Líon iontrálacha sa taifead staire: 2044 (Taispeántar anseo na 500 ceann is deireanaí.)
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-04-01 04:39
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A number of children play this game. The tallest girl sits up on the wall or ditch and is the grandmother. Then the rest form a line and come up to the “grandmother” and say “grandmother – grandmother may we go to play?” Grandmother says”, “no dear no dear not to-day”. Children: “Why mother why mother we won’t stay long away.” Grandmother: “Will make three bows and away you go. Then the children run away and stay away for a
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-04-01 04:39
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a minute.
Grandmother: -shouts “Dingle! Dingle!
Grandchildren: - “I don’t hear you.”
Grandmother: -louder “Dingle, Dingle”
Grandchildren: - “I don’t hear you.”
Grandmother: - “Where are your manner?”
Grandchildren: - “Below in our shoes.”
Grandmother: - “Where are your shoes?”
Grandchildren: - “Up on the top of shelf.”
Grandmother: - “How will I get up.”
Grandchildren: - “with broken chairs and stools”
Grandmother: - “and if I fall.”
Grandchildren: - “Sorra (Sorrow) much loss”
Then grandmother jumps down off the wall and follows the others. The first one she will be grandmother next time.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-04-01 02:27
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thirteen on fifteen. The girl on whom the last number falls has the “tig.” All now run away as fast as they possibly can and the one who has the “tig” must after them. The first one she touches will have to take her place and the game proceeds as before.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-04-01 02:27
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Any number of children may play this game. They all stand in a row. The oldest child stands out and says. “My old grandfather had a shoe how many mails did he put through.” At each word she says she points to a child and the last one she points to says a number for example nine
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 16:11
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39. Let your anger set with the sun but not rise with it.
40. Money is the servant of some and master of many.
41. One work and that well done leads to excellence.
42. Sloth makes everything difficult and industry makes them all easy.
43. Unwillingly go to law and willingly adjust your differences.
44. To increase wealth you must work.
45. We know the worth of water when the well is dry.
46. It is easier to commit a fault than to hide it.
47. The mouse can play while the cat is out.
48. An empty barrel makes most wine.
63. It is never too late to mend.
64. It is never too late to learn.
65. One swallow never made a Summer.
66. A word in earnest is as good as a speech.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 16:09
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28. The man that sows in the Spring, he reaps in the Autumn, the horse that earns the oats seldom eats it.
29. Two hens fighting is the sign of a stranger.
30. There are often valuable goods in a small parcel.
31. Wilful waste is woeful want.
32. A character is better than a great fortune.
33. By learning to obey we know how to command.
34. Extravagance in youth brings want in old age.
35. Friendship multiplies joys and divides grief.
36. Half an hour too soon is better than half a minute too late.
37. Industry pays debts and despair increases them.
38. Kind words are the pearls of every day life.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 16:03
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Proverbs.
11. Spare the rod and spoil the child.
12. A stitch in time spares nine.
13. An apple a day keeps the doctor away.
14. The hills far away are very green.
15. The cat can look at the king.
16. A dirty grate keeps the dinner late.
17. The best hunler is always on the ditch.
18. Talk is cheap.
19. Many hands make light work.
20. The ready way around is the shortest way home.
21. Better late than never.
22. A watched kettle never boils.
23. If you don't sow you won't reap.
24. Learning is no load.
25. Too many cooks spoil the broth.
26. A long road without a turn and 'tis a bad cake without a currant.
27. The weather is a good story-teller.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 16:01
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Proverbs.
1. The more hurry the less speed.
2. Fair and easy goes far in the day.
3. Curiosity kills the cat and information makes him fat.
4. Cows far away have long horns.
5. The more rain the more rust, and all sunshine is not the best.
6. A man without learning and wearing good clothes is like a gold ring in a barrow pig's nose.
7. A man with learning and wearing bad clothes is counted a drunkard where ever he goes.
8. Listen to the sound of the water and you will catch fish.
9. A good beginning is half the work.
10. Early to bed, early to rise makes a man healthy and wealthy and wise.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 15:57
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day of the year.
written by:-
Thérése Holohan.
Abbey.
Loughrea.
Co Galway
Got from:-
John Holohan
Abbey
Loughrea
Co Galway
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 15:56
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Lore of certain days
1. The old people say that Wednesday is the luckiest day to get married. Friday is counted the luckiest day for changing into a new house. People do not bring a cat when they are changing as it is unlucky.
2. It is unlicky to work a horse on Whit Monday. It is also unlucky to drive a nail on Good Friday.
3. Saturdady is a bad day to begin work because you will never finish it. Monday is an unlucky day to open a grave and the way they do is to take some off it on Sunday.
4. A crop is usually sown after the first stage of the moon. Onions are sown the shortest day of the year and pulled the longest
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 14:32
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to twelve o'clcok. When it comes to one o'clock again the players say "There is a cart of sand coming." The mother asks the grannie what does she want the sand for. She says to cut the heads of the children. The grannie gets up and tried to catch one of the children. If the mother can prevent the grannie from taking the children she wins the game.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 14:30
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On the third time he tips someone. The person he tips is called the cat. The cat then follows the mouse until he catches him. When the mouse goes into the ring again the cat goes around the ring and tips someone as the mouse did. The cat is called the mouse as soon as he tips another person and the person he tips is called the cat. If the cat and the mouse keep tipping each other they are bycotted and are put out of the game.
Here is how Grannie Clock is payed. there are about ten players wanted for this game. One of the players is called the Grannie. The Grannie sits on a stone. The others line up one after the other. The first one is called the mother of the others. they walk around a ring when the are passing the grannie. They ask her the time. She first says one o'clock, then two and so on up
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 14:23
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There are many games which the children around this district play. Here are some of them: Hide and go Seek, Grannie Clock, Grannie Gray, Jennie Joe, Blind Man's Buff, Ship Sale Scout, Alic go around the Moon, Tip, Colours, Tug of war, Hares and hounds, and Rounders.
Here is how you play Scout. First draw a fairly big ring. Then one boy or girl goes into the ring and tries to catch hold of the other players who have formed into a ring. If he or she can bring one of the players inside the ring he is released himself and the other person goes into the ring.
Here is how to play cat and mouse. The players first make a big ring. they they choose someone to be the mouse and that person has to walk around the ring three times.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 14:18
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I play many different games throughout the year. I have certain games for spring, others for summer, and autumn, while in winter I play different games entirely.
In spring I play games out of doors. I swing, I skip, I play hidings, I play tick, I play Jack stones, and colours.
In Summer I play some of the spring games. They are Jack stones, high windows, thread, thread the needle. hidings, and frog in the pan.
In autumn I play other games. These are picking blackberries, haws, sloes, and bilberries.
In winter I have other games which are played in the nights. These are dallóg, playing cards, giving round the ring, and playing frog.
The words I say playing tick are ettle attle black bottle ettle attle out if you buy a penny bottle
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 12:54
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This story was told by Tomas Cusack of of Gola. One night when Pat Cooney of Greaghadusam was going on his caley to Palo Flyns to lionagirl. When he was going on his way he found a great crowd of people coming he stepped to one side to let them pass but to his surprise they were a crowd of fairies carrying a coffin just as he was passing they said who will carry next. One of them answered "Who but Pat Cooney" Pat answered them back and said.I tell you Pat Cooney ont carry or have anything to do with you so he was not long getting to his caley. This story was told to me by John"Farrely of Granafarna". Once upon a time there lived a man and a woman. They had one son. A fairy came one day an asked if sell him. At first the man said he would not. Then he said he would sell him for a year. The fairy agreed to leave him home at the end of the year and so he did. The fairy came
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 03:25
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A number of children from a ring. One girl goes into the centre and thinks of a number such as twenty, thirty, or forty. She then counts and the girl on whom that number falls runs after the girl who was in the centre. The girls in the ring hold their hands up high and they say, “High Windows, High Windows.” The other two girls run in and out under their hands one after the other. When number forty catches the other girl she will go in to the centre and think of a number. Then she counts and the girl that was in centre girls will going the ring. They keep on playing like this.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-30 00:45
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Any member of children may play this game. All sit down on the ground except two, one to give out the button and the anther to see if anyone looks behind her. Those on the ground have their hands behind to their backs and the girl with the button goes around and puts the button into somebody’s hands. Then the other girl asks those sitting. “Who has the button?” She has a rod
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-29 22:53
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Two children go away from the others and think of two things for instance; an orange and an apple or a carrot and a parsnips. Then they come back and hold each others hands. The rest of the children from a line and march out under the first two childrens hands singing “Lord Duke Lord John let them all pass by but the very last one.” The last one out is sought and while the others are marching and singing round the playground the “prisoner” is asked which does the like best an apple or an orange. If she says she would like an apple best she will then have to go and stand behind the girl who requests an apple. Buy if she prefers the orange she will have to go to the other side. Under
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-29 22:52
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circumstances must it be told what the two girls represent. The prisoner is must try to and guess as best they can. When all the players have gammed in the way two lines behind the two who have their hands caught, they are told to get ready. Then each girl takes her arms round the one immediately in front of her and all begin to pull. They keep pulling until some side either breaks or falls. The side that does not will have won the game.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 23:42
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300
Local Story
About fifty years ago there lived an old woman over in Kilmoylan. She was very fond of jewlery and she used to wear beautiful rings on her fingers and when she was dying they left the rings on her fingers. One night after the woman being buried there did two men decide to go to her grave and open the coffin.
So they opened the coffin and when they were trying to get the rings off her fingers her fingers began to bleed and she began to rise up out of her coffin and the men brought her home. She was very thankful to the men she employed them for the remainder of her life.
This story has been collected from her mother
by Teresa Crowe Carnahallia
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 23:30
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Some years ago in Ireland, There lived an old man who went begging from house to house. He went by the name of a poor scholar. One night he came too a house to ask for lodging. Which he got. When he was eating his supper, he saw a wooden lid left near , and it bore some writing. Which he read, he enquired where they had found it They were slow to tell him as it was the lid of a keg of gold which they had found buried in the ground. So he told them where ever they had found it there was another in the same place, So they went and they found it, It is said they made him a big present of gold.
This story has been collected from his mother by
Seamus Hammersley Carnahallia
Some years ago when John Ryan Knocknavara was repairing his house he got a canister in he thatch and fifty soveriegns in it. still knocked more of thehouse and got another canister with ashes in it, As if the money was all gone int dust.
The Story has been Collected from his father by Tim Joe Buckley Lough Cappawhite
Co Tipperary
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 23:09
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298
men died soon after and two more are still living. Where they dug is still to seen from my house.
This story has beeng collected from her father by
Teresa O'Dwyer Toomaline Doon Co Limerick
In the year 1910 all the woods had been cut down near our townsland. The foxcover was the last one the entered one day at twelve oclock the steward got charge when they began to cut this tree. He told the men to stop and leave it so as he had to be Carried home. but he would not tell what he had seen and the tree remained there and the people that new all about the foxcovert came to see this tree and said it was grown on the old chapel in former days. The steward was a very old man but a very good Catholic.
Teresa O'Dwyer Toomaline Doon Co. Limerick
Long ago there were three men searching for Gold in Toomaline. The gold was supposed to under a big stone. They dug for the gold. While they were digging a big bull appeared to them and followed them.
But they escaped, One of the men is a alive yet but the other two are dead. It happened that they had to come home without gold.
This Story has been collected from her mother by
Teresa Crowe Carnahallia.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 22:42
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297
Hidden Treasure
Once on a time a man dreamt of gold hidden at the foot of the hill near a large rock. He told four of his neighbours about it and asked them would they come and dig with him. They gave consent and he fixed the night they were to go. He invited them to his house , And treated them well with whiskey each man had taken a lantern. The man who dreamt of the gold to Limerick and bought a lantern which was to hold against rain or wind It was guaranteed to him. They left the house just before midnight. They had about a quarter of a mile to go. They started to dig. The man who dreamt held the good lantern after a half hour's digging. The lamp went out they lit it again & again it went out. It occured four or five times. The next thing that happened was that one of the men was missing. The man who dreamt of the money said we shall go home and so they did. There was no more about it until the day after when they met and talked about it the man who was missing said he was taken of his feet and left in a field away and said the cause of the lantern quenching was that horsemen rode furiously around them then the other two men saw or heard nothing. The man of the next house his cows were bellowing at that very hour He got up out of his bed and went to see his cows and when he went out to his yard the whole place was on fire He returned in and told his family that the place was in fire This thing happened about 30 years ago a half mile from Toomaline two of the
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 21:49
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329
Local Cures
a cure for to(o)thache was to rub turpentine jaw outside opposite wherethe pain or a funny cure was to fill the mouth with water and sit on the fire until it boils The whooping cough was supposed to be cured by a patient drinking milk a ferret would have left or to meet a man a man with a white horse and ask him for a cure, Meylew Well was supposed to have great cures by going round the field a certain number of times and visit twice a year, As for herbs three are a great number, water-cress, lime cress, mustard cress, pile worth, leeks,elder leaves a great poultice for boils also a hot water bottle with venice turpentine later to draw it, Warts were cured in olden times with lodged water or a snail. An old cure for sore eyes is cold tea and also spring water to bathe them well.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 19:45
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only got one leg, when they this they run around on one leg.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 19:44
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Will you have a Glass of Wine
This game is very exciting. When being played there must be an even number of children at the two sides. As they advance towards each other, one side says "Will you have a glass of wine, a glass of wine, a glass of wine will you hvae
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 19:25
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The gallant soldiers
On one side there would be children called the Irish men, on the other side the children would be cakked the English men. The Irish men would say "take your glass and go your way we are the rover we are the men of ninty eight for we are the gallany soldiers". The English men would say "we are hardy British men, we are the gallant soldiers". Then the two sides would fight.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 18:10
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they would quit at night. They would not get very much in that time.
[Got from Mrs. Murphy, 80, Black Law]
Famin Times (Kathleen Rocks).
There was not many people living in the time of the famine. They all died with hunger. At first there came a brown spot on the potatoes: then they withered away. They rotted away. Then the people could not eat them. There was not much to give to the animals. There was a good lot of the animals died.
[I got this story from James Kelly Ballagh]
Famine Times (James Ward)
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 18:09
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Famine Times (Mary Murphy)
There was a house in Black Law where a family lived in famine times. The trace of the house is there yet.
The blight was a kind of black. Then the leaves died away. The potatoes did not rot in the ground. They would not grow any bigger when the blight came on them. Then the people would not have a good crop that year.
[Got from George W. German, 78, Black Law.]
The people used to have oaten meal instead of potatoes. The people used to get two meals in the day - one in the middle of the day and another when
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 18:05
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from sheep and after being oiled was combed. It was then put into rolles. They attached it to the spindle. The wheel was then turned and the wool became thread.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 18:05
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17th February, 1938.
Old Crafts.
Information obtained from:
Mrs. O'Leary,
107 Ard-na-Greine
Clonmel.
Candle-Making.
The old Irish people took the fat known as tallow from the sheep. They melted it in pots. They then got thin pieces of cord. They dipped it into the tallow a few times and left it to get hard.
Spinning.
Wool was taken
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-28 13:03
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Do thaínig sí annsan deire “Céad mile fáilte romhat , is mithid duit ceart”, ar seisean. “táim sé feadh na h-oidhche ag fanacht leat”. Tr’om leith an píopa sin”.
“Gheobhair é agus míle fáilte” ar sise. Do thairg sí an píopa do “Seo” ar seisean, “agus beannacht dé le d’anam agus le h-anamnaith I bPurgadoír. Ma tá peaca ar t-anam go múscailidh dia tú”
Do tharraing sí stair mhaith do’n píopa í féin agus thairg sí chuige airís é an tarna babhta agus ghuid go ducrachtach le na h-anamnaithe I bPurgadoír. Tharraing sé an píopa is ghuid sé trí h-uaire le-n-a h-anam.
“Sé do bheatha id’shaoghal is id’shláinte” ar sise “is fada do bheinn I bpiantaibh Purgadóireachta muna mbeadh tusa . Táím ullamh dul go Flaitheas anois. Déanam anois is tabharfaidh mé píopa is tobac duit”
Do bhí tigh I geomhnuidhe in aice na reilige. “Déir anois” ar sise “cuir do lámh isteach agus tarraing an bolta agus beir leat an sluasad agus an ramhainn go dtabhairfaidh mé píopa is tobac duit”
D’imthigh , is nuair do chualadar gach aon béir acu cheap na daoine gurbh’ é an Sprid a bhí ann. Chuadar isteach san reiligh, bhí tor seuche gile ansan.
“Bhí se ag romhar agus beadh sé ag romhar ag bun seiche gile”, bhí an eagla air bhí an poll dá dhéanamh cómh doimhin san.
“Tá eagla teacht orm”
“Ní gádh duit eagla , ní bhaoghal duit mise, tá an iomad anóis agam duit. Sáith síos do romhainn”.
Do dhéin. Do bhraith sé mar bheadh leat. Ghlanadar mór teimpheall na lae agus thógadar an leac. Is amhlaidh a bhí dhá oighean óir agus iad anuas ar a chéile.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 23:44
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416
The Local Landlord
Mr. Bailey was the local landlord. He lived in Rookwood House. Mr. Strevens was his agent. His family were about eight years settled in this district. He was a good man and seldom evictions were carried out on his estate.
Mrs. Bailey although a protestant bought a picture of the Blessed Virgin for Athleague Chapel Evictions were more common in the districts of other local landlords. A man named Conboy from Coalpits who as a bailiff for Mr. Bagott was evicted for non-payment of rent.
This man had a small holding of land in Beechlaun and he went to live there. His decendant is living
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 23:32
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414
Taken down from John Cunniffe of above address.
Mattie Mannion.
Almost a hundred years ago a child who had seven fingers on each hand was born in Fairfield on the western slope of Mount Mary. His name was Mattie Mannion. Shortly after his birth a story got about that such a person was mentioned in an old prophesy and that in the final battle for Irish freedom he would hold up the enemy calery (va) in a three cornered field (John Lohan's field.)
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 23:22
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399
Riddles Common in This Locality.
Q. A hot kiln red, limestone in it, smoke overhead and no fire lit.
A. Your mouth.
Q. When it's flying its lying, when its walking its standing.
A. A plibein's topin. !!
Q. What is it that goes from Galway to Dublin without walking or moving.
A. The road.
Q. What is the difference between a blind piper and a sailor in prison.
A. The blind piper can not see to go and the sailor
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 23:12
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365
Local Marriage Customs.
When a man is getting married he asks a neighbour or a friend to ask a wife for him. Then the girls father and the man's father meet in some hotel and make the match. They arrange the day and the hour on which they will be married.
When they are going out to be married an(d) 00old shoe is thrown after them and sometimes an old shoe is tied to the motor car. When they are coming home after their (marriage) fires are lit along the sides of the road. The village people light candles in windows. When they are going in the door an oaten cake is broken over their heads.
The evening of their marriage they invite all their friends and cousins and have a
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 22:54
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407
Vanished landmarks.
In the days before the infamous land-lord Pollock "swept the cottage" and other land-marks "from the green there was a cemetary in the townland of Cuilnacappy
which was regarded as one of the oldest grave yards in Ireland. A few hundred yards to the east of this was a holy well called Tobar Mhuire Thunais where stations were performed by the people of Kilbegnet and adjoining parishes.
There was an acient ? tree beside this well and people who performed stations there, usually tied ribbons
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 22:43
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395
Food in Olden Times.
The people ate three meals a day, long ago. They always did most of morning's work before eating their breakfast. The breakfast generally consisted of stirabout or potatoes. Milk especially butter-milk was drunk instead of tea by the children. It was a common scene to see a group of children sitting around a pot of potatoes on the floor. They put salt on the potatoes and ate them with butter-milk. Oaten-meal bread was eaten long ago. It was made with water and meal and was baked on a griddle. Flummery
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 22:34
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393
the village that grew up beside it derived the name Ath Liagh Finn.
Maggie Cunniffe.
Coalpito,
Creggs,
Co. Galway.
Taken down from John Cunniffe of above address.
O'Sullivan Beare.
In the winter of 1601 when O'Sullivan Beare and his army were on their way from Kerry to Breffni they passed through Creggs district. On the top of Mount Mary they were attacked by the forces of Mac-David-Burke but having defeated the attacking
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 22:25
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390
Rocks from Sliabh Muire
From the ice age to the time of the Fianna there were three huge rocks on the summit of Sliabh Muire. One is still there towering above the whins and heather. Another is in the village of Curragh just across the Galway-Roscommon border, and the third is just visible above the waters of the River Suck, about thirty yards west of Athleague bridge
The separation of those three rocks came about in this way. One day when Fionn Mac Cumhail and his companions were hunting on Sliabh Muire they
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 22:17
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388
Richard Kirwan
Richard Kirwan, a decendant of of one of the Tribes of Galway, was the last occupant by the terrace near the bridge.
He was a great lover of music and spend much of his time playing the harp. When Bunting set himself to the task of collecting the traditional music of Ireland about the year 1890 Richard Kirwan invited him to his castle where he was a guest for many months.
During this time Bunting and his host visited every district in
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 22:09
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384
Taken down from John Cunniffe of above (below) address
The Moving Bog.
from the earliest ages to the beginning of 1909 there was a vast track of bogland on the eastern slope of " Mount Mary known as (Mog) Monageeraghfin
One Sunday towards the end of January there was a heavy rain fall which caused flooding in many districts. On that Sunday evening people noticed a large flood adjacent to the bog disappearing through an underground passage hither to unknown in the locality
About twelve o'clock on that night people returning
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 21:27
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381
have gone under the hands of all the children in the row. When this is finished they make a ring and swing.
Robert Ormsby
Robert Ormsby at Tobberavaddy between Creggs and Arhleague. He was a cruel and callous tyrant and was known to the people .?..................... of his time as "Riobard na Gli?ennac" because of the rattling armour he used to wear. As a persecutor of Catholics he was notorius and he had several people put to to death for the faith.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 21:13
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School Games I Play
Rounders
When you want to play a game of rounders, you have to make a ring with stones.There has to be two parties playing this game.A penny is tossed to see which party will get first hand in. Then a child of the other party will throw the ball to a child of the party that is to get first hand in. Then she strikes the ball and runs around the ring. If she is struck with the ball while between two stones she has to go out of the game, and if she striches the ball behind the den she has to go out of the game also. The den is one
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 18:14
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Story
A man named John Moore from Ballyteague North had a ghost in his house Every night the fire was thrown about the house He had a cock of hay and one night it was set on fire by the ghost under the eve of the thatched house and the house was not set on fire at all The priest advised him to give a load of turf to someone far away for nothing He gave it to people in Boston Co Kildare named Sextons. That night Sextons house was burned The ghost never appeared again in John Moore’s house
Told by Mrs. Cleary aged 70 to her grandson Tom Ennis
Grangeclare Kilmeague Co Kildare
Story
A man named Paddy Nugent came home from America to Ballyteague He said a little bird followed him across the sea behind the ship. One day when he was wheeling turf in the bog he said he could see the little bird coming. He used to see the dust moving when the little bird would be coming. The bird used to sit on the barrow. The people said he should ask the bird some question that maybe it was someone in trouble. So he promised that he would ask it a question. The people caught Paddy by the shoulders and held him and he saw the bird coming. He fainted and wasn’t able to ask the question. He told the priest about it and the priest told him the bird would never trouble him again.
Told by Mrs. Cleary aged 70 to her grandson
Tom Ennis Grangeclare Allenwood
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 17:37
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Story
A young girl called Etty Daly lived in Littletown Robertstown Co Kildare One day she heard the banshee crying near the house and she went out to see what it was. and she saw a woman [ ?--ing] round the end of the house combing her hair. The girl was only 8 years of age. She didn’t know ‘twas the banshee. She had a stick in her hand to hit the woman and because she thought she was coming to steal something. She ran after the woman and was shouting at her to go away. She followed her up to the tunnel at Nellie Connelly’s gate at Grangeclare and the banshee went in under the tunnel. The girl went round all sides of the bridge but couldn’t see the banshee. She began to get afraid then and ran home & told her mother & her mother said it was the banshee. Ettie Daly was burned to death soon after.
Grangeclare Kilmeague Naas
Told by Pat Cleary aged 79 to Thomas Ennis aged 14 Allenwood School
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 16:58
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A Hidden Treasure
I live in the parish of Rathcormac
In the townland of Knocheen, Leamlara,
There is a trasure hidden in Collins Glen * Glengaeeiff more (leamlara). It is hidden , ar bruac na habhann,ar cam na coille, coir dá sgear, inagraid an Rí Cullichid G. Kathleen O'Leary.
Knockeen an Cruac
Michael Collins owner of This farm & father of the present owner did some digging in search of this gold but failed.
J.C. neville.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 16:47
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Ballard Killa: Cotters; O'Brien (2 families Mulcahys) McCarthy; Savage, warly, Doolan, Graham, ( All farmers)
boreen: Daltons ; Cotter (cottage)
Clash: Barry; (Ahern in cottage)
(McCarthy cotter)
Corbally: Moore farmer - ( Kingston farmer from west Cork) Riordan farmer:
Ballinasheha : MsCarthy farmer
Burdullerick: 2 Sweeneys Cotters Relatives) (3 Cronins Cottiers relatives) (OBrien cottier)
Captain Creagh Barry( former a Capt. of militia)
Glengarriff-,1 Broderick, 1 O'Donovan, 1 school house, 1 school- 1 Collins
Leamlasa : Barry, Catholic church, ( Kelliher Post office)
Ballybramaigh- Fitzgerald;
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 12:37
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the main road of Leamlara to Watergrasshill to Ballinaglough and through the Mollies to Glengarriff to main road Cork Tallow.
Collected by J.C. Neville Leamlara
Warren was the Landlord of Ballycrana, Ballinaskeha and Corbally, Lisgoold. At first he was unpopular. In the land war Troy was evicted from Ballycrana. The landlord demanded his tenant to save his crops. When Troy was evicted an emergency man took over the farm and Warren supplied the best of seed for the farm. The emergency man was fond of drink and sold the good seed to the neighbouring farmers for little or nothing. Warren seeing things going against him toned down and began to help his tenants and became popular.
J.C. Neville
Leamlara
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 12:33
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Cures for diseases
Wildfire: The wild fire is a rash on the skin, it is cured with a coal and a special prayer.
Whooping cough: The cure for a whooping cough is to go to a married couple of the same surname. Ask for three charities such as tea, sugar,an bread, bring them home and give them to a child that has a whooping cough three times a day.
The dirty mouth: A person that never saw his or her father has the cure for the dirty mouth. The person about to make the cure must go fasting to the patient. He must breathe into the persons mouth and say some special prayers.
Stain: Rub the persons arm on their leg three times and while rubbing it say some prayers.
Stye: Pluck a branch of a gooseberry bush with ten thorns on it. Take one thorn off and leave the other nine on. The nine that are left paint them to the stye every morning saying "in the name of the father and
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 12:00
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Two women were walking around the field one of them said to the other look over at the woman dressed in blue. Before the other woman had time to look over across the woman was gone. That was the start of the well.
Nora Fitzgerald (Townland Ballycrana)
This story told by Mrs. Buckley of Lackabeha near Ballyleary. This woman is about 60 years of age.
J.C Neville (Teacher).
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-27 10:14
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Food in olden days
In the olden times the people ate three meals each day. The meals consisted of potatoes or porridge. They ate the potatoes for their breakfast and porridge for their dinner and then potatoes for their evening meal. Breakfast was eaten at ten o clock, the dinner at one o clock and the evening meal around seven. Sometimes the men would do about four hours work before coming to the house to eat breakfast. Potatoes were not eaten at every meal. Milk was not drunk very much during the winter. It was drunk mostly in the summer, when it was plentiful a drink called sowens was used when milk was scarce.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 23:51
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If the sky is red where the sun sets it is a sign of rain.
If there were ants on the road it would be a sign of rain.
If the sun is smothered when it is setting it is a sign of rain.
If the hens were picking their feathers it would be a sign of rain.
If the wind is coming from the South it is a sign of rain.
On the twenty fourth of June, the Fair of Spancihill, it is always wet.
Collected by Brian MacMahon from his father Nicholas MacMahon, Fountain Cross, Ennis. Aged 49 years (1938) and Mrs MacMahon aged 36 years (1938)
Signs of the weather are birds flying low, seagulls coming in to land, soot falling, a ring the moon or a clouded moon. When the meat is wet it is a sign of bad weather or the water bubbling: or to see wild swans, or the cat to sit near the fire with his back to it.
A mackerel sky is the sign of good weather. Old people feel their corns in
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 23:35
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out of the chimney it would be the sign of rain.
When the swallows are flying high it is the sign of fine weather or if the lark was flying high, or many other things like that. When the Fair of Clare comes round it is surely wet, It was not wet the last day because it fell on a saints day.
Those are the most common signs of the weather and more often they are sure signs and should be remembered not only interesting but also as useful information.
Collected by Frank Donohue from his father Cornelius Donohoe, Toonagh, Fountain P.V. Ennis, aged 56 years (1938)
The Weather
If there is a fog around the moon it is the sign or rain.
If the swallows were flying low or if they were on the wires it would be the sign of rain
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 23:21
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The Weather
People, such as farmers, whose work is affected by weather, are able to fortell it. They have learned by exper-ience, to find signs of the weather in the world about them, and to judge its changes from nature, the birds, animals and insects.
As bad weather is what they most dislike, it stands to reason that farmers are most interested in sign's of its approach. These are some of the commonest signs. We learn of the approach of rain from the birds such as the swallows, seagulls and geese. About the swallows if they were flying low it would be the sign of rain. But the seagulls flying inland the sign of a storm at sea. There are a lot of other signs of weather from the animals. About the the cat and the plover if the cat was sitting by the fire or the plover flying inland it would be the sign of bad weather. There are still other signs. If there was a ring around the moon or the smoke going straight
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 22:26
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a book and kiss it inside in the house and go out and kiss it outside.
Putting yourself through the the keyhole is another. Write your name on a piece of paper and pass it through the keyhole.
Putting your right hand where your left hand cannot touch it is another. Place it on the left elbow.
Collected by Brian MacMahon from his father Nicholas MacMahon, Fountain Cross, Ennis, Aged 49 yrs(1938) and from his mother aged 36 yrs. (1938)
The following was collected by Thomas Fitzgibbon, from his father Daniel Fitzgibbon, Ballygriffey, Ennis aged 56 (1938)
Hallow E'en
Hallow E'en is on the thirty first of October, and on that night we have a lot of sport and we play a lot of games. The play starts at supper. We have a barm-brack for supper. There is a ring in the brack and who ever gets the ring it is said he will be married before the end
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 22:09
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Hallow E'en
First Mammy makes a cake and puts a ring and a sixpence into it. Then whoever gets the ring will be married and whoever gets the sixpence the richest of the family.
Then we get a long cord and hang it from the ceiling and fasten an apple and a candle on to the cord to see who would get a bite of the apple.
We get three saucers and we put water in one and earth in the other and salt in the last one . Then we put a handkerchief around someone's eyes and he would put into one of the saucers. If he put his hand into the saucer of earth he would be first to die; if he put his hand into the saucer of water he would be be first to cross the sea and if he put his hand into the saucer of salt he would be first to be married.
Next we put two beans down on the flag of the fire and name someone to be the husband and wife. We leave
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 21:31
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A Story
There was a spirit who used to come out on a hill on a certain road. Everyone who came along he would ask this.
"Coinnleoir agus Coinneall ann,
Chuir tusa leat-rann leis sin."
that is "knock knowledge out of that".
The spirit was a priest that had masses to say and did not. People were afraid to go the road for they could not answer the question and the spirit used stop them.
Then the poor Scholar came along. The spirit asked him-
"Coinnleoir agus coinneal ann
Cuir tusa leat rann leis sin".
And the poor scholar said -
A oubairtfa- sa t'aifreann (aifreann) i n-am,
Ni beitea ag prugadoireact annsin"
And the spirit went up into heaven in a blaze of light. He was never seen again. His penance was to stay there till someone made the leitrann. Masses he didn't say was why he was there
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 21:07
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There are two graveyards in this parish.They are Dysart and Kilcross, and they are still in use. There is a children's graveyard in a field about two hundred yards from Jiggs Forge, but it is not in use . There is a children's grave-yard across the road from Dysart Chapel, but it is not used. There is the shell of an old church and an old round tower in Dysart. There are a lot of people buried in the ruins both in Kilcross and in Dysart. There is a slope in Dysart graveyard towards the north. There is no slope in Kilcross. It is in a hollow. There is a grand tomb-stone just outside the walls of Dysart graveyard. It is made out of red granite. It marks the grave of Synge.
He would not be allowed by the church to be buried in the Graveyard because he was not a Catholic. There is a tomb near where the altar was in Dysart church. Here is the writing on it = "This tomb was erected by Michael O Dea of Dysart in 1684...". There is a fine round tower there also. It is 50 feet high and is 60 feet in circumference. There was a brass bell found in the round tower. There are no tomb-stones in Kilcross because erecting one would bring luck. No one would like to
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 20:33
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be the first to erect one.
The grandest music you ever heard used to be heard Kilemoss graveyard until a protestant was buried there. Then the music stopped and it was never heard again.
There are a lot of people buried outside the parish such as in Rath, Barefield, Cill na Mona and in a lot of other places.
Collected by Michael Leahy from his father John Leahy, Erinaghmore, Fountain, Ennis, aged 49 yrs.
Treasure
People went to look for it but each time were frightened away by a ghost and so no one ever found it.
Once upon a time there was a man named Crowe and he lived in Inagh and he dreamed that he get his fortune at the Bridge of Limerick.
So he went to Limerick and he spent three days at the bridge and on the third day a cobbler asked him what he was doing there, and the man said that he dreamt that he would get his fortune on the bridge.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 17:21
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A Maighdean ghlórmhar mhúmar[?]
mhaiseac
Go mo tú mo stór mo
luam agus mo taisge
Go mo tú an réalt ólais
hom ins gach bealach
Is ar uair mo bháis go
bhfághadh na Flathais
Tá mé ag carradh na déirc[?]
isteach i dteach na féile
ag feitheamh na glóire is ghá
héisteacht
San áit mach mbeidh mé ag
iarraidh biad ná éadach
Corra do chos go moch i
na nAifreann
Osgail do bhéal ar briathra
beannuigthe
Osgail do croidhe agus
díbir an ghangadi [?}
Agus breathnuigh suas ar
mhac na banaltra
Cránn díreach dilleach glas
crann ar ceasad críost
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 17:10
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áthas an domhain ar a mháthair é a fheiceál ar ais arist cuice.
Annsin dimtigh sé arist lá ar na bhárac agus rinne sé ar phálás an fhathaigh aríst.
Bhúail sé ar an doras agts dosgail bean an fhathaigh an doas dhó.
Cuir sí í bfoghlac sa gcórfha aríst é.
ba ghéarr go dtáinic an fathac isteac
'Fú, Fá, Feasóg adeir sé faim baluth Eireannac bréagac bradac.
Cuartúigh sé an teac acht ní raibh an t-Eireannac le fághail aige.
Dúbhairt se lé na mnaoí an suipear a réidhteac dhó.
Thus sí an suipear gan mórán moille núair a bhí sé ithte aide dúbhairt sé an chearc a thábhairt anuas chuige. Núair a thug a mnaoí an chearc anúas chuige dúbhairt sé leis an gcearc ubh óir a bhreith.
Rug an cheac ub óir ar an bpoinnt annsin bhí an fathach lánt-sásta leithe.
Bhí an fathach tuirseac annsin agus thit a codladh air.
Núair a bí sé sgathamh na
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 17:01
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isteach i dteach lean mach an ceannuige mála í nuair a tháinig sé iseach bhí bean bréag istig roime. tá tú agam sa deiread dubhairt mach an ceannuige mála
táim agus fanfa eindig leat ars an bean. phos mach an ceannuige mála agus an bhean
Siobhán Ní Confhaoile
Fuair mé an sgéal seo O Padraic OConfha
as Loch-Con-Iartha
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 16:49
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thart d'fhiafrúigh sé de mhúinntir an garrdha cé leis an coirce? dúbhairt na fir go mba lé tigearna Mac Carrabhas
Breathnuigh na fir ar an Rí agus breathnaigh an Rí ar Mhac Charrabhas nach breágh an píosa talaimh atá agad
Tá go deimhin adeir Mac Carrabhas
Siubhaladar leo annsin no go dtáinic siad go garrdha eile a raibh fir ag ceangal coirce. D'fhiafrúigh an Rí de na fir cé mba leis an coirce. Dúbhairt siad go mba leis tighearna Mac Carrabhas. Ó arsa an Rí, nach agad atá an talamh breágh ar seisean.'Tá' arsa Mac Carrabhas
Tháinic an cat annsin go dtí teac a raibh Rí na comhnuidhe.
Cúala mé arsa an cat go bhfuil tú indan tú fhéin a cur i gcrot ainmhidhe ar bith is féidir leat.
Táim arsa an Rí agus d'iompuigh se é fhéin i gcrot leomhan. Núair a connaic an cat an leomhan tháinic faitchíos air. Annsin d'iompuigh an leomhan é fein na luch. dith an cat an luc agus ba bhin é deireadh an Rí draoidheactac bá geárr annsin no go dtáinic
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 14:35
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"A sponge."
"If I threw a red brick into the black sea what would it become"?
"Wet"
"What toes suffer most when stood on"?
"Toma-toes."
"What is the difference between a hill and a pill"?
"One is hard to get up and the other is hard to get down".
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 14:27
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Here are some riddles I heard locally.
"Why is a hat like a railway engine?"
"Because it goes on a head."
"Why is a cat like a comma?"
"Because one has claws at the end of its paws, and the other is a pause at the end of a clause."
"What is that, which has never been felt, seen, or heard, never existed, and yet has a name?"
"Nothing"
"Which stocking does a boy take off last?"
"The left one."
"Why is the letter F like a bull's tail?"
"Because it is at the end of beef"
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 12:11
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Leamlara "The Mare's Leap".
Account of the Barry Family of Leamlara.
The present representative is Mr. Standish Barry one time a M.P. is a Catholic.
In former times lived in a thatched house in Clash Leamlara with mud walls: This same house is owned presently by John Barry Clash-Farmer-whose father bought same from the Barrys. The mud walls were knocked and rebuilt with stone and slated. As accounts will show it was from here the Mare raced with its owner from the Soldiers and gave the Famous Jump. Known as the "Leim Larach".
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-26 11:31
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stream flowing into the well.
There is a large square stone about a foot square in front of the well in the stream water call locally a Foot Stone. Then there are two stones one on either side about a foot high. These two are shaped like a man in the rough. The eyes, mouth and nose are visible and the hands by the side as in illustration.
A little west of the well stands a large stone 3 or 4 ft high of sandstone. On this stone there are several crosses cut into it. There is one big cross in the centre. This is called locally the "Mass Stone".
It's believed locally that Mass was said here in the Penal Days. The soldiers used be watching from Buckley's Wood of Lackabeha and that people leaving Mass were killed here by the soldiers.
Note:-
Processions headed by the Lisgoold Musical Band visited this well in 1920 or so but fell through during the Black and Tan War and have not been revived since.
J.C. Neville (Teacher)
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 16:38
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and during the 9 days after the feast. No rounds are made here. The visitors just say the rosary - take a drink of the water, and leave hanging on the Palm Trees bits of rags, medals, beads or ribbons as offerings and take home some of the water.
It's known as "Our Lady's Well". The story written by Nora Fitzgerald and told by Mrs Buckley has reference to the origin of this Well. A palm tree grows on either side of the well and a Hazel tree near one of them. These palm trees are growing there as long as anyone can remember.
There is mention that a young boy who had a stiff arm (not able to use it) got the use of it after visits to this well. His mother was a faithful visitor to this well.
It's a belief that if the water were boiled a "frog" would come in the pipe of the kettle, or a fish in the kettle.
The well is built round with stones laid flat on one another. A large flat stone is placed on top covering the well. A stream flows from the field down a rocky incline and there is no sign of a
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 16:20
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Ballycrana Well is situated in the townland of that name bordering on the townland of Knockaheem. The field in which the well is is owned by Mrs Fitzgerald widow of John Fitzgerald (now dead) who was a mason and his father before him also. This mason told me that his father would never allow him put a crystal (white stone) in a house or floor as it is unlucky.
The well field has no name as it's the only field owned by this woman. This is the only holy well known in the Leamlara side of Lisgoold Parish.
The well is still visited by people on the 15th of August and on the 9 days before.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 16:08
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amach ar féin.
Cúaicib (?) sé isteach i sean sgioból áit a mbíodh go leór coininí na geomnuidhe
sgar an mála ar poll a bhí ann agus cúaid sé féin i bhfoghlac.
Ní raibh sé i bhfad i bhfoghlac núáir a chonnaic sé ceithre coinín istigh sa mala rith sé chuig an mála cas (?) rua (?) ar a bhéal agus thug na coiníní abhaile chuig a mháighistir agus teasbáin a mháighstir dá athair iadh agus bhí an t-athair ann bhuidheac den cat.
Núair a bhí braon bainne ólta ag an gcat dimthigh sé amach aríst agus cuir sé an mála an áit a mbíodh go leór pearróide ina gcomhnuidhe.
Ní raibh sé i bhfad ina suidhe núair a cúaidh péire pearóide isteach san mála.
Rith an cat chuig an mála cas an muineal ar na pearróide agus thug abhaile chuig a mháighistir iad.
Fúair an sean rí bas fén ám seo agus tháinic rí eile in áit.
Lá amháin bhí an cat agus a mháighistir ag siubhal in aice na fairrige
Connaic an cat an rí nua ag siubal
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 13:52
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this the rich man fell down on his knees and begged the King for mercy and so he did.
I got this story from my father Pather Gibbons. He got it from his own father.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 13:51
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feeding and not myself."said the king. "Yesterday I came to you dressed as a poor man and you drove me away. To day, because I am wearing a handsome cloak you make a feast for me but I was the same yesterday as I am to day, your King."
Speaking these words the King rose and threw back the handsome cloak and there he stood dressed in the old clothes of the poor man.
On seeing
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 13:41
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at the door of his house but as soon as he saw the king he brought him unto the house and soon had a dainty feast spread before him.
The king took up some of the food and broke it into small pieces but instead of eating them he put them into the folds of his coat.
"Why do you do that" asked the richman. "Why do you not eat them"
"Because it is my fine cloak you are feeding
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 13:38
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poor and I am tired and hungry."
"get away from here" said the rich man in an angry voice. I will have no beggars around my house." The king said nothing but turned sadly away.
Next day he again dressed himself in the ragged old clothes but he covered them with a handsome cloak of silk. Then he went once more to the house of the rich man.
As before the rich man was sitting
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 13:23
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
friends" asked the king. "Nothing" answered the servant.
This set the king thinking for a while but he said nothing and returned to his palace.
Next day the king dressed himself in ragged old clothes and went alone to the rich man's house.
THere he found him sitting at the door, and the king bowing said "Give me a little food and let me rest in your beautiful house, I am very
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 13:21
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Story
In Ireland many years ago there lived a very good and wise king.
one day he passed a lovely new house. "Who lives in that house" he asked one of his servants. "the richest man in the country lives there." said the servant. He gives feasts every day to his rich friends. "And what does he give to his poor
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 12:03
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stains from clothes.
Nettle water revives colour in navy.
Zurze Blossoms are boiled the juice is used for yellow-jaundice.
Yarrow is boiled and the juice is drunk for Rheumatism. It is said that cabbage-water let flow by a cow house in which cows are causes the cows to Sling.
Bhristybronin
Lisavara
Ballingarry
Got from my Mother (55) also from mr o bonnor age 50
Doonbeirne
Ballingarry
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 11:55
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Herbs :--
Sloe wine -- Sloes put into vessel. Hot water was poured an then after a week the juice was taken out. Add sugar Bury it for two months in the ground in a crock. Then it is fit to use.
The lark of older boiled in cream is good for curing pox in cows teats.
Dandelion tea is good for consumptive people bomfrey is used for sprains. The root is pulped and applied to sprain for eight Hours Swamp root is good for cutsard is used as a Blister. The juice is extracted by cutting and bruising the root and the juice is rubbed to the sores Ivey water -- is good to remove
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 11:36
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
When the night fell the "Grainnes" came and then the fun began. A wooden bucket of whiskey was left out for them and they drank it up with noggins. When that night was ended all the fun was over.
Written by
Paddy Sheanon,
Drumanespic,
Bailieborough,
Co. Cavan,
Material obtained from:-
Mrs Sheanon,
Drumanespic,
Bailieborough,Co. Cavan
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 11:33
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Herbs :--
Burn leaf of cabbage and apply it to sore head and it would cure it.
Boil wild violets and drink the juice and it would cure a pain in the head.
Burn a leaf called hartstongue and apply it to burn and it would cure it.
A cure for a sore throat is to boil the juice of a dandelion and drink the juice.
To rub the milk of a plant made long ago from sloe banes the method for making the tea was to dry the leaves and put them into teapot and make it the same as ordinary the. Tea was also made from agrimony,
Yot from my mother clliehaef siennessy
age 54 Ballingarry
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 11:27
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they could get married at ant time of the day.
Long ago white horses were ridden to the chapel. Going to the chapel the bride sat on her own peoples horse and coming home she sat on the mans horse. A race was run from the chapel to the home. Whoever was home first won a bottle of whiskey.
The people were dressed differently from now . The men wore "a body" coat and knee breeches "a body"coat is a coat with a long tail from the back, the women wore bonnets and veils and paisley shawls and a pair of shoes from a shoemaker. Their clothes were down to their toes and they held up their skirts with one hand
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-25 01:32
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63
Hidden Treasure.
In a field near Mick Regan’s [insert: Clonmore North] there is supposed to be money hidden. A certain man dreamt of it and told the neighbours. A number of men including my grandfather stayed digging all night at the spot but without result.
The old people say there is money hidden in Gavin’s field at Lisava under a tree.
There is also supposed to be money hidden in Bradshaw’s, Clonmore, left there by Brennan the Outlaw before he was caught when hiding in a chimney.
A workman from Galway was working at Roche’s of Raheen, and he was setting cabbage in the haggard, where there was supposed to be money hidden, and he found a lot of money. He left at once without telling anybody and he didn’t even wait for his belongings. He was never heard of again.
Collector: Willie UReill, Clonmore, Cahir Co. Tipp.
Information supplied by Daniel Guiry, Clonmore, Cahir, aged 95 years.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-24 05:54
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
73
you will never miss the water till the well runs dry. Bat after kind.
Michael Hennessy
Ballingarry
got from my Mother age 54 and others.
Waste not want not is the maximum I will teach
Let your watchword be despatch
And practise what you preach
Never let your chances like some beings pass you by
For you never miss the water
Till the well runs dry.
James Jruin
Frankfort
Got from Ballingarry
My Grandfather martin Barroll Loolrus Bruree. He died December 1934 aged 72
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-24 05:40
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Proverbs :--
You can’t expect blood from a turnip.
A green bhristmas is a rich churchyard.
A white bhristmas is a poor churchyard.
A shut mouth oaths no flies. Mafee hay while the sun shines. Beg from a beggar and you will never be rich.
The old dog for the long road and the pup for the puddle.
Trot mammy, trot daddy and why wouldn’t foaleen trot .
Plough deep while sluggards sleep and you will have corn to sell and to keep .
A nod is as good as a wink to a blind man. The early bird catches the early worn
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 18:54
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Then she thought of a trick that if she got people to play cards for a good turkey and who ever would win it she would give him the sick one. That night there were five men in and they played for a turkey. All the men gave two shillings each. When the turkey was played for, the man who won asked her for it. She got a bag and put the sick turkey in it. The man went home and looked at it and it was dying. He went back to the woman and showed it to her. She said "That is not the turkey I gave you" and he had to keep it.
Oliver Gennon, Delvin, Westmeath.
Got story from Thomas Glennon (Senior), Delvin, Westmeath.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 17:54
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
1. When a mother had to leave her baby in the cradle and go out working, she always put the tongs across the cradle, to keep the fairies away from her child.
2. If a person was visiting a house, he or she got a grain of meal or salt to carry in his pocket on leaving.
3. A coal out of the fire was never given to a neighbour if there was a sick person in the house.
4. Some people would never give a coal away on a Monday morning.
5. On the first of May — May day — milk is never given or sold in some districts.
6 If a person cut a lone bush in a field, he would die in that year or get some lingering disease.
7 If you rob a swallow's nest you will never have any luck.
8. Quite near the school is a farmhouse called 'Cottage'. (Incidentally this farm is now about to be divided on local tenants)
Years ago there was supposed to be a treasure buried near the cottage. It is quite near the River Suck and tradition says that a huge monster, like an Eel, comes up out of the river to guard the treasure. Strange lights are seen at night and people would not visit certain fields late at night.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 13:31
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for the night’s lodging and a feast of a few roasted potatoes and a
bowl of milk.
Neil Ni lusnsize
Áβo na δzesc
Ósile an lasa
besnnrbsize
purses an szisl seo was ó
Disbmuno ó Szese
Áro na Szesi
baile an essa
besnnebsize
Co.Cor
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 13:17
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This is the story of a stud groom who had charge of a gentleman's horses at Gerrardstown Dunshaughlin. He was extremely jealous of his wife. This morning when he went out to work he chanced to hear some injudicious remark concerning his wife.
He rushed back, shot his wife and baby and then himself.
No churchyard would take his remains for burial Mrs Reilly remembers seeing the coffin being taken from one to another on a cart and being refused admittance everywhere.
At last it was thrown into the sea at Balbriggan. The house of tragedy was demolished by order of the Dunshaughlin priests. The place is said to be haunted since.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 12:58
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an old school
In the year 1851 they had an old thatch cabin Killmacowen which they need as school house. There were no glass windows in it of five places eith. On wet days the rain used som through the roof. The children has no seats toast on only sods of earth. They had no slates to write on only stones. Sometimes harvest they used make some in out of blackberries and writing pens out of quills of geese. the school master whose name was Shea had no home of his own not received no salary for his teaching. When his days teaching was over he looked amongst his scholars to see which of them would invite him to their home
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 12:33
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Cloonacashel Landlord
There lived in Cloonacashel, three miles from Balinrobe, a landlord who used to evict his tenants. When he dies his sun succeeded him. He was afraid to live in the castle which his father has inhabited as it was reputed to be haunted by the fathers ghost. He entreated his workman to stop him and promised to give him ten pounds as a reward. He agreed.
One night, about midnight, as he was leaning over the fire, he heard a tramping noise coming up the stairs. The ghost entered the room. The workman said, "Come in and warm yourself." the ghost said he was glad someone had spoken to him at last. He beckoned him to approach and showed him a bag of gold. He told him to share it with all the people in the village he had wronged, until they forgave him.
The workman did accordingly, and all forgave the landlord but one (land) window. The workman told the ghost the next night. The ghost gave him another bag of gold to give to the widow until she forgave him. the widow didn't forgive him (she forgave him) until all the gold was nearly gone.
The landlord was in Purgatory and he wouldn't be let out until everyone he had wronged had forgiven him.
Mrs. P. Mullany,
Greagh Rd.
High St,
Ballinrobe
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 12:20
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The old temple or church in Cooleeney was a Protestant Church and the Rectory was where David O'Callaghan lives presently. No one seems to have heard of any minister living there.
The ground around the building was consecrated in 1918 and James Wall of Cooleeney was the first person to be buried there
Joe Kiely Cooleney
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 12:18
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
In the townland of Derryfadda on the farm of Stephen Brennan there is an old ruin called the monastery. A peculiar stone in the shape of a trunk or box with a key-hole in it lies here. One moonlight night Martin Halpin (pronounced Haypnee) was out hunting rabbits and when in sight of the ruins three monks in their robes appeared and walked around the ruins.
(Joe Kiely Cooleeney)
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 11:45
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returned to his own home again.
Kathleen Lynch,
Barnfield,
Ballina,
Co. Mayo.
Story told by:-
Patrick Lynch,
Barnfield,
Ballina,
Co. Mayo
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 11:44
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was once a man and his wife living together.
They had one son, and when he was seven years old his father died. Before his death he told his son that there was a tree growing in one of his fields and when he would be twenty one years old he would pull it up from the roots. The boy kept working away, and one day he went out to the field, he put his arms round the tree and shook it, and he said when he would be twenty one years he would do as his father said. When he was twenty one years he went out and pulled the tree and about an acre of land along with it. He went into the house and got a sword under the bed and it was printed on it that the man who carried
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 11:34
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However he had some coppers in a leather purse strapped over the shoulders and unloosening the straps the agent threw the purse on the ground some distance away from the robber and galloped off towards Cork. The Breichleach picked up the purse and on examining its contents found it contained only coppers, abandoning his gun and taking only his dagger he gave chase. The agent was gone a mile of the road before the Breichleach started. Coming near Rylane the runner was within two yards of the horse and going into Blarney village he struck the horse in the flank with his dagger. The horseman jumped from the animal's back and escaped into a house and reported the matter to the military who started off in pursuit. The Breichleach kept on running in the direction of Nadd Banteer until finally he reached Gortmore Caves. Here he jumped the Blackwater. On the opposite side was a woman washing clothes by the bank who remarked that it was a great jump. He answered saying she would not be surprised if she knew the running he took to it. Here the military gave up the pursuit
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 11:26
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Breicleach seeing them coming ran for his life and escaped and the horses were not able to overtake him.
He had to go on the run then and he disguised himself in a big, long whisker and old clothes and a stick.
He carried a kind of dagger and gun for protection and holding up passers by and robbing them of small sums.
Six months later a rent agent was passing along the Munsire [?] road on his way to Kerry to collect rents. He travelled on horseback. He stopped the Breicleach and enquired the road to Millstreet. He also asked if the Breicleach were around and that he he was a great runner. The Breicleach did not disclose his identity but discovered that the agent would be returning in three days with the money.
Three days later when returning the agent was halted by the Breicleach who told him to hand out his money. The agent told him that he would be dismissed for doing so. However he had some coppers in a leather purse strapped over the shoulders and unloosening the
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 11:11
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Story of a Great Runner
The Breicleach Ua Buachalla
This event happened about 100 years ago and was told to me by Dan Duggan, Blackrock, Kilcorney, farmer, aged about 50. The latter heard it from his father Con who died two years ago at the age of eighty.
The Breicleach Ua Buachalla and his father were living in a small farm in Musheva where Con lives at present. One day they were digging potatoes. The father had no tobacco and was anxious for a smoke. A pedlar woman was passing by and the son asked her for a bit of tobacco for the father.
It was then sold in strips at the rate of as much as would go around the waist for 1d. The son has no money so the pedlar refused to give the tobacco and the boy took it from her by force. She went straight to the Millstreet Military Barracks and swore she was robbed. The military came out on horseback in pursuit of the robber. The Breicleach seeing them
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 08:50
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Thomas Egan's land called "An Bóthair Dut" it is so called because it is dirty and slobbery in Summer and Winter.
There was a tree in Cappatable called the "Sean Crann" it was so called because it was three hundred years old. It was so called because it was empty inside once a haw fell into it and a tree grew out of it. It was like a basket on top.
Collector: Kitty Jennings, Cappatagle, Ballinasloe.
Got from Mr. Michael Jennings, Cappatagle, Ballinasloe.
Local Place Names (Continued)
For na Pioba is the fort of the attack. It was on this way Patrick Sarsfield came after the battle of Aughrim for Limerick. It is in the townland of Nail Rd. and in the parish of Cappatagle.
Páirc na Gcapall the field of the horses. There used to be a lot of horses grazing in it in olden times. It is the townland of Páirc na Gcapall and in the parish of Liaquell.
Páirc na Laogh the field of the calves. There used to be a lot of calves in that
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-23 08:41
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Place Names
There is a field in our land in the village of Cappatagle called "Con Murphy's Field" it was so called because he was living in this field about 94 years ago. He had two daughters, they were very poor. One day they were playing at the foot of an old tree when a pot of gold fell out to them from under the tree. Then they all went to America.
There is a field in Michael Loughmane's land in the village of Cappatagle called "Croc an Gatis". It is so called because a blacksmith lived on a hill in this field and it was called after him.
There is a field in Patrick Campbell's land in the village of Cappatacle called Paírc Bhán it is so called because it used to be covered with flowers some years ago.
There is a field in James Garvey's land called Patsy's Garden in the village of Cappatagle. It is so called because a man named Patsy Hardiman lived in it 90 years ago. He had only this garden and it was called after him. He was evicted and went to Aughrim.
There is a road leading over to
KT
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 23:04
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
there is a blue light seen in the fire. Bad weather is approaching if the dogs eat grass and also if the cat scrapes timber a storm is expected.
Kathleen Hanlon
Drumnacurra
Causeway
Co. Kerry
Name and address of person from whom material was obtained.
Patrick Lucid
Castelshannon
Co. Kerry
Age 60 years
KT
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 23:00
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Weather Lore
Changes take place in the weather from time to time and there are a number of signs to be noticed which indicate the kind of weather that may be expected. These omens may be observed in the heavenly bodies the sun, the moon and stars.
It is an indication of rain if the sun has a pale appearance when setting, and it is also said that bad weather may be expected if a halo is observed round the moon.
If the stars appear to sparkle they indicate the approach of frosty weather. The wind at certain points may be also taken as an indication of the weather to be expected.
If the wind blows from the West it is a sure sign of rain and if it blows from the North snow may be expected. The West wind brings most rain to the district.
When all the sea birds come to the land it is a sure indication of a storm and when the dust rises on the road it is a sign of rain.
Rain is expected if
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 21:26
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
At the present time there is a man named Beatty living at Marlinstown Mullingar, who cures warts When the "patient" visits him has asks his name, age, and the number of warts from which he is suffering.
He does nothing else - while the patient is there anyhow - but tells him to call back again. By the time he calls back the warts have disappeared.
There is a man in Loughnavalley about four miles from our school who cures warts by rubbing a piece of an alder tree on them. The patient makes three visits to him and the warts disappear.
A man named Tuite who lives near Dysart, and is a seventh son, cures ringworm by touching it with his hand.
A woman named Gilsenan who lives at Ballivor cures sciatica by rubbing the affected part with water while saying a prayer.

[?]
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 21:18
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
bacon melts the warts disappear.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 21:17
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Sore or weak eyes are relieved by bathing in cold tea.
Whooping cough is cured by eating bread backed by a married woman whose sirname was the same as that of her husband.
Ferrets milk is another cure for whooping cough.
Asthma is relieved by inhaling steam from the water in which hay is boiled.
Bunions are cured by the sufferer going barefooted through a bog for a few hours each day.
Dandruff is cured by rubbing bear's [?] grease into the scalp at night.
Warts are cured by washing them in water in which potatoes have been boiled.
Old people say warts can be cured by rubbing them with fat bacon which is then put under a shore. As the
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 18:38
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
lake is about half a mile from Ballinode. The following story is told about it. The late Robert Graham of the Point Ballinode tells the story that there is a tunnel from the Pole hill a field in the townland of Rosefield. This tunnel is supposed to run under the Rosefield road and right under the Rosefield lake to Kilmore hill on the opposite side of the lake.
On each of these hills there was a fort and this was a secret passage from one fort to the other.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 18:35
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
My home is in the village of (Ballinode) Ballinode. The townland is Mulaghmore west. The parish is the parish of Tydavnet. The barony is the barony of Monaghan. There is about thirty families in the townland and about fifty people. McAree is the most common name in the townland. Slated houses are most common. There are several old people over seventy in the district. The late Robert Graham of the point could (Graham of If (?)) tell a story in English and Irish. Houses were more numerous in former times. There are about ten ruins in the district. Numbers of people emigrated to America in former years.
The land in this district is hilly and is good for tillage and pasture. The river Blackwater flows through Ballinode. There are numerous streams and lakes in the district. Quighlough is a lough near Ballinode and when the old canal was in use it was the feeder of the Ulster Canal. Rosefield
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 18:27
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Kilnahalter is the name of our townland. It is in the Parish of Kilmore. There are three families living in it. There are four old people living in the district. They do not know any Irish. There are many houses now in ruins. Many people went away away to America in olden times. The townland is mentioned in no song or saying. The land is neither hilly nor boggy. It is fairly good land. There is a big wood about a quarter of a mile from our house. It is called the nutwood and there are fifteen acres in it.
Not very far from the wood there is a little river behind Mr Pattersons mill.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 02:43
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The halter is kept when a beast is sold. There is special fairs some places for
Bonhams horses and sheep but in some places there is not.
Written by Míceal Oh Cadromáin
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 02:31
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Fairs
Fairs ar held in Limerick New Castle West Rathkeale Ennis. Nenagh. Croom.
They are always held in towns. Buyers often come to farmers house buying cattle. The
Fair is not held in streets but in a special place called “The Fair Green”. Toll is paid to a
Man at the gate at 4d ahead.
When a man sells a beast and [?] he sells the beast he gives a luck penny. The bargain
Is made by striking the other man’s hand and the Buyer marks the beast with scissors
And he puts a cross on the beasts back. Other colours them purple or Red.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 02:30
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Holy Family
On Christmas Night Our Lord was born on Christmas Day in a stable in Bethlethem.
And since that time we celebrate Christmas for a very holy week on an account of that. And the
Parish Priest sends his clerk for holly and Ivy and the makes a crib and he puts a box near the crib so that if the people like they can but a few pence into it. And on Christmas morning
All the people goes to an early mass on that morning and on Christmas Night the people light a candle or two on honour of our Lord.
Míceal Oh Cadromáin aged 13 years
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:35
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The fairs are held in the neighbouring towns [?] Raphoe, Letterkenny and Convoy. Sometimes the byers come to the farmers' houses to buy when the cattle are scarce in the fairs.
There are no local traditions of fairs held on hills or castles or forts in this district. The fairs in Raphoe are held in the street and the fairs in Letterkenny are held in the market place and in Convoy they are held in the street but it is a small town and there are only two fairs in the year in it, one is on the 17th May and the other is the 26th October.
Very often money is given back. It is called a luck-penny. When a bargain is made both buyer and seller show their agreement by striking each others hands.
Some animals are marked with a keel when they are sold and others are marked by cutting some hair of different places of the cattle.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:23
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One May morning two men were going to a fair in Ballaghaderreen. When they were about a mile from home they saw a woman inside a ditch saying "gather, gather, gather." When they were coming home they looked inside the ditch where the woman was. They saw a big heap of butter inside the ditch. It is said that she gathered butter on the May morning. Fairies gather butter on May moring to have for the whole year.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:21
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
from it also.
A turlough is to be seen in a valley between that hill and Castleteehan every year. There is a great spring well which never dries up and it supplies some of Lisalway and the most of Castleteehan in Summer when water is not to be found any place else.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:20
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Browne Hill is situated in Lisalway. It is a very high hill and a family of the Brownes lived there long ago. A village named Castleteehan can be seen from that hill. Another hill much higher than it can be seen in a distance. Most of Lisalway can be seen
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:18
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Q. What are the three letters that will frighten a thief.
A. A. I. C. U
Q. What is always behind time.
A. The works of a clock.
Q. What part of Dublin is in France
A. The letter "n"
Q. It can't go up the chimney up but it can come down the chimney down
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
want. Too late to spare when all is spent. June is the month of rosies. Practice makes perfect. A word in court is better than a pound in your purse. A wise man always carries his coat.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The longest way round is the shortest way home. After a storm comes a calm. The longer you live the more you know. He who goes a - borrowing goes a - sorrowing. He who grasps at much loses all. Idle dogs worry sheep. Distant hills looks green. A bird in your hand is worth two in the bush. Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today.
Natural isen't wonderful. One look before you is better than two behind you. A stitch in time saves nine. Foreign cows have long horns. Jewels are rare and precious. When the cat is out the mice can play. Wilful waste makes woeful
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:13
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago there lived in Karnakit a great hero named John Kearns. One time he was getting a cart made in Castleplunkett. When it was finished he went for it. He put the cart up on his shoulder and carried it from Castleplunkett to Karnakit without ever resting. He was a great hero but he is dead now.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Q. Where was Noe when the light went out?
A. In the dark.
Q. What is the smallest county in Ireland?
A. Cork because it can fit in a bottle.
Q. What has eyes and cannot see?
A. A potato
Q. Why is it dangerous to sell a secret in a cornfield?
A. Because there are so many ears listening.
Q. Why does a hen run across the road?
A. Because she wants to get the other side
Black and white and read all over
A. the newspaper
Q. Who can you tell a secret to?
A. A liar because he won't be believed
Q. What is the difference between a cat and story book?
A. The cat has its tail on the outside and the book has its tale on the inside
Q. A five lettered word take two letters from it an there is only one left.
A. Stone. take st. from it and there is only one left.
Q. Why is the letter "T" like an island.
A. Because it is in the middle of water.
Q. Patch upon patch and no stitched.
A. A head of cabbage.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Q. It is the beginning of eternity. It is the end of time and space. It is the beginning of end and the end of of every place.
A. The letter E.
Q. Why is a shoemaker like a dying man?
A. Because each of them prepare their (sole, (soul, for the last
Q. As I fell out the window what did I fall against.
A. My will.
Q. A small messenger from house to house and sleeps out at night.
A. A road.
A small little thing smaller than a mouse and it has more windows in it than King George's house.
A. A thimble.
A useless useful article bought in the shop the man that buys it doesnt own it and the man that ownes it knows nothing about it
A. A coffin.
Q. What gets bigger the more you take from it
A. A hole
it is once in a minute twice in a moment and never in a thousand years.
The letter "M"
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:03
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About two miles from Kilmurry school in a place called Rathbarney there is a forth. Round this forth there are three big ditches. It is a very deep rath. Long ago it is said music was heard in this rath and the fairies were spinning wool while it was going on. A man by the name of Martin Ryan lives near this rath. It is said that the fairies help him
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:02
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Before Lisalway farm was divided there used to be a point to point race three times every years in it. The Balfs who were living in Southwark who used to be racing. They had a lot of race horses. They are not living in Southwark now but there are some of them living in Dublin. The Roscommon Harriers came as far as this district hunting and jumping.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 01:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About nine miles from Kilmurry school in a village called Tibohine there is a hidden treasure. It is a bag of money. During the black and - Tan war.
One day a dog was scraping under a tree and he scraped up a bag of money. It was in a field belonging to a man named Mr. Hanley. This man got the money and he opened the bag. It was filled with five pound notes but they were no good because they were rotten.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Pisrogues are very common in Ireland and were also common long ago.
When there is a churning going on in a house everyone who come in has to take a turn of the churning. If anybody comes in and takes a coal with him to light his pipe he will have to quench it again before he goes out because the people of the house believe he would bring the butter out of the churn with him.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
If there are seven sons in one family the seventh would have a cure for ringworm.
People suffering from ringworm goest to the seventh son to get cured. He rubs his finger around the ringworm and it cannot spread any more after that. If the person goes ones to the seventh son it will do. After a fortnight an improvement is coming on the ringworm and is better in a month or five weeks.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Ogula is situated about four miles from Kilmurry school. When St Patrick came to Ireland he went to a place called Ogula. He met the two daughters of the High King of Ireland named Eithne and Fidelm. He taught them all about God and afterwards baptised them. They wished to die and immediately after baptising them they died and went up to heaven.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
when the people would be going to Mass and had it got before the Consecration the eel would let you bring it. If you hadn't got it before the consecration the eel would kill you. We get the first part of Rathmoyle from this rath. It is said that Milid the chieftain of the Milesians lived in this downland. From this we get the second part of the word Rathmoyle
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In my parish there is a downland called Rathmoyle. In this downland there is a rath and it is said that there is a pot of gold in in it. There is an eel minding it. If you got up on Easter Sunday morning and started to dig to get the pot
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Vale View is the name of my townland. It got its name because it is situated between two hills in a valley.
It was joined on with Lisalway farm once and a man names Dorkin was herding on it. A priest named Father Keirnes ordered Lisalway farm to be divided. It was divided then and the people gathered together. The priest asked them what would they call it and an old woman said to call it Vale View. Other people said to call it several other names. The priest said to call it Vale View. There were houses built on it and each household got a holding of land.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
After a storm there comes a calm
God helps those who helps themselves
Many hands make light work
Laziness is a heavy load
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush
Courage is half the battle
Every beginning is weak.
Too many cooks spoil the broath
A stich in time saves nine
Save hay while the sun shines
A rolling stone gathers no moss
The night of wind should not be the night of the scallob.
Birds of one feather all flock together
A wise man always carries his coat
The longest way round is the shortest way home
Do to yourself what you would like to do to another.
Go to bed with the dark and get up with the lark.
it is better to die that tell a lie
Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Why are a cats claws like a comma?
A cats claws are at the end of his paws and a comma clauses at the end of (clause) pause.
Its the beginning of Eternity the end of time and space its the beginning of the end and the end of every place?
The letter E
A five lettered word take away two and there is only 1 left
Stone
What part of the motor care [car] goes into the town first?
The noise.
Twenty sheep went out a gap twenty more followed that the shepard and his dog how many feet was that?
Two feet, the rest are legs
Niddy Noddy two heads and one body?
A barrel
Why is a vane lady like a drunkered?
Because both are fond of the glass.
As round as an apple as flat as pan one side a woman and the other side a man
A penny
How many stick go to a crows nest.?
None because they are carried to it
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
It has an eye and still its blind an [?] to man and woman kind?
A needle.
Which part of the cow goes out the gate first?
Her breath.
Which is the sorest county in Ireland?
Roscommon because it has Boyle at the end of it.
Why is Ireland like a bottle? because it has a cork in the end of it.
As I went out the gap I met my uncle Dan I cut off his head and drank his blood then left him down easy?
A bottle of wine.
Long legs crooked thighs small head and no eyes?
A tongs.
Why does the hen pick the pot?
Because she cannot lick it.
The man that makes it does not use it and the man that uses does not know it.
A coffin.
When was beef at its highest?
When the cow jumped over the moon.
What is the hardest lock to pick?
That of a bald head
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The school that I go to is called Kilmurry. Near this school there is a Glen called the Mass Glen.
The name reminds us of Penal Days. During the Penal Days no priest was allowed to say Mass. The Mass had often to be said in a private house in a cave or on a rock. If a Priest was caught saying Mass he would be shot on the minute.
Mass must have been said in the glen I am writing about or the glen would not have got that name.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The school that I go to is called Kilmurry. Near this school there is a Glen called the Mass Glen.
The name reminds us of Penal Days. During the Penal Days no priest was allowed to say Mass. The Mass had often to be said in a private house in a cave or on a rock. If a Priest was caught saying Mass he would be shot on the minute.
Mass must have been said in the glen I am writing about or the glen would not have got that name.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:22
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Off went the horses and Martin noticed the chocolate and brown jockey side by side with a canary coloured jockey and they were keeping head for head but at the 3rd fence out sprang the chocolate and brown as quick as a flashlight of lightening. Martin bet as much as he was worth and when his colours came in first there was no cheering from the crowd as no one knew anything much about Martins old nag and of course there was no one a winner but Martin himself.
He came home from the Races a rich man. He cared his horse well until he died and believes from that day to this that the man who rode his horse was one of the good people for Martin never laid eyes on him ever afterwards.
I received the above story from Martin Conry Rathnallog Ballinagare
An old age pensioner.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
very different animal to what he had been a month before. He also told him to enter his name for the Galway plate on that day that he first visited him at the house. And Martin had done so.
Now when Martin and his horse stood inside the railing of the big Galway course he felt very forlorn indeed not seeing any one whom he knew. "Musha" "God help me" said he I am a holy show standing here and knowing no one" and just as he was saying this to himself on came his man dressed in his chocolate and brown jockey suit and a badge on his arm and he jumps on the horse as the last call was given and he said to Martin "I shall get a light run as one of our men is out against me but when you see me at the third fence from the winning post and if I am sure I'll win I'll put the whip across in my mouth and put all you possess in the world on the horse as he is sure to win and with those parting words he was gone with the others in the race
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
home. A man came into the place where Martin was filling the load of manure and said - God bless your work Martin. "You too" said Martin although he never remembered seeing him before in all his life. "That's a great horse you have Martin" said he. Oh! musha said Martin he is good enough for what he is doing. Well will you do one thing for me now? Martin, will you enter him for the Galway Ra[ces]. Stop your jibing said Martin or I'll sink this whip in your head said Martin. Do as I tell you said the man and I promise you, you won't be sorry. After much persuasion however he gave in and promised to do as the man wished. "Now Martin" said he "It's a month until the big race in Galway is run" and so you take him out from the cart - put him back into the stable and field and groom him well, until the day of the race. Martin did as he was told and he brought him into the race course on the appointed day looking a
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-22 00:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In the downland of Rathnallog there lived a man by the name of Martin Conry who owned a small farm of fifteen acres and in one of his fields there was a big rath or fort which can be seen there today by anyone who wishes to visit the place.
Now Martin kept three cows and in those days three cows was considered a very good number as most of the people who lived nearby had only one. Now every morning as Martin went out to milks cows he always found one of the three had been milked by someone - this person could never be seen either coming or going to the byre. Martin was a quiet easy going man and never made any complaint about the loss of the milk.
Well one day he was carting out manure to his fields with an old worn spent horse which he regarded as almost valueless except for the bit of work he did round the
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
James Geraghty is a man of about 68 years. He lives in a thatched house on the roadside in Ballindollaghan. He sold his land and has now only the grass of a cow. He is very deaf and has to get a pension but he is a very fluent talker and a good writer. He reports for our local papers viz:- the Roscommon Herald and the Roscommon Champion. He composes some fine pieces and charades which he sends each year to Moores Almanac. It is a pity his writing couldn't be all collected and put into one boo. He wrote a poem about the "Lovely vale of Rathmoyle" where his father was stewart in the dead days gone by. This Rathmoyle has a big rath in one of its fields and its a supposed fact that a sum of money was got buried in this fort by a local man who is living there still.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
And they'll get a cordial welcome
If the proper course they take.
And link up with brother Irishmen
From the Liffey to the sea,
To make our country prosperous
And restore her unity.
IV
Twas selfish bigots doing
That encouraged party spleen,
And sowed the seeds of dissension.
Between Orange Blue and Green
Tell those bigots go to blazes
That we are sick and tired and sore
With their bawling and their ranting.
That we're Irish to the core.
V
There's an ancient town in Ulster
of great historic fame;
An animal and witch transposed,
correctly gives its name;
It will not cause any trouble
To a cleaver bard like you
To solve this crude effusion
Till Thirty-Nine adieu.
Copied by Margaret Dolan
Ballindollaghan
Castlerea
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Composed by a local poet.
James Geraghty
Ballindollaghan
Lisalway Castlerea
I
We cannot rest contented
Until Partition we undo.
And that vile and hated Border
Forever fades from view;
Old Ireland is an nation,
With a glorious history;
Twas against the laws of nature
That sundered she should be.
II
The way to end Partition;
Let all creeds and clans unite,
And work in peace and concord,
The cause is just and right.
We want the Glens of Antrim
And the green field of Tyrone
Where the great O Neills once flourished
And had a royal home.
III
Our kindred o'er the border
We esteem and venerate
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
It went to America and it stopped there and it came back again because it never went there
II
A duck before two ducks and a duck behind two ducks and a duck in the middle between two ducks
How may ducks were in it!
It goes up the chimney down but it won't go up the chimney up. It goes down the chimney down but it won't go down the chimney up.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:37
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I received this story from my cousin
James Kelly of Corlis
Castlerea
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
delight. And a rainbow in the morning is the shepherd warnings. It is also believed that if a rainbow is seen on Saturday night the following week will be wet.
The south and south west winds bring most rain at twelve or one o'clock when the sun goes south. The east and south-east winds
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
(1) If the moon is hidden behind a cloud thats a sure sign of rain. (2) If theres a ring around the moon another sure sign of rain. (3) Or if the stars are too bright and blinking is another sign. (4) A rainbow in the morning. a sign of rain. An evening rainbow is not a bad sign of rain. When Wind comes from the South thats for rain.
When the sky is red especially in the morning we know that a storm is approaching.
If a swallow flies low skimming the grass. a sure sign of rain.
Seagulls out on the land lying comes out from bogs. sign of rain. Crows lying on the walls another sign of rain. If birds fly high a sign air is clear and good weather will follow. The cat turns his back to the fire (Bad weather follows). If dust flys on the road. a sure sign of rain. Pipes from the moon. (Wet weather).
If soot falls from chimney - sign of rain.
If house fills with smoke - " " rain.
When the sun goes down red on a summers evening the next day is supposed to be fine. The Aurora Borealis is a sign of rough weather. The old people have a saying about the rainbow. A rainbow at night is the shepherds
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Patches upon patches and no stitches
Ans A head of cabbage
What three counties fit in a dish.
Ans -Turkey Greece and China
Why is water like a racehorse.
Ans - Because it is always running
What is the dirtiest thing in a house.
Ans - A clock because it never washes its face.
When is a black dog not a black dog.
Ans - When its a grey hound.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:22
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A row of white horses standing in a hall the red one came out and licked them all
Ans A tongue
I have a room full and cannot give a spoonful
Ans Smoke
Why does a hen pick the pot
Ans because she cannot lick it.
What is the difference between a pot of potatoes boiled and a egg boiled
Ans One boiles hard and the other soft
What can be boiled with a lb of salt and it would not be salty
Ans egg
As I went up a London hill I met a London scholar he took out his pen and drew his name what was his name
Ans Andrew
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
When are roads very greasy
Ands When they are dripping
What is the best thing to make in a hurry
Ans Haste
Why is a proud person like a book of music
Ans Because they are both full of airs
Why is the sun like a good dough
Ans Because it is light when it rises
What is the difference between the North and South Pole
Ans: All the difference in the world.
Why are birds melancholy
in the morning
Ans: Because their beaks are dew.
Why does a miller wear a cap.
Ans - To cover his head.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long legs crooked thighs little head and no eyes
Ans A tongs
What is it that has four fingers and a thumb and has neither flesh nor bone
Ans A glove
What is it that never asks questions yet requires many answers
Ans A doorbell
Which bird has a name you could spell with one letter
Ans The jay
Which bird has a name that tells you whether he flies fast or slow
Ans swift
Who was the first whistler.
Ans The wind
A word with five letters take away two and there is one left
Ans A stone
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:14
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
What has its hands always up before its face
Ans A clock
If I built a way from here to Dublin what heights would it be
Ans The height of nonsense
What has a body and a nest and nothing else
Ans A bottle
What has eyes and cannot see
Ans A potato
Why should a hen never have untidy feather
Ans Because she has a comb
What has teeth and cannot eat
Ans A comb
What is the smallest bridge in the world
Ans The bridge of your nose
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the dinner they were thrown out on this skib to cool and in very old times people ate the spuds off this and enjoyed their meal out of it perhaps far better than the man who sits down to his courses at the present day. They ate them with salt and milk and a noggin of Shurings sometimes.
A weaver by the name of Corman Dur lived near our school about 30 years age. He wove all the blankets that were needed by the people around the district. The women spun the thread on their own woollen wheels and brought their big balls of yarn to Cormac to make flannel, frieze, or any woollen material out of it, which was needed. He has no one belonging to him but his house can be seen by any one who wishes to do so at it is only a quarter of a mile away from our school.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 23:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
My father and grandfather always made creels, and baskets, or skibs as we call them even today. I saw my father making a creel and the way he did it was like this. He stuck rods sufficiently strong into a grassy spot in the sheltered part of his garden just the required size of the mouth of the creel. Then he got sally rods not nearly so strong as the ones he stuck down into the earth and he wove the rods in and out between them until he had woven a sufficient height for the creel. Then he bent the rods that were standing straight, right across the bottom and fastened them securely each side through those he wove the finer rods just like you would weave a piece of cloth or do darn and so completed the creel. He then pulled it up out of the earth and fastened into one side of it two straw ropes by which you could suspend it from your shoulders on to your back and so carry a creel of potatoes in from the field or a creel of turnips or mangolds from the tillage fields to the living house where they were boiled and given to pigs or else eaten raw.
Another useful article made from rods was a basket shaped like [drawing] this. It was called in the home the skib. Now when the potatoes were boiled for
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 22:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
On peal so charmingly
The price of al the maids seen there
Was Annie young and free
On wild and heath clad Tully hill
Young maidens would tip oer
The green of all that virgin throng
Was Annie ban asthore
VI
On Tully's Hill now hangs a cloud
Far darker than the night
A shade is seen oer Brackloon's green
A sad and mournful sight
All nature seems combined to weep
For this dear maid thats gone
Tis Annie ban who oer the deep
From Erins Ise hath flown
VII
Farewell you hours of breathing love
Farewell you happy days
For never more with Annie ban
Ill road through pleasures ways
Hers was a mind of Heavenly thought
A heart of purest core
May Heavens light now guide the steps
Of Annie ban asthore
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 22:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
him. A crane, moved by his entreaties and promises venture her long neck down the wolfs throat and drew out the bone. She then modestly hinted at the promised reward. At this the wolf grinned and showing his teeth replied with seeming indignation: Ungrateful creature: to ask for any other reward than that you have put your head into a wolf's jaws and brought it safely out again!"
John Mulligan, Delvin, Westmeath.
Got story from James Holloway, Delvin Westmeath.
The Sick Turkey
Once there was a woman who had turkeys. One of the turkeys was sick and she did not know what to do.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 22:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
That maid Ill ne'er see more
That girl of girls that pearl of pearls
Young Annie ban asthore
III
Her step was like the gentle fawn
Her robe was like the swan
Her neck was whiter than the foam
Lough Gara's waves float on
Her cheeks were like the primrose gay
Her teeth of pearly white
Her eyes were like the fairy shades
On Gaza's waves at night
IV
Her glance was milder than the dawn
On Tully's heath clad hill
Her heart was purer than the waves
On Brackloon's rippling rill
Through Tully's green and flowery meads
How often did she stray
But from the haunts of early youth
To-night she is far away
Mongst Brackloon's green and shady bowers
How gladsomely we played
But over the waves she sleeps to-night
Far from her nature glade.
V
When [?] bells would fit the air
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 22:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
follow - "Annie Ban Asthore"
The sun behind the western hill
Was sinking to the sea
The darksome shades were falling fast
On [?], lawn and lea
The night winds rave now violently
On Croghan's royal hill
And solitude now reigns supreme
By streamlet lake and [?]
Though glorious moon whose silvery light
Shines fair on Inisfail
And brightens like a watch fire light
Each mountain hill and dale
A [?] near that bounding ark
That cleares the [?] roar
And bears from Inisfail and me
Young Annies ban astoir
II
Though music strains were pealing sweet
Through lone Kilcorkey shades
And through loves Tulley's flowery meads
Do roam young comely maids
But ah; my heart is not with them
It flies far, far away
It flies from homely joys and cares
Along the will waves spray
It flies to that beloved one
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 22:44
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After a while the branch fell and the man fell. He began to shout "Help help I am killed." After a while a man came along the road and saw him and when the man that fell off the tree told the other man he laughed and said. "Its a terrible thing to be a fool and not to know it."
John Devereux, Delvin, Westmeath
Got story from James Growney J Delvin Westmeath.
The Wolf and the Crane
A wolf was chocking with a bone in his throat, and in great agony ran up and down, asking evey animal he met to extract it, at the same time promising a very handsome reward to the one who should relieve
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 22:38
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About two and a half miles N from my school lies the once famous place of Kilcorkey. To-day it is the burial ground of all the old families who live nearby. In the centre of the grave-yard lies the ruins of an ancient church which belonged to the Franciscans up to the 17th century. Cromwell and his soldiers pillaged and destroyed it carrying off and selling the sacred vessels and [?] some of the Friars [?]. It is local tradition amongst the people of the district the manner in which the Friars selected the site of their monastery and church. In is said that when they were about to build in, the Abott in seeking divine guidance went on his knees to pray and to ask our Lord to point out to him where to build his church and immediately a storm drone together with thunder and lightning and towers of hail-stones fell and uprooted a number of trees round about where he was praying leaving an area of some 20 yards or so free from rail hail or storm. He immediately rose from his knees and bless the place and decided to build his new church there. After Cromwell battered and [/] the ancient church the poor surviving monks were left without shelter or home until the generous nobleman Charles OConnor of Ballinagare gave them
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 22:24
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The Man on the Tree
Once upon a time two men went to a field to saw a branch off a tree. They brought a ladder with them when they were going. When they reached the wood they put the ladder against the tree. One man climbed up the ladder and when he got on to the tree he started to saw the branch. The man on the ground forgot to take down the ladder when the other man was up. When he had the branch sawed the ladder fell and the branch fell on top of it and broke it. The man that was on the ground ran to a house for a ladder. The man of the house said to him "What do you want the ladder for?" and the man told him that there was a man on a tree and he could not get down off it. The man
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 22:05
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of the house gave him the ladder and he brought it over to the tree. He put it up to the tree and the man got down. The man that was on the tree was very thankful to the other man for getting the ladder and if he did not get it he would be left sitting on the tree.
James Glennon, Welvin, Westmeath.
Got story from Thomas Glennon, Welvin Westmeath
A Foolish Man
Once upon a time a man went to cut a branch off a tree in a wood. He had a ladder with him. He put the ladder up to the tree and he got up on the tree. He sat out on the top of the branch and began to cut at the butt of it
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:52
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people of this district used all buy their tea from an old man who was known as "blind Dan" and who had a little shop where the Post Office now is, in Clonakenny. Some years later a man who often travelled through the distrct was the "tea-man". He generally had a horse and small waggon in which were scores of pound and half pound packets of tea. We are told that he was so persevering that no woman would get him away from the door except she kept a packet of tea; and if the door happened to be shut and no one inside he would shove a packet through the window and called for the money on his next "round". The tea sold by those men was generally so bad that it had to be put down by the "glaum" (handful).
On Christmas Day a boiled goose was to be had in almost every house for dinner and on Easter Sunday dozens of eggs used to be eaten.
Written by Maud Treacy St. Cronans N.S.
Most of this was told me by Batley Maher, Clonakilty
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:49
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yellow meal were mixed to make porridge or as it was best known locally "stirabout" and this was used especially for supper with "roapy" (thick) milk.
When the old man was telling me this he referred to the "yellow gruel" which the poor people used to get at the local dispensary, then situated at Bourney cross in the famine days. He said that if you spill some of it on the way home you would want to be a good runner to catch it.
Tea was not used in the district till between sixty and seventy years ago and the sugar was so dark in colour that it was known as black sugar. It is said that when the tea first came the people boiled it well then threw out the "water" and used the tea-leaves with butter. The teapots used were all made of tin and the tea was often "drawn" for half an hour or even more beside the fire and a "boil or two" was not supposed to do it any harm. The
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:46
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and the old man who told us about this said "that's what would put the colour in your cheeks." In the case of the poorer people a canvas bad was generally spread on the kitchen floor and the boiled potatoes were spilled onto it. The people sat round on the floor and peeled the potatoes with their fingers. The buttermilk was drunk from wooden vessels called "noggins". In the better class houses the boiled potatoes were spread on a table in the middle of the floor and people sat around on forms and knives were generally used. In very few houses was there a meal of bacon and cabbage and in these only on Sunday or on Christmas Day.
About this time also bread began to be used generally; this was made of various things oameal barleymeal and in the case of the larger farmers' wheatmeal all these were used in a very rough state. In the summer when potatoes were scarce oatmeal and Indian or
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:44
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Food in Olden Times.
From what we can learn from the old people the class of food used in Ireland up to sixty years ago was very poor. People used to eat three meals a day; they used have potatoes for breakfast for dinner and again in the evening and when the potatoes were scarce they often kept over those left at night and use them for the breakfast. A very common thing to happen was that when a man had to go work very early or go to a fair, the only breakfast he had was the cold potatoes left over from the night before. If he had time enough he lighted a fire and re-heated the potatoes by placing them in the red ashes near the fire and putting red cinders on top of them. These were commonly known as "roasters" and were looked on as a fine healthy meal. Sour milk of some kind, generally buttermilk was used with the potatoes
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:38
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Eileen Breen. 17th October 1938
Old Graveyards.
There are two church-yards in the parish, St. Mary's and Johnnstreet. They are situated in Irishtown. One of the is round. There are no ruins of churches in any of them. The church yards contain very old tomb-stones. Unbaptised children are buried in the churchyard which is not consecrated.
Information received from Miss Eileen Breen, 11 Glenconnor Cottages, Clonmel.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:35
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three parts of him. He did so. He went on his journey. They called him back to give him three gifts, one was to be a boar and master of the forest, the next to be a hound the faster ever ran, the third to be an eagle the handsomest bird that ever flew. He went in for lodgings to an old woman. There was a great Kings palace near by. He had three daughters. There were hundreds of people to get his eldest daughter in marrage and they were all to be beheaded who could not do so. He went to guess the King's daughter in marriage. He suceeded. One day he was walking out and the mermaid came up and took him away into the river.
Kitty Butler,
Ballyglasheen, Clonmel, Co. Tipp.
A story about fishing.
My neighbour Patrick O'Gorman, Railway-worker, Priorstowr, told me this story.
One night long ago ther ewas a fisher-man fishing for salmon in Fiddown.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:32
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man and he was not catching any fish. A mermaid appeared to him and asked him was he catching any fish and he said "no" "Will you promise me your eldest son in marriage and I will send you plenty fish." "I could not do that he said, "I am not married at all. Well you will be married and you shall have my eldest son in marriage.
In time his son was born. He got to be a very rich man with the fish and he built a great mansion. He had to be very careful of his son when he came to the age of a school-boy. He had to send him very far inland to have him educated in case the mermaid would take him away. He was then fully educated and he had no comfort. He had to keep indoors for fear of the mermaid. One day he said to his parents, "I will go off foreign," So he did. He was going through a forest and he met a lion, a grey-hound, and a boar and they had a hare. They asked him to make
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:27
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that the Saint must have traversed that route.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:26
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These are some of the local sayings about the weather.
When the crows tumble in the air it is a sign of rain.
When the sky is white we will have no rain and when the sky is black we will have rain.
When the moon is on its back it is a sign of bad weather.
When you see the rainbow it is the sign of showers.
If the swallows fly low it is the sign of rain. When the cows lie down it is the sign of bad weather.
Robert Marksby, January 1938
Newtown Anner,
Clonmel,
Co. Tipperary

A funny story. March 1938
Long ago there lived in Co. Tipperary a man named Jack Madden. This poor man had a hump on his back. There was cousin of his who was also a hunch-back.
You can judge of Jack's astonishm,ent when one morning he met his cousin looking fit and well and without his hump.
"How did you get rid of your hump?" asked Jack.
"Well" said the other. "On last Monday night as
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:22
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When the insects fly low the swallows fly low also and this is a sign of rain.
When the sea-gulls fly inland a storm is coming.
When ever the stars are bright it is a sign of bad weather.
When the birds build their nests low it is the sign of a bad summer and when they build their nests high it is the sign of a good summer.
If the chimney smokes it is a sign of rain.
When the soot goes on fire it is a sign of rain.
Jessie Sparrow,
5, Gladstone St.,
Clonmel.
Co. Tipperary

Riddles, January 1938
Q. What happened to the baby who swallowed the spoon
A. It couldn't stir.
Q. What is the best key for unlocking the tongue.
A. Whiskey.
Q. What is the hardest key to turn
A. A Donkey.
Robert Marksby Mewtown, Anner
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:20
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night. How long did it take him to come up?
A. Twenty days.
Q. What is this? 2 legs sitting on 3 legs with 1 leg in his hand. In comes 4 legs grabs 1 leg and runs out. Up jumps 2 legs gets 3 legs throws it after 4 legs and get back 1 leg.
A. A man sitting on a stool with a leg of mutton in his hand. In comes the dog grabs the muttomn and runs out. Up jumps the man gets the stool throws it after the dog and get back the mutton.
Betty Bovernizer
Knocklofty
Clonmel
Co. Tipperary.

Weather Lore. Jan 1938.
The people of Clonmel Co. Tipperary have many ways of forecasting the weather. Here are some of them.
Some people say when their corns are bad it forecasts rain. Others say that if their rheumatism is bad it is a sign of rain.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:17
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Riddles. November 1937.
Q. What is the smallest bright in the world?
A. The bridge of your nose.
Q. What is always behind time?
A. The back of a clock.
Q. What key is the largest in the world?
A. A Donkey.
Q. What is the smallest lock you could get
A. A lock of hair.
Jessie Sparrow
5. Gladstone St.,
Clonmel,
Co. Tipperary.

Riddles. November 1937
Q. What is 3/7 of a Chicken, 2/3 of a cat, 1/2 of a goat?
A. Chicago
Q. Put twenty horses into five stables without having an even number in any?
A.
Q. A frog was down twenty feet deep. He came up three feet every day. And went back two feet every
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:15
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to get the treasure he would have to dig up the floor in the morning. The slave got out of bed and got a pick-axe and dug up the floor. After digging for a long time he saw a box underneath him. Was it the gold? he wondered. He was about to take up the box when someone held him by the shoulder. It was Johnson again. He pulled him way frm the box. Then he said. "You have not got patience, so you won't get the treasure." He pushed the slave out of the room and covered up the treasure. Nobody ever tried for the treasure since.
This story was told to me by
Jas. Keating, Knocklofty, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary.
Bitty Bovernizer,
Knocklofty,
Clonmel
Co. Tipperary.
James Keating Labourer Age about 50 years
He does not know who told him this story.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 19:12
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Hidden Treasure. October 1937.
Situated on the banks of the Suir on a mass of rocks near Clonmel, Co. Tipperrary, lies Kilmamahon Castle, part of which dates back to the sixteenth century; and in the older part the legend says there is hidden treasure.
There is a room in the old tower and there is supposed to be a very large treasure hidden there.
There was a certain man who had a treasure sometime in the seventeenth century. He was said to be called Johnson. Shortly before he died he hid the treasure in this room underneath the stone floor. When he was dying he said that if any man wanted to see or get the treasure he would have to sleep in the room one night. One night a few months after Johnson's death his slave said he would try his luck. So he got ready to sleep in the room. When he went to bed there that night he could not go to sleep for a long time. After about an hour's sleep, he woke up to find himself with a man rather like Johnson. He sat up in bed and was very surprised.
Johnson said that if the slave wanted
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 18:59
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was not rightly distributed. Whole districts were left without any. The people of England sent large sums of money to feed the starving of Ireland. Money was also sent from other European countries and from America.
The government started the making of roads which are called relief roads, to give employment to the Irish people. The roads which were made were useless at that time because they were not used much.
Many Irish landlords were ruined as a result of the famine because they were not receiving any rent and could not pay their debts. Some of them gave all they had to help the starving people.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 18:57
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"my home district"
saying "See Rathmullan and die".
Famine Times. (1846-1847)
Written by; Monica McMackin
Told by; John Begley
There was a blight on the potato-crop all over Ireland about the year 1846. The crops were a failure in the two succeeding years too. This gave rise to a terrible famine.
Before the famine the food of the Irish consisted mostly of potatoes and milk. They had scarcely anything to eat when the potato-crop was unfit for use.
Great numbers of people died on the roadside with hunger, and families were found dead in their houses. Over a million died of hunger during three years, and over a million emigrated to America.
The Government at first did nothing to help the country. When it did try to assist it was too late because most of the people had died or had left the country. It distributed food but it
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 18:53
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big hole for the mouth. Some of these are as good as a bought one.
Some boys find amusement in making catapults. If a boy is going to make a catapult he looks for a forked stick. If he gets one he then looks for a piece of rubber, and if he gets a piece he cuts two strips of it. Then he gets a tongue out of an old boot and some cord; then he ties them together.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 18:52
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"Home made toys" 16=3=38
By Francis Gallagher. (12)
Told by. John Connor. (67)
Rathmullan.
Some boys find great amusement in making tin or wooden boats. Sometimes they put sails on them to make them sail fast and others put seats in them. If a boy is going to make a tin boat he first of all looks for an old toffee tin. If he gets one he cuts it up one side and straightens it. Then he bends it across the middle and hammers it at each corner.
Some girls find amusement in making dolls. When they make the doll they make dresses and coats to fit it. Other boys and men make lanterns out of large turnips. They cut the inside out of the turnip and make it hollow. Then they cut four or five holes in it and put panes of glass in the holes. Some people can make very good lanterns. Other people can make false-faces of of large turnips. They cut two holes for the eyes, then they cut a hole for the nose and last of all they cut a
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 18:47
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the Abbey. It was once a monastery, and monks used to live in it. There is a graveyard beside it now, and Protestants bury in it.
There is a height up above the Protestant Church, called Bluebell hill. It is called that because bluebells grow on it in the summer. There is a field in Rathmullan called Hillyhead.
There is a stream outside Rathmullan called Ballyboe stream.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 18:46
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Local names and 10:11:37
Names of Fields
Written by; Monica McMackin, age 13
Rathmullan.
Told by; John Begley, age 65
Rathmullan.
There are a lot of fields about here with special names on them. There is a field in this town called the Fair Field. It is called that name because a fair used to be held there once a month. It is called that name since.
There is a field down the road, (outside Rathmullan) called the Tower Field. There is a tower in it, and that is how it got its name. The tower that is in it is not very big.
Down the walks there is a field called, the Fairy Field, because there are supposed to have been fairies in it a long time ago. Craigidarton is another field. There is a big stone in the middle of it.
an old ruin in
There is an old ruin in Rathmullan called
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 13:32
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Local Cures
St. Anthony's Fire:
With the blood from a member of the Cahill family, make a ring round the affected part. The "Fire" will dissappear.
Mumps.
Roasted salt put into a stocking and tied round the neck.
Cuts: Place a cob-web over the cut.
Ring Worm.
With the blood of a black cat make a circle outside the "Ring"
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-21 12:04
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Riddles.
As black as ink as white as milk and hops on the road like hailstone. A magpie.
I have a little sister she lives near the wall she is red and she is tall. She eats all all I give her and drinks nothing at all. The fire.
I have a little sister she lives on the wall and every hour of the day she starts to bawl. A clock.
What weather are rats most afraid of. When it is raining cats and dogs.
What is it that the more you take out of it the bigger it gets. A ole in the ground.
As round as a marble as deep as a cup and the king and his army could
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 23:11
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breed, touch one ounce of their coveted treasure, and so, in their anger and despair they flung it into the well. Anketell put his men digging for the treasure, but always the rising waters prevailed, and the men cried out for more pay. When they did not receive an increase in wages they refused to dig any more. Therefore Anketell had to give up the attempt, and go home with the thought that McKenna's gold was lost to him forever.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 23:06
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What queer, but interesting tales the old people have about buried treasure. One of these has been related to me by
It happened that hundreds of years ago there lived powerful and wealthy chieftains in a place called Drumashallog, Co. These people were called McKennas and they had their dún on top of a high hill. Nothing remains now to mark this spot, save a raised mound. Yet, a few yards from the mound there is a little hollow in the earth, and it is said that a well once existed there. It was dug down the l̶e̶v̶e̶l̶ depth of the hill, so that it came in level with the river nearby - a sheer depth of almost two hundred feet. Now it happened that there was a churl of Saxon breed living in the neighbourhood called Anketell. Anketell knew that McKennas had gold and silver and vessels in plenty, and one can imagine how he waited impatiently, and with bated breath to lay his ruthless hands upon these valuables. One day he collected a few hundred men, and when the McKennas were off their guard, he attacked them with the object of getting the valuable plunder. The Irish chieftains, however were determined never to let Anketell or any of his
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 20:13
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fainted at the door. She called her two sons, and they came in then they knew her and they had a great party for her. they were very happy, and they had great fun. In the evening, the girl and the man went home, and they got married soon after that. they lived happy together from that on.
Nellie Murphy
Curry,
Cummer,
Co. Galway.
I got this story from my father.
Martin Murphy
Curry,
Cummer,
Co. Galway.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 17:08
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agus bhí alán airgid ag an bhfear mar ní raibh sé ag ól a thuille.
Bhí an bhean ag lobhadh agus do chaith sé amach chun na gadhair í ach do mhair a fear go dtí go raibh sé a chéad is a ceathair bliadhna agus is amhlaidh a chuireadar chun báis é.
Aon lá amháin bhíodar ag dul go Maghchromdha ar chapaill agus bhíodar ag dul ana mhear agus do thuit sé amach as an dtrucaill agus do fuair sé bás i gcionn cúpla lá.
Isé an áit ‘nar chuireadh é ná i bpoll sa talamh san áit a cuirtí madraí agus rudaí salacha eile.
Críoch.
Siobhán Ní Scanaill (II) na Ceapacha a thóg síos ó béal-aithris a h-athar Domhnaill ua Scanaill (67) “”
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 17:07
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Do chuireadh í ansan.
Do thosnuig an fear ag goid ansan, coirce, agus feól agus prátaí ó fear go raibh bean agus clann aige, agus ní fhéadfhadh aoinne beirthe air.
Aon lá amháin do bhí an fear amuich agus do chuaidh sé isteach agus do ghoid sé leath muice matha agus bhí an fear ag teacht isteach ‘na choinnith agus do rug sé air agus do thóg sé go dtí na gárdaí é agus do chuir sé isteach sa phríosún é.
Do cimeádadar sa phriosún é ar feadh deich mbliadhna. Do scaoileadh leis ar feadh tamaill ansan mar bhí sé seachtmhó bliadhain agus do chuaidh sé adh iarraidh an pinsin agus do fuair sé é agus do bhí sé lán t-sásta leis féin.
Chuaidh sé amach sa gháirdín ansan agus do osgail sé an poll ‘na raibh a bhean curtha agus do thug sé isteach í agus ní raibh sí lobhta in-aon-chor
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 17:06
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.) eile amach á lorg déirce.
Do fuair an fear sgilling chun peidhre aráin do cheanach ach is amhlaidh a ól sé é uag do thosnuig an bheirt aca ag troid airís agus do bhí bata mór ag an bhfear agus do thuit an bhean i laige agus dubhairt an fear léi "ó mhuse a chonách san ort".
Do chuaidh sé isteach sa tig agus do fuair sé púnt ar an an driosúr agus do thóg sé é agus do chuaidh sé go dtí an tig thabhairne agus d'ól sé é go léir.
Nuair a tháinig sé abhaile dubhairt a bhean leis cad a thug sé leis mar do bhí ocras uirthi agus dubhairt sé nár thug sé pioc leis.
Thosnuig an bheirt aca ag troid airís agus do bhuail an fear an bhean agus do thuit sí i laige.
Do tharraing sí amach an doras í aga do fuair sí bás.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 17:05
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bheirt aca go Corcaig féachaint an leigfeadh an athair isteach é ach ní leagfadh agus do chuaidh an fear isteach go tig tabháirne agus d'ól sé an méid airgid a fuair sé nuair abhí sé adh iarraidh déirce
Bhí ocras ar an mnaoí mar ná fhéadfadh sí pioc a ithe agus ba dhóbair dí tuitim ‘na laige.
Do thosnuig an fear is an bhean ag troid agus do tháinig sé amach le sguab agus do leag sí leis é agus do bhí an t-ursal aige leis á bualadh.
Bhí fear éigin ag gabháil an bhóthair agus do tháinig sé isteach chun an mhnaoí do shábháil agus do leag sé an fear agus do thosnuig sé ag bualadh an fhir agus is amhlaidh a thosnuig an bhean ag bualadh an fhir eile mar gheall ar a fear féin a bhualadh.
Tháinig bean an fhir eile isteach agus do thosnuig sí ar a fear féin thógaint suas. Chuaidh an bheirt
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 17:05
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Púnt ólta ag an mbuachaill.
B’éigin do dul ansan agus mála ar a dhrom aige adh iarraidh déirce.
Bhíódh an cailín agus an buachaill ag troid i gcómhnaidhe ansan, mar gheall ar an gcéad púnt.
Ní thabharfadh aoinne pioc dóibh mar bhí fhios aca go n-ólfadh an fear é.
Aon lá amháin do thug bean éigin píosa feóla dhóibh agus dubhairt an bhean an fheóil do bheirbhiúghadh agus do dhein an fear an méid sin.
Nuair a bhí sé beirbhighthe d’ith sé é go léir agus níor thug sé pioc de‘n mnaoí agus nuair a tháinig an bhean abhaile dubhairt sí leis an fear blúire feóla a thabhairt dí.
Dubhairt an fear léi “For God’s sake I ate it all myself”, do thosnuighdear ag troid agus do fuair an bhean an sguab ba dhóbair gur mhairbh sí é.
Tháinig an mhaidean agus do ghuibhal an
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2020-03-20 17:01
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An Spré
Bhí cailín ann fadó agus nuair a bhí sí fiche bliadhain d’aois dubhairt a máthair léi go gcaithfeadh sí pósadh agus do chuaidh a h-athair ag déanamh cleamhnas di agus ‘sé rud a bhí á rádh aige ná “tá cailín breágh agam sa bhaile agus aoinne a phósfaidh í tabharfad céad púnt do.”
Aon lá amháin chuaidh an fear go Corcaig agus do chuaidh sé isteach i dtig mbeag suarach agus do bhí alán cloinne aige agus bhíodar ana bhocht.
Dubhairt athair an cailín “tá cailín breágh agam sa bhaile agus aoinne a phósfaidh í tabharfad céad punt do.” Bhí mach aige agus d’ólfadh sé Loch Éirne agus do phós an cailín an buachaill a bhíodh ag ól agus do fuaradar an céad púnt.
Do bhí an cailín agus an buachaill ana ceanamhail (ceanúil) ar a chéile ach i gcionn seachtmhaine mó mar sin do bhí an chéad
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 16:48
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people. A man got 6d per day and a woman got 4d per day. A woman named mrs Browne Garryduff Campile, Co. Wexford followed a horse and drew out stones off the Arnestown road and also helped to spread them on the new line at Nolan’s kiln. (New Ross)
2) There was a merchant kept a shop in Ballykerogue Campile, Co. Wexford a poor woman with six children went to him for a half stone of Indian meal she had but one shilling and two pence he did not give her the meal being 1d short.
3) There was a family who worked on the Bog of Boley cutting turf. They had nothing to eat for three days and three nights. They went into a shop Hennessy’s of Gusserane where Mrs O’Brien is now living to get a half stone of yellow meal for porridge. The shopkeeper wouldn’t give it without money so they went down and told the priest in Gusserane. The work away that they would not feel hungry, so they worked away and felt no hunger, until they got their pay.
4) There was another family in the year of the famine their names was Kellys from the Bog side. They were ten in the family. This family nearly all died with the hunger. They had but a stone of potatoes and 8d worth of turnips and had to do with that for a week. The ways they used to cook this was, they
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 16:29
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only was sown, the remainder of the potato being reserved for food. The people of this district only speak of the famine of 46 & 47.
The food the people used in this district was mostly Indian corn ground into meal. This was evidently distributed at the local mills. Sometimes free and sometimes in payment for work done on relief schemes. Evidentially Government relief reaches this district in the latter years of the famine. Turnips were also eaten.
Stories of Famine Years
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In black 46 and 47 the people almost dies of hunger and sickness owning to the blight on the potatoes and oats being their chief food. The potatoes blackened in the ground and in the pits and very few seed potatoes were left for the following year. The government granted some seed potatoes and the eyes were cut off and sown and the remainder of the potatoe eaten. I think they were sown in drills and ridges. There was some Indian imported into Ireland and the price was 2/6 per stone and each family only got a certain compliment just to keep them alive. There were public works opened for the relief of the poor.
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2020-03-20 16:12
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Hidden Treasure.
There is supposed to be a hidden treasure near Kilcolgan. I do not exactly know who put it there, but whoever did, is supposed to have made a tunnel from Kilcolgan Castle to Gallen church-yard, and he is supposed to have put a tea-chest of gold in the tunnel, and if anyone goes near that treasure, the fairies will cut off the heads and tails of the calves. The fairies are supposed to be minding the treasure. The tunnel is closed up now. People have been digging the ground for the money. When the old man was dying he was asked where the treasure was. He said it was where the cow was grazing.
Collected by Eileen Sheridan,
Main Street
Ferbane.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 16:08
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Tá saghas teampall eile istigh i Márthain féin fé bhun Beárna na Gaoithe ach is dócha go bhfuil na seacht seana aoiseanna ó cuireadh éinne annsan. Ac mar sin féin d’aithneochá go raibh sé ‘na roilg tráth. Tá an áit mí-cothromhamhail agus tá crosanna cloch ‘na seasamh ann ach tá sé nós aon páirce anois agus ní deineann daoine aon ath dhe.
Daoine á gcur i roilgí iasachta
Is mó duine ó pharróisde Mhárthain a cuirtear i roilgí tamall ó bhaile agus teampall ina bparróisde féin aca. Tá teampall Baile Bhoithín ana chomhgarach de mhuinntir Mhárthain (tá trí cinn de bhailte fé’n ainm ‘Mhárthain’ i bparróisde Mhárthain).
Cuirtear a lán de mhuinntir Mhárthain i gCeanntrágha.
Tá an uaig atá annsan cois farrge ar an daibhche, agus tá a lán crosanna tathacháin os cionn na dtuamaí ann.
Lá Chaitlíne – Lá Naom Caitlín bíonn turas sa teampall so gach aon bhliain. Bíonn lá saoire aca i bparroisde Ceanntragha lá Chaitlíne.
Deirtear go bhfeiceadh duine éigin sa pharróisde Naomh Caitlín an lá san no go gcuireadh an chéad Phrodastúnach ann. Deirtear go b’eadh tháinig an corp isteach leis an dtaoide agus annsúd é.
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2020-03-20 16:07
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fanaidhe síos leis toisg í bheith ar thaobh sléibhe.
I gcúinne guirt atá sé ar thalamh mín agus in áit an-uaigneach. Níl aon bhóitrín ag dul ó droicheadh Baile Bhoirthín go dtí an teampall ach suas trí ghort a gheibhtear. Tá céimeanna ar an gclaidhe ag dul isteach ann. Tá an áit ‘na tímcheall go lom gan coill gan crann. Tá fó thuama ann nar cuireadh éinne ionnta le sínsearacht.
An Raingléis:- Seana theampall é seo a bhí in úsáid fadó ach ní cuimhin le h-éinne a mhaireann sa pharróisde indiú aon chorp a chur ann. Déanamh triantánach atá air agus tá a lán túmaí agus clocha ‘na seasamh ortha ach níl aon uaig ná cros táthacháin ann. Roilg mhór fhairsing do b’ead an Raingléis fadó ach tá bóthar thíos na bhun anois agus a claoidhe atá ar thaobh an bhóthair ta deilbh croise déanta de chloich ann – cuid de’n roilg é seo. Deir daoine go bfuil tuamaí thíos fé’n mbóthar agus is mó áit taobh thoir, tiar, thuas agus thíos do’n roilg a mbuailfeadh uaig leat. Tá an áit seo anois á úsáid ag fear ó Baile Bhoithín (Tomás O Mainín) cuin a chuid stuic a chothú. Mar is leis an talamh agus an áit timcheall air.
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2020-03-20 16:07
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sar a raibh sé críochnuithe ‘na ceart agus leagadar é. Bheadh na Prodastúnaig ag tabhairt seirbhíse ann chó maith agus ní raibh san óisbidéal ach leath-scéal. Sin é an chiall go dtugadh an Teampall Bán air toisg go m-beadh seirbhís ann. Deir sean daoine eile gur annso cuireadh na Spáinnig a thit i gcath Dún an Óir.
M’ainm féin Brighid Budlaeir, Baile ‘n Fhirteáraig.
Ainmneacha na ndaoine a thug eolas eolas dhom
1. Pádruig Budhlaeir, Baile ‘n Fhirtéaraig, Daingean.
2. Peaid Shéain Uí Chonchubhair, Baile Bhoithín, Baile ‘n Fhirtearaig.
3. Pádruig Ó Slatartha Na Cluainte, Baile ‘n Fhirtéarag.
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Tuilleadh eolais ar Roilgeacha
Níl ach aon teampall amháin bparróisde Márthain go m-baintear úsáid as, ach tá ceann nó dó de sheana teampaill ann a bhí ag na daoine a tháinig romhainn.
Tá teampall an phárróisde réamhráidhte idir Bhaile Bhoithin agus Baile an Éanaig ach teampall Boitín a tugtar air cé gur i dtalamh Baile an Éanaig atá sé. Cuirtear a lán corp ann toisg gan a bheith aca ach é.
Roilg ceárnógach iseadh í agus tá sean fhotharacha sean shéipéil ann.
Tá daoine á adlacadh sa bhfotharach fós. Tá tuiteam
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Roilg an Driobhail: Tá Roilg an Driobhail leis i mBaile Bhoithín agus é tamall ó’n Raingléis. Nuair a chuaidh an saoghal i bhfabhas d’aistrig an t-áitreabh a mhair tar éis dóibh an mhuinntir a bhí ann rómpa a chur go Roilg an Driobhail agus deineadar tuamaí chun iad féin a chur nuair gheobhaidís bás.
Níl claidhe ach ar thaobh amáin dho.
Roilg Bhaile Bhoithín
Tá Roilg Baile Bhoithín i n aice an na Raingléise.
Cuirtear daoine sa roilg seo fós. Tá fothrach seán-séipéil ‘na lár. Tá ana talamh réidh comhtrom agus ceithre chinn de chlathacha cloch ticheall uirthi.
An Teampall Bán
Seo áit i dTráig Áirt-na-Caithne ar an daibhche.
Ní teampall ceart é ach is amhlaidh a cuireadh máirnealaig bhochta bháidhte a tháinig isteach ar an gcladach leis an rabharta, fadó riamh.
Sí an t-slighe go dtugadh an Teampall Ban áir ná go dtóg na Prodastúnaig oisbidéal ann sa droch shaoghal chuin go meallfaidís cucha na Caitlicig nuair a bheidís breoidte. Níos thastuig sé ó na Parróisteánaig agus thángadar
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2020-03-20 16:07
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cros cloiche ar chuinne an teampaill. Bíonn turus ionnta gach bliain. Tosnuigheatar ag an gCill bheag agus críochnuightear ag an gCíll Mór.
Deirtear go leigheastar aon duine go mbíonn tinneas droma air a dheineann an turas.
An Maig
Ta an Maig i naice bóithrín na mbróg ar an Cluainte. Ar thalamh Dhómhnaill Uí Chinnéide atá sí. Tá sgeacha agus raithneach agus spriocacha go flúirseach ann.
Ní cuimhin le h-éinne cathain a cuireadh daoine go deireannach ann. Tá carn mór cloch i gcúinne do’n roilig.
An Raingléis;
Tá an Raingléis taobh thíos de Bhaile Bhuithín atá i bParróisde Mhárthain. Bhíodh an roilig seo á úsáid ocht nó naoi de cheadhta blian ó shoin. Tá cloch mór i lár na roilige. Deanamh rotha atá uirthe mar sin é an tsaghas croise a bhíodh ann san aimsir sin. Tá ‘sí mar sprioc le huaig bráthar.
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2020-03-20 16:06
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Curtha ós cionn trí chéad bliain. Roilg ceárnach iseadh í agus céimeanna ag dul isteach ínnte.
Tá an talamh tímcheall an teampaill cothrom ach tá an teampall féin an-achrannach. Tá mórán sgeach is fiadhaile ag fás na timcheall.
Sé an chiall go dtugadh teampall Dhún Úrlan ar an dteampall ná go dtug Úrlan Firtéur píosa dá chuid talmhan chun cur leis an roilg nuair a bhí an roilg ag dul i laighead ag go raibh ana chuid daoine curtha ann.
Cealúrach
Tá sean chealúrach i n-aice an Riaisc.
Cealúrach a tugtar ar an áit a cuirtear leanbhaí gan baiste. Ní baintear aon úsáid do’n gcealúrach anois. Tá na ceadhta bliain ó cuireadh aon leanbh ann.
Cíll bheag agus Cíll Mhór
Tá an Chíll bheag agus Cíll Mhór i mBaile Chaladh. Táid gairid do na chéile. Glaodhtar Cíll Mháighread ortha araon. Seana roilgeacha iseadh iad. Tá an talamh mí-chothrom ach tá casán réidh tríthe. Tá
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2020-03-20 16:06
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Roilgeacha
Roilg Dhún Úrlain
Tá roilg Dhún Úrlain i lár pharróiste an Fhirtéuraig. Ar thalamh na nGort nDubh atá sí.
Do bhí fotharach ann fadó ach níl aon rian do ós cionn talmhan anois. Tá uaigeanna ins an áit go raibh sé. Is i Roilg Dhún Úrlain a cuirtear furmhór de mhuínntir an pharróiste. Do bhí seacht tuama déag le muíntir Chonaill i lár an Teampaill agus níl áitreabh ar an cheann acu anois. Is go Roilg Bhaile Bhuithín a théigheadh Conallaig Ard na Caithne. Tá inghean ministre Prodastúnaig curtha i Roilg Dhún Úrlain. Deirtear ná raibh aon fhiacal ag teacht dhi, do ghearraigh an ministir a dranndal le súil go ndéanfadh se slighe dos na fiacla, as san cailleadh í. G.G.Gubbins atá scríbhte ar lic na h-uagha. Tá uaig eile ar an dtaobh thuaidh doin dteampall i n-aice uaig na bhFirtéarach. Rice agus Ferriter agus ainm éigin éile na h-ainmeacha atá scríbhte ós cionn na h-uagha. Tá siad
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2020-03-20 16:02
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Famine Times
The famine did not affect this district very much. However some people died but many of them were people who had fled from poorer districts in the west & south west. The old people tell stories of the famine times some of these I give below.
The population of this district was about double what it is now and the grass covered mounds to be seen here and there are the remains of houses where large families lived.
The blight was supposed to be caused by a very wet summer. According to the people the potatoes decayed both in the ground and in the pits.
A small quantity of the potatoes were saved in some families and were sown the next year. When the leaves came above the ground they were cut off. This was done while the potatoes were growing. This was to prevent the potatoes being affected. The result was a very small potato but it was free from disease. When the people were sewing the potatoes during the famine years the “eye”
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 16:00
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Story.
There was once an old woman and she was letting on that she was not able to walk. She got a kind of a wheelbarrow to carry herself about. She was very poor and she lived going about from house to house. A person from each house had to wheel her to the next house and so on. It happened one day that she was wheeled to the house of the blacksmith. The smith told his boy that he wouldn't wheel her any further. He told him to get a spade and dig a hole beside the old woman's wheelbarrow. When she saw him digging the hold she asked him what he was doing it for? He told her that he was going to throw her into it. When she heard this she leaped out of the wheelbarrow and ran for her life.
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2020-03-20 15:46
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anuas den staidhre agus tháinig sé chun na cistine. Do shuidh sé síos do féin agus ní raibh sé ann i bhfadh nuair a tháinig Máire cuige agus í ag gáiríde agus ag magad fé. Níor labhair sé in aon-chor ar feadh a bhfadh ach ansan dubhairt sí leis ‘táim go h-ana mhaith airís’ ar sise(an) agus ansan d’fhreagair an fear í mar seo :- ‘ó ó twas yesterday’ agus as an san amach níor tháinig aon breoideacht ortha. Lá amháin do thuith Séan agus do gearr sé a cos ach do bhí sé álright airís i gcúpla laé. Do mhaireadar go léir as san amach go seasgair cómpórdach.
Caitlín Ní Loingsigh (13) a sgríobh síos ó béal aithris a h-athair Pádraig Ó Loingsigh (56) Gort- na Tobraidean, Baile Mhúirne.
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2020-03-20 15:46
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sgreadh aisti agus nuair a airig fear an tighe é do cheap sé go raibh sí ag fághail bháis agus do rit sé suas an staidhre agus baisín uisge aige. Nuair a shrios sé an seómra i na raibh sí i na luighe dubhairt sé mar seo :- ‘ ar son Dé- Dé May Whas [I]? ‘’I-I’’ agus ansan airís dubhairt sí go mear ‘the Sky’. Nuair a airig sé an rud a dubhairt sí do bhí sé ar buile mar ní fheadhfhadh [sé]? na (féadhfhadh) focail ceart do rád mar do bhí leithídh sin do sgamhrad air nuair a airig sé ag sgreadaigh í. Siad seo na focail sa i ceart a bhí aige ghá rád:- ‘Ar son Dé Mary what up’ ach ní fhéadhfhadh sé íad san do rád sa ceart ar dtúis mar do bhí sgamhradh air. Do chuaidh sé go dtí a seomra féin ansan agus bo shuidh sé san leabaid agus ansan do tháinig sé
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2020-03-20 15:44
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Lá amháin do tháinig breóidheacht an bhean an tighe agus do bhí eagla a chroidhe ar an bhfear agus ceap sé go bhfaghadh sí bás ach mar sin féin ní bhfuair an uair seo. Cúpla lá i na dhiaidh san d’eirig sí as an leabaidh agus do bhí sí go h-ana mhaith airís agus do bhí áthas ortha go léir ansan. Máire ab’ainm di agus Cáit agus Máire ab’ainm den beirt cailíní agus Séan an buachaill agus do bhíodar go h-ana dheas. Do bhíodar i na chóinnuidhe ana chóinpórdach ar fadh go ceann abhfhadh agus so seire do fuair an bean breóidhte Máire agus do bhí ana bhrón ortha mar do bhí sí ana olc ar fadh agus do bhí fhios ag an t-athair go bhfaghadh sí bás. Do cuireadh fios ar an sagart agus do tháinig sé agus nuair a bhí sé imthighthe airís do chuir Máire
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 15:43
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as frathacha an tseomra sé bó a dearbhshéathar.
Ar baint na baise d’imithigh an chúirt agus a raibh ann as
radharc agus fuair sí í féin imbuaile a dearbhshéathar agus
cad a bhí ann roimpe ach sean-duine marbh in ionad na bó.
“O Dia le m’anam” ar sise.
Tháinig a dhriofúr amach ach ní sean-duine a chonnaic sise ach
an bhó agus theastaigh uaithe go mbéarfadh an bhaintreabhach
cuid de’n bhoin leí.
“Ní thógfad” ar sí sin, “Níl aoinne a iosfaidh aon phioc de
sin ná go mbeadh breoidhte go ceann ráite.”
Laetheannta `na dhiad` san tháinig an cailín airís agus
dubhairt sí leo go raibh a maigheastrás ag imtheacht.
amáireach agus go dtáimigh sí chun slán. D’fhágaint acu.
Táimíd ag imtheacht go h-iochtar na h-Éireann agus tá
dream eile ag teacht `nár ndiaid.”
Ní raibh na scróinséirí ach cúpla mí tagaithe nuair do
chailleadh bean an fheirmeora. D’fhan an bhaintreabhach san
áit ar feadh tamaill agus b’é toil Dé é gur bhog an
saoghal. Bham sí amach Duthaigh Duibhneac airís di féin.
An chéad loing seólta chuaidh go h-Ameirice d’imthigh sí
leí feín.
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“Sin é an chéad uair a chuala go raibh sé tinn” ar sise. “Téanam
imtheannta”.
Thug sí suas í sa tseómra, seomra eile. Bhí doras cliathánach as
an gcistin isteach ann is amhlaidh a bhí sé lán suas de daoine ‘na
suidhe ar ghach thaobh ann.”
“Arb ’ aoinne agaibh” ar sise leo “A chuir isteach ar mhac na mná sheo”
“Ní h-aoinne” ar siad san.
Chuaidh sí i seomra eile. Bhí cuid ba mhó ná san ann. “Arb’ aoinne
agaibh” ar sise leo “a chuir isteach ar mhac na mná seo?”.
Bhí sean-duine trom críonna cois na teime. “Is mé mhuise”
ar seisean. “bhí sé ag a leithéad seo do rás agus bhí sé ag gabhailt orm”
“Téanam” arsan bhean uasal. Chuaidh sí amach ag cliathán an
leasa. Phrioc sí luibh di.
“Teír abhaile ar sise “Cuir í sin ag beirbhuí”
Dhein an bhean bhocht amhlaidh. Thug sí trí deocha dó, is d’eírigh sé
cómh maith is bhí sé riamh.
Ligeionn tamaill cailleadh bó ar a dearbhshiair agus chuir
sí teachtaire ag triall uirthi go mbéarfadh sí leí bolg na bó.
“Ní mór liom di féin é” arsan driofúr. D’imthig an teachtaire
abhaile. Niorbh fhada a bhí sí imthighthe nuair do tháinig an cailín
“Ó” ar sise “níor chuadhais ag lorg bolg na bó ar do dhearbhshiair.
Ná dein. Seo fáinne dhuit, thug mo mhaigheastrás duit é. Tar
ag triall uirthe, cuir an fáinne ort agus chídhfidh tú cad
tú ag crochadh as na Frathacha”
D’imthigh sí leí. Bhuail an bhean uasal leí is thug sí isteach
sa chúirt í. Chuir sí uirthe an fáinne agus nuair do
shroich sí an seomra cad a chidhfeadh sí ag crochadh as
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mbuachaill ná Séan, agus do bhíodh sé ag obair len-a athair nuair a thagadh sé abhaile ón sgoil gach oidhche. Ansan níorbh’fhada go raibh duine des na cailíní chun stop agus gan dul go dtí an sgoil a thuille mar do theastuigh sí ón a mháthair agus ansan do stop sí. Do bhí an cailín eile is an buachaill ag dul ar sgoil agus do bhí árd shaoghal achu ag dul ann. Do bhíodh eagla a croidhe ar an t-athair riomh nah púcaí nuair a bhíodh sé ag teacht ó bheith ag [sgoruidheadh]? do féin. Do bhíodh mór cuid oibre le déanamh ag bean an tige gach aon lá ach ansan nuair a fhan an cailín sa bhaile do dhéanfhadh sí mórán obaire dhi. Nuair a tagadh an buachaill abhaile ón sgoil do théigeadh sé ag obair leis na athair.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 15:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
iasacht corcáin ortha. Bhí an áit iar-geulta agus b’ait leo cad b’as
Go dtáinig an cailín ag lorg an chorcáin. D’imthigh sí amach is
d’fhair an bhean í. Cár chuaidh sí ach isteach sa lochán.
“Dia le m’anam is isteach sa lochán a chuaidh sí sin.” Ach ní h-aon mdh
-é sin. Nuair a bhitheas ullamh leis an gcorcán thug sí léi abhaile é
agus dubhairt go raibh a maigheastrás an-bhuidheach di.
I gcaonn cúpla lae bhuail an cailín cúiche isteach airís.
“Cuir mo mhaigheastrás ag criall oraibh” ar sise “Féachaint an
ndéanfaidh sibh dá thúirne de’n líon glas do sniomh di”
“Déanfam é agus míle fáilte” ar siad-san.
Do chuir sí ag triall ortha leis an líon glas. D’fáise bean an tighe
Chun na h-oibre. Bhí sí laethannta ag gabhail do agus nuair do bhí
sí ag gábhail di bhuail an cailín isteach airís cúcha
“An fada go mbeidh an líon síomhtha?” arsan cailín.
“Tá sé déanta anois” ar sise. “Ní fiú duit imtheacht, suidh
ar an gcathaoir go gcríochnóchadh amach duit é.” Nior bhfhada go
raibh sé ullamh ag bean a’tighe di agus thug sí leí abhaile é. Lá’r na
bhárach do tháinig sí ag triall ortha airís chun go ndíolfadh sí iad as
an dtrioblóid.
“Dá tóg aon phinguin uaithe” arsan bhean leí “ach lorg leigheas
do mhic” fear breágh óg é sin a bhí san leabaidh.
D’imthig sí i dteannta an chailín gur chuadar isteach sa liosachán.
Bhí cúirt bhreágh ann, thúg sí siar sa Pharlús í. Bhí bean uasal ann
roimpe.
“Táim an bhuidheach dibh” arsan bhean uasal “Pé beag mór
a d’ealóchaidh tú orm. Tabharfadh sa duit é.”
Ní éalochad – sa ort ach mo mhac atá breoidhte do leigheas”
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 14:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhi fear og ann fado, bhi se ag teacht abhaile o chuairt, do rith much treasna an bhothair roimhe agus ceap se gur much chearth a bhi ann. Do tharainng le'n a bhrog uirthi, ni raibh dadha ann acht a sghath, do thainig an much roimhe tri h-uaire i ndiadh a ceile, do tarainng se gac uair uirthi acht ni raibh aon rud ann acht a sghath.
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Thainig eagla air annsan agus ni raibh se abhalta siubhal ach go moll, bh se ag iarraidh siubhal comh fada le thigh muinteirdhe, dairigh fear an thighe amuigh ins sraid e, chuaidh se amach agus thug se cuiread do teacht isteach, d'innis se an sgeal do fhear an thighe.
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Do cuir fear an thighe fios ar a dhaoine an fhir og, thugadhar abhaile an fear og ar agus car cuireadh fhios ar an sagart agus do cuir sagart ann ola dheideanach ar aguss bhi se an thinn ac nior mhair se ac seachtmhain.
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Fuaireadh an sgeal so o,
Tomas O'Cuilleanain (65 bliana),
Baile Salach,
Dubhlinn
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 14:08
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
buaile:
Treasna an Ghleanna tá “buaile” áit na chuiridís na gearaltaig a gcuid bó ag inbhear: tugtar “buaile Uí bhriain” ar an áit freisin.
Cnoc Túis:
Tá Cnoc Túis suidthe ins an gcúinne atá ag gobadh isteach i gConntae Corcaige: baile fearann mór é seo. Tá scoil ann. Deineann an abha, An Glaisabhuidhe teóra idir é agus conntae Corcaighe
An choilín:
Tá an áit seo beag. Luigheann se ar an dtaobh thíar de Gort na Tiobrad: Tá talamh ar a dtugtar “Na Commons” suidthe ann.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 14:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Do bi se raidhce go raibh na daoine maithe timpeall phobail Tuath Glae.
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Nuair bhiodh daoine ag ghabhail an bothar ar a leitead sin d'am san oidhche, do tagadh capall suas leo agus fear ag marcaidheacht air agus gan aon ceann ar an bhfear.
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Thuiceadh ar fear laige agus bhiod se marbh ar maidin.
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Chuir fear e fein i gcoir cuig fios a bheith arbh fior go raibh an fear agus an capall ann.
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Thug se scian marbtha muc leis.
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Thainig an capall suas leis agus an an fear gan ceann agus do labhair se leis ac mar dhein an fear ac casadh timceall agus do shaith se an fear a bhi ar an gcapall leis an scian.
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Dubhairt an fear leis "tarraing agus saith arais". "Coinnig a bfuil agat" arsa an fear.
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Ar maidin chuaidh se go bhfeicfeadh se cad a bheadh ann agus cad a bhi ann ac crap mor bog agus scian saithithe ann agus ma ta breag ann ni mise a chum e.
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Scriobhadh an sgeal seo thuas,
o innsint Bean Ui Flanagain (68 bliana),
Baile Salach,
Dubhlinn.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 13:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Deirtear gur troideadh cath fuilteach annso. Thug feirmeoir éigin fén a briseadh act gac fód ar chas se bhí cnámha ag eirghe, agus d'eirig se as.
Cúl an Lín:
Tá Cúl an lín ar an dtaobh sóir de idir é, agus na Tullacha : Deirtear na thaobh go raibh an talamh ann an. oireamhnach do fhás an lín, bhíodh barraí breághtha de ag na feirmeoiri ann.
Na Tullacha:
Tá an leath – thuaidh de sráid bhéil an Átha siudthe ins na Tullacha, se sin, na cnocáiníní beaga.
An bán Mór, sé sin an pháirc mhór, bhán
baile fearann fada cuang e seo. Tosnuigheann
sé ag an droichead ag luigeann sé ó dheas i dtreó cnoc Túis.
An Cnoc Glas:
Ar an dtaobh thoir den bhan mór tá an Cnoc glas. agus leaca nó taobh cnuic. ag sínead isteac go gleann an Chapaill, taid na trí áiteanna so ar theorainn Chorcaighe.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 13:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Cill Eidhleach:
Is é seo an ainm ceart ar “Mountplummer” Ainm nuadh é seo. “Mtplummer”. ó mhuinntir Plummer a bhí na dtiagharnaí talmhan ar an mbaile fearann so. bhí duine acu ‘na mhinistéar sa teampall gallda a bhí ibhfán liátháin (feirm an tSuibhneach anois) Tá sé curtha i nGort na Tiobrad.
bhain an chuid is mó den áit seo le Parróisde N. Ide in aimsir Íde , agus tá an Cillín le feichsint fós ann, tímcheall dachad slat ó’n droichead. Cuirtí na naoidheanáin a gheibhtí bás gan baiste innti in. allóid.
Tá “Cnoc a’ droma” cnoc an. árd sa mbaile fearann so. Tá radharc áluínn ó’n a bhárr. Chífeá an t Sionainn go soiléar lá breágh gréine. Tá Macairc luimnighe ag síneadh ón a bhun soir, siar is ó thuaidh uait.
Ins an mbaile fearann so tá ainm fo -áite atá caillte ar fad anois. sé sin “barra ceapach” Níl a fhios ag éinne acagcor. duine cá bhfuil a suidheamh (feirm mic Amhlaoibh a díoladh le muinntir laochdha breis is bliadain ó shoin).
Lios na fola:
Ar an dtaobh thuaidh de Cill Eidleac tá dhá bhaile fearann beaga. lios na fola is Cúl a’ lín tá ráth no lios mor feárac ar fheirm uí lionnaehaín
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 13:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Fuairead an sgeal o
Padraig O'Cillireain,(72 bliana).
Sraid na n-Iascairi Dubhlinn.
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Bhi fear ag teacht abhaile oidhche o Inisdiomain agus bhi se ag teacht anois an bhothar ag an dha uair deag a clog san oidhche agus thainig fear agus capaill agus (trucall) trucall aige suas leis agus comhra istig san trucall aige.
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"Suas isteach" arsan fear, thainig eagla ar an bhfear nuair connaic se an comhra ac mar sin fein shiudh se isteach.
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Bhiodar ag imtheact leo go dtainig siad go barr a' Churraigh agus bhi lios istig san bpairc ann.
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Siubal leat istecht arsa'n fear ta socraid annso" Isteac leo dos na daoine maithe bhi ana oidhche aca ag ithe is ag ol; agus bhi ceoil breag aca ann leis.
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Ce bhi marbh ac athair crionna an fhir a bhi curtha sa saoghal seo cead blian roimhe sin agus bhi uaigneas mor air nuair d'airigh se e, nar ba fear breag e mar e fein.
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Fuairead an sgeal o,
Eamonn O Concubhair, (62 bliana).
Baile Bearra,
Dubhlinn
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 13:15
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
turus ar an áit, le linn do na Gearaltaig a bheith ‘na gcomhnaidhe ann.
Tá cur siós déanta aige obruadair ar áiteanna thart – timcheall mar atá “Fairche an Triúin” áit atá ós comhair an Caisleáin Amach ar an dtaobh theas. “An Cnocán Ruadh” – ardán atá le h - ais an chaisleáin
Ag trácht ar “bhás Eamoinn“ dó shamhluigheann sé dúinn na cnuic agus na h. aibhne is na gleannta sa chomharsanacht ag déanamh comh - bhróin leis, ‘na bhás, mar seo : -
“Atá bunóch cúmogach casta, Ó thulaig anuas ‘na cuil deataigh An Fhionnghlais fós iar sódh i seascar Is tobar an géidh gan léas a lachta “
Fairche:
baile fearann mór. cnocach é seo. Tá an leath theas den t sráid seo suidte ann. Sroiseann sé ó dheas go teórainn Chorcaige. Sé an ciall atá leis an bhfocal “fairche” annso ná “An talamh a bhaineann leis an dteampall”, (Cill Achadh o liatháin) nó “bhuich Lands”
Tá Cnoc an Chairn suidhte i lár an bhaile fearainn se. Tá se timceall 750 troig os cionn coth throm na fairrge. Tá Cnoc na Ceárdhean ar an dtaobh theas de.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 12:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Gort na Tiobrad : Tá tobar fíor – uisge i gcúinne páirche annso. Is annso do bhí Gearaltaig ba mhó cháil i gCúige Mumhan ‘na gcomhnaidhe. Is eól dúinn go rabhadar san go láidir ar son an Chreidimh i n. Éirinn. Dheineadar connradh eatorra feín an fiór chreideamh do chosaint i gcoinnibh luct an Nuaidh. Chreidimh
Is mó uair a thug Dáithí ó bruadair, an file,
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 12:29
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Cholera: At the time when the Cholera ravaged the country Leighlinbridge was badly hit by the disease. The village that time was twice as big as it is today. So bad was the disease that one lane retains the name “The choler lane” to this day. Mr Path Burke told a gruesome story of this time in the village. No one would approach a house where a victim of the cholera lived, so that those unfortunates were left in a miserable state. No one could be found to coffin the corpses, particularly as it was circulated that the danger of contagion was multiplied by going near a corpse rather than one still alive. The only one to go near a house was a Board of Works man who peeped through windows & wrote names in his book. a huge grave had been dug to accommodate many coffins & some said that victims were even buried in the choler lane. Shed was erected in this lane where makeshift coffins no better than boxes were hastily putt together to hold the ever increasing number of victims. The fact of corpses being left in houses led to much offence & indignation amongst the people but who would remove them? A solution was found.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 12:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Marriage Customs
8-12-1938
In olden times they had a different way of celebrating marriage from now. June was counted a lucky month for getting married and Wednesday a lucky day. On the morning of the marriage and before getting married the grooms party would go to the brides house for breakfast. For breakfast a cows head and old hens were served. Plenty of meat was served and a six penny loaf was eaten. They danced and danced, sang and drank whiskey galore. Whiskey was very cheap in those days only a shilling a quart. The pair usually went to the chapel around two o clock but
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 11:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Gas in a beast
In Summer it happens often that a cow maybe come gassed. If so, all that is necessary is to get a briar with two ends in the ground. Cut this and tie around the beast - under her stomack and across her back in the name of the Fr Son & Holy Ghost.
In a similar manner for all cattle.
Chincough
This is simple enough as all that is necessary is to get assess milk and give it to ailing person. The ailing person drink 3 sups in the name of the Fr., Son and Holy Ghost.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 11:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Foul Mouth
Certain people have the cure of this, which is performed in the following manner. The child or person ailing goes to the possessor who blows his or her breath 3 times in the mouth of the diseased person, in the name of the Far. Son, Holy Ghost. It must be done when both are fasting.
Foul Mouth
The person who licks a mankeeper has this as well asa the cure of the burn. The cure is performed in the same way as above.
Jimmy Gallagher, Clyspare, Sligo
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-20 11:01
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Other Cures
A cow having a chill; the water from St Patrick's well rubbed on her back and some of it given to drink.
A burn: The man or woman who licks a mankeeper has the cure. He may be found in a well or stream. Some people call him a lizard. To have the cure all that is necessary is to lick the mankeeper; if he does so he will have the cure which he performs in this way. He licks the burnt part - let it be the hand or foot with his tongue.
Paddy Quinn, Castlegal, Sligo
James Gallagher, Clyspare, Sligo
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 23:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
these are called "sgiollain"/"sciolláin, and others are left whole and these are called sprouters. Epicures is the name given to the special variety of early potatoes which are generally dug in the month of June.
All the crop is dug in the months of September and October. Sometimes they are dug with a spade or a plough. The large potatoes are picked at first and put in a pit in the ground or put in a house and the small ones are given as food to animals on the farm.
Neighbours of this locality help each other with the setting and digging of potatoes.
Eibhlin Ni Súilleabháin 25th Deireadh Fómhair
My Native Parish
My native parish is Caheragh. It is situated in West Cork. Its boundaries are the parish of Skibbereen on the south, Durrus on the west, Bantry in the North and Drimoleague in the east.
It is a fairly large parish and it is situated in the country, only a small village is in its southern side, namely Killenleigh.
In this parish are situated seven schools, two in Dromore, two in Killenleigh, two in Gurranes and one in Burravilla, two chapels, one in Dromore and one in Killenleigh, one corn and flour mill, two post offices, one in Dromore
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 22:04
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Ins an sean áimséar nuair a bhí na saighdiúirí ag suibhal tríd na tíre bhí ar na daoine lóistín a thabhairt. Oidhche amháin tháinig siad go teach in raibh sean bean agus a mac ina gcomhnaidhe. Thug siad lóistín do cheann acu. Rinne an mac leaba dó in aice na tine. Da ghnáth leis an sean-bean éirghe gach oidhche ag caitheamh a píopa. Dubhairt an mac leis an saighdúir go dtagadh cailleach na Farraige gach oidhche agus gan aon eagla a bheith air. San meadhan oidhche d’éirighe an sean bean. Bhí an saighdiúr ag faire leí tharraing sé chuige a ghunna agus marbhuaigh sé í. ‘Anois a fhear ar chuige abair sé’ tá Cailleach na Fuairhaige marbh.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 22:03
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Rith an madra abhaile ar ais go dtí an teach. Rinne sé iarracht dul isteach ins an dteach acu níor fead sé mar bhí na doirse agus na fuinneoga dúnta go daingean. Thosaigh sé ag tafaint ansin agus ar deire tháinig duine den línaighe amach chuige. Rinne sé iarracht an madra a mhealladh isteach. Nuair a nach raibh an madra sásta dul isteach ghlaodh sé ar muintir an tígh agus tháinig sé amach chuige. Thosaigh an madra ag rith i dtreo na páirce in a raibh a mháistir sínte, ceap na daoine go raibh sé as a meabhair. Lean siad é agus threoriugh sé stad go dtí an áit a raibh an píobaire píobaire. Is ar éigean a bhí sé beo ar chor a bith. Bhí sé beagnach chlúdaithe leis an sneachta. Thug na fir abhaile chuig an teach feilme é agus i gceann cúpla seachtaine. Bhí sé slán follán arís. Marach an mhadra gheobhfad an píobaire bás an oidhche sin.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 22:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhí fear ann uair amháin darbh aimn do Gobán Saor. Bíodh sé i gcomhnuidhe ag siubhal ar tóir oibre ac ní thiubarfad aoinne obair dhó mar ní raibh aon chuma oibre air agus cheapadar nach raibh cheird aige cor ar bith. Bhí sé ag siubhal an lá seo go dtáinig sé go mainistéar Baile Chláir na Gaillimhe. Bhí triúir fear ag obair ansin agus nuair a chonnacadar go léir ag gáire agus ag magadh faoi. D’iarr an bhainisteoir air cén áit ar fhoghlaim sé a cheird. ‘Is Cuma duitse cén áit ar fhoghluim mé é ach tá mé cinnte go bhfuil sé agamsa níos fearr ná agatsa ars an Tobán leis Bhuill déan cur is dá earbaill annsin fhaid is beidhimíd ag ithe ár ndeinnéir arsan bainnsteoir leis agus é ag gáire. Chuaidh an bainisteóir agus an beirt fear eile isteach go dtí a ndinnéar. Thosaigh an Gobán ag déanamh an cat is dá eirbaill chómh tapaidh is dféadfad sé.
Níorbh fada go dtáinig an triúir amach. Nuair a chonnaicadar céard a bhí déanta ag an n-Gobán , oscail a shúile agus bhí longradh mór orra. Fuair sé obair ón mbainisteoir annsin agus bhí sé ag obair ann le ceann sgáthain Mairth. Tá an cat is dá earbaill le feicéal go dtí lá indiu í mainistéar Baile Chláir agus tagann daoine léigheannta ó gach áit i n-Éireann chun é a fheiceáil.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 19:34
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The people still point out ruins that had been dwellings of people before the famine in this Townland one opposite the school owned by Rosie Donnolly which now belongs to Brian Lynch. On my father's farm there is still to be seen parts of three or four houses which are said to be dwellings before the famine.
The blight came on the potato crop in the month of June. Before the famine the potatoes were of a much better quality and nicer to eat. Then there fell on them a disease called the blight. There was a germ in the air that caused it. After this they grew no more only the size of small marbles.
In the following year owing to them being so small some people dropped them very thickly and other people so the broadcast like corn.
The Indian grain was imported from America, Canada, and the United States into the country. When it came it was ground into meal. The blood was not in them to boil it or to eat it and they took a disease out of it called the "cholera".
The government that granted relief to feed the starving people.
The people died in great numbers about eight or nine would be found dead behind the ditch.
A great disease followed the hunger called the "black fever".
James McAuley Drumnatrade Kill Cootehill told by Patrick McAuley.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 19:15
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Famine times
There are stories told in this district by people of the famine times 91 years ago .These stories were handed down from their parents and grandparents. . You have to do. In this district there was a man who went round with the cart bringing three Coffins each time he went. He was collecting the dead bodies and bringing them to the place of burial. There were often two two corpses in each coffin. After the famine beggars were very plentiful. Any beggars that came into a house it was always the custom to give them a noggin of butter milk and porridge. There was often plundering and stealing for food and money where it was known to be any.
The famine effected this district very much as a great lot of people had to leave their homes , and some died from want . This district was dotted over with white wash Cottages before the famine.
On my way there were eight cottages, four on the lower Hill,and three on another and one at the head of the garden.
They had about nine of a family and about eight or nine and about eight or nineon two or 3 acres of land. When the famine came they had to leave their comfortable homes in want and starvation. This district was sthickly populated before the famine and there were more houses on the land
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 16:38
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
‘Sé a dubhairt sé le búistéir na sgine,
“Fan socair, féach romhat, bhí réidh”
Is go mór mhór gur measa duit t’anam.
Ná mac mghean Báb a’tsaoir
Thíos ag an geúirt seo Sheághain fhada
Tá an gearra-phoc aluinn mhéith
Seanchas déinidh feasda
Ar mac mghean Bháb an tsaoir
Bhí ceann air choin mór le ceann tairbh
Croiceann is cnámh dá réir,
Ni measfainn fé bhun giní gur fiche é.
An phinginn is lugha san saoghal
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 16:34
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
An Gabhar
Mil is céir-bheach bhíodh again ar maidin,
Ó ghuideadh mo ghabhar aréir.
Is gabhar é atá coidhche liom sgartha,
Is de bheatha grásta Dé
Bhí a mháthair go h-áluinn cun bhainne
‘Gus a athair gan cháim (?) ins an saoghal
Is an dream úd a d’lonntuigh tar falla é.
Ná feicidh siad grásta Dé.
Do ghaibh sé siúd síos an claidhe fada
Is ceangailte ar ceannrach caol
Bhí beirt des na comharsain dhá fhaire.
Is mór m’amhras nár chuaidh ar stray
Bhi beirt des na comarsain dá fhaire.
‘San slighe siúd a d’imthigh sé
‘S a Dhé ghleighil nár bheactach an obair.
Gus d’eulaigh sé thórsta araon.
Leag sé siúd lámh ar a earna,
‘S ar sin siar di na bléin
A shúile gur d’ionntaigh in a chloigean
Lé h-anatha (anfa ?) an t-saoghail go léir
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 16:26
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Ní leat-sa fhéin ba mhéin liom luighe.
Ioir do dhá láimh ná fé lár do chroidhe
Is gan aoinne beó láimh liom dem’ cháirde ghaoil
Is gur thall atá an té chráidh mo chroidhe
Iompuigh anall orm a chúilfhionn óg
Is tiormuigh do shúile atá dúbhach fé dheóir
Ceangluigheadh liom tú is tú bog óg
Thar mnaibh na mbeann is tú mo stór.
Dé bheatha id shláinte a sháir-fhir óig
Cuirim go h-árd céad fáilte rómhat
Seo mo dhá láimh duit le grádh ‘gus póg.
Annsa luighfead go lá is go bráth lem’ stór
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 16:21
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Maidin ar a' Drúcht
Ar maidin ar a’ drúcht is mé ag siubhal go pras.
Chasadh orm an chúilfhionn múinte deas,
A chumainn gheal is a rúin tabhair dom gean.
Nó rachaidh mé san úir féd’ chumha gan stad.
Ní orm-sa ba chóir duit stró a chur seal,
Mar ní chuirfinn féd chumha acht clú fhir mhaith
Bhí agam nuachair d’óig-fhear deas
Is ní fheadar mé nach beó tá mo stór is é ‘teacht
Cár imthigh sé uait a shuairc bhean dheas?
Go dtagann a chumha chomh dlúth san leat
D’imthigh sé uaim is mo chúis fé ndear
Is tá mo ghustal ró- ghann chún é thabhairt tar n-ais.
Osgail an doras a spéir-bhean chiúin
Agus sgaoil mé a chodladh go sásta chúghat
Beidh an obair seo go thobann in gach áit ar siubhal
Is go bhfuil fhios ag an bpobal gur bhádhadh é siúd
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 16:11
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“Deacair is dith ort is fíor gur tusa atá ann
Mar is deacair dul díot nuair luigheann tú sealadh ar greann
Seo guí óm chroidhe cuir díot an talamh anonn.
Is má thagann fear a tighe ort gheobhair díol an bhromaigh sa bhfabhal” (?)
Ceannóchad-sa ríbín beidh ró-dheas fighte de’ n chnáib
beidh ceann de ‘ ge mo stór is go leor de fighte ar mo láimh
Ar eagla aon stroaire gheobhadh im choinne sa t-sráid
Go mbainfeadh póg nó dó de bhean an daill bháin.
Ar chuala tu an t-éad bhí aréir ar mo ridire daill?
Is gan bean ar a’ saoghal ná deanann le fear eile cainnc.
Drissead-sa an seula is sgaoilfead mo chocól féin gcoill.
A’s ‘se aindeis a tsaogaoil cuir mé féin im ghiolla ‘gceann daill
Chuadhar go Tir Eoghain fé dhó lem ‘ ridire daill.
Ar rúd go Newport is go leor de conntae faoi laighean
Ag imtheacht lem ar fúd bóithre pluide is iad doimhin
Is mo mhallacht go dró do’n té gheobhadh le duine gan radharc
Níl bean ins a ‘ tír seo á aoirdeacht a maise is a cáil
Ó Chaiseal na Riogh is as súd ó dheas go Newport.
Ná sgéanfadh mo chroidhe oidhche fhada achaitheamh ma cóir
Sin í eachtra an daill is gan mhoill iseadh bheemíd ag ól.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 16:02
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Bacach na Léige
“A bhean a’ tighe shéimh cuir do dhéirc amach cun a’ daill,
Olann nó líon nó píosa de’n mhuic ar an oidhean,
Sgilling de’n chíos má chidheann Dia ‘gat é ‘san adairt,
Ní chuirfir go bráth é níos fearr ná cuid do roinnt”.
“A bhacaigh na léige ní binn liom eisteacht le do ghlór
Bhí do bhean annso indé is tú féin indin le na bonn”
“Ta mo bean-sa sa chré mo léir is leac le na ceann
Is dá chómhartha san féin tá an léine dubh ar mo dhrom”
“Níl neart agam féin ort a laogh, mar a mblaisfidh tú beoír
Níor rug an chearc mhaol sa druimfhionn donn óg.
Tá olann mo chaorach go léir amuigh in Newport.
Nuair a chasfaidh tú glaoidh is beidh déirc in aisge ‘gam romhat”
Ar mo charadh dhom, ghlaodhas, bhí laogh ag an druimfhionn á seól
Rug an chearc mhaol is bí doraon breagh ubh aici im chóir
D’altaigheas mo dhéirc is léigh mé an t-sailm in a cóir
Bhi bean a’ tighe buidheach dom is í treillicí * sodar im dheóigh

`
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 14:59
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The Famine
1 About 91 years ago there was a great famine in Abbey. The potato crop failed and the people were in a very bad way for food.
2 In poor parts around here the people had nothing to eat only meal, porridge, and they go so weak from this food that they died.
3 They were so poor that several had to be buried without coffins and were buried in fields as they were dying so fast they could not be brought long journeys to the graveyard.
4 the famine lasted for about two years. The poor people had not seed potatoes to sow as they had no money. Then the government gave round seed potatoes which they got from England and Scotland.
Written by:- Gary Roche, Kylemore house, Abbey, Loughrea, Co. Galway
Got from:- Mr W. J, Roche, Kylemore house, Abbey, Loughrea, Co. Galway
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 14:22
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order to complete the rounds.
Once a man took water from the well, and put it in the kettle on the fire, but it never boiled. Since then the well has never been interfered with.
Mary O'Sullivan Joormore.
In my district there is a Healing Fountain called the Well of the Warts and by some "tobar na sūl". It is believed that if you bathed your hand in the waters and left some relic after you that the warts would disappear.
Hannah McGrath Gurtyowen.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 14:16
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Holy Wells.
Ireland from the Christian times has been celebrated for holy wells and healing fountains. People believe that long ago a saint or a hermit lived there, or drank from them, or baptized in their waters.
There are not many wells in this district. The nearest one is situated among the hills at the back of this school. It is called the "well of the warts", as it is believed to cure warts. When a person used go to the well, and bathe the affected part or limb in the waters, and have some relic (token) after him, such as a rosary beads or medal, it was believed that he would be cured.
Nobody likes to interfere with the well, they think it would be unlucky. There is a three -cornered stone in front of the well, and long ago when boys were coming to this school they threw away the stone from the well, and afterwards when they returned it was in the same place in front of the well.
There is also another holy well about 300 yards to the back of Killhomane school. Long ago people used pay rounds at this well, and they used to pay three visits in
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 13:54
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borrowed and blue, she is thought to be lucky. An expensive dress is bought for that purpose and usually it is not worn any more only for the marriage ceremony. The bride’s dress can be of any colour and there are sayings about every colour, some of which are:-
“marry in red you’ll wish you were dead;”
marry in blue you’ll always be true:
marry in green you’ll be ashamed to be seen;
marry in white your spirits will be bright.”
Winnie Duckelow,
Droumatinaheen, Durrus, Co. Cork.
Name of person from whom material was obtained:-
Thomas Dukelow,
Droumatinaheen, Durrus, Co. Cork.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 13:52
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Marriage Customs
Marriages most frequently take place on Shrove Tuesday as it is one of the oldest customs which can be observed. The month of May is thought to be the unlucky month to get married as you’ll surely rue the day. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays are thought to be the unlucky days also in the week to get married.
There are no local customs on beliefs connected with Shrove now-a-days.
Matches are made now as well as in ancient times. Money is given as dowry, that is if the wife go to live in the husband’s house she will have to hand over a large sum of money to her husband. Stocks or goods are not given either now.
The marriages taking place in the house was one of the oldest customs, which is never observed now.
A wedding feast is held at the bride’s house and after that feast the married fair would go to the same distant place to spend their “honey moon”. After their marriages confetti is thrown after them. If the bride is dressed in something old and something new, something
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 12:43
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Old Houses
Long ago the houses were not as good as the houses we have now. They were very small and some of them were built from mud. Those were called mud - wall cabins. There was no chimney on the mud-wall cabin but there was a hole in the roof and a creel on top of it. The fire was at the gable. They cut timber in the wood and put it on the roof of the house. They put soda on top of that and then they thatched it with heather or flax or rushes. The rushes grew in Lucawndubh and Curraghbawin. They had neither door nor window but at night they put up straw mats on the holes through which they entered. The bed was in a corner of the kitchen and it was called a “poach” the people burned bog- fur and turf. The bog fur showed light also. They made rush candles. They used the candles mostly when a woman was spinning
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 12:30
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Riddles
What’s in the rock and not in the stone,
What’s in the marrow and not in the bone,
What’s in the priest and not in the people,
What’s in the church and not in the steeple,
Twice in the river and once in the air,
Through lakes, ponds and ditches.
You’ll not find me there.
(Answer- the letter r)
Pupils name. Mary McGoldrick. Buck hill Barn Dromahair.
Two dead men went out to fight one night.
Two cripples ran for the guards. Two dummies shouted hurry hurry.
Answer. A lie
A beggar had a brother and the brother he was drowned. What relation was the beggar to to the brother that was drowned?
Answer. A sister
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 12:25
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Seo é an caoi a ndéantar aoil annseo. Ar dtuis téightear go h-Arann ar iarraid cloca airthrid a bhíos dath gorm orad. Sin iad na cloca le h-agaidh an aoil a déantar. Tugann siad na cloca leo as Árann i mbád. Annsin deántar poll mór sa talamh le h-agaidh na cloca annsin bristear na cloca agus cuirtear teine mhór i mullach na gcloc. Deantar an teine aoil go na clocaí aoil. Bíonn an teine ag doghadh ó maidin go tráthnóna go mbíonn sé na aoil. Annsin thogadar as an poll an t-aoil agus cuirtear isteach i stabhla an t-aoil agus annsin díoltar é. Is ar san a tugtar an tornóg aoil sin ár an áit a déantar é.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 12:24
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Sé an chaoí a ndheanfhadh na caoladoirí na caísain fadó is amhlaidh a theidis go dtí an choill ag baint slata ar feadh chúpla lá. Annsin theigeidis abhaile agus thugeidis na slata abhaile leo agus chuiridis síos in uisge iad ar feadh seachtmhaíne le haghaidh iad a bheith bóg. Nuair a bheadh siad ag deanamh na gcisáin thógidis as an uisge aríst iad agus bhaineadh siad sgrágh ghlas as an talamh agus chuiridis na slata síos ins an sgrágh agus thosuidhis dá bhfeachan. Nuair a bhiodh a ndoithin slata acu innte thosuidis ar an mbhéal. Is é an chaoí a ndeanidís béal an chaísain ná slata a chuir thar an slat éile agus a bheith dhá bfeachán leo mar sin no go mbhidís ag an táis. Annsin ceanglaochadh siad suas na slata a bhíodh suas as agus thugidís dhá slat leo as an dá thaobh den chaísan agus chuíridis síos iad ins an gcuid den chiasán a bhíodh deánta acu cheána dhé. Annsin thugídis leo casúr agus bhuáilidis síos iad le faitchíos go dtiocfaidís aníos aríst agus go sgoitheach an caisán amach aríst. Annsin sgoileadh siad na slata a bhiodh suas as aríst agus tosuigidís dá bfeachan go mbhiodh siad go dtí an deireidh. Annsin bhainídis an cásan aníos as an sgrágh as chuirídis slat anonn agus slat análl nó go ndunidís é. Annsin ghearidís na slata beaga a biodh amach as, agus leagidís suas i dtaísge é.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 12:21
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anois.

Seo é an caoí con teach a dheasughadh. Baintear an taobh agus buailtear é. Nuair a bhíonns sin déanta acú fághann siad sgrath agus cuireann siad ar an gceann taobh amuigh é. Fághann siad go leór taobh annsin agus téigheann fear súas ar an teach con an deasughadh a dhéanamh. Bíonn fear eile ar an talamh ag cur súas taobh. Sgaoileann síad na dornáin agus leagann siad ar an gceann é leagann siad ceann eile ar a ceann sin agus mar sin nó go mbéidh siad ag bárr an tíghe. Tosuigheann siad ag bun an tighe arís agus leanann ortha súas mar a chéile. Nuair a bhíonns an taobh sin réidh acú tosuigheann siad ar an taobh eile. Déanann siad an rud céadhna ar an taobh sin. Nuair a bhíonns an dá thaobh de’n teach réidh acú cuireann siad na súagann súas. Cuireann siad trasna ar an teach ar an teach ar dtús iad agus cuireann siad i bfastúghadh sa falla iad le pionnaí. Cuireann siad trasna ar bhfaid an teach iad annsin. Nuair a bhíonns na súagáin socruighthe suas go maith bíonn an teach deasuighthe.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 12:20
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Fadó ní bhíodh coineall ar bith le faghail sa tír. Ní bhíodh aon solas aca san oidhche bhídís féin ag deanamh coinnle le bribheanna. Ní bhíodh ola ná solas ar bith aca ach na coinnle a dheinidhís leis na bribheanna. Ar dtús theighidís amach sa ngarraidhe agus bhainidís na bribheanna agus thugaidís isteach iad agus ghlanaidís iad agus sháithidís suas sa seimléar go mbeadh siad cruaidhe. Annsin nuair a cheapaidís go mbeadh siad sáthach cruaidh thugaidís anuas iad agus bhainidís díob an craiceann agus nuair a bhíodh an méid sin deanta aca chuiridís suas san seimléar arist iad. Nuair a bhíodh sé trí no ceithre lá ann thugaidís anuas arist iad agus chuiridís sios pota mór ar an teine agus chaithidís na bribheanna síos ann agus annsin gheobaidís geir caora nó bithidheach agus chaithidís síos sa bpota é annsin thosuighidís dá measgadh thart timcheall. Nuair a bhíodh an pota tamall maith ar an teine thógaidís aníos é agus thógaidís na bribheanna agus an gheir aníos as agus do dheinidís cruinn é agus annsin d’fhágfadh siad annsin é go mbeadh sé fuar agus annsin bheadh sé in na coinnle. Do bhíodh na coinnle seo níos fearr ná na coinnle atá ann anois agus is mó solas a bhíodh ortha ná mar atá ar na coinnle atá ann
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 12:17
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snáta dubh don olann dubh. Fághann siad crann mór annsin agus déanann siad crióseanna mór den snáta bán. Túgann siad go dtí an fíadaóir é annsin agus tá seól mór aige agus cuireann sé an snáta bán isteach ann agus nuair a bíonns gach rud déanta aige leis fághann sé túirne beág agus deanann sé círtliní beaga de’n snáta dubh. Suidheann sé síos ar stól bheag annsin agus leágeann sé a chósa ar píosa beág iarainn atá sa seól. Fághann sé an snáta dubh annsin agus tosuigheann sé dá cur isteach agus amach idir an snáta bán agus ag cur ola air. Nuair a bhíonns sé reidthe aige annsin cuireann sé sgéal ag an duine ar leis é. Nuair a thúgann sé leis é tágann go leór mná le céile agus glanann siad é. Sin é an caoi a déanfadh muínthear na h-áite seo é fadó acht ní h-é anois. Cuireann siad an olann go Gaillimh anois agus bhíonn sé déanta glánta nuair a baíle anois an cuid is mó dé, agus an cuid eile bhíonn snáta déanta de. Do bíodh an fonn ar na mná a bheith ag sníomh agus ag cardáil fadó acht níl na mná atá ann anois i ndon sníomh na cardáil a deanamh.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-19 12:15
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Sé an caoi a ndeaneann muíntear na h-áite seo an breídin. Baineann said an olann do na caoirigh, agus glanann siad í. Nuair a bhíonns sí glan acu fághann siad túirne agus déanann na mná snáta geal don ólann bán agus
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 23:10
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Aon oidhche bhí beirt ag teact abhaile ó shiubhal. Do cúaidh duine acu treasna na páirce go dtí a thig féin. Do léin an fear eile an bóthair. Núair a bhí an céad fhear síos tamall an na páirce connaic sé síofra ina sheasam i dtaobh coca féir. Do rith sí in a bhfád agus cuir sí an coca ammás air agus marbhú sí é.
Oidhche eile bhí fear eile ag dul abhaile ó imirt córcaí. Núair a bhí sé síos go dtí an áit ina marbhuigheadh an fear fadó do bhúail phían in a cosa, Agus tá sé ‘’crippled’’ o shoin i leith. Thomas Noonan is ainm don fear ^bacac.
Máirín Ní Ghealbháin
My cousin told me this too
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 21:15
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Bhí fear fadó ann sa droch saoghal. Bhíodh sé ag (?) ó mhaidin go h-oidhche. Bhí sé pósta agus lán tighe paístí aige. Bhí easpa an toac air agus dubhairt sé lena bhean bhúire éigin tobac do sholáthair do. Dubhairt sí go ndéanfadh.
Nuair do thaínigh sí abhaile d'fhiagraigh sé dí an riabh an tobac aice agus dubhairt sí na raibh, ná féadfadh sí é d'fhagháil ó aon duine mhuinteardha.
"Raghaidh mé ag triall ar Sprid an Teampaill féachaint an b'fhaighinn tobac" ar seisean.
"Ná dein , agus b'féidir go mbeadh rud éigin agam duit amáireach"ar sise.
D'fhan sé go dtí lá ar na bháireach agus bhí an fear bocht ag tuitim as a chéile gan an gal. Nuair a tháinigh sí b'é an scéal céadna é. BHí an saoghal an chruaidh ar ghach n-aon.
Níor stad sé gur shrioch sé bóthar an Tempaill, áit a raibh an Sprid. Shuidh sé in aírde ar an gelaidhe. Déarfadh aoinne gur annsan thiocfadh an Sprid. Sé deireadh sé leis féin "Dia le
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 19:20
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They would sing all night and had other classes also.
When the people used to be taking the remains to the churchyard they would always go the longest way.
Another custom the people had was to have the coffin on four chairs so that the people would say their prayers. When the coffin was taken the chairs would be turned face downward and nobody would take them until all belonging to the deceased person was washed. Another custom they used to have was to have the lid of the coffin outside the door until the person would be coffined.
Maureen McGrath. Told by Michael Blake Liskeevy Milltown
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 19:19
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Wakes
In the olden times the people had a lot of customs at wakes and funerals. They would keep the corpse in the house for two days and two nights. There used to be a great gathering of people at night.
When they would come to the wake the first thing the women friends would do was to cry out loud over the corpse.
There would be boxes of clay pipes filled with tobacco and every member would take one.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 19:12
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gcapall agus cuaidh sé isteach san tigh agus mhairbh sé an sean-fhear agus thug se leis an bhean óg. ''Tá luach trí puínt eile agam'' ar seisean.
Nuair a bhreacaigh an lá thug sé a aghaidh ar an dtigh agus nuair a tháinig sé go dtí a thig feín connaich sé a bean 'na gcodhlad agus ceap sé nach é a mhach i n-aon chor a bhí ann. Cuaidh sé amach ag trial ar an grofán chun é do mharbhí, ach cuimhnigh sé ar an gcoímhairle agus níor mairbh sé é.
Searadar an bhollóg agus thuit na naoí bpúnt amach as agus bhí an croiceann sa luach aige.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 19:12
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gcapall agus cuaidh sé isteach san tigh agus mhairbh sé an sean-fhear agus thug se leis an bhean óg. ''Tá luach trí puínt eile agam'' ar seisean.
Nuair a bhreacaigh an lá thug sé a aghaidh ar an dtigh agus nuair a tháinig sé go dtí a thig feín connaich sé a bean 'na gcodhlad agus ceap sé nach é a mhach i n-aon chor a bhí ann. Cuaidh sé amach ag trial ar an grofán chun é do mharbhí, ach cuimhnigh sé ar an gcoímhairle agus níor mairbh sé é.
Searadar an bhollóg agus thuit na naoí bpúnt amach as agus bhí an croiceann sa luach aige.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 19:04
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Nuair a eirigheadar ar maidin bhí bollóg beag agus bollóg mór déanta ag bean Mc Cailcé do, í gcómhair an bhótair. D'imthig sé leis go brónach de bhrógh ná raibh aon-rud aige taréis a trí bhliadhan ach na trí cómhairlí, agus eagla air roimh a mhnaoí.
Nuair a bhí sé tamall de bhóthar do connaich sé fear agus dúbhairt an fear leis an cómhngar a thógaint, ach cuimhnigh sé ar a cómhairle agus níor cuaidh, ach cuaidh an fear eile an cómhngar agus mairbh na beithionaigh é, ''Tá luach mo trí puint agam'' adúbhairt sé.
Bhí an oidhche ag cuiream anois agus cuaidh sé isteach í dtigh igcómhair na h-oidhche agus ní fada a bhí sé istigh nuair a connaich sé sean-fhear líath pósta le cailín óg. Cuaidh sé amach nuair a cuimhnigh sé ar an gcoímhairle ach glaoidh an sean-fhear air ach dúbhairt seisean leis go dtiocfaidh sé isteach arís.
Nuair a fuair sé é féin amuigh cuaidh
sé fé cocha féir a bhí sa gharraidhe. Í lár na h-oidhche do bhrath sé capall ag teacht agus nuair a shrois sé an cocha tháirigh an tiománaidhe anuas den
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 18:57
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When the wedding was over in the chapel the bride and groom went in cars to the bride’s house to have dinner. Then a number of horsemen started on a race from the chapel to the bride’s house on horse back. The first man to reach there was to get a bottle of whiskey. The present James Mullican grand father had a great guy money for racing and he got the name of “Win the Bottle”.
No later than twelve months ago a number of straw boys were at John Fichpatrich’s wedding. They were dressed in straw with false faces on them. First they went in and danced the bride and asked for some drink and if there was none they were given some money.
The next day the bride and groom went home to the groom’s house accompanied by many others. This was called a “Hauling Home.”
The bride and groom in this part of the country were never known to ride on horseback.
Patrick Farrell,
Gallonreagh,
Cootehill,
Co. Cavan
This was got from. Patrick Farrell
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 18:56
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Local Wedding Customs
About two years before the wedding there was a match made between the bride’s father and the groom. This match often lasted till the small hours of the morning and often a match was broken off by the division of a five pound note.
Every month except May are thought very lucky. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday were thought the luckiest days of the week. Monday was said to be very unlucky because it was the beginning of the week. There were never any weddings in this part of the country in the houses.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 18:49
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Sa deire thiar thall cuaidh sé ag obair d'feirmeoír darb ainm Mc Cailcé. Do bhí sé ag obair ar feadh trí bliaina ar trí púnt sa bhliain, [?] naoí púnt ar feadh na trí bliana, ac b'ionann naoi bpuínt an uair sin agus dachad púnt anois.
Nuair a bhí na trí bliaina caithte dúbhairt se le Mc Cailcé go mbeadh sé ag dul abhaile maidin lá ar na bhaíreac agus a págh a thabhairt do bhíodar suidhte cois na teire agus dúbhairt Mc Cailcé leis gur naoi bpuínt a bhí ag dul do tarús a cuid obre.
Bhíodar ag cainnt ar feadh tamaill agus sa deire dúbhairt Mc Cailcé leis go dtiúbharfadh sé trí cómhairlí do ar an naoi bpuínt. Bhí leisge air agus mar sin féin do thóg sé na cómhairlí.
Do cuadar a codladh agus thug sé
na naoi bpúnt do Mc Cailce ar na cómhairlí [?] (i) Coimeád an bóthar díreach (ii) Ná codlaigh in-aon tig go mbeidh bean óg pósta sean-duine, liath.
(iii) Ná dein aon rud indui mar beidh aithris ambhaireacht ort.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 18:22
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A story of St Patrick
There is a story told in Glasgow about St Patrick
When he stole away from Miolchu, the latter followed him and tried to take him back. Patrick dug a sod and immediately it was turned into gold. He handed the golden piece to Miolchu who returned home and left the gold on his table.
Miolchu said then that he would follow St Patrick again and take him back. Then the gold was turned into the sod again, so Miolchu had neither money nor Patrick.
Told by
Jack Cryan
Calry, Sligo
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 18:21
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Wife and they decided to keep watch that night. At the same hour the little pig did the very same as he did the night before. The man jumped up to him and threw the pig skin into the bed. “Get out” he said to the little man, and give me my pig.”
The little man said he would not until he got his skin. After a long argument he went back to the fort and drove back the pig.
The little man ran up the chimney and from that day to this sight nor light has not been seen or heard of him
Told by
Annie Cullen
Calry
Sligo
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 18:20
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A Fairy Story
Once upon a time there was a man and his wife living in this parish at the foot of the mountain.
They lived beside a fort. One day the man went to the market and bought a pig. He carried him home in a cleibin on his back. When he came to the fort the pig jumped out of the cleibin and ran into the fort. The man followed him and after a great struggle caught him and took him home. The pig never grew big or fat as pigs do but was continually grunting
One night when they were in bed the pig stole up to the fire and threw off his pig skin, turned himself into a little red haired man and began to smoke.
The man of the house saw what was happening and was surprised
Next morning he told his
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 18:19
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Wakes
When a person dies the people hold a wake. At the wake three candles are lit on the table beside the corpse. Usually the neighbours come in to keep the people of the house company. A plate of snuff and a plate of tobacco are left on the table by the people of the house. Every man smokes a pipe full of tobacco in honour of the corpse, and every woman takes a pinch of snuff. The neighbours usually stay till morning and whiskey and tea is given to them
This was told to me by my grandmother,
Mrs Mc Guinn
Hazlewood Cottages, Calry
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:57
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The water from this well, was used mostly for butter.
Sean Mac Domhnaill, Coill O Nowgean, Beal Cara.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:54
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Holy Wells
There are two holy fonts in my village. There is one in my father’s land, which is called Daire An Zarrda, and there is another in Mr. Hubert Mc Gowan’s land.
They are in the townland of Cullonaughton, and in the parish of Killasset. There are two big round rocks in the field and on top there is a font of water. Round the rocks there is a bath. People say, that mass was said at them long ago.
There is another holy well in the wood. It is in the townland of Callow, and in the parish of Killasset. It is called the Blessed Virgin’s Well. There is a bath leading to it. Every summer it dries with the heat. No one comes for any cure to it, but they did long ago.
There is another holy well beside the roc caulin, which is at the side of Callow lake. It is called Sean Coinnigham’s well. It is in the townland of Callow, and in the parish of Killasset.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:48
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Bíongantach an phearsain é Colmán ó bhí sé in-a leanbh agus ba leir go mbeadh sé in-a fhear cráibhtheach nuair o’ fhásfadh sé suas. Tharla dhá mhiorbhailtí ag a bhaisteadh. Ar dtús ní raibh aon uisge le fághail chun an leinbhe a bhaisteadh, ach bhí bacach agus dall i láthair, agus rinne ceann aca cómhartha na Croise ar charraig a bhí ann agus ar an bpointe phreabh tobar íor-uisge suad agus baisteadh an leanbh ann.
Annsin nigh an bacach a chos le h-uisge an tobair bheannuighthe, agus nigh an dall a shúile leis agus fuair an beirt leigheas. Tá cuid mhaith tobar beannuighthe ar fuid na háite agus glaoidhtear le h-ainm an naoimh iad.
Tá paidir an naoimh ag na sean-daoine mar seo:- Deirid ‘‘Glóire do Dhia, do Phádraig, agus do Mhic Duaich.’’
Cuireadh Naomh Colmái san roilig ag Cill-Mhic-Duaich ar dtús, ach bliadhanta in-a dhiaidh sin nuair bhí cath Eachdruim le bualadh tóg na Gaedhil cnámha leo chuig pairc an áit chun an tádh a thabhairt dóibh. Tar eis an chatha seo d’ath cuireadh é in Eachdruim mar a bhfuil a luaithre ag feitheamh le lá Deiridh an Domhain.
Baistear leanbhaí d’ainm an naoimh sa cheantar fós, agus bíonn a lá Fhéile ina lá mór saoire i gCill-Mhic-Duaich agus ins na báiltí thart timcheall ar sin. Ní dhéanann na daoine aon obair an lá sin.
Cáit Ní Rálf (15yrs.)
8-11-37 (Cill Éinne)
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:31
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ullamh dóibh agus nuair bhíodar ar tigh suidh isteach chuige tar éis altú roimh bidh a rádh dubhairt Guaire na féile go mba mhór an truagh é nach raibh na soghluistí go léir duine bocht ochrach. Ní raibh an focal ach as a bhéal nuair d’éirigh na miasa dé’n mbórd, agus amach leo tríd na fuinneóige agus iad ag eiteall san aer. Amach leis na sealgairí in-a ndiaidh. Chuadar ag marcuigheacht ar a gcapall agus amach leo ar fuid na tuaithe ag leanamhaint na mias go dtí gur shoicheadar Gleann an áit i na raibh Mhic Duaich agus a buachaill bocht ag clamhsán fáth nach raibh soghluistí deasa aca le n-ithe tar eis a bheirt ag troscadh i rith na Carghaoise.
Mar fhreagair do phaidir Mhic Duaich ar son an bhuachalla tháinig na miasa síos nuair a shroicheadar Gleann, agus d’ith an beirt a sáith. Níor fhéaduigh Guaire agus a chomráduidhe theacht chuca ám go raibh siad réidh mar greamuigheadh crúidhte na gcapall dho’n a carraigreacha. Ta rian na crúidte ortha fós agus tá rian na bplátaí ann freisin go dtí an lá indiú.
Nuair ó fhéad na capaill dul ar aghaidh arís isteach le rí Guaire chuig Colmán agus chuir sé cainnt air. Tríd an seanchais go léir fritheadh amach gur col-cheathair a bhí ionnta. D’iarr Guaire ar an naomh a theacht amach agus go dtabharfadh se talamh chun teampuill a bhunadh, dó. D’aontuigh an naomh leis agus thóg sé na teampuill ag áit in-aice le Gort Inse Guaire agus tugtar Cill-Mhic-Duaich go mbudh é sin an áit a mba mhaith le Dia na n-eaglaisí a thógáil ná seo:- Pé áit a dtuitfeadh crios Colmáin b’shin é suidhe cheart na n-eaglais.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:30
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macaw got in new floors with her timber. The also got cups and plates and numerous other things. They also had plenty of whiskey to drink.
This happened in the night. It was blowing a gale of southerly wind. All the bodies that were got were buried in Rathmoylan graveyard. The hole where the wreck occurred is now called the wreck hole.
After the wreck her lights used to be seen sailing into the wreck hole. Many people saw them.
Kathleen Gear
Ballymacaw
Dunmore East
Co Waterford
Got from my father Patrick Gear
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:11
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Na Trí Cómhairlí
Bhí lámha í nDún Caoin fadó, agus
bhíodar an-bhocht ar fad. Bhí aon mac amháin acu agus ní raibh sé mór i n-aon chor.
Nuair a bhí an t-ocras ag teacht ortha dúbhairt an fear go raghad sé síos go láir na hÉireann ag tuileamh a bheatha agus nuair a bheadh cúpla púnt tuillte aige go dtiocfadh sé abhaile ach mar adeir an sean-fhocal , ''Ní ionann dul go tigh an rí agus teacht as''. D'imtigh sé leis riamh agus coidhche ná gur srois sé lár na h-Éireann agus é ag lorg ar gach feirmeóir ar gach feirmeóir é a thógaint mar buacaill aimsire.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:08
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Naomh Patrúin an Cheanntair
‘Sé naomh Colmán naomh patrúin an cheanntair seo, ach ‘sé an t-ainm atá ag daoine na háite sir ná Mhic Duaich. Bhí seacht teampuill ag an naomh san áit, agus tá a bhfotharacha ann fós. Cill-Mhic-Duaich a tugtar ar an áit in-a raibh an teampaill tógtha, agus ar an dúthaigh thart umcheall ar sin.
Tá scéalta deasa ag daoine na háite i dtaobh an naoimh. Deirid gur chaith sé seacht mbliadhna ag guidhe agus ag troscadh dó féin in áit uaigneach fá bhun sléibhte burrín. Gleann a tugtar ar an áit sin. I rith an ama seo go léir ní raibh mar compánaigh ag Mic Duaich ach buachaill beag a dheineadh freastal air. Bhí trí peata beaga aige cómh maith.i. luch, cuileóg, agus coileach. Dheineadh an coileach glaodhach ar an naomh ar maidin, agus muna gcloisfeadh an fear cráibhtheach é, thosuigheadh an luch ag scríobhadh ar an chluais é chun an chadhladh a bhaint de. B’úsáideach an fheithide an chuileóg cheanfadh sí siubhal fá líne leabhair an naomh nuair bhíodh sé ag leígeadh agus nuair a stopfadh a sé ní théigheadh an cuileóg níos fuide, ach o’fhanfadh sé san áit ceanann céadna go n-oscluigheadh an naomh a leabhar arís. Bhíodh fhios aige annsin cé’n áit ar stop sé an t-ám fé dheire.
Bhí Mhic Duaich seacht mblidhna i nGleann agus tar éis an ama sin tháinig sé amach. Ba mhiobháilteach an chaoi in-ar glaodh Dia amach é. Domhnach Cásga a bhí a ann agus bhí guaire (colcheathair do Mhic Duaich a raibh dún aige i gCinnmana) agus plód sealgairí eile ag fiadhach. Ar theacht abhailedóibh bhí béile breágh
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:07
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róistín. Tugadh ‘‘boscty’’ ar an sórt cáca seo.
Cáit Ní Rálf (Scoil: Cill Éinne)
Cahercon
27-10-37
Scéal Fá Cuigeann
Bhí sgata cailíní ag dul thar leasa lá i gCathar Con. Chualadar mar bhéadh duine ag déanamh cuiginne istigh san lios. D’iarr ceann des na cailínibh deoch oí’n bláthach agus ar an bpoinnte cad do fágadh os a comhair acht mug bláthaighe. Do scannruigh sí agus níor ól sí an bháinne. Annsin tugadh buille beag ar an leiceann dí. Dubhradh go bhfuair sí bas tamall ghearr in-a dhiaidh sin. Na céadta bliadhain ó shoin iseadh thuit an rud seo amach. Deireann daoine na háite seo nach cheart d’aoinne uirlísí stáin nó iarainn a thabhairt amach as an teach agus cuigeann dá dhéanamh.
Tráthnóna fóghmhair nó cloich i bpoll móna
An rud a théigheanns fada tuigheann sé saor
Muna mbeidís plean agat ní bheidh bean agat
Cáit Ní Rálf
Caherchon
30-11-37
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:05
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annsin agus cuireann siad na fataí beaga i bpoll amháin agus na fataí móra i bpoll eile tar éis iad a phiocadh go haireach. Bíonn na puill seo déanta ag an bhfeilmeóir chéanna. Déanann sé poll a romhar agus an creafóg a caitheamh ar gachtaobh de. Caithtear na fataí isteach annseo agus ar dtús ‘sé na gas a cuirtear mar clúdach ortha, ach i gcionn tamaill baintear iad seo dóibh agus is tuighe a cuirtear ortha, agus taobh amuigh de sin cuirtear clúdach mhaith de chréafóig.
Ins an aimsear fadó dheineadh mná na háite seo stairs des na fataí. Ghéibhidís píosa stáin cruinn in-a mbíodh puill beaga agus scríobhfaidís na fataí ar seo go dtí go mbeidís in-a píosaí beaga. Annsin chuiridís na píosaí seo i gceirt agus bhrúghaidís an súgh amach. Dóirtidís braon beag uisge ar seo agus b’é sin an stairs.
Tugtar ‘‘Epicutes,’’ ‘‘Airan Victors,’’ ‘‘Kerr Pinks,’’ agus ‘‘Bhampions’’ ar na fataí a fhásanns sa gceantar seo. ‘Sé na ‘‘Kerr Pinks’’ is fearr a fhásas annseo. Fásann ‘‘Hibernians’’ go maith freisin.
Is minic a déantar arán de fataí san áit seo. Bruithtear na fataí ar dtús annsin cuirtear isteach i losad iad. Brúghann an bean-a-tighe iad le rollaer annsin go dtí go mbíonn sé in-a phúdar. Measctar é annsin le h-uisge, agus cuimiltear píosa íme isteach leis. Taréis é a fhuineadh go maith cuirtear an cáca in eidhean le bácadh. Ní chuirtear aon chlár ar an eidhean leis an gcáca seo a bhácáil.
San aimsear fadó deintí arán de fataí dubha agus bhíodh sé go blasta. Scríobhaidís na fataí ar rud a dtugtar ‘‘grater’’ agus measctar le plúr iad. Dheinidís na cácaí seo do bhácáil ar
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:04
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Nuair bhíos na gais ag borradh os cionn talmhan cuireann an feilmeóir cuid mhaith aoiligh amach ortha, agus déanann sé é do sgaradh ar na driollaí. Fágtar annsin é le h-aghaidh roinnt lá agus annsin dúntar na driollaí lé cheacht. Seo mar a déantar é:-
Ceannuightear leasú agus bheirtear mala de chuig an ngort. Tosuigheann fear ag crathadh ar na driollaí an leasú seo, agus tagann fear eile in a dhiaidh; agus a chapall gabhtha fé’n gcéacht aige chin na driollaí a dhúnadh. Tar éis críoch a cur leis an obair seo déantar na driollaí a leagadh le cairt.
I rith an t-Samhraidh fásann na gais suas go glas, agus ó ám go hám déantar fiadháile a ghlanadh asta ionnus go rachadh an t-aer isteach. I mí an Iúil déantar na fataí a spréidheamh sa gcaoi seo. Ceannuightear trí nó céithre púnt de cloich-ghuirm, agus measctar le an méid céadna sóid ngeacáin agus uisce é. Bíonn inneall ag cuid des na feilmeóiríbh leis an spréidheamh a dhéanamh, ach is le sguab fhraoich a dhéanann an cuid is mó díobh an obair. Líontar buicéad leis an spréidh, agus sáithtear an sguab fhraoich isteach ann. Craithtear an spréidh ar na gasaíbh annsin as an sguab fhraoich. Déanann an spréidh seo na fataí a choinneál slán ó’n ‘‘dubh’’.
I ndeire an fhóghmhair tosuightear ar na fataí a bhaint. Gabhann an feilmeóir a chapall fé’n gceacht agus trabhann sé na driollaí. Téigheann sé ar a ghlúnaíbh annsin agus tosuigheann sé ag crúbadh sa gcaoi seo:-
Géibheann sé píosa stáin agus cuireann sé lúb ur ionnus go mbíonn sé éasgaidh na fataí a iompuigh amach. Tagann na mná
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:02
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An Barra Fata
Déanann fataí a fhás ar ár bhfei gach bliadhain bíonn leath-acra faoi fataí againn, ach uaireanta bíonn ceathramhadh níos mó nó níos ceathramhadh níos lugha againn fútha.
Déanann m’úncal an talamh a dhíanamh rúdh in a gcóir. Ní chuirtear aon leasú ar an gcré sul a n-iompuightear suas é. Cuirtear na fataí i ndriollaí. Is le chéacht adhmaid a déantar iad ó cheann ceann an ghairdín. Bíonn iomar créafóige annsin ar gach taobh, agus líne in-a lár mar a gcuirtear na prátaí gearrtha, nó na sgiolláin mar a dtugtar ortha.
Úsáidtear láidhe leis na guirt beaga a dhéanamh réidh i gcóir ar bharra. Ceannuightear na láidhe seo i siopa. Ní déantar san gceanntar iad, ach uaireannta déanann an feilmeóir an faic agus an bróigín, agus géibheann sé an cuid eile sa siopa. Thosuightear ar na fataí a cur, i lár an Earraigh. Géibheann in-a sgiolláin iad le sgin ghéir. Ní mór súil a bheith ins gach sgiolláin aca ionnus go sgéithfeadh gas asta nuair a gcuirtear sa gcré iad. Fágtar i gcúinne iad go ceann roinnt lá agus annsin cuirtear iad. Is gnáthach leis an bhfeilmeóir meitheal a bhailiú leis na fataí a cur.
Cuireann na inná práisgíní ortha féin, agus líonann siad le sgiolláin iad. Fágann siad sgiolláin umchiall duch n-órlaí ó na chéile ionnus go mbíonn an spás a ndóiain aca cun sgéicheach amach, agus a fhás suas. Tagann na fir annsin le sluasaid, agus clúdaigheann siad na sgiolláin le chréafóig.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:02
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Moire. Shíl sí go bheadh saoghal breagh go dheo aice. ''Ach ní mar a síltear a bhítear''.
Do chuaidh an trúir mach iasgach tráthnóna amháin agus d'éirig stoirm agus bathadh an trúir. Níor chuaidh sí a codhladh an oidhche, sin ach tíos ar an gcadladh ag fhanacht leó, ac mo léan níor thángadar.
Bhí a fear marbh le blianta agus ní raibh faic san t-saoghal aice anois. Nuair a
eirigheadh sí ar maidin bíodh sí ag gol go dtéigheadh sí a codladh san oidhche.
Sa deireadh dúbhairt sí féin go raghadh sí go Cíllmaolcéidir mar bhí gaol ann aice. Cuaidh sí go Cíllmaolcéidir ach sar ar cuaidh sí go dtí an tigh cuaidh sí ag ól uisge agus thuit na deóra as a súile agus deineadh buileóga as na deóra.

'' Sin é mo sgcéal agus má tá bréag ann bíodh''.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 17:01
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graveyard. In later years there was a church built in Ballinamore. The people were drawing the stones from the old Church to the new one when they brought down Saint Bridgets head. It went back again every night. This was going on till they got a Catholic man to bring the head back and it did not go back again.
There is a Holy Well in the Parish of Ballinamore. In the townland of CLover Hill. It is in a field belonging to a man called James Darcy.
People visit it once a year. They go on the first of February. The prayers that are said. When you go in view of the Holy Well you start the rosary and you must say the full of your beads three times. When you go into the graveyard you say
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a holy well in this parish. It is situated in the townland of Clover Hill. The name of the man who has the field is James Darcy. People go there on a pilgrimage every year on the first of February. The rosary is said three times before you come in sight of the graveyard. Then you go around a tree in the graveyard three times and say three Our Fathers and three Hail Marys and three glory be to the fathers. Then you go around another tree and say the same again in the graveyard. When you have that done you go down to the well and bless yourself three times with the water. Then you go in to the graveyard again and say one Our Father and three Hail Marys and one glory be to father in honour of the souls who were buried there. IT is very lucky to bring some of the well water home.
There is a story told about Saint Bridgets head. Once upon a time there was a Catholic Church in Augeraugh the present
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:42
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diúltaithe
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An Old Graveyard
There is an old graveyard in Mr McGrath's farm Ballygarron. It's now part of a field for the ditches around it are broken down. It is on the right hand side of the road going into Waterford. There is a lot of round stones like rocks with crosses on them. There are names written in Ogham on some of them.
Kitty Quann,
Ballyshoneen,
Dunmore East,
Co Waterford.
Got from my uncle John O Regan
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:41
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diúltaithe
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Archaeological
57 Wake + Funeral Customs
Mevcean. 1.1938
This was told by Mrs. Wagner, Clogagh, Timoleague.
When people died long ago they used to bring them downstairs and lay them out in the kitchen on a settle or table. The people of the house supplied tobacco, beer, snuff, and cigarettes. They stayed up all night for two nights and tea was made at certain times during the night.
When they were taking the person to the graveyard they avoided passing as many churches as possible and they always went the old road.
A person never went alone to a wake house. If anything was borrowed for a wake the same person should return it.
This was told by Mrs. Nolan. Age 40 yrs.
Ballinascarthy.
Co.Cork.
It is unlucky to carry a coffin on a car or in a bier drawn by a breeding mare. Any accident at a funeral is considered a bad omen.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:40
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diúltaithe
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Tá tobar beag fior-uisge cluighduighthe le buileóga beaga. Tá sé le feiscint fós í gCillmaolcéidir. Tá sgéal mar gheall air an fáth go bhfuil na bhfuil na buileóga beaga ar barr an t-uisge.
Is minich a cloistear í sean bearsaí agus filiócht, Ó tig Moire go tigh Donnachadha Diágh. Do bhí tIgh Moire ínDún Caoin láimh le Daingean Úí Cúge. Bhí sí ‘na cómhniudhe go searbhach dí fhéin gan cíos na cathú uirthe.
Bhí trúir mach aice agus théigfhidís ag iasgach
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:39
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People had local cures for ailments formerly.
There is a cute for the pain in the back.
There is a well at Lasser, in Kilronan, there is a stone flag on four pillars about two feet high, and the people to be cured have to go under it three times for the cure pain in the back.
The cure for the chin cough is ferrets leavings.
The people bring milk to the ferret to drink and take it away before he has it all drunk.
Another cure for the chin cough is to go under an ass foal that nobody rode on.
The family of the seven sons that have no sister in between and the seventh son of the family has the power to cure the ring worm.
The cure of the nettle is, dochen juice.
The cure of the mumps, is, to cross a river three times.
The cure of the jaundice is, the wood of a certain tree boiled in milk (thats the cure of the jaundice)
The cure for the strain foot is, to wash the foot in potato water.
The cure of the sty in the eye is, to pick ten thorns off the gooseberry bush, and throw away one, and point nine to the sky and throw them away. the people who have the sty must point them nine times.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:23
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Many cures of a more or less novel description have been in use for a very considerable time in this district and one of these was a cure for mumps. To cure this complaint it was customary for the person suffering from this disease to have an ass’s halter put around his (her) head or neck and to be led by another individual three times across a south running stream. It was usual also to place the ass across the stream and then pass the patient under the animals’ belly, three times, but I don’t think this last part of the cure was always put in practice.
 To cure bhim cough it is still the practice in this locality for someone of the house usually one of the children's parents to go to the house of some married couple in the neighborhood whose couple, were of the same surname before marriage and ask an alms for god’s sake. The person so asked would make up a little parcel containing some tea and sugar or perhaps a hard boiled egg and some bread and milk. These things were then brought home by the child’s parents and given by them (the parents) to the child or children of the family affected by this children’s disease. 
Of cure for toothache, very common in this district is for the person suffering from this complaint to give up for life some custom usually such a one as shaving on sunday morning or the polishing of boots on sunday morning. Have known persons practicing a simple cure of this kind, to obtain complete relief from the complaint for the portion of their lifetime subsequent to the commencement of practice of the cure. Another cure for the toothache, which I may also mention, but which is not in such general practice is applied in this way. The person on occasion of the first funeral watches his opportunity until and old shull entertaining teeth is turned up, when if the sufferer pulls a tooth out of the shull with his teeth he is expected to obtain complete relief  from the complaint thereafter. 
Certain persons in this district have what is known as th
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:20
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One day there was a very old witch sitting outside her door minding three pots of porridge which she was cooling. After some time she went in for a plate to get some porridge to eat. While she was inside a little dog came up and eat up all the porridge.
When the witch came out the three pots were dry and she noticed the little dog running away across the field. She went in for her wand and ran after the dog over hedges and ditches until the dog came to a river and was not able to cross it. The witch got up to the dog and turned it into a stone.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:16
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
He received the information from - Mrs McArdle
Wood Hill
Dunleer
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:12
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
When the marriage is over the two come out of the church and their neighbors through "confetty" on them to show gladness and friendship. They then go home in the car, and before they enter a bottle of wine is broken on the door step. When the breakfast is over, the pair go for a drive around the country, and if they rich they go on their honeymoon to some foreign country.
Recieved From
Kevin McArdle
Wood Hill,
Dunleer
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:11
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This story was told by Bartle Mallon Aughnahee.
There was a man named Brady that lived beside Gallon Corra. One morning he went out and there was a mare and a foal feeding on a field. He brought home the foal and reared it. When it was full-grown he trained. He worked it for some years. One day he was giving it a drink and it went into the lake and neither the man or the horse were ever saw again
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:09
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customs mostly at weddings.
Some of those customs are as follows.
When an engagement is about to be made. The man goes to the house of girl and brings with a bottle of whiskey. He then sets the father drunk, and when the engagement is made, the marriage is all that has then to be performed.
About one week later the marriage takes place. The two people then come to the church in a motor car with a boot hanging out of it for good luck. The marriage then takes place.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:05
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usually invite some neighbors, and they dance and sing until morn. If the people are rich they go on their honeymoon.
Received From
Dermot Brown
Ardee Road,
Dunleer.
He received the information from- Mrs Brown
Ardee Rd,
Dunleer.
Marriage Customs
There are still many old customs left which the people exercise at certain times. One of those customs are still used at weddings, and wakes, but they those
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 16:00
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago people had queer customs at marriages. I never heard tell of many of them marriages do not take place in Advent or Lent.
The man that is going to married comes to the chapel with the best man. The marriage is performed by the parish priest.
Presents are given to show gladness and friendship by their friends.
Some other customs they have is to tie a boot on the back of the car for good luck. When the marriage is performed, they do go to the house and break a bottle of wine on the door step. They
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 15:47
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The weather guide
(1) If the wind is coming from Virginia it brings rain.
(2) When you heat the bell of the Ballywillen train ringing you are going to have rain.
(3) When you see a blue blaze in the fire you are going to have rain.
(4) When the swallows fly low you are going to have rain.
(5)When the midges are biting you you are going to have rain.
(6) When the rooks fly high there is going to be a storm.
(7) When the smoke goes up straight there is going to be good weather.
(8) If the smoke goes back down there is going to be rain.
(9) When the soot falls down there is going to be rain
(10) If the sun goes down red in winter there is going to be frost.
(11) If there are streamers from the
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 15:33
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remains another night and next day the funeral takes place to the family burial ground.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 15:30
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Attendance at wakes is an old and honoured custom in Ireland. When a person dies people of the locality visit the relatives of the dead. There they pray for the soul of the departed and spend long hours sitting round the room, where the dead person lies, consoling the relatives, chatting in low tones with one another. At night the men of the place come and the Rosary is recited as usual, and pipes of tobacco are handed round. Refreshments are also provided, whiskey and wine for the men and tea and eatables for the women.
The corpse is left a night or two in the house and is then transferred to the church, where it
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 15:24
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and onions. all these she mixes together and she also puts a little water in, in oder to make the blood plentiful. first she puts a pot of water on to boil.
then she begins to fill the puddings with somebody holding them. she always ties the ends of the puddings with twine. she uses a small jug for filling them. she only fills half because if she filled them to the top they would burst when boiling.
she puts one or two on to boil first. when she considers them boiled enough she takes them is sufficient lard in it, if not she cuts some more lard for the others and adds it to the mixture.
then she begins to make the next, and when she considers she has enough made she outs them on to boil. when boiled she takes them up into a large basin to cool. this is the method my mother has for making pigs' puddings.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 15:12
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
really believed that the fairies existed. However she did something one day which was supposed to have annoyed the fairies or little people as she herself called them. When she was walking around her house one day she fell and hurt her leg. Her sister sent for the doctor, but when the doctor came the woman told him to go away about his business. She said if they brought her back to the spot where she fell, and put a handful of mud into her mouth she would be cured.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 15:07
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Pigs Pudding
when we kill a pig my mother always make pigs puddings out of the blood. when killing the pig my mother holds a basin for the blood which is the principal ingredient for making the puddings. this she stirs and stirs with a stick and often times bruises the lumps of. blood which thicken owing to frost or so. while stirring it she puts an odd 'fist' of salt into it, in order to preserve the blood from thickening too much.
Next she cleans the puddings by rinsing them first. Then she turns them inside out and cleans the dirt off them. Finally she washes them again, and then she leaves them aside in a basin of salted water until the following day.
early next day she sets to work. First of all she cuts some lard off the pig. this she cuts into very small pieces. these she puts into the basin of blood as well as other ingredients, such as, pepper, all spice, cinnamon, cloves,
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 15:06
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If a person gets the blood of a true Cahill and puts it on with the whisker of a black cat it will cure St Anthony's fire.
If salt is spilt, the person who spilt the salt will have bad luck for seven years.
One magpie for sorrow, two for joy, three for a wedding, four for a birth, five for silver, six for gold, seven for wealth all untold.
A woman in the parish of Mullinahone
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 14:43
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
It is believed that if a person wants to get rid of warts he should put as many little stones as he has warts into a bag and drop the bag on the road. The person who picks up the bag will get all the warts.
A blacksmith was supposed to be able to cure warts by making the person who had the warts put his or her fingers on the warts. The blacksmith would then take off his hat and say some words and the warts would disappear.
The cure for a backache is to creep under a briar with the tip and the root growing from the ground.
If a child has measles and it is passed three times under an asses stomach it will get alright.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 14:37
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The Hare and the Woman.
Long ago a witch used be seen around this district. She used to milk the cows on some people and when anyone would come she would change herself into a white hare. One day as she was milking a cow a man and a few dogs came along. She changed herself into the white hare and the dogs hunted her. They hunted her a long way and could not catch her. One dog only bit her in the thigh and cut her. She got away again and ran on until she came to her house. She ran in and went to bed. The man and dogs ran in but they could not find her. In the finish the man looked into the bed and saw an old woman. She was all covered with blood and the man guessed it was the hare that was after changing into a woman.
Kitty Quann,
Ballyshoneen.
Dunmore East,
Co Waterford.
Got from my father.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 14:35
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A man in Southlodge named Samuel Cooney is supposed to be able to stop bleeding from the nose, or a wound, by taking off his cap when entering the house.
Machine oil is supposed to cure a bad cut or a wound in a day or two.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 14:32
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"Continued"
mornings in succession and each morning points one of them at the sty and then throws it away, the tenth morning the sty is supposed to be better. A black snail is very good for warts if you happen to find one, but you must not look for one or it will not do any good.
You must rub the snail on your wart and then stick it on a thorn bush where it must left. Another way for curing warts is every morning when you wake up (...) on the wart until it is better. There is also a way which some people believe can cure warts. It is if one gets a friend to count his warts and then they are supposed to leave his hand go on the person's hand who counted his warts.
There is yet another way for curing warts. This is by a weed called
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 14:11
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As i love my Jesus- my Jesus loves me my soul and my body I resign unto thee
our blessed lord nailed to a tree
our blessed mother standing by with a heavy heart and a dismal cry
Spear spear from the hand of Uan that speared our saviour through the heart!
who says this prayer 3 times a night three times a day
shall never enter Death though the gates of hell.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 13:54
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Riddles
17-11-1937
1.
In yonder meadow there is a table,
On yonder table there is a cup,
And in that cup there is a sup,
That every man must taste.
- Death
2.
What goes in and out on the gap, and leaves a bit after it?
-A needle and thread.
3.
How many feet has forty sheep a shepherd and his dog.
-Two
4.Riddle me riddle me ranty o,
my father gave me seed to sow.
The seed was black and the ground was white,
Riddle me that and I will give you my pipe.
-Writing on white paper.
5.
As round as an apple as flat as a pan,
One side a woman
and the other a man.
-A penny
Riddle me riddleme ranty
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 13:53
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After that he never had any luck and all his horses and cattle died. In the middle of this fort there is a round hole and some people say that there are passages under the fort and from that hole there is a passage running down to the other passages. Nobody ever tried to go down into this hole because they were afraid that they would be kept below by the fairies. It is said that there are underground ways which lead to another fort outside our district. No grass grows in the space in the middle of the fort. Whenever the fairies were kicking football near the fort they were entertained there. There is another fort in the townsland of Rathard. It is called a Rath. It is round and it contains about a half acre of land. It is built on a big hill. There is a big ditch around the Rath which is covered over with ferns and briars. Inside this ditch there is a big trench which is always full of water. There is only bridge which spans the trench. There are also a great many paths winding around it. There are some white-thorn bushes growing in it. One could not touch these bushes because there are thorns an inch long in them. A certain man cut some of these bushes and he never had the use of his right hand again.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 13:51
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the number of people in the district now.
Such was the life of the people of my district during the famine period.
Ellie Nolan,
Killedan,
Kiltimagh
Got from,
John Nolan,
Killedan
Kiltimagh
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 13:50
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people had nothing to eat, and the consequence was that disease accompanied starvation and people died in hundreds all over the district.
Some of the people emigrated to America. Some of the people who were left behind after vainly endeavouring to sustain life by every means in their power, even to the boiling and eating of nettles and dock leaves died.
After a time sulphate of copper was discovered and when mixed with lime and washing-soda made spray, and this the people put on the potatoes, and then the district became prosperous again, but there is only half
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 13:48
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My district during famine times.
In the varied history of our beloved country where there is scarcely a darker period than that of black 47 and [?].
The district of Killedan was very prosperous in every thing, especially potatoes, but after the famine there was not much prosperity in the district.
The famine was caused by the complete failure of the potato crop in that year. The vast majority of the people had come to relu on the potato crop as their chief subsistence. When the potato crip failed in my district [?]
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 13:43
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
there are briar bushes, and in the harvest-time the children go to the corn-field and help in the saving of the corn. They do not forger to treat themselves to the big, soft, rich juicy fruit.
Bridgie Kelly,
Banbrack,
Hiltimagh.
Got from;
Mrs Margaret Kelly,
Banbrack,
Kiltimagh
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 13:41
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
extent of land as level as a plain.
Another bears the name of "[?]" because it icnocán ruaos a field situated at the edge of a river and on this account it is soft and marshy. It is never cultivated.
Another is named Cnocán Ruao because in the centre of it there is a hillock. On the side of this hillock heather grows. It is a pleasing sight in Summer-time to see the hill covered with a red mantle.
We call another [?] [?] because it is boggy land but still it grows good crops. Along the edge
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 13:37
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There is a fort situated about a half-mile from my house. It is on the lands of Mr. Halloran in the townsland of Chamberlainstown. It is a round fort and it covers about a half-acre of land. There are two big ditches surrounding it. One of these ditches is higher than the other. Both of them are covered with white-thorn and furze and trees. Between these two ditches there is a channel which used to be full of water when the fort was inhabited. These bushes and ditches were built to keep out enemies. It is believed by some people that the fairies live in this fort since the time that the Milesians defeated the Tuatha De Danann. The Tuatha De Danann changed themselves into fairies and went to live in the forts all over Ireland. Some people say that it is unlucky to cut white-thorn or furze in a fort and if you did cut them the fairies would curse you and something would happen to you. There was a man one time who lived near this fort and he would not believe that the fairies would curse him if he cut the bushes so he went to the fort and cut down some of the white-thorn
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 13:34
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Field Names.
Practically all the fields in my father's farm have each an Irish name. The following are some of them: Páirc Úr, Garroa Úr, Mácaire [?], Cnocán Ruao agus Sraivne [?].
One was called "Páirc Úr" because it is a new field and has not been tilled for many years.
Another received "Garróa Úr" because the soil in it was poor. Gravel and lime were put on it , and it is now very rich and yields fruitful crops.
Another is called "Mácaire" because it is a large level
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 13:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago there was supposed to be a leipreachan living in Annagh, a district which adjoins my district. He was dressed in a bright blue jacket and a red cap and he wore wooden shoes. An old woman, who was selling apples, and who dwell in the locality, saw him and she ran with fear, because she thought it was ghost. She related the strange adventure to the neighbours and they told her it was a
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 12:54
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
saw a man dressed in white clothes. He seemed to be counting the gold. They also saw a great amount of gold around him. The two men became terrified and ran away for their lives. They went home and told some neighbours that they had seen the ghost of the Dane who was supposed to be guarding the money in the fort. It is said that the two men only lived a few days after and that both died suddenly. Since then no attempt has been made to dig up the gold.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 12:53
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
enters Lough Key. About a month later four soldiers were drowned in the part of the river locally known as "John's hole". They went out bathing and when they were a few minutes in the water they got into difficulties and sank almost immediately.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 12:49
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a big fort in the middle of a field near the village of Rosegreen, County Tipperary. It is said that in this fort gold is hidden. It was supposed to be hidden about the time the Danes were plundering in this country. A Danish warrior was one day crossing the field in which the fort is and when he went into the fort he was struck dead. Two men who saw him fall went over to him and found that he was carrying a great load of gold. They dug a hole in the fort and buried the gold and they also buried the Danish warrior near it. Several people dug for this gold afterwards but they could not find the spot in which it was hidden. One night two men went to dig for it. They dug a great hole down very deep in the ground until they came to a huge flat rock. They came several nights trying to dig up the rock. At last they succeeded in removing the rock. They then looked down into the hole which the rock had covered and below in it they
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 12:36
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The night of the great Wind.
There never was a night or one that's kept in mind.
like the night of January the 6th in eighteen thirty nine
The Kerry cows you know are small.
Went soaring through the air.
A funny sight it must have been.
To see them land in Clare.
It blew the peaks of Cuddy's reeks and leaped across the moor.
The people thought they all were killed
The way the wind did roar.
II
A Family of the Burkes who lived near Scibbereen
Were blown from Cork to Kerry.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 12:12
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
May day customs
There are a great many customs connected with May Day. Some of the customs are religious and some of them are superstitious placed on May Day the children of Mary place flowers on her altar and the flowers are called may flowers. The people shake holy water on the cows on that day and it is said it increases their milk. The people do not let fire out of the house on May Day. If a man comes in to light his pipe he is made smoke it inside. If a person gets up early on May Day he should not kindle a fire unless he sees smoke out of the priest's house. On May morning the man of the house goes to the nearest stream separating his land from his neighbour's and he takes a [?] of water home with him, and he also picks a branch off the whitethorn tree. The water is left in a safe place and the branch is hung on the [?] and it is left there until the following year. People do not give away milk on
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 12:12
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The burrow of Tramore is said to be the residence of an enchanted gentleman called The Garanoogah. Generally before a storm he rides out across the strand on a white horse. There is a small island where a coastguard used to live long ago near the burrow.
My great-grandfather had a grey mare that used to graze on this island. One evening he went to fetch home the mare. He did not bring a bridle or anything as he knew she was old and quiet. He got on her back and away she went as fast as the wind across the strand and around the burrow and brought him back to the same spot again and then disappeared.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 11:36
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relatives, and if the ghost speaks to him he should not answer, because the ghost would have some kind of a "hold" on him then.
27. If a cow has two calves - two of the same kind is a pure sign of bad luck; if of different kinds, good luck.
28. A person who breaks a mirror or a salt-cellar will have 7 years' bad luck.
29. A person would not make a "short cut" when coming from a wake.
30. A person who cuts a tree (an "elder" I think) on a "meaning" fence will die soon.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 11:33
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22. If a grave runs along the side of a wall, the clay when the grave is opened is to be put on the land-hand side from the foot.
23. When a "dead" bell is heard in the left ear, a man is dead, if in the right, a woman.
24. If a weasel runs across the road before a person, he should turn home. But if he comes out of his burrow and runs on in the direction you are going, you will have good luck.
25. A person never goes to a fair on the 1st Monday of the New Year.
26. If a person meets a ghost whom he believes to be ones of his own
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 11:31
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17. A person should not make a "short cut" going to a funeral, nor should a corpse be brought by a "short cut" to the church or graveyard.
18. A person who gets money from a priest wouldn't buy or sell with it, but pay bills with it.
19. People who sew on Sunday will have to "rip" it with their noses on the Last Day.
20. If a person had to dig a grave on a Monday he would dig a few "preabs" of it on Sunday.
21. A person would not dig clay before sunrise.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 11:28
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12. When a coal falls a stranger is coming. If a drop of water be poured on it he won't come.
13. On St. Martin's Day a cock is killed and there are crosses made with the blood on each door of dwelling house and outhouses.
14. On St. Brigid's Day crosses of straw are made and put inside on roof of kitchen.
15. When people buy at a fair they usually keep the "luck money" till they sell at another fair.
16. People do not put on addition to the west gable of a house.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 11:26
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over her back three times. Some of the milk is then milked on to the coal to extinguish it.
7. At night before going to bed, a little bread and milk is left for the fairies or "good people".
8. When a person sees a thing or a baby for the first time he says "God bless it", in case he might make a "bad eye" of it.
9. Split a heifer's ear when calved.
10. Turn home if you meet a red-haired woman on a grey horse.
11. Do not carry iron on your shoulder in-doors.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 11:23
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1. Milk is given away on May Day.
2. Milk is not given away after a cow calves, till a churning is made.
3. A person is not to bring a lighted coal in his pipe out of a house when a churning is made.
4. If some food falls from a person when he is eating, he does not take it up as "Someone wants it", he says, - meaning the "good people".
5. When a person has finished milk-ing he makes a the Sign of the Cross with milk on the cow's lip.
6. When a cow calves, a red rag is tied to her tail, and a live coal is passed
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 11:23
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the well. There is hardly any trace of it left at present. It was along that the old people went to the well. There is a stream running from the well. It runs out under the road and off through the fields to Ballycullinan lake. Eels are often seen in this stream, and are sometimes seen in the well. There is a golden eel supposed to be in it too but it is very seldom he is seen. Patrick Mc Guane Scumhall Corofin.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 11:17
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from sunset in the evening to sunrise the next morning. then when the sun rises to wash the eyes with water from the well. Doing these things was called "doing the [?]". There was an old woman one time called Mrs Mac Mahon and she had one son John. When John was about six years of age a scum came on his eyes. The mother did not know what to do until she heard of this well. Then she made up her mind to come to it. They stayed there all night until the sun was rising in the morning. Then when the boy's eyes were washed with the water the scum disappeared. Many years ago there was a different [?] to the well to what there is now. It began at the chapel gate and continued on for a couple of hundred yards through a field which is near the well until it reached
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 11:14
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1. No one gives out milk till the first churning is made after a cow calves.
2.When people make a churn', they make the Sign of the Cross with the churn-dash over the churn when they have finished it.
3.People put the Sign of the Cross on the cow's back when they have finished milking.
4. A coal is put under the churn before churning begins.
5. Nobody gives away milk on May Day.
6. Nobody gives anything out of
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 11:03
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The Blessed well
In nearly every distrcit in Ireland a Blessed well can be found. Many of them are said to have cures for certain diseases. There is one of these wells about six hundred yards from the school. The name of it is Tobar Orleacht. It is not known how it got the name.It is formed by three times tone rocks which form a kind of basin into which it runs. It rises from under another limestone rock. Overhead it is a large whitethorn bush. This is supposed to have been sown there by some saint whose name is not known. It forms a shade for the well on hot days. It is belived that there is a cure for sore eyes in the water of the well. To obtain the cure a person has to say the Rosary at the eastern side of the well and at at the western side of it, and keep (doing it) saying it
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 10:45
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a doll dressed in white in honour of Saint Bridget and ask for money.
I got this from Annie Daly,
Mrs Higgins, Galway Rd.,
Galway Rd. Tuam.
Tuam.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 03:40
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níd amac léi mar tuit le n-a deirbfiúr agus do deinead cearc dí mar an gceadna agus cuiread isteac i seomra na fola í i dteannta a deirbféar.
Cúpla lá 'na diad sin bí an tsiomad deirbfiúr ag tabairt bíd do na cearceaib nuair táinig an coileac beag le h-agaid an sgeul do giorrugad tuit gac níd amac léi mar tuit le na beirt deirbféar go dtí go raib sí ag dul isteac sa seomra úd. Ní deacaid an beirt eile níos sia ná an doras óir do scannruig an fuin agus na cnáma iad; act cuaid sí seo isteac go dána agus connaic sí an dá circ istig agus fuair sí an slaitín draoideacta agus boidéal ola. Buail sí dá buille de'n t-slaitín draoideacta ar an dá circ agus do deineas beirt cailín óg díob agus d'aitin sí a beirt deirbféar annsan. Do buail sí dá buille eile orta agus do deinead dá circ díob arís. Tar éis sin do nig sí a cosa leis an ola agus do glanad an duil díob láitreac agus d'imig sí síos agus cuir sí an glas ar an ndoras 'na 'diad. Deirtear gur fág sí an buidéal agus an slaitín draoideacta san áit a fuair sí iad.
Nuair táinig an fear abaile um trátnóna d'fiafruig sé dí an ndeacaid sí isteac sa seomra agus dubairt sé nac ndeacaid sí isteac agus taisbeán sí a cosa do. Nuair nac b'faca sé aon fuil orta ba dóig leis go raib sí ag innsint na fírinne do agus níor dein sé
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 03:29
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mbosca an uair seo agus cuir sí an t-ór síos uirti. Nuair abí an coileac imtigte leis an mbosca cuaid sí suas agus d’aimsig sí an slaitín draoideacta agus d’imig sí amac agus do lean sí an coileac agus do coimeád sí radarc air icomnuide agus táinig sí suas leis nuair a bí sé ag caiteam an bosca tríd an doras. Nuair a bí sé sin déanta aige tarraing sí amac an slaitín draoideacta agus buail sé buille de as an gcoileac agus dein sí coileac coitceann mar aon coileac d’é. Tá sé ag imteact ó son ar fud na coille agus ní feidir leis duine do déanain de féin níos mó.
Cuaid sí isteac annsan agus do mian sí féin agus a mátair agus a birt deirbfeár ar fead mórán bliadiain ‘na diad sin agus níor táinig tuillead trioblóid orta go dtí lá a mbás.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 03:29
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sé aon níd uirti. Cúpla lá ‘na diad sin dubairt sí leis an b’fear go raib a mátair ag fágail báis leis an ocras, agus gur mian léi rud éigin a cur cúici. Dubairt sé léi dul síos go dtí an áit ‘na raib an t-ór go léir agus go b’fagad sí bosca mór ann (‘na raib an t-ór go léir) agus an méid ba mait léi féin do cur sa mbosca agus go b’fanfad sé go dtí tac a mátar an bosca. Cuaid an bean suas go stí an seomra ‘na raib a beirt deirbfeár ‘na ndá circ agus d’aimsig sí an slaitín draoideacta agus buail síbuille leis an gcead circ agus d’éirig a cead deirbfiúr ‘na crut féin. Annsan tug sí a deirbfiúr léi go stí an áit ‘na raib an t-ór agus cuir sí isteac sa mbosca í agus cuir sí ór síos uirti go raib sí cluduigte leis an ór. Annsan do dein sí poll beag sa mbosca ionnus nac múcfad a deirbfiúr agus go bféadfad sí a h-anál do tarraingt. Annsan d’imig sí agus dubairt sí le na fear go raib an bosca lán aici. Dein sé sin coileac de féin agus cuaid sé síos agus gur tóg sé an bosca ar a earballagur cuaid sé go stí teac mátar a mná agus cait sé an bosca isteac tríd an doras. Annsan d’fill sé tar n-ais arís go dtí a bean. Tamall eile ‘na diad sín dubairt a bean leis gur mian léi rud éigin a cur cun a mátair le h-agaid an sgéal a giorrugad cuir sí a dara deirbfiúr i
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 03:26
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fuil. Dun sí an doras arís agus sgannrad mór uirti agus cuaid sí síos. Nuair do connaic sí an fuil abí ar a cos tosnuig sí ar í nigead agus í nigead agus í nigead ac níor bain aon blúire den fuil den cos agus ní bainfead dá mbeidead sí gá nigead osconn nuair a táinig an fear abaile um tratnóna do cur sí a cosa i bfolac fé’n a gúna ionnus na feicfead sé an fuil (agus nac naitneofad sé go) agus nác n-aineoiad sé go n-deacaid sí isteac insan seomra. ‘Sé dubairt sé sin “ar deinis mar a dubair mé leat?” “Deineas” ar sise. “A n-deacaid tú isteac sa seomra úd?” ars eisean. “Ní deacaid mé” ar sise. “Más rud é nac deacaid tú”, ar seiseann, “ní misde duit do cosa taisbeánt dom”. B’éigean dí na cosa taisbeáinn agus nuair connaic sé an fuil bí fios aige gur bréag abí sí ag innsint dí agus cuaid sé insteac sa seomra ‘na raib an fuil agus tug sé slaitín draoideacta amac leis. Buail sé leis an skutín í dein sé cearc dí agus cuir sé isteac í seomra an fola í agus do dún sé an dorus uirte.
Cúpa lá ‘na diad sin bí an dara deirfiúr do ingeanaib na baintreabaige ag tabairt bíd do na cearcaib arís nuair táinig an coileac beag arís le h-agaid an sgeal do giorrugad do tuit gac
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 03:26
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fear óg breag uasal isteac agus dubairt léi “is mise an coileac ud do leanas in [dui] agus bím an coileac sa lá agus im fear san oidec. Ma’s mait leat mé, ba miain liom uí pósad,” dubairt sí go bposfad sí é agus do posadar a céile annsin agus do cuadar ‘na gcodlad. Ar maidin ta’r na mónac sul deirg an grian, taisbeán sé dá [insar?] a cuid óir go léir agus tar éis sin dubairt sé léi féacaint na tímceall agus in ionad an botáinín ‘sé connaic sí palás breág álainn. Annsan tug sé eocair gac seomra ins an bpálás di aci act bí aon tseomra amáin agus do [?] sé í ar dul isteac ann in aon-ar agus dreidead sí isteac ann dubairt sé go mba di ba measa. Tug sé eocar an tseomra seo di I steannta na n-eocracab eile. Dein sé coileac de féin tar a éis sin agus dimig sé amac luaid an bean a fud an tige agus cuaid sí isteac ins gac seomra dá raib ann go dtí go dtáinig sí go dtí an seomra speisíolta úd. Stad sí ar fead tamaill agus mactnam léi féin agus mo léan guirt d’oscail sí an dorus faoi deiread agus cuir sí cos isteac iar táinsig. D’feac sí isteac agus ní raib le feiscint aici act fuil agus cnáma bí an t-úrlár lán d’fuil agus bí a cois foluigtí le
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 03:18
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Do bí beantreabac boct ann fadó agus bí triur ingean aici. Bí an mná ba sine acu ag tabairt bíd do na cearcaib sa srád nuair tánag coileac beag agus (d’innis sí) agus tosnuig sé ag iread an bís ar na cearcaib. Cuaid an ingean isteach agus d’innis sí an sgéal d’á mátair agus d’fiafruig sí dí cad do déanac sí. ‘Se dubairt an mátair léi (imreact?) agus breis ar an gcoileac agus é tabairt isteac go manbóeaidís agus go n-iosaidís dóib féin é. D’imig an ingean amac agus tug sí iarract faoin gcoileac aci má tug d’imig an collicín uaia agus do lean sí é agus do bí sí fá leanmaint riam agus cóidec go dtí go n-deacadar araon isteac I gcoill a bhí cóngarac don áit. Ní fada bíodar ag rit tríd an gcoill nuair d‘imig an coileac as radarc an cailín agus b’éigean di stad. Nuair d’féac sí ‘na timieall ní raib le feiscint aici act crainn agus crainn agus síor crainn agus bí aon [b’oiámnín?] amáin I ngar di. Bí tuirse uirti tar éis a reacta in diad an coiléin, agus cuaid sí faoi déin an botáinín agus cuaid sí isteac. Ní raib aoinne istig roimpe agus do cuir a codlad uirti. Nuair a dúisig sí bí an oidce cuirte. Táinig an
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 01:01
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Long ago people used cure nosebleeds by tying string on the little finger, and the bleeding would stop in a few moments.
A disease called the ague is cured by swallowing a frog. A very common disease among children is the dirty mouth, and any child born after its father’s death has the cure of it.
If there is a worm put in the hand of a seventh son after birth and squeesed to death, this boy will have the cure of a disease called the running worm, when he grows up.
To cure a sty on a person’s eye one used get nine thorns of a gooseberry bush, and the person with the sty used bless himself with each thorn and throw the ninth one away, and the next morning to bless with himself with each thorn and throw the eight one away, and so on for nine mornings till all the thorns would be gone, and by this time the sty would be cured. If a man with warts on his hand unexpectedly finds a hole in a stone with water in it, and dips his hand in it three times, in the name of the “Father,” “Son,” and “Holy Ghost,” the warts will be cured in a very short time.
Another cure for warts is to put a fasting spit on them in the name of the “Father Son” and “Holy Ghost” for nine successive mornings.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 00:14
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The juice of carrots boiled is admirable for purifying the blood.
A bunch of mint tied around the wrist is a sure remedy for disorder of the stomach.
Nettles gathered in a church yard and boiled down for a drink was said to cure dropsy.
Any corn ring worn on the fourth finger was said to keep away rheumatism.
Written by Sheila Murray James St.
Obtained from Ellis Byrne Millmount
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 00:11
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Bheadh bean ar lic an dorais agus nuair a tiocfadh an cáilín tar éis pósta briseadh an bean an cáca bainfheise ar a ceann. Fataí, cabáiste and bagún a bheadh acu ar an bainfheis.
Fadó posádh siad gach lá ach lá na leanbh. Ba cheart trí rudai a fagháil ar iasacht an lá sin. Seo iad: leath-chróinn stól-trí-gcos agus naipicín pócha.
Ní bheadh sé ceart capall bán a beith ag an bainféis. Is ceart cruiscín, cupán, ná rud eicínt a bhriseadh an lá sin.
Ní ceart dul ar bainféis gan cuireadh dhá lá agus ní ceart de’n piobaire dul ann gan cuireadh lá a fágháil. Ní phósadh na dhaoine ar an lá a mbeadh an grian ag soillseadh.
Padhraig O Coincheanainn a sgríobh.
Micheál Ó Coinceanainn a d’innis.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 00:09
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In Slane there is a famous holy well one which St. Patrick was very much connected with. Every year a pilgrimage goes there to honour St. Patrick and bring home some water which is said to have healing powers. One year there was in the pilgrimage a woman who could not leave the bed. She begged her friends to get her some of the water. Her friends forgot to bring it to her so they obtained some water from a near well and gave it to her. She drank it and got better because she though she had the true water.
Written by Sheila Murray James St. Drogheda
Obtained from (60) Madge Bates Marsh Rd. Drogheda
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 00:09
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Na Sean Pósaithe
Dá mbeadh fear ag dul a pósadh d’innseóchadh sé dhá cara cailín eicínt a fágháil dhó. Gheobhádh sé buidheal “fuisgigh”. Annsin tuibhrodh sé dá cara é. Rachadh an cara agus fear eile go dtí an teach a mbeadh an cailín ag fanacht. Bheadh an fear agus athair an chailín ag cainnt ar an sórt áit a bhí ag an fear a bheadh ag dul a pósadh. Dá mbeadh athair an cailín sásta leis an méid talamh agus stuic a bhí aige pósadh an bheirt acu annsin. Nuair a bheadh siad ag dul a pósadh fadó capaill a bhíodh acu ag an bainfheis. Nuair a bheadh siad ag teacht abhaile bhíodh rás acu leis na capaill agus an duine ba thúisge a sroiceadh an teach ba ag an fear sin a bheadh an capall a b’fearr. Nuair a bhíodh siad ag teacht abaile is abhaile, leis an gréin a thagaidís. Nuair a bheadh an lánamhain ag teacht abhaile lasfadh na daoine punainn tuighe in onóir dóibh.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-18 00:02
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About ninty years ago Lukey Conlon tried to stop the people from going to this well. “He said he wanted all the field for his cattle.” In a year afterwards all his cattle died and he was trusting to a goat for milk. Since then the path is there and nobody ever tried to stop the people from getting water from the well. Marty Duff Termonfeckin, Drogheda. Material collected from Mrs. Duff, Termonfeckin, Drogheda, Co. Louth.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 23:58
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Once upon a time there was a blind lady called Connelly living in Termonfeckin. This lady visited this well twice on Trinity Sunday Cove at mid night and washed her eyes with the water. Third time she went to the well and knelt down on the the stone and said her Rosary.
When she finished she got up and when her hand tiped the water she was cured from her blindness.
St. Feckin Blessed this well. Each person who visits the well on Trinity Sunday (Cove) and drinks three cups of the water and say “In the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost Amen”
In this well there is a golden fish. This fish is seen every Trinity Saturday night when the men are cleaning out the well. There is a thorn bush growing next this well.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 23:52
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There are two holy Wells in this district named Trinity Well and the PanWells. Trinity Well is situated in Trinity Field on the left hand side of the Baltray Road and the Pan well is situated on the right hand side of the Strand road.
Many people visit Trinity well on Trinity Sunday and take three cups of the water saying “In the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost” Amen.
People also visit this Well on Trinity Saturday night at mid-night and say the Rosary. There is no account of how the Well was made.
It is said that Saint Patrick baptised children at this well. Long ago people were cured from blindness at it.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 22:12
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in.
3.[ This story was told to Bernard Doherty by a Frank Doherty of Cappry, whose son, Pat lives in the place at present. ]
A friend of Frank Doherty's lived in Tieveclogher. He was getting wealthy as time went on. His cattle were increasing and in the end he frowned that he would have to build a new byre for their accommodation. He was cutting out the ground wall for the byre when a little woman came to him at sunset one evening and asked him not to build his byre there because if he did that the refuse from it would run on their domain. She pointed out to him a spot which would do for his purpose just so well and would not interfere with their pleasure. The man was stubborn, wouldn't take her advice but went on with his own idea. When he had the byre built he put all his cattle into it but his luck had turned. One after another his stock took bad and died - in twelve months he hadn't a four - fooled beast
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 22:01
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2. There is at present an experienced farmer and millowner named John Martin living in the townland of Corlecky, near Welshtown, in the parish of Glenfinn. His father was Peter Martin and he was very fond of "the cup that cheers." In those days there was no place licensed for the sake of intoxicants on the Corlecky side of the river where the Martins lived. A family called Annott had a public house on the opposite side, and Peter Martin on his journeys to and from this place used to take the short-cut across the river.
One evening a little woman came to his house in his absence and asked his wife for a copper. Mrs. Martin said what she believed to be the truth, namely that there was "not a known copper in the house." The little woman told her to look in the pocket of her husband's trousers behind the room door and that she would get six pence. The other did so and got the money. Being a bit frightened by this time she said nothing but handed the sixpence to the little beggar, who took it saying: "Many a time I guided your husband across that river down there below, or he would have been drowned." She then left as quickly as she had come
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 21:27
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Of the following stories the first five were told by the Bernard Doherty mentioned on page 26 and elsewhere through the book.
1. His grandfather lived at the Ironworks now a large mill owned by Thomas John Kee of Cappry. His gradnmother was called Liza Burus before marriage. When Bernard himself was a child he often heard his mother tell the following story: -
It was a summer evening in the gloaming. A wee woman above the size of a girl of five, and dressed in a red hat and coat came into the kitchen. She made signs to his grandmother that she was hungry and pointed to a barrel of meal in the corner. The grandmother gave her a bowl of the meal, and she left without having spoken. In the gloaming the next evening she came back with the bowl of meal. (Here the story ends abruptly)
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 20:49
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
in honour of Saint Brendan.
Then you would sit down on the seat, and take three mouthfuls of water out of the well. This well was put there by St Brendans when he was passing to Kildare, and he rested there. This well is called after St Brendan, and one time a girl had a sty in her eye and she was taking a drink and the sty fell into the cup. When you go to the well you have to leave a relic after them. The relics left are--: buttons, books, flowers and many others.
There is a story told about a servant girl that came to Thomas Monton's house, and she got the water from the holy well to make the tea. She put the water down to boil, and it was down all day, but it would not boil.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 20:47
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
about a man who tried to drain the well. His name was Thrench and he was a protestant, and he tried to stop the people from performing at the well by closing it up with stones. The water went up into an ash tree that is beside the well, and is there still. The time for performing is the month of May. Everybody leaves a relic of description after them. The relics left are --: beads, leaflets, books and flowers.
The second holy well is in the townsland of Holywell in Thomas Monton's field. People still visit the well between the 16th May and the 1st October. There are prayers said and rounds performed there. There are five little hills, and at the first hill you would say five Our Fathers, five Hail Marys, and five Glory be to the Father's. Then you would go all round the tree, and say the breed.
Then you would kneel down at the second hill and say Seven Hail Marys, and seven Glory be to the Fathers. When you would have that finished you would do the same again, and keep doing that until you have them finished. There is little seat made of stone, and you would say seven Hail Marys
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 20:41
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are two holy wells in the parish of Abbeygormicon, namely Saint Brendan's well in boolagh, and also Saint Brendan's well in Holywell. The holy well in boolagh is situated in Mrs. Yshery's field in the town-land of bhickens well, which in olden times was in Thrench's estate. He ploughed the land in order to prevent the people from trespassing the land and using the water.
People still visit this well and perform rounds there, and say their prayers. There are five stations beside the well, and they prayers to be said at each station are, the bread, the Our Father and three Hail Marys.
Saint Brendan was seen coming from Holywell to this well, and he slept there one night. It is said that he knelt on a stone praying and the track of the knees are still to be seen. people who have sore feet go to this well, and leave the affected part on the stone where the Saint knelt praying. If there anything wrong with a person they either rub the water on the affected part of drink it.
There is a story told
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 20:30
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to the man that stands for him and the girl gives a present to the girl that stands for her. All the friends of the two that got married would meet at the public house the next Sunday and they would have a good drink. Straw boys usually come in during the night they are known locally as caileares they demand food and drink and they get it. In olden days a girl required no fortune is she had a good fighting faction.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 20:27
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago the people used to get married on a certain day and on that account it was called Wednesday. Nearly on a Wednesday the people get married and they say it is a day.
When a couple get they both go to their own homes for about a month for it is an old custom. The people never get married at lent or advent it is at Shrove and Easter they get married. Some of the people go to the wedding and in olden times the priest used to dance with the bride.
A long time ago the people used to go to the houses and steal the girls away with them on horse back. Sometimes the girls would not be behind them at all for they would be stolen by someone else. Then the man sends someone out of the house to settle about the fortune and he usually brings whiskey to be divided amongst them.
Then the marriage takes place and the man gives a present
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 19:41
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Cures continued
place it on the wound and after a while, if the wound deep not stop bleeding you must put on another cobweb. This is a cure for a bleeding wound.
Chilblains
A very good cure for chilblains is to get a cupful of the water that a blacksmith cools the irons, and pour it on the chilblains. If the chilblain does not go in an hour you must out on the water again and it will go in a half minute.
A way for drawing out bad blood out of a wound is, to get a bit of a weed called crowfoot and boil it with water until the water turns green, then get a cupful of water and a cupful of linseed meal and boil until it gets thick. They mix both together and put them on the wound and leave it on for two hours and when you take it off all the old blood will be on the linseed meal and crowfoot.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 19:41
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
the Drummonwood sits on the bog at one time Lord Vaux kept it in order he said it was the nicest scenery in all Ireland he used to bring English gentlemen ip on the hill sitting on the bog with the heather growing up to the ditch each side and in the same place there is a place called glenn na Rapairí now it is called the Robbers Hollow, there are only one river in Rosmead the stoneyford.
Peggy Quinn
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 19:38
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nuisance in the well to keep the other parties from using it and a terrible fight started on a Sunday morning and several people were killed. From that time on, it decayed away and the fair and the fair was changed to Fore and some parts of the town remained until about one hundred and forty years ago to prove that.
There was a Blacksmith called Mickie Lynch, he was sentenced to be hanged for making pikes in '98 and he was put standing on the trapboard in Mullingar Jail, till the last Woods, the owner of Rossmead went upon the trapboard and took the rope off his neck and ordered him down.
My Father remembers hearing very old men talk about it who saw some shops in Leavestown but Rosmead House or Leavestown house was in the field called Iranhuth. A catholic family called Moores lived there, their descendents are now living in a place in Co. Galway. Rosmead has a population of eighty nine people, this side of the Stoneyford River, only eight slatted houses including five slated labourers cottages, there are nine thatched houses in Rosmead.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 19:28
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Cures Continued
to me by harry Mc. Phillips Ballymacargy.
He has this cure but he could not give it to a man only to a woman, and a woman could only give it to a man.
It is a prayer that has to be said, but he would not tell me of it because if he did he would lose the cure.
If you do not believe you will be cured you will not be cured.
A wound.
I know a good cure for any kind of a wound.
Wounds
Yet an uncooked potato and bruise it up into small pieces.
when this is done the wound must be very clean, then get the potatoes and put them on the wound. This treatment for two days will fade away the wound.
Boils
A good cure for a boil is to get a small piece of a cobweb and put it on the boil and leave it on for two and all the bad blood will be drawn out.
Bleeding wounds
A cobweb is also a good cure for a bleeding wound. You must get a large cobweb and
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 19:24
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Told to me by my Father
Thomas Quinn
Rosmead
Delvin
Rosmead
My Townland is Rosmead and Cavestown, it is now called Rosmead and it is in the North corner of the parish of Delvin.
The ancient name of my Townland was leavestown and Rosmead, Rosmead is only a small field southwest of the stoneyford river over near the churchyard of Clonarney, but now leavestown and Carneybrogan are included in the townland of Rosmead. Once Leavestown was a very famous town and an annual horse fair was held in it. It used to last a week, there was a day for racing and a day for jumping horses, it was something similar to the horse show in Dublin. It must have been the leading horse fair of Ireland until a dispute arose among the people of the town about a well, one of the parties committed
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 19:16
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Folklore
Cures, Warts
A great cure for warts is, get a piece of chicken weed and bruise the milk out of it and put it on the wart.
Warts
I know a good cure for warts. It is get a hint of hot water and half a cup of salt mix both together and melt the salt, then put the warts into the saucepan that you have the cure in and do it every day for nine days and the warts will wear way.
Ringworm
a good cure for ringworm is to rub it with a fasting spit. This treatment should be continued for nine mornings until it fades away.
Ringworm
Getting a seventh son to place his hand on ringworm is a certain cure. Not every seventh son has the power. When born, an earthworm has to be placed in his hand. Should the worm turn white and hard, which shows he is dead the boy, will have the cure, but should the worm remain alive for a long time the boy will not have any power to heal.
Toothache
Throw a good cure for a toothache. It was told
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 18:39
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And in the back woods o'America,
Where their weary feet they set,
Stumpy was there the first they met,
And he haunts their children yet.
Young man 'tis hard ta strive weo' sin,
But the greatest sin o'a,
Is whare the greed for gain sets in
And drives God's grace awa.'
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 18:36
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
"For it's up to the [brae, crossed out] brim,
And it's up to the brae,
And it's up to the meadow rig"
"Aye" quoth Stumpy comin' clattering in,
And hit the aul woman a bat on the chin,
"But a come noon by the brig".
And every nicht as the clock struck nine
The hour that they did the sin,
The wee lil' dog began to cower,
And the ghost came clattering in.
And o'er the stools and o'er the cheers,
Such a sight ye never sa,
With his bloody heed, and his knee bones bare,
It was sure to be stumpy himself.
They sowl their wee bit ferm o' lan,
And ta forin lan they went,
But the first they hard on the deck o' the ship,
Was the thumpin o' them two knees.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 18:30
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around the bush and say five Our Fathers and five Hail Marys three times. People do not use the water from the well in Clonalten for household puposes as it is siad to be unlucky.
A man tried to close the well at Clonalter but when he went to milk the cows they were dry so he went back and cleaned up the well and the cows milked as usual.
Annie Claffey
Killogenehan
Fandnum
Athlone
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 18:26
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
"Holy Wells"
There are two holy wells in this district, one in Killomeenchan and one in Clonalten. People go to killomeenchan on the fifteenth of august every year and do stations to be cursed of their sores and bodily ailments.
The prayers that are usually said when doing the stations are, five Our Fathers and five Hail Marys, and they go round the well three times; sometimes they drink some of the water from the well or make the sign of the cross over the sore, Killomenchan got its name from St. Menehan. People go to Clonalten on the 17th of March every year to do stations there. There is a big rock there with two holes in it. It is said when St. Patrick was passing by he knelt on the rock and left the knack of his two knees in it. There is a big bush at the well. people do stations
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 17:28
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Thomas Gaughan 8th November 1937.
Béaloioeas - Ciste Óir i bfolac.
A field which belongs to John Ferguson runs for about a quarter of a mile along the east side of the Ballymore lake. Through this field there flows a little river.
It has been handed down from the oldest times that a pot of gold lies buried in a bank of this river. A serpent with a flesh-fork in its hand guards this pot. Anyone who is smart enough to snatch the fork and kill the serpent before it gets into the water can bring away the gold.If the serpent gets into the water it is free and the person who has tried to kill it is immediately turned into a serpent and must guard the pot.
It is not known who put it there but it is said that the pot will remain there until a certain family of people comes to whom it will be given.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 16:47
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Sigle Ni Coileain
Lisin na meala
Tomas D Coileain. fedmear
Lisin na meala. Aois.
Tomaiseanna
Ceard a tipiul teanga auge agus nac feidir teia tabair
Freagra brof
Ceard e an rad is fearr te cur trid cacs.
Freagra do cuid piacla.
Ceard a teuigeann triasna na h abaunn gan aon torann.
Freagra Sgealla.
Ceh uair.a tupuil an feilmear oroc tianra leus an coirce.
Freagra nuair a buaileann se e.
Treasa Ni Crair,
Creag Mor.
Seain Mac Crair, fedmear
Creag Mor. Aois
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 16:47
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
casúr bhíod na mná gá mbhriseadh agus na fir a gcur amach lé gcuid gcapall agas a gcuid (g) cárana bhí bhíod aon ghaineam acu lé cur amach ar na boithre an t-amh sin acht puntáin mór do clocaí. Ní bhíod mórán páide lé fágail ag na daione san amh fadó is mar atá anois.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 16:37
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Cures
For Warts:
Get a small black snail and rub it across the wart three times in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Ghost. Then stick the snail in a thorn of a bush. As the snail withers away the wart disappears. Another cure for them is if you water in the hollow of a stone (without looking for it) and wash the warts with it.
For a sty in the eye:
Get nine thorns from a gooseberry bush, point each of them at the sky in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Ghost. After doing so throw them across your right shoulder and afterwards bury them. This cure is best on Fridays.
For a headache:
Mrs. Burns Kildooragh Ballimore has this cure. She will make it on Mondays or Thursdays. It is made by measuring the head and saying a round of the beads. When the pain is severe the head is open two inches. After the cure is made the head gradually closes in and the pain goes away.
For worms in people:
Mrs. Chas mo Keon Lisnatullagh has this cure. She makes it by digging up a small worm
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 16:33
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Tá go leor sean bóithre in mo baile sa ar a dtugtar bóithrín sean bhaile bóithrín Murtaigh bóithrín dúras bóithrín an locha agus bóithrín an phortach. Seo é an fáth ar tugadh bóithrín sean bhaile ar an bóithrín sin mar gheall ar go raibh sean bhaile an fadó. Seo é an fáth ar tugadh bóithrín Murtaigh ar an bóithrín seo mar gheall ar go raibh fear d'arbh ainmh Micheál Ó Murtaigh in a eómnuidhe an agus tá bóithrín Murtaigh mar ainm ar ó shóin. Tugtar boithrín an locha ar an bóithrín seo mar gheall ar go dteigheann sé go fada lé loch Corrab. Teigheann bóithrín sean bhaile ó cros bhótar corrandulla go dtí mo bhaile féin. Cógar isead é freisin i gCor na daoine a bíos ag dul ag an Aifreann nó go dtí Gaillimh na go dtí teigheann bóithrín Murtaigh chom fada lé portach eile. Tá na bóithríne sin déanta lé suim mhait blíanta. In aimsear an gorta. bhíod na mná agus na fir amuigh ag briseadh clocaí le na cuid
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 16:19
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Rushes grow in damp boggy land. Long ago rushes were very useful for thatching all houses, but nowadays they are only used for thatching out-houses.
Nettles grow along ditches, in gardens and fields. They are pulled and boiled for chickens and turkeys.
Linda Kenney
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 16:15
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Herbs
The most harmful herbs that grow on our farm are: chicken-weed, boralain, thistles, baile-brioscain, caphogs, cradan, trairuiu, rushes, black-heads, borrage, foran, nettles, lubain.
Chicken-weed generally grows in potatoes and turnips, and when it grows too plentiful it is time to stop tilling it. Borrage mostly grows in oats and if the oats is not cleaned with a sieve before given to horses, it generally gives them a cough. If sieve is used for taking borrage out of oats, and a riddle is used for cleaning out the chaff, the holes in the sieve are smaller than the holes in the riddle.
Black-heads grow in meadow and it is harmful to the grass if it is not cleaned out before growing too strong, and slag is supposed to clean away them.
Thistles and boralain grow in every field. Boralain is good to fatten sheep, and they eat only the yellow part of them. Sheep and donkies eat the thistles.
Foran grows generally in gardens, and along a potato crop, and it is always pulled and given to pigs when the potatoes are scarce in summer.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 16:07
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231
drink and got very wild. There was a draging home held. Sometimes they had side-cars but mostly they used to have horses, sometimes they used to race against each other hasting and running to see who would be the first to reach the wedding house. It was said which ever party reached the house the first would live the longest. Wives used to sit on horses with their husbands this is an old custom i got this information from: Mrs. Mary Kilgarriff,
Dunmacreenia,
Claremorris, Co. Mayo.
Written by:
Mary Kate Walsh,
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 15:56
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230
of them got forty or fifty pounds and others got a beast or a few sheep. I do not remember and marriages taken place in the house.
they used to invite friends and neighbours to the wedding feast. Sometimes wedding feasts were held. They used to take place at the young man's house. Ten or twelve of the straw-boys used to visit the house. Then dress were women's skirts and blouses and (?) and their faces blackened. They were received well and got plenty to eat and drink but sometimes they got too much
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 15:33
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229
Local marriage customs
The marriages of long ago used to take place on shrove Tuesday but not again until Easter Monday. The people thought it unlucky to get married on the on the feast of the holy innocent of on the month of May.
It was considered unlucky to get married during shrove tide. If a man wanted to get married to a girl and her parents were not willing to give a fortune then he would run away with her and would not marry her until the fortune would be given. Three or four matches took place round here some
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 15:32
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Horse-radish generally grow in gardens.
7. When you would see thistles in a field it is a sign of very rich land. The nettles and rushes only grow in poor land.
Written by:
Therese Holohan
Abbey
Loughrea
Co. Galway
Got from:
John Holohan
Abbey
Loughrea
Co. Galway
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 15:26
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Willie Handlon lived in the Glen. He was coming home from Realthog through Staffordstown heading for home. He saw that a big dog, up to his elbow, was walking along with him, as he passed the Graveyard and towards the Hall door of Staffordstown house. He followed him until he was crossing the Nanny Bridge on the front avenue.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 15:22
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Long ago there was a noted Robber called Collier. He was hard pressed with Police. They were following him when he passed by a man ploughing in a field. Collier exchanged his clothing for that of the ploughman’s. Soon his enemies who halted him entering the field and asked supposed ploughman if he had seen Collier. “Yes,” said Collier. I was talking to him some two hours ago, he is gone for that wood there. So the Police went on as told and Collier once more put on his own garments and the ploughman his and Collier went his way once more a free man.This happened over in “The Glen.” Walterstown Parish. There was once a man called Britchley and occasionally he used to go to a hill in Lismullen land called “Reloo” where he used to be taken away by the fairies and he often was away for a fortnight. So he was named Fairy Man Britchley on account of this.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 15:20
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Herbs
1. Here hound is good for a cold. It grows in a garden or haggard. The way it would cure is to drink the juice of it.
2. Garlic is used for killing poison. Garlic usually grows in gardens or haggards.
3. The bark of an oak tree would cure saddle sores on a horse. Dandelion is good for weak lungs.
4. Dock leaves would cure stings. Dock leaves usually grow in fields or gardens.
5. Nettles are good for young fowl. Nettles grow mostly in fields or gardens or haggards.
6. Horse-radish is mostly for seasoning soups.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 15:15
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… next day. It blew away hay, corn and houses. In fact it blew the fishes out of the canal. Some neighbouring woman’s house was blown away and to protect her very young child she turned a pot over it.
In the year 1892 there was another great storm, in the month of February. People named Broke lived in a house near where our school is. The roof was blown off by the wind and the house soon afterwards.
In February 1903 there was a fierce storm. It swept roofs off houses, broke windows and uprooted trees. It killed the crows in the woods. People said that human voices were heard in the wind. Ships and boats were lost at sea.
In August 1914 there was a severe thunder storm followed next day by a heavy down pour and flood. Battle cocts and hay were swept from place to place. The Liffey was flooded and at Newbridge cocts and hay floated in its waters. On one a dog was found lying.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 15:08
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3. If your nose was bleeding to put a cold key to your back would stop it. Blue would cure a sting of a bee. Salt cures boils. A bit of an orange would also cure a sting of a bee.
3. If you had a sty on your eye and if you put a gold ring around it, it would cure it. If you had a ring worm a gold ring would cure it also.
Written by -
Neil Conroy
Ballygowan
Abbey
Loughres
Co. Galway
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 15:06
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The river Dereen divides at Stralasky and joins again and then forms an island. There is a lone bush on this island and the following story is connected with it.
An uncle of the man residing in this townland was coming on Hallow Eve night to visit his friends. He saw a number of little people whom he thought were boys and girls wearing masks as is customary in this district on that night. He got down off the car he was driving in and crossed the ditch in order to see them. They went on before him laughing and clapping their hands. They went on down towards the river. When they came to the river, however, they walked across the surface. He then knew they were not children as the Dereen was very deep at that time of the year. The fairies as then he felt sure they were came on to the long-bush and danced around.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 15:03
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121
folklore
Local Marriage Customs
spring time marriages used to take place the afternest. The people used to be married before lent and on shrove Tuesday, Fridays and the month of May were thought unlucky for marriages.
The runaway matches were when a girl would get great to a boy he would go to her house and take her away and leave her at a friends house for a week before they would wed. Matches are made round here to the present day. Where there is a boy with a big farm he looks out for a girl with a big sum of money. They get married in the evening and they go on horseback to the church, when they would come home the people of the house would let them in the back door. Then the couple would knock down and the cake would be broken over their heads. Then the feast would begin and a dance would follow.
When everything thing would be over the couple
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 14:37
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him home. For days lay in bed neither living or dying. Then the priest was got to read an office. When it was read he spoke to the priest, who said he could be all right but to do penance for believing in the dream.
Roíse Ní Sámrain
Raiz ā seace
18th February '38
Lore of certain Days
Most of the old customs are after drying out. But they are still remembered by the old people. No regards these old customs it was considered unlucky to throw out anything on New Years day. On May eve primroses would be gathered and scattered round the house. On May day a branch would be cut off a neuron tree and tied round the churn dash for fear the butter would be taken. May eve the door of the cow house would be locked for fear anyone would go in. As it was supposed if anyone went in and milked a cow that they could take the butter. It was also thought if anyone if anyone went into a house where they were churning would have to help, to churn, otherwise he could bring the butter. A coal would not be let out on May day as it was thought if a coal was brought out the luck would be brought out.
It was a custom that who ever would have the first smoke up May morning would have no luck during the rest of the year. Whoever would be first to bring a bucket of water
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 14:24
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
They used to have a great days outing and this was called " an eirige amac".
Shrove Tuesday was called "Máirt na smut" because marriageable girls looked cross and sulky at the market on that day, because they were not married during shrove.
Long ago they used to have cabbage and bacon for the wedding supper. On the wedding night also, boys used to come uninvited but disguised to the wedding. They used to have straw ropes bound around them, and they used to have a tin can for porter which they got from the bridegroom. these boys were called "Stucairi " and sometimes "fir tuige".
When the couple were a month married they paid a visit to the girls house, (the months visit) and the girl remained at her old home for a week. After a few weeks the parents of the girl used to come to visit her, and they brought her a large wooden box for holding clothes and also bed-clothes. When they were a year married they got a heifer from the girls father. This was called "colpa spre".
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 14:21
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Matchmaking is still common in this part of the country.The relatives of the prospective bride and groom meet at a fair or market. Over a few drinks they discuss the dowry of the bride and the land and stock of the groom. One of the bride´s relatives walks the said land and values it. Sometimes cattle are borrowed for a few days by the groom for this visitation.
When all arrangements are completed a day is named and preparations are made for a wedding feast at the bride´s house. It is scrubbed from top to bottom. New delph is got for the occasion. Whiskey and other drinks are procured. It is not considered lucky for bridegroom and bride to meet on the eve of the marriage. On the marriage morning they are not to meet until they meet in church.
Neighbours when going to the wedding feast always bring presents for the wedded pair. These are usually useful things for a house. The dowry of a bride was often paid in kind-cattle, sheep, churn, spinning wheel etc. Now it is always money.
It is not considered lucky for a bridesmaid to act as sponsor twice in a year, nor is it right for a brother and sister to marry within the same year. The bridegroom should not see the wedding dress until he sees it in church. A bride is not to visit her parents within one month after her marriage.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 13:27
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Some years ago a young man who was coming from Blacklion was by "Ar Diuv". It was after twelve o'clock at the time. As soon as he was oposite it, a young lady came out ot him and said: "Remember, young man I'm a friend of yours, so don't come near to the fort or you'll be taken up the same as I was." When he had gone away a few yards the fight started between the fairies. It seemed that the nest of them heard the lady warning the man, so they arose out against her. Next morning there was nothing to be seen around the fort but lakes of blood.
After sunset on a summer's evening there is a circle of lights around the fort in Mully. Sometimes there is a sound of churning and music heard in it. Once, a cow went in, and started grazing on the sweet green grass. After sometime the animal got lame, and was lying when the owner got her. He took her home but she never did any good. If the fairies don'r kill at once, they give a slow torturing death. It is supposed that these forts were the homes of the Danes long ago.
There is a fort at the foot of Sliabh builceagh. A man living in Leglass once dreamt that there was a pot of gold in that one. He was told in the dream that he would have to bring another man and go on Friday. On that day he went alone, forgetting what he was told in the dream. He dug up a few sods, and before noticing he hit a large white flag with the spades. At the moment he heard a sound like thunder. Then a gush of wind came up, and fell unconsciously on the ground. He lay there until his brother got him and took
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 13:11
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
heard playing music and dancing there.) Obtained from: Mr J. Ward, (58)
Kilmore,
Williamstown,
Co. Galway.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 13:09
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Holy Well
Written here on 16th Dec. 1938
There are four holy wells in my parish, one in Marblehill, one in Ballinagar, one in Curra, and one Drimkeary. Of that four, the holy well in Drimkeary is the nearest, and I have heard most about it also. It is nicely situated in the north corner of Edward Sheil’s field, about one eighth of a mile from Drim School. There is a little boreen running out side the field and a fence just coming between. Another well is situated outside the fence, which is used by the neighbouring people.
The holy well is said to have been blessed by some saint. Most likely this saint was Saint Patrick, for a few hundred yards away there are visible rocks, with the traces of two knees which are believed to be Saint Patricks. The well is circular in shape, and rather deep. Some haw-thorn bushes and ash trees grow round it.
There were a few fish here in the years past, but were taken away by a family quite near. At present briars, and grass grow beside it. The sand of this little well was used for curing headaches by a man, who lived a short distance away. However, it is not used in any way now. Once the water was put down in a kettle, but it would not boil.
Information obtained from Brigid Keane, Drimkeary, Loughrea, 2 years ago (70 years) then. She lived in Drimkeary.
Written by Kathleen Sheil, pupil (13 yrs) old.
Drimkeary,
Loughrea.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 13:06
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Marriages
People get married in shrove nowadays. It is unlucky to get married on Fridays and on Lent and Advent. Money and stock are given as fortunes. Matches took place in the houses long ago. The father of the girl and the mother of the boy made the match. The straw boys came on the wedding night with their faces black and straw round their heads. It was a “pisreog” to walk round the Chapel before being married. After the marriage, they would walk out the door of the chapel together, because the one who went out first would die first. There used to be runaway marriages long ago. If a girl liked to marry a boy she would go into his house and she would not go away ‘till the boy would promise to marry her.
The priest would make them kneel inside the Altar Rails for three Sundays.
Thomas O’Dea
Ironpool House
Kilconly.
Age 46 years.
Mary O’Dea
Ironpool House
Kilconly
Tuam.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 13:06
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some years ago. This was supposed to have been done by the fairies. (Number three) About a quarter of a mile from this fort, there is another in Mr Love’s field. Soldiers are supposed to have been killed here several years ago. This fort is also surrounded by hazel trees. Some old men in the neighbourhood are said to have seen a headless soldier near this fort.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 13:05
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There are several fairy forts in this district, and it is locally believed that they were built by the Danes. It has been noticed that from any fort in this neighbourhood, two more are visible. On the border separating the farms of Michael Farrahen and John Raftery there is a fort known as Brian Keane’s fort. (Number one) It is circular in shape and two more forts can be seen from it, one in James Bonnells’ field and the other in Edward Gibbons’ field. (Number two) Near Blooncagh there is another fort in Mrs Feeneys’ field. This is also circular in shape. It is surrounded by hazel trees and aloe-bushes. A bullock was found hanging from one of the trees one morning
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 13:04
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Monica Connolly, Cahercrin, Craughwell.
In our place when curing warts people get a snail and rub it nine times on the wart and then hang the snail on a white thorn bush and when the snail has withered the wart is gone.
The milk of a dandelion is also good for a wart and the water on a stone when you are not looking for it.
When children have the whooping caugh people give them whatever cure they got when they meet a man with a white horse.
Another cure for whooping cough is to get a porcupine, kill him, take off the skin. Then boil the flesh till very tender and give the soup to the children.
A good cure for a sore throat is to get “flaggers” and put them into a stocking and put them around the throat.
A bite from a dog can be cured by a rib from the dog.
Cold tea is a good cure for sore eyes.
A cure for sore feet is to get a piece of fat bacon when
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 13:03
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
In the townland of Pollynoone there are two forts. One of the forts is a round circle of raised land with brushes growing on one side of it. The other one is trodden down.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 13:03
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one. It is a high bit of land surrounded by bushes and briers. It is never ploughed because it would not be right. It is a place where fairies live. There were people living in a house one side of the fort and it was haunted with fairies. Nobody takes brambles out of the bushes because they belong to the fairies.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 13:01
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Near Williamstown there is a big fort. There are many furzes in it. There was a woman who had a cow in the fort. Each morning she looked at the cow and she wasn’t there. The man that is living near the fort saw the cow every evening. She never saw her after. There are fairies in it every November’s night. There are cattle grazing there also.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 13:00
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
In Whyte’s land in Pollea there is another one. It is a high bit of land surrounded by bushes and briers. It is never ploughed because it would not be right. It is a place where fairies live. There were people living in a house one side of the fort and it was haunted with fairies. Nobody takes brambles out of the bushes because they belong to the fairies.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 12:59
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
In the district there is also a fort and the old people say that a man was passing from the fair of Williamstown and had a cart. He had pigs at the fair and had them in the cart. He did not go home till it was dark. As he was passing by the fort a large crowd of fairies came out of the fort. They jumped into the cart and he could not put them out. They wanted to bring him to the graveyard. When he came up as far as the road where he was to turn in they tried to bring him up the other road. Then they jumped out of the cart and he came home and after two weeks he died.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 12:57
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In Beaugh there is another fort and it is situated in the middle of the field. This field has very old mounds and there is a cave in the middle of it. In years past when the Rebellion was in Ireland some of the true patriot men sheltered there nights and slept there to hide from the enemies as it had been quite safe. They made it their restoring place where no danger ever overtook them. On the side of this fort trees are growing. (Fairies were heard playing music and dancing there.)
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 12:56
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a fort in Joyce’s land in Cloomahara. It is a round circle of raised land with brushes growing all round it. Just inside the circle is a dyke. In the winter it is filled with water and in the summer it dries. It is said that in long ago when the Rebellion was in Ireland the Irish hid in that fort. In the centre of it is a very large stone with a little brush growing in the middle of it. There is always a light seen in the middle of it. Every night after twelve o’clock the fairies dance and sing in its side in the fort.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-17 10:59
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Marriages took place anytime during the day. The guests assembled in the brides home in the forenoon. Then they all went to the church at the appointed hour and from that to the future home of the married pair where the dancing and merriment was continued till some hour of the night. There was no nuptial mass or honeymoons. Sometimes the marriage took place in the priest's house.
When the festivities were over the bride retires to her room taking with her the bridesmaid and one or two other marriagable females. These stood in a line. The bride took off her right stocking. She was then blindfolded and threw the stocking in the direction of the 3 young women. Whoever was hit would be the next bride.
A piece of the wedding cake put through the bride's ring placed under the pillow was supposed to bring vivid dreams of your future spouse.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-16 22:28
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Holy Wells
St. Lassar's Well Kilronan is situated about a mile from my home. If I wish to visit it I can either go by boat across Lough Meelagh or by road.
The well is situated in a little wood near the edge of the lake. It is dedicated to St. Lassar who was a sister to St. Ailbe. A holy well dedicated to St. Ailbe is situated in Upper Arigna. The waters are clear and sparkling.
Three steps lead down to the well which is about a yard in diameter. It is surrounded by a sort of parapet and people walk on this parapet when doing the Station.
The Station starts on August 15th and ends on the Sunday within the octave of September 8th. On this day a "Pattern" or local fire is held and people of the locality call that Sunday the "Big Sunday."
When the season is over the place around the well, but particularly the ash tree growing over the well is strewn with pieces of ribbon, rags, medals, crosses and such things. These are left by people who wish to obtain cures. In leaving these things they are supposed to leave the disease as well.
It is visited by many people from the
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-16 22:17
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and very few listen to their protestations.
This is how the people of the locality make the station:
I Three Hail Marys are said at the edge of the well.
II In the wood at the east of the well a decade of the Rosary and the Apostle's Creed are said
III The Rosary is continued while going round the parapet at the well (This last is done three times)
IV Three drinks of the blessed water are taken (What remains in the cup each time must be thrown away and fresh water taken up.)
V The Rosary is finished in the wood at the north of the well and requests are made.
Saxie Kavanagh,
Annagh,
Ballyfarnon,
Boyle.
Information got from:
Mr. W. Kavanagh, Aged 40,
Annagh,
Ballyfarnon,
Boyle.
Farmer.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-16 22:10
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neighboring parishes and even by people from far distant places.
Tradition says that originally the well was situated on the top of the hill at the foot of which it now stands.
It is said that a man closed up the well and then it burst up in its present place. The original place is now known as Carraig Oarmusa an is reached by a stiff climb up the hill. A cross has been erected and a railing now encloses the place where the well was. People, when visiting the place take some blessed clay away with them. This clay is supposed to cure sore eyes.
Carraig Oarmusa also commands an excellent view of the surrounding scenery, which is very beautiful indeed and a visit is well rewarded.
Near the well there is a large flag (5 x 3 I would suppose) supported by four upright stones about one foot in height. It is piously believed that a person who suffers from backache will obtain his cure, if, with faith he crawls under the stone, three times.
Some people claim that this custom of making the station at the well is a pagan custom but they are in the minority.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-16 21:29
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Our Holy Wells
There is only one Holy Well in our parish. It is in the townland of Cornahallis. The name of the field is Cluan Patrick. The people visit it on the three first Sundays in July. The people go round and say one Our Father and One Hail Mary and one glory be to the Father fifteen times.
There is not any story about the well that I heard of. It is said that Saint Patrick slept there a night. He had a horse with him. The track of the horse's hoof is there yet.
I never heard of any one been cured at it. People drink three drops of the water. It is said that a person tried to boil the water but it would not boil. There is not any fish in the well.
Mary Mee,
Carrowntemple,
Four-Roads,
Roscommon.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-16 20:17
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been waiting for fifty years for the shave Jimmy." said he. I could not enter heaven without it and I am very thankful to you. For I might have to wait many another weary year only for you.
"Now." said the ghost. "Day one see that knob I was throwing the soap against. Pull out that and you will get a fortune. The ghost disappeared then and Jimmy did as he was told . There was a drawer attached to the knob and it was filled with gold. Jimmy was a rich man for the rest of his life and he never was done praising the "ghost of rath."
Note :-
This tale was told to me by Edward Allen of Killininey. He heard it from an old man named Hopkins who is long since dead. The house about which the story is told disappeared but the spot where it stood can still be pointed out.
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-16 20:02
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a big fireplace in the kitchen and a heap of (stones) sticks in the corner. Jimmy lit a fire and sat on a stool in front of it. The house was mighty lonesome and the fear of it kept him awake.
At twelve o' clock he heard a noise in the loft over him. From his seat he could see the ladder and bye and bye he saw a mans foot on the top step. Down it comes, slowly, slowly and Jimmy never stirs. He is a man about forty or fifty years old Jimmy thinks. He is in his shirt sleeves and he is carrying a basin of water, a razor and soap.
He comes to Jimmy and bathes him with the soap. Jimmy remains as quiet as a mouse. The man begins to shave. He removes the soap from the razor with his finger in the Chimney every time.
When he finished Jimmy stood up and pointed to the seat. The ghost sat down and Jimmy took the razor and soap and lathered and shaved him too. Jimmy looked at the ghost and the ghost looked at Jimmy. "I have
gnáthbhall (stair)
2020-03-16 19:30
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Local Cures.
Washing soda is supposed to be a cure for wars. If you wash your face with the dew that is on the grass on a May morning you wont be sick that year. The teeth of a corpse if rubbed along your own teeth you will never have toothaches. The stone of a priest's grave is a cure for teethaches also. People tickle the palm of their hands to stop a hic-cough. When people have pains in their stomachs they lie on their mouths under. If you get a thorn under a white thorn brush and your hand swells up you should look for a dor daol and put it in the fire. When he bursts the swelling will burst.
Patrick Bornelly 13 years
Snim Na Gorta
Ballymore.
Given to me by my father
Peter Bornelly 65 years
Snim Na Gorta
Ballymore,