Cuardach téacs

Líon na dtras-scríbhinní: 20
  1. Wardtown Castle

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Bailitheoir
    Paul Dolan
    Faisnéiseoir
    Mrs K. Dolan

    There is a famous castle about three miles outside Ballyshannon. It is known as Wardtown Castle. It was there the “Colleen Bawn” lived with her father Squire Folliott. The Colleen Bawn” fell in love with an outlaw, Willie Reilly, but her father would not allow her to marry him. Willie Reilly was arrested and put in jail. The “Colleen Brawn” got sick and lost her memory, and her father was very much upset. So an order was made to release Willie Reilly and he and the “Colleen Bawn” got married.

  2. Willy Reilly

    Teanga
    Béarla

    Its home then she was taken, and in her closet bound,
    Poor Reilly all in Sligo Jail, lay on the stony ground,
    'Till at the bar of justice before the judge he'd stand,
    For nothing but the stealing of his dear Colleen Bawn.

    Now in the cold, cold iron, my hands and feet are bound,
    I'm handcuffed like a murderer and tied unto the ground,
    But all the toil and slavery I'm willing for to stand,
    Still hoping to be succoured by my dear Colleen Bawn.
    The jailer's son to Reilly goes and thus to him did say;
    "Oh, rise up, Willy Reilly, you must appear this day,
    For Esquire Tolliard's anger you never can withstand,
    I'm afraid you'll suffer sorely by my dear Colleen Bawn.

  3. Willy Reilly

    Teanga
    Béarla

    "Oh, rise up, Willy Reilly, and come along with me,
    I mean for to go with you and leave this counterie,
    To leave my father's dwellings, his houses and free land,
    And away goes Willy Reilly and his dear Colleen Bawn.

    They go by hills and mountains, and by yon lonesome plain,
    Through shady groves and valleys, all dangers to refrain,
    But her father followed after her with a well-armed band,
    And taken was Reilly and his dear Colleen Bawn.

  4. Cailín Bán

    Teanga
    Béarla

    Colleen Bawn

    The Colleen Bawn was drowned in the Shannon west of Glin on the 4th of July 1819. She is buried on the other side of the river in Clare.
    All the people connected with this terrible event are dead but their grandchildren still live in the place.
    It was the Knight of Glin who broght the criminals to justice.
    The spot where the Caitlin ban was done to death is still shown and no natives of Glin like to pass the spot at the hour of midnight.
    Opposite that spot, on the Main Road, a black dog is constantly seen at twelve o'clock or from twelve to two.
    Many people have been frightened on that road. Noises of various sorts have been heard in the Knight's lawn. The noise corresponds to that of a cart drawing a very heavy load which made the axle creak.

  5. Local Shebeens

    Teanga
    Béarla

    A Shebeen was an inn in which unracked whiskey, poteen, and all such illicit drinks were sold. This practised in various remote districts in which the mandates of the law were held in little dread, but in this locality they were never free from prying eyes hence we are not surprised to find the absence of shebeens in considerable number and within the memory of the oldest inhabitant the only one that ever existed was in the fringe of Rusheen grove where it approaches the shore. Here it was rumoured Sullivan, - the tool whom Scanlan used in his murder of the Colleen Báwn obtained drink to apply a stimulus to his flagging purpose.

  6. Local Monuments

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Bailitheoir
    Joseph Doody
    Faisnéiseoir
    Michael O' Grady
    Aois
    81

    went with lanterns by night to search the graves but after making a couple of little holes and finding nothing they gave up the search. It is said that Knockfierna is called after Donn Firinn the king of the Munster fairies who is still supposed to live under the hill in his palace. It is a tradition that a pagan God named Scusidricin had a temple to his worship where the cairn now is. The district next to the hill on the west is still called the Strickeen. There is a fort in the Strickeen called the Lisnaveean. Some say it was inhabited by giants and that one of their pastimes was casting rocks. Some of these are scattered for miles around. The broth from the giants cooking places at the flowed over and down into the valley below which is still called gleann an Anairice. In the Strickeens was the original home of Eily Hanley the "Colleen Bawn" about whom Gerald Griffin wrote a great

  7. Local Heroes - Singers

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Faisnéiseoir
    Mr Phil Cushen
    Aois
    82
    Gairm bheatha
    manager
    Faisnéiseoir
    Mrs Catherine Maguire
    Aois
    84
    Faisnéiseoir
    Mr James Kiely
    Aois
    76
    Gairm bheatha
    steward
    Faisnéiseoir
    Mr Patrick Whelan
    Aois
    50
    Gairm bheatha
    huckster
    Faisnéiseoir
    Mr Thomas Bolger
    Aois
    50
    Gairm bheatha
    lock-keeper
    Gairm bheatha
    boatman

    Garret Dalton Headfield Ballymurphy Co Carlow was a great singer. His favourite song was "The Colleen Bawn". He used to sing at the cross-roads in the evening after work and all the neighbours used to gather around to hear him sing.
    Denis Honohan Knockeen Graigue was a well know singer. He was over ninety years when he died. He used go to a farmhouse in Ballyogan every night to

  8. Story

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Bailitheoir
    William Neylon
    Faisnéiseoir
    Mrs Mary Neylon
    Aois
    50

    There were also three boat men putting out for Jarbert. They landed Ellen Walsh in Glyn where she had a job. She afterwards identified all the parties at the trial. The murderer was found concealed in a heap of straw and was brought to Limerick jail. He was tried at the assizes in Limerick. A clean verdict of murder was brough against him for the murder of this beautiful young girl. On the day of his execution the horses that were attached to the carriage refused to take him over the bridge that crossed the Shannon at Limerick. He had to be taken out of carriage and dragged and mobbed to the place of execution. The "Colleen Bawn" is buried at Brawn Church Yard in the parish of Killimer, Co Clare. My grandfather told it to my mother.

  9. Willy Reilly

    Teanga
    Béarla

    This is the news, young Reilly, last night that I did hear,
    The lady's oath will hang you, or else will set you clear,
    "If that be so", says Reilly, "her pleasure I will stand
    Still hoping to be succoured by my dear Colleen Bawn.

    Now Willy's drest from top to toe all in a suit of green,
    His hair hands o'er his shoulders, most glorious to be seen,
    He's tall and straight and comely as any could be found,
    He's fit for Tolliards daughter, were she heiress to a crown.
    The judge, he said "This lady being in her tender youth
    If Reilly has deluded her, she will declare the truth".
    Then, like a moving beauty bright, before him she did stand,
    "You're welcome there my heart's delight and dear Colleen Bawn".

  10. Local Shebeens

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Faisnéiseoir
    (ní thugtar ainm)

    The following story was told to me by my mother.
    Shebeens are shops in which drinks such as porter, whiskey and other drinks are sold unknown to the government. There was one in Carraig. On the night the "Colleen Bawn" was killed, the man who killed her was drinking in there. When he was drunk he forced the "Cooleen Bawn" to go out boating with him.
    She consented to go with him. When they were out as far as Carraig a Holt he killed her and throw her into the sea.

  11. (gan teideal)

    Don't be telling me about Scanlon.

    Teanga
    Béarla

    "Don't tell me about Scanlan
    (The villain of the Colleen Bawn drama). I know enough about him. I have a tailboard belonging to him. I got it from old Donovan the fiddler, and he got it, as a garsoon from Scanlan's mother, after Scanlan was hanged.
    (And what is it like, Will?").
    What is it like you oinseac, but like every other tailboard. What is it only the tail piece of a fiddle, that the strings are fixed on. Don't be telling me about Scanlan", and nobody was only asking

  12. Local Ruins

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Bailitheoir
    May Gillespie

    foaming waters of the Atlantic.
    Mid-way between the O'Clery castle and the town of Ballyshannon another ancient pile lifts his head above the encircling sandhills. This is the famous castle of the Mac Wards, the hereditary bards of the O'Donnells.
    A romance hangs around this castle. Here the Colleen Bawn (Squire Ffolliotts daughter) of Carleton's tale resided before being betrothed to her lover Willie Rielly.
    The English confiscated the lands of the Mac Wards when there[?] rule was established in the district, and handed the castle and lands over to Squire Ffolliott. This castle is also falling into decay.
    About a mile north-west of the town stand the crumbling ruins of the famous Abbey of Assaroe, where Michael O'Clery, the annalist received the rudiments of his early education. The tomb of another of the O'Clerys lies in the cemetery in the shadows of the ruins.

  13. The Colleen Bawn

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Bailitheoir
    Seán Ó Finn
    Faisnéiseoir
    Seán Ó Finn

    The Colleen Bawn.

    About a 120 years ago, Ellen Hanley came to live with her uncle Michael O'Connor, in a little house at Yellow Town, in upper Ballycahane. Some people assert that the house adjoined Mr. Keating's, while others maintain that it was situated opposite the old barracks in the land now occupied by Mr. McNamara.
    There lived in Ballycahane castle, at that time, a gentleman by the name of Mr. Scanlan. A naval officer, who returned to the castle, and being struck by the beauty of Ellen, he got her to elope with him.
    A marriage took place, but it was only a marriage in disguise to the innocent girl.
    It is believed that Scanlan used visit the "Knight of Glin". So taking the steamer from Limerick, they sailed down the Shannon and nothing was heard, until her

  14. William Scanlan And The Colleen Bawn.

    William Scanlan lived in Ballycahane with his mother. He fell in love with Mary Halvey, whose father was a rope maker. Scanlan was in debt, so his mother advised him to marry a lady with a fortune. As the debts were due, and his mother was so insistent, he decided to get rid of Mary Halvey. So he took Mary on an excursion. He hired a boatman named Michael Sullivan to row him from Limerick to Kilrush. Between Tarbert and Kilrush, he drowned Mary Halvey, and after a time he figured in Limerick court on a charge of murder.

    His defending counsel was none other than Daniel O'Connell. the trial took place in 1822. Part of the trial can be read of in Lenihan's History of Limerick. In those days the men who were to form the jury were chosen at the inquest, and of those who were chosen in this particular case, only three were able to write their names. It is said that Mr. Henry Lyons of Croom House had to use threats to this

  15. Local Place Names

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Bailitheoir
    Mary B. Ward
    Faisnéiseoir
    Miss Mc Gowan

    Abbey River and Bridge.
    Near the Abbey is the little rocky rivulet spanned by a bridge of two arches.It is believed to be built by the monks and is probably the oldest bridge in Ireland.
    Catsby:
    The cave on the north bank of the stream contains a rude altar, a fort and a roughly carved head in stone. This is a relic of the days when persecution stalked the land.
    Wardtown Castle:
    Near the Atlantic is Wardtown Castle. It lifts its brow above the encircling sandhills. A romance hangs around the Castle. It was here the Colleen Bawn resided before being betrothed to her lover Willie Reilly.
    Prior to the coming of the English, the lands adjoining the Castle were the property of the Mc Wards the historian bards of the O'Donnells.

  16. Story of Colleen Bawn

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Faisnéiseoir
    Michael Byrne

    The story of the Colleen Bawn was the usual subject of conversation in these parts 50 or 60 years ago. The names Eily O'Connor, Hardress Cregan, Danny Mann, Ann Chute, were in everybody's mouth.

    Gerald Griffin in his novel
    "The Collegians gives the substance of the story, but the names may be fictitious.
    It seems that the true story is that Eily O'Connor lived in the County Limerick, with her uncle "to the east of Foynes" - an old man with some property. In the same district lived the family of Scanlon, connected with the best blood in the county. Mrs. Scanlan was a DeLacy and her husband was connected with the Masseys and the Fitzgibbons, both noble families. Young Scanlon, the heir, who had been an officer in the army, persuaded Eily to rob her uncle of a large sum of money, to elope with him to Glin. Here they lived together 'till the money was spent. He had in his employ, a man named Sullivan, (Danny Mann) connected with him by what in Ireland is a strong tie, that of foster brotherhood.
    Cregan kept Eily in a lonely cottage, leaving her under the impression that when a suitable

  17. My District

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Bailitheoir
    Mary Culhane
    Faisnéiseoir
    Mr J. Griffin
    Aois
    90

    I live in Kilkee a sea side town on the west Clae coast. It is in the barony of Moyarta.
    Kilkee was built within the last 140 years.
    Before this time it was just sandhills.
    About 120 years it was only a little village with a few fishermens houses.
    The Colleen Bawn spent part of her honeymoon in Kilkee in 1819, so very likely there was some kind of hotel in Kilkee at that time.
    The present Catholic Church was built by the late Rev. Micheal Comyn P.P Kilkee in 1834, and a few years later 1842 there was a number of small houses built just here and there but not in any regular order.
    Re. Michael Comyn

  18. My Inchigeelagh Lass

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Bailitheoir
    E. Mac Firbisig
    Gairm bheatha
    múinteoir
    Faisnéiseoir
    Conchubhar Ó Mathúna

    Twas the last I saw of my Colleen Bawn My Inchigeela Lass
    VII
    I sped by Iniscarra before the break of day
    Took passage in a Yankee ship that in Queenstown harbour lay.
    The captain being a Fenian man my safety to compass
    I soon set sail from Granuále and my Inchigeela Lass.
    VIII
    But what became of Máirín Óg Eveleary's fairest flower
    She drooped as droops the may flower neath beleated winter showers
    Ere the Autumn leaves fell from the trees she was laid beneath the grass
    My promised Bride the village Pride was My Inchigeela Lass

  19. Old Song - Cuisle Gheal Mo Chroí

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Bailitheoir
    John Conway
    Faisnéiseoir
    Mr P. Conway

    In splendour may they shine.
    On the plains of Ballyhahill.
    I can no longer gaze.
    Whilst here alone I sigh and moan.
    So far beyond the waves.
    I long to be remembered to
    The friends I have left behind.
    For as long as I am in America.
    I will bear them in my mind.
    Oh the day we will meet together.
    I long for it to dawn.
    When I will have the pleasure.
    To see my colleen bawn.

  20. The Glen of Mornington

    Teanga
    Béarla
    Faisnéiseoir
    Mathew Lynch

    'Twas last July as I passed by,
    Resolved to see the strand,
    I was compelled, where beauty dwells,
    To come to a long stand.
    Fair, pure delight did me invite,
    To enter on that ground,
    To view that place, that vale of peace,
    The Glen of Mornington.

    It happened to be, on that same day,
    The family of the Glen,
    Home from abroad, but still on board,
    Was soon expected in.
    The flags were floating in the air,
    and the bands commenced to play,
    As the "Colleen Bawn" shot round the nook
    And entered the Boyne Bay.
    Loud gun-shots broke from hill and slope
    To hail their safe return.
    The servants all, in the grand hall, With joy their hearts did yearn.
    And gladness beaming in their eyes
    As they assembled in.
    Saying, "You're welcome home, no more to roam,
    From your sweet, lovely Glen."