen. The horse jumped across he river and the man said, mo charadh do léin a seana

  11. A Prophetess

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bibbie Clancy
    Informant
    Denis Clancy
    Age
    54

    About seventy years ago a pious old lady came from the city of Cork, and lived in a hut overlooking Doon Bay. She was very holy and was praying always. Some people did not believe in her. She was of a very respectable family and had a sister living in Cork. She seemed to have a falling out with her people. She brought some beautiful furniture with her. She planted flowers in the church at Doon and they bloom every year. She said she had a vision of a convent being built overlooking Doon Bay, and that she could see the nuns

  12. Local Heroes

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Cora Regan

    Bartly Regan of Doon was a good swimmer long ago. He lived in the townland of Doon. He swam from Black Island to his own shore. He is a good story-teller presently. Doctor Doyle of Smutternagh was a good runner and jumper long ago. John Graham of Smutternagh was a swimmer long ago. He is a good boat-man yet. Michael McDermott of Annagh was a good runner. Paddie Mattimoe of Doon was a good digger. Jack Brennan of Andrasna is a great thatcher at the present day. Charles Regan of Curnacartha was a very good mower long ago. He was able to mow an acre and a half in one day. Pat Conlon of Curnacartha was a great drummer long ago.

  13. Father Hickey's Cow

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Ryan
    Informant
    Mrs Ryan

    During the time of the Cas-breacs[?]. Tithes were levied on the people for the up-keep of the Protestant Ministers. The Catholic people of Doon protested against this injustice. Fr Hickey then P.P. of Doon, entirely opposed it. With the result his cow was seized for payment of these tithes. The cow was taken to the pound at Bilbo. After a few days she was offered for sale, in the meanwhile Fr. Hickey informed the people of Doon and the surroundings to be present at the sale, but not to break the law. One man in the gathering was bribed to break the law, which he so done by throwing a stone at the soldiers who was also present at the sale. The soldiers then opened fire on the people. One man was severly wounded and appeared in great agony. Fr. Hickey was sent for and he read over

  14. An Old Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Ethna Mc Cabe
    Informant
    Patrick Mc Cabe

    that never told his dream on a Friday.

    There was a man living in Murmod called Mr. Clerkin, and he used to go to a ceilidhe to a house in the townland of Doon to tell stories. When he used to be telling about something that happened in Doon he used to start the story by saying, "There is not such a place under the sun or the moon as this famous townland of Doon.

  15. Muingle Lot

    Language
    Mixed

    MUINGLE LOT (LOT)

    - a hollow in Patk Shea's farm Doon, Tahilla

    FAILL an NAOIMH
    - phonetically spelled (?) (Faill an Naoimh) name of bog of Patk Shea, Doon, Tahilla situated in John Foley's farm Doon Tahilla

    GLOSHA CASEY
    - a hollow in Pat Shea's farm of Doon, Tahilla

    CÚL PHÁIRC
    - a field in farm of Patk. Shea Doon, Tahilla

    CUAILLE na SEAFAIDÍ
    - a field on side of mountain in Patk Shea's farm Doon, Tahilla

    CNOCÁN a' BHACAIG
    a field beside road in M Shea's farm of Doon, Tahilla

    POINNTE BÁN
    - a headland or point in farm of M. Shea on seashore (white rock)

    PÁIRC MHÓR
    - a big field in Patk Shea's farm Doon, Tahilla

    PÁIRC na PHÓNA
    - it used be a pound long ago in farm of Wm Gaine, Coomakilla, Greenane, Kenmare

    PÁIRC na GADHAR
    - an old field in farm of Patk O'Sullivan Droumlusk, Blackwater

    HIGH LACCA
    - a high field in farm of Patk O'Sullivan Droumlusk, Blackwater

    SUIDHEACHÁN

    - a flat field on mountain side of Patk O'Sullivan's farm Droumlusk, Blackwater.

  16. Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary O' Dwyer
    Informant
    Mrs O' Dwyer

    St Fintam's Well
    There are many wells around Doon St Fintam's well is situated at the side of the Barrack. Some years ago it wa situated in Bottlehill a strange thing happened there, a woman washed clothes in it and it [nemoved] down to the side of the Barrack
    Kenny's Well
    There is another well situated about two miles from Doon, it is called Kenny's well. it was called after St. Kenny. The people go to the well to be cured, by making three rounds around the well. About a quarter of the mill from Doon there is another well

    St Winifred's Well
    This well is situated about a quarter of the mill from Doon. The people leave badges and medals to gain an indulgence. There are many other wells around Doon unknown.

  17. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English

    Fairy Forts
    28-2-'38

    The townland in which I live in is called Doon. It is often called 'fort covered Doon' on account of the number of forts that are in it. There are three forts in Doon, and three in the next townland-Umeraboy.
    The nearest fort to this school is John Ring's fort. It is the largest and the most interesting fort in Doon. It is circular in shape and is surrounded bu a high fence. There is an open gap in the front where we can get in. It is never tilled but the cattle feed in it. It is said that a king was buried there long ago, and babies who died before Baptism were also buried there.
    The Danes were supposed to have built all the forts in Doon. There is a smaller fort in John Linehan's land, and another one in Dan Linehan's land. There are three forts also in Umeraboy. It is in Umeraboy our school is built. There is one fort in Ger O'Connor's land, one in Ian Healy's land, and the third in

  18. Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Teresa Hyland
    Collector
    Margaret Drislane
    Collector
    Mary Flynn
    Informant
    (name not given)

    branch of the Barnahown road. It starts where we call Finn's Gullot. The gullot is in the townland of Barnahown. Then the road goes east through Doon. It then turns north east and it goes along through Foildearg. It meets the Clogheen road near Shandrahan Cross.
    There is an old Mass path from Doon to Ballyporeen. It starts at Martins in Doon. it goes north through the Doon mountains and down through Glenacuna and it meets the Ballyporeen road at Pynes.

    The road which runs near my home starts at Keane's Cross on the Lismore-Fermoy road and meets the Ballyporeen road at the end of Corrin Hill. it is called the middle Barnahown road. It was made in the year 1850. The local men that made it.
    There is a branch of the Barnahown road going off through the mountain