Líon iontrálacha sa taifead staire: 4806 (Taispeántar anseo na 500 ceann is deireanaí.)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In olden times, spinning was carried on in this district. When the wool was taken off the sheep, it was carded and then it was spun with a spinning wheel. These are the ruins of an old flour-mill at Bridgetown. It was built about a hundred years ago, but it had not been used for sixty years. It is seven stories high and when it was in use, it gave employed to a great many people. Long ago, candles were made in this district.
They were not the same as the candles we have now. They were made from rushes. The green part was taken of the outside of the rushes and the outside part was dipped in grease and left till it was day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:52
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wool into yarn and then they knitted it into socks and jerseys.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago, in this district, there were men who made barrels, churns, and butter dishes and they were called coopers. Long ago, people made their own linen. First, they sowed the flax and then it was pulled and tied into sheaves. Then, it was put into a flax-dam and covered with water for nine or ten days. It was then taken out of the dam and spread lightly on a field to dry and then it was taken to the mill to be scotched. It was then taken home and spun into thread and then woven into linen and made into different things.
Some men earned their living by making butter dishes and were called dish turners. The woman of long ago spun all the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:52
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
In olden times, round this district, they spun all their own clothing. First, the wool was corded with carders and made into small rolls. Five or six old woman used to gather together for a days spinning. The rolls were spun into yarn on a spinning wheel. To make cloth, the yarn was twisted and then put on a reel turned round and when it cracked there was a cut ready for off. When finished, it was taken to the weaver and weaved into cloth. Then, it was brought home and rolled up into a hard lump. Then, they gathered their neighbours together to give them a help to thicken the wool.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:51
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These dishes were made out of sycamore wood and had to be without a seam. The best dish turner who lived in this district was a blind man.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:51
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There used to be binders long ago. For instance, one bought a weekly lock they kept it until they had six or seven or until the stories would be completed from one book to another. Then, they took it to the book-binders [sic] and they got it bound. You could get it done in leather or paste-board [sic] or any way you wanted it.
At one time, there used to go round men who make mattresses out of straw and they would make a mattress for you bed for about a shilling. There is another old trade that is going out of existence, who used to make wooden dishes, which were used for making butter.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:48
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Some people put may flowers [sic] on the window sills and on the door step on May Eve. It is supposed to keep the witches and fairies away till the next May Day. Some unmarried people gather yarrow on May Eve and they put it under their pillow at night and it is supposed to make them dream of their future wife or husband. They pull ten stalks of yarrow and after they pull each stalk they say,
“Good-Morrow, Good-morrow fair yarrow,
I hope before this time tomorrow,
Thou will show my true love to me.”
Some people get up early the first morning in may and they was their face in the dew. This is supposed to make them lucky.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:46
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rope and to his great surprise, the barrel was full of butter. On May Eve, people put May flowers [sic] on the doors and windows and the out-houses to keep away the witches.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:46
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Long ago, on May morning, lots of old woman went out in the morning before the sun arose and swept the dew of the grass by pulling a long rope after them and calling,
“Come all to me,
Come all to me.”
This was a kind of witch craft [sic], taking away butter of other people’s milk. One May morning, a man was going along the road with his horse and cart to the bog. He happened to see this old woman pulling at the rope and saying, “Come all to me.” He jumped out of the cart and ran over and cut a piece of the rope and brought it home and threw it in a barrel. A short time afterwards, he went to the barrel to look for the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:46
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keep away all ill-luck and it will keep anybody from over-looking the cattle for the next twelve months.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:46
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The month of May is greatly given to superstition. On May Eve, it is a custom for the people to go out and gather May flowers [sic] and put them on the window sill sto keep away the witches.
You should never take off any of your Winter clothes till May is out so the old saying goes,
“N’er cast a clout
Till May is out.”
No body [sic] should bathe in for,
“Those who bathe in May
Will soon be in the clay.”
Country farmers light fires in their yards on May Eve and when the clock strikes twelve that night, they take out their cattle and drive them round the fire, repeating the Three Best Names. This will
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:46
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pillow. And they are supposed to dream of their future wife or husband.
May is said to be a very unlucky month to be married in,
“Marry in May, you will surely rue the day.”
It is also unlucky to start bathing in May. It is a custom for all the children to dress up in May flowers [sic] and play May-queen.
A damp May and a warm June, Makes the farmer whistle a merry tune.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:45
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There is a lot of customs attached with May day and May eve.
A very old custom is to rise very early on May morning and wash your face in the dew. It is said if you do this, you will always be lovely. Another old custom is to put May flowers [sic] on the doors and windows of the house or the cows byre. It is suppose to keep away bad luck. Another custom is for all the unmarried to go out and gather yarrow. You pull ten stalks, at the pulling of each stalk you say,
“Good-morrow, good-morrow fair yarrow,
Trice good-morrow to thee.
I hope before this time to-morrow,
Thou will show my true love to me.”
Then they throw away the tenth stalk and put the other nine under their
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:45
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There are no ancient crosses in this Parish. There is a monument in the town-land of Cashmoore [?] about three miles from here. It is situated on the top of a hill. It is called Reynold’s Monument and it is in the Parish of Kilbarron [?]. There was a heap of stones on our hill in Carnhugh and inside was a square stone or slab. It was triangle and the shape of a cows [sic] foot in the centre. It was said that the Danes had it for a land mark [sic]. Father has it still to be seen. Further up by Pettigo [?] there is another.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:45
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A few years ago, a tombstone was found in the mill garden with the name of Rev. Knox carved on it. Rev. Knox was the first Protestant clergyman of Drumholm. The tombstone was later taken to Derry by some of the Knox family who lived there.
There was an old monastery in the townland [sic] of Ballymagrorty [?] and a manuscript containing the Psalms, which was written by St Columba in said to have been kept in it. This manuscript was carried in front of bottle and it now in the Royal Academy Dublin. A square shaped bell was dug up near the monastery about a hundred years ago and it was given to Captain Hamilton.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:45
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On the top of And Fayagh [?], which belongs to Mr and McClure, a cave was found long ago. One day Mr McClure grandfather and another neighbour man were shoveling potatoes when they came on a large flag stone, which they lifted and they saw the hole down into the ground. They tied their two shovels together, but could not reach the bottom the bottom of it and then they closed it up again. It is said that, that cave runs from And Fayagh [?] to McGouigh [?] fort in Glasbully. Also it is said that one of the O’Neills lived on this same hill, And Fayagh [?].
In one of Mr Coburns fields in Glasbully, there is the remains of a giants grave.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:45
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It is supposed to be unlucky to change from one house to another on Friday or Saturday. An old saying is
“A Saturday’s flit
is a short sit.”
It is said that any child or animal that is born on Whitsunday will either be killed or it will kill somebody. It is also said that if you sleep outside on Wednesday, you will be dead before the next Whitsunday.
Cross day is on the fourteenth of Septemeber. Friday is supposed to be the most unluck day of the week.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:44
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Saturday is supposed to be a very unlucky day for changing anything to another house or starting to plough or any new work. An old saying is
“A Saturdays flit
is a short sit.”
Monday and Wednesday are said to be the most lucky [sic] days of the week. Some days are luckier to take a wish on than others.
Wish on Monday ‘twill come true,
Lucky wish is Tuesdays too.
Wednesday just wish at eve,
Thursdays wish you’ll soon receive.
Never wish on Friday, don’t forget,
And Saturday only if it’s wet.
Wish next day whatever befall,
Sundays wish is bet of all.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:43
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other?
Husband and wife.
What gets longer the more you take away from it?
A hole.
What is empty and had something in it?
A pail with a hole in the bottom.
What can run, but cannot walk, can whistle, but cannot talk?
A railway engine.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:43
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What goes round the wood and round the wood and never gets into the wood?
The bark of a tree.
What goes up the river and never gets to the top of the river?
A mill wheel.
Why is a woman a pet?
Because her husband likes her.
How far can a dog run into a wood?
Half way.
If it takes twelve men six days to dig a hole, how long will it take six men to dig half a hole?
You can’t dig half a hole.
What size of a hat does the king wear?
One to fit his head.
Two carolers were singing, one was the father of the other’s son, what relation were they to each
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:43
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The face of a clock.
As long as a ribbon, as white as snow with two green sides?
The road.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:43
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earth, but the water and the sun?
Mist.
As round as an apple, as sharp as a lance. It hunted the highland man out of France?
Hunger.
Haig’s mother was Donald’s granny. What was Donald to Haig?
His son.
What is the shortest verse in the Bible?
Jesus wept.
Spell black water with three letters?
Ink.
What always walks with its head down?
A nail in your show
What kind of fowl is it that never had any feathers?
A tailor’s goose.
A hard working father, a lazy mother, and twelve black children, and a whitewashed floor?
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:43
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What is full and can be fuller?
A pot of potatoes when water is put in.
Where was the first potatoe [sic] found?
In the ground.
Which is the oldest tree?
The elder tree
As I wen [sic] over London bridge, I met a London scholar. He took of his hat and drew of his gloves. What was the name of the scholar?
Andrew.
As I went over London bridge, I met my uncle, Davy. I took off his hat and drank his blood and left his body easy?
A bottle of whiskey.
What is black and white and red all over?
A newspaper.
I have a web of chacker [?] is in neither wove nor spun and it covers all the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:42
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weary men,
They brought me to my journey’s end?
Turf [?]
Four stiff standers, four lily hangers, two lookers, two cookers, a licker and a swinger?
A cow.
A byre full, a barn full, I couldn’t get a dish full?
Smoke.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:42
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But are bought in the nearest town.
Seed potatoes are usually put out on a floor and plenty of light allowed to shine on them because it makes them better for growing and if they are budded they grow quicker when they are planted.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:42
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Potatoes are grown on our farm at home and about three roods of them are planted every year but sometimes there is less and sometimes more.
The ground is not manured before it is turned up but when it is ploughed and borrowed twice drills are manured and the potatoes are dropped about eighteen inches apart on the manure the drills are then closed on top of the manure and potatoes. Sometimes the potatoes are set in ridges. If they are being set in ridges in a green fields the ridges have to be marked out and the sods on the furrows have to be cut off and turned over to the foundation of the ridges. The manure is put between these sods and the seed potatoes are planted on top. The clay out of the furrows is used for covering the ridges.
The spades are not made locally
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:42
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the robin is the most common bird found in our district and it stays with us a whole year round. The bird generally builds to rest in a grassy bank or fence. The nest is made of moss dry grass and hair and almost hidden in the place where it is built. The eggs are white and are fairly thickly covered with little brown spots, it takes about two weeks for the eggs to hatch.
Weather can be judged by the behavior of certain birds for instance when swallows fly high in the air it is supposed to lead to good weather and if they keep close to the ground, nad weather is expected.
The yellow hammer when calling is supposed to say “As little bit of bread with new cheese” When the […] (Peewit [?] ) is calling it says “peewit” and that is why is is sometimes called the “Peewit”.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:41
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For burning.
There were different methods used for giving light such as rushlights and candles made from grease.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:41
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in olden times the most usual type of house in this district was lowly built with a thatched roof. It was with rushes or reeds that they were generally thatched. Nearly all had a sort of bed in the kitchen and it was placed alongside the wall near the fire. This was called a “settle bed” and it could be folded up in day time to serve as a rest.
The dire was generally in the centre of the gable wall. I never heard of it being in the corner of the house. The front of the chimney was made of clay and stone.
The houses in ancient times had no chimneys but a round hole in the rood. Sometimes the hole was near the wall and the fire against the wall and the smoke went up through this hole. This was a very bad method because the house was often filled with smoke.
Half doors were common in this district in former times. Turf and wood were used
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:41
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Potato bread, boxty bread and oaten meal bread are even baked yet by some of the Irish people. The oaten meal bread was sometimes baked standing up in front of the fire. Griddle bread was often made.
Long ago the people had not as good flour as we have now because they had only querns for grinding and they were not as good as our nowadays mills.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:41
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It is red, it is yellow, it is gosling green. The King could not touch it no more than the Queen. The pope in his room could touch it as soon, come riddle me that from morning till noon?
Rainbow
There was a man of Adam’s race,
He had a certain dwelling place.
It was neither in Heaven no Earth no Hell,
But yet in a place where man did dwell?
Jonah in the whale belly
I washed my hands in water,
That was never rain or run.
I dried them in a towel,
That was never wove or spun?
I washed them in the dew and I dried them in the sun
They paved my head they should my face,
They brought me from my native place.
With tired horses and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:40
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down. Hairy around the neck and baldy round the grown.
Hazel Nuts.
As round so an apple, as flat as a pan. The half of a woman, the whole of a man?
A Victorian penny.
What goes out between two woods, and comes home between two waters?
A man carrying two wooden pails of water.
What can go up a chimney down, but cannot go down a chimney up.
An Umbrella
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:40
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago, the bread was made from wheat or oats. The flour was ground in this district by things made of stones called “querns” and these were worked by hand.
There were different kind of bread made such as potato bread boxty[?] bread and oatmeal bread. Before potato bread was made the boiled potatoes were peeled and bruised and some flour added to them. The dough was then rolled in flat pieces and cooked.
Boxty bread is made from grated raw and some cooked ones and flour and made something like potato bread.
Oaten meal bread is made from oaten meal and water. This dough is rolled out flat and thin and backed on what is called a “griddle”. Milk water or buttermilk is added in kneading. Bread was baked everyday.
Sometimes cross shaped marks are put on top of the cake in order to make it bake better. The bread was baked in pot ovens.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:40
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Four and twenty white cows,
Standing in a stall.
Up cam them red bull,
And licked them all?
A cow’s tongue licking her teeth.
What never was and never will be,
Look at your hand and you will see?
Your wee finger will never be as long as your middle finger.
A long man legless came to the door headless, and said keep in your hens madam. I’m not afraid of your dog?
A worm
What would you fill a barrel with to make it lighter?
Holes.
What goes around the house and around the house and peeps into every hole.
The sun.
What hangs high up, but looks low
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:40
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A woman spinning.
What flies high, lights low, cuts the grass, but never mows? The frost.
How many feet has forty sheep, the shepherd, and his dog? Two feet.
I have a brown cow with two leather horns. She’s a leaper of ditches, a clipper of thorns? A hare.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:40
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As I went in into Saint Ives, there I met with seven wives. The seven wives had seven sacks. The seven sacks had seven cats. Kits, cats, sacks, and wives. How many went into Saint Ives? One person.
As I went over yonder hill, I met my uncle old man. He had diamonds, he had rings, he had far better things. He had a cat with nine tails, and a hammer with four nails. He had old Jennie spinner to make ready his dinner with the half leg of a frog, and the hearts blood of the beetle, and the liver of a trout, and four sheep skins [sic] with the wrong side out? A man weaving.
I have a wee mare with an iron throat as fast she gallops she swallows the rope?
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:40
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in every corner? Snow.
In Samson’s Park there lives a deer with golden horns. She disappears without sticks, stones, flesh, or bones in Samson’s Park she walks alone? The moon
Eight arms, no hands, a wooden leg, but cannot stand, is often wet, but cannot feel, it has no boots and is shod with steel, a dress of silk, a belt round. How can you guess this sill riddle? An Umbrella
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:39
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
What sits on the back with an eye like a hawk? A Soot Drop [?]
What hangs and bears and never blossoms? A crook.
As I sat in my gerible garible I looked out of my werible warible I saw Billy thicken out in the world of wickam, I sent Hentry Gendry out to hunt Billy thickan thackam out of the world of wickam wackam? A bull in a field of corn.
I ran and I got it, I sat down and searched for it, I didn’t get it and I brought it home with me? A thorn in your foot.
What turns without moving? Milk
What goes round the house and round the house and leaves a rag
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:39
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and then there is another well at the Abbey outside Ballyshannon and people go there too for cures. Another famous place for cures in the Old Cross at Ardloh [?] close to the banks of Lough Neagh. It is one of the famous better designs. Many people come from Scotland and England in the summer to see it. It is said if you stick a pin in the Cross you will get cured of your complain
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:39
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In bygone days, old cures were more applied than nowadays.
The cure was to put the horses winkers on the children and lead them to drink at a well for three times in succession. Nobody had this cure unless their parents were of the same names.
A cure for the whooping cough was to put the child in and out under the donkey’s legs in the three best names.
This was an awful severe disease. Old people got nettles a boiled them and made nettle tea and they put it all over them.
Also, long years ago, there was an old man down in Murvagh [?] and he used to bleed himself to give a cure.
There is a small well down by Letterkearny [?] and people go there to get cures for all kinds of diseases
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:38
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Children whose parents were of the same name are supposed to have the power to cure mumps. The cure was to put a pair of donkeys winkers on the person who had the mumps and led him to a well once every day for three days, each time taking a cup in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.
Some people have the cure for the worm toothache by placing their hand on the cheek they can kill the pain upon the instant. It is said if you place a worm on the persons hand that has the it dies.
People take strong tea without milk or sugar; in it is a cure [for?] the headache.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:38
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Mouth in it placing a burning candle inside of this and putting it on a fence in order to frighten people who are passing. Nuts are eaten at Halloween and fruit is also eaten. Games are also played.
At Christmas the “mummers” go about from house to house dressed in old clothes and a white shirt belted at the waist singing songs and dancing and usually asking money. Christmas is kept in memory of the day that our lord was born and it is a great feast day for everyone. It falls on the twenty fifth of December. The shops and houses are all decorated for Christmas.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:38
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It is said that any body [sic] who licked an arch slave three imes in the three best names they had the cure for a burn in their tongue.
A cure for the toothache was to rub the cheek with a bit of a sheet that a corpse had been layed on.
If you took it in your foot it is supposed to be a cure to bury it. You go out to the field and some one will have to go with you and make a hole with a spade, put your foot in. It is then covered up with clay for say half an hour for three days, you have to act this for three days.
Jaundice can be cured by boiling different herbs in milk. It must be taken every morning till you are better.
An old cure for cuts was to rub them well with salt and others put new lime on.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:37
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cure and they pray over it, and then they rub it on the afflicted part and it is said to cure immediately.
There is a Holy well in a field outside Ballintra and the water is supposed to be able to cure the toothache.
A woman named Walsh, who live in the townland [sic] of Rockhill, has a cure for a sprain. She ties a cord round the part that is sprained. This is done three times and it is said to cure the sprain.
A man the name of Johnston has a cure for cancer. The cure is made of herbs.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:37
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Anyone whose father and mother havr the same surname has a cure for mumps. They take the person who is sick to a stream that is running South and they lift water in their hands and the patient takes three mouthfuls in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. This has to be done thee says in succession.
A Stye on the eye can be cured by getting ten gooseberries stabs and touching it with nine of them and throwing the tenth one over your left shoulder.
Epileptic fits or falling sickness can be cured if whoever sees the person taking it first, takes a handful of something that cannot be numbered and throws it on them in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.
Rose [?] can be cured by taking a piece of butter to whoever has the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:37
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Of march and on that day it is the custom for the people to wear shamrocks in their coats because when ST. Patrick was with the king he plucked a shamrock from the ground and said that the three leaves on the one stem represented the three persons in the trinity. This day is kept in memory of the day St. Patrick died.
At Easter long ago young people used to go away from home to some old ruined house make a fire boil eggs and have tea. On Easter Sunday people always eat eggs and rejoice and hold great feasts because our lord rose from the dead on that day.
On Halloween night long ago young people used to go round the houses and listen and whenever they heard being talked about they were supposed to get married to those persons. People do many tricks on Halloween night and the well-known one is cutting the centre out of a turnip and making two eyes and a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:37
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
It is a cure for whooping cough to go to a woman that has married a man with the same name as herself and get a piece of bread or a spoonful of sugar to eat.
A cure for the toothache is to eat a double nut. Another cure for the toothache is to eat a double nut. Another cure is to go to a holy wll and or down on your knees and put some of the water on your tooth, then bring some water home with you. Another cure is to let a frog put its paws on the sore tooth.
Clay out of a priests [sic] grave mixed with fresh butter is a cure for Ring worm [sic]. A cure for mumps is to go through an animals legs three times.
There was a man living in Mullinacross who had a cure for a sprain. He tied a string round the sprain and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:37
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said a few words. After a few days, the sprain was better.
There was a woman that had a charm, she could take a mote out of your eye. She got a cupful of clean water, and she said a few words. Then, the more came into her mouth and she put the cup to her mouth and the mote came into the water.
An ivy leaf put to a corn will remove it.
A black snail put to a wart will cure it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:36
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A cure for styes is to break ten thorns of a gooseberry bush and throw one over the left shoulder, then paint the nine to the stye, then bury them in the ground and if they rot, you would never have any more styes.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:36
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The people of this district believe in several old customs connected with the feast days of the year. The most important festivals are namely St. Brigid’s [?] day, St. Patrick’s day, Easter, Halloween, Christmas and St. Stephen’s day.
St. Brigid’s day which falls on the first of February is the first important festival of the year. On that night some of the people make crosses out of rushes and hand one in every room over the door and bless them. On St. Brigid’s night the doors of the houses are left open the fires unquenched so that St. Brigid and her followers may come in and warm themselves and bless the house. When everyone is in bed the head of the house takes one of everyone’s clothes and leaves them somewhere for St. Brigid to wear and keep herself warm.
St. Patrick’s day fall on the seventeenth
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:34
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Long ago there was more harm done with storms then there is nowadays. My father remembers a storm which began on the twenty third of July. We were then living beside the sea and the storm was stronger there than any other place. The first night of the storm the hay stacks were blown into the water and the rain washed the potato drills out of the fields. Next morning the storm was so strong that it carried a cart into the sea and tumbled old houses and turf stacks. Trees were tumbled on roofs of houses and calves were killed with lightening.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:34
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There were many Graveyards in this district in olden times and some of them can still be seen. There is one in Birray which belongs to Mr. John Mangan and he has now crop of potatoes and corn in it. The old people remember a church being there and people being buried there. Some time ago man were widening the road at the of the Graveyard and they came upon Human teeth. There is said to be a ghost on the road there because one night a man was cutting a stick on the ditch and there came a foot round the turn.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:34
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Buying and selling was very common in this district long ago. The people used to gather together and sell the things in town or in a country house. Some of the people bought on tick which means without money. In that time clothes were bought on the street and they were not as good as the clothes we buy now in the shops. Long ago it was very hard to sell animals because nobody would give a good price for them. It was the woman who did the selling and the men worked in the houses.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:33
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Long Ago there were many houses in the district but they were not the same as the houses of the present time. Some of them were round in shape and the fire was put in the middle of the floor. The oblong houses had the fire in the same place as some have it now. Long ago the bed was in the corner opposite the fire. The table had two feet on one end and he other end was fastened to the wall by an iron rod. When the table was not in use t was lifted up and fastened at the top by a hook in the wall which caught in a ring in the table. In that time half doors were very common and the houses were thatch with straw rushes reeds and bent. The rushes and bent were got in fields and the reeds were found growing long the waterside. The people grew the straw themselves and later they found out that it always makes the best roof.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:33
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there were many giants living in this district in olden times but very little is known about the,. Long ago there was a giant living in Ballintra district and everybody he saw he threw stones at them. One day there was a man going along the road and the giant saw him. He at once got a stone and threw it at him but by good luck the man escaped being hit. The stone went about twenty yards over the road and lot in a field which is one side of Ballintra Chapel. The stone is about six feet high and about ten feet long and the shape of the giant’s hand is in it. When the owner of the field saw the large stone he and some other men tried to lift it but they were not able. The stone still remains in the field.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:32
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Long ago there were many industries carried on in this district and some of them still exist such as basket making and thatching. My father makes baskets and thatches houses. When one is making a basket one has to make a hoop out of a long rod. Then put nine robs in it and tighten them so that they will not come out. After that one winds rods between the ribs. It takes four twisted rods to put in two handles because if the rods were not twisted the handles would get loose.
When thatching a house the old thatch must be removed. Every row of straw put on is about two feet wide. When a row is completed […] ladder […] to be altered. As leave space for another row. After finishing thatching the straw is cut so as to leave an eve on the rood. The thatch is then completed.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:32
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A cure for ringworm is to put a gold sovereign or a gold ring round it and it will keep it from spreading.
A cure for heart fever is to go to a person who is supposed to be able to cure certain ailments. The patient is to get a bowl of oatmeal and put it against their heart three times in succession. If there is a hole in the meal the person had to make a cake of the meal and eat it and then they would be cured.
The person who had the mumps was to be led to South running water, by a person whose father and mother’s surnames were the same. The patient had to be led with a pair of donkey’s [sic] or horse’s [sic] winkers. They had to be led three times and take a drink each time.
An old cure for whooping cough was to take a drink of donkey’s milk.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:31
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Man with a black beard, she would never get grey.
People called straw boys used to visit the house where the wedding feast was held. They were something like our nowadays […] only they were dressed with straw and they amused everyone and generally got whiskey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:31
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May is supposed to be an unlucky month for marriage and Monday and Saturday are supposed to be the unlucky days of the week as the old saying says “Saturdays flit is a short sit.”
Long ago people used to g to the wedding on horseback and after the wedding there was a race home and the first to arrive got a bottle of whisky. It was counted lucky if the bride did not stay at her own home for a month. The bride had to wear something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue and it was said to be unlucky if she wore green.
The father of the bride used to make the match and if the man who was going to marry her did not think her good enough he might get money or land with her. This money was called “dowry”.
It was said that if the bride kissed a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:27
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Motor car and most of the building was burned.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:27
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the ground. It also tore up the road.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:27
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About seven or eight years ago a fire look place in this district of Rossnowlagh the premises in question comprised of a garage and a newly built bungalow and was the property of Mr. McAskie [?]. In the garage the owner kept his motor care and also a horse care of a neighbour named George Farrel.
The fire started but how nobody knows but when my father, William J. Stronge was going to bed he saw the fire and he went to the place but there was no one to be seen there. The flames were well over the building by this time so my father went and got help and when help enough came the door was broken open all rushed in and succeeded in getting hold on the horse-car bit owing to the great heat they got burned and had to let go. After about an hour the fire was put out but the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:27
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About sixty years ago, there was a flood in this district and there was a great many crops destroyed and there were many sheep lost. The water went into a house at Laghey bridge and it tossed it. But the people that were in the house escaped in time to save their lives. In the year 1922 there was a great thunder-storm [sic]. There was a woman killed with lightening and one of her cows were [sic] killed the same night. The same evening there was a man who lived in Ballinakilleur [?] getting hay at the hay-stack [sic] and he saw a ball of fire coming towards him, he thought it was was [sic] going to hit him, but it passed without doing him any harm and it struck a [sic] oak tree that was near him and it split it to
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:26
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there was a great fire on a mountain in this district about fifty years ago. The cause of this fire was that someone when crossing dropped a living match and the long grass took fire. It burnt for a week because everything was dry as the weather had been good for a long time before.
This fire burnt turf and many bird’s nests. Many people went out and tried to put it out but they did not succeed in doing so. Men went out and dug drains round their turf to protect them from the fire. This was the biggest fire ever seen in this district and many hundred acres of land was destroyed with it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:26
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Churns. Some of them could change themselves into animals such as a hare and go into the byres to draw the milk from the cows. It takes an hour to churn and it is usually done by hand in this age and also by creameries. Before the milk is churned you always pull the churndash up and down but when the milk is churned you always give the churndash a rolling motion to gather the butter. When you pull the churndash it is always covered with milk and so by that you are able to tell when the butter is made. The water is poured on the milk during churning from to turn the milk into butter it would get “scalded” and be white in colour. When the butter is made, it is lifted out into a wooden dish by hand or by a large spoon. Then it is salted. When the butter us taken off the milk it is called “buttermilk”. It is used for giving to calves or for making bread.
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2015-03-18 14:26
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III
The load it blind folded them,
Not knowing what to do,
They all jumped out into the deep
And drowned the whole crew.
IV
There were two females in this boat,
In Birragh town to dwell.
It was few about this country,
Could those to girls excel
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:26
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we have not a churn at home, but there is one in a neighbour’s house. The sides of the churn are round and it is about thirty years old. The upper part of a churn is called the chim but of never heard a name for the under part. There is a hole in the lid through which the churndash goes up and down, the churndash is round in shape like a wooden wheel. There is a round block in the centre of the churn and when you will it up with milk to this block you have it half full. Butter is made about twice a week in winter and three times a week in summer. The woman of the house always does the churning but sometimes her husband helps her. In olden times if a stranger would come in to a house during churning time he would have to churn for about two minutes. There were often people who used a charm with which they could take the butter of
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:26
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About eighty years ago, there was a great storm in this district. It blew away a lot of things. It blew away about eighty pounds worth of lint, which belonged to George Thompson of Drumholm. It also blew away hay-stacks [sic] that were iun fields and grain was blown into Drumholm Lough. About sixty years ago, there was a big flood in this district, which took away turnips and mangle and other things out of fields.
I
It was on a Monday morning,
In the month of May.
Down by the shore, the billows roar,
The young men took their way.
II
A boat they launched they soon advanced,
The morning it seemed clear.
Five of them sat down to row,
The sixth one for to steer.
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2015-03-18 14:26
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Wait until day came. I took the money away.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:25
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There is said to be much hidden money in this district. People say that it was the Danes who buried the money all over Ireland. There is a crock of gold hidden in a place called Glassbolly Alt. and men have often tried to find it but failed to do so. One night a man was in his bed and a voice came to the back door. It said “come out with your spade to the alt, and dig at the foot of the tallest tree you see and you will find a crock of gold”.
There is a flag on the lid and […] only four inches deep of earth on it. His wife would not let him go because she was afraid it was someone who wanted to kill him. The next day the man took his spade and set out for the alt. the tallest tree he saw was a nut tree and he at once started to dig but could find no gold. At last he had to come home, and was very angry because he did not get any money. That night again the voice came and said. “if you had come last night and started to dig you would have found the gold but since you had to
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:25
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About forty-five years ago, there was a great thunder storm [sic] in this district. It cause great damage to animals, trees, and houses. After the storm was over, there were extensive floods all over fields and roads. About sixty years ago there was a great storm in this district. Trees, hay-stacks [sic], walls and roofs of houses were blown down. In the townland [sic] of Mullinasole, there were three houses blown down. In one house, in which an old woman lived, tables, chairs, boxes, boots and all sorts of vessels were swept away by the floods, which follows the storm. The woman was finally swept away when she tries to rush out. A man from one of the neighbouring houses rushed in after her and brought her safe to land.
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2015-03-18 14:25
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Cure it.
A large fish called a pike is the cure for consumption.
If you get very fine whins and boil them their juice will be a cure for a shortness of breath.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:24
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there are cures for many kinds of diseases such as follows.
If one finds a stone in potatoes after they are boiled, it is a cure for toothache. This stone is rubbed three times to the tooth in the three best names. The father, son and the Holy Ghost. Then you throw the stone away. It is said that when you throw it away you also throw the pain away.
The seventh son of a family, without a girl coming in between has the cure for the evil.
If any father or mother are of the same surname their children can lead one ill of the mumps to a stream or to a bowl of water. The ill person takes three mouthfuls of the water in the name of the father, son, and Holy Ghost. Then the person is cured.
If one licks a fish called an “Ash-Sleff” he has a cure for a burn on his tongue.
If one has a sty on the eye and pulls ten gooseberry stabs and throws the tenth one away. Then point the other nine at the sty, and it will
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:24
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once upon a time a man left Donegal and when he was a long way up the road he heard a very heavy foot coming after him. At last it appeared in the form of a pig and at last into a bag of feathers. It kept in front of him to Ballintra and it then disappeared until he came through the town. The next time it appeared it was in the form of a turkey and at last into the shape of a coach. Then it disappeared at a place called Fillard, but when the man came further on it came again in the form of a man and it walked with him till he came to Fayogh Bridhe. The man was very frightened although he was often out at night before and he went to bed for three days after.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:20
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A cure for mumps. If the person who has the cure puts a horse’s bridle on the sick person’s head and drives them to a pool of water and makes them drink three times in the name of the father, son, and Holy Ghost, it is said to cure it. 4. To rub the green leaf of a dock on a nettle sting is said to cure it. 5. If anyone has a stye on the eye and plucks ten gooseberry thorns, throws away the tenth and points the remaining nine at the sore, three times in the name of the father, son and holy ghost it is said to cure it. 6. To cure hiccough one should swallow three times without drawing breath or drink from the wrong side of a cup.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:20
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long ago the Irish people had cures of their own for various diseases and sores and yet although Ireland has many famous doctors and hospitals a number of the people especially the old generation have great faith in these ancient cures.
Locally many people prefer to doctor themselves by these ancient methods then to trust the medical doctor.
These are some of the local cures
1. If anyone finds a stone unexpectedly among boiled potatoes and helps it, it is said that they will never like toothache. 2. Dandelion juice is supposed to cure corns. 3. If the father and mother in a house were of the same name before they were married their children will have a cure for mumps. William J Stronge, my father has
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:20
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Thing going on but could see no one.
He came on home and after he came through Ballintra he saw a black dog on the rood trying to catch his tail. A full moon was shining and so everything was very clear. The dog ran over the ditch and the man went into the field to see if there was anything there but there was nothing.
The man was a bit frightened and began to run, and ran all the way home to Rossnowlagh.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:19
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my great grandfather was once going to a fair in Pattigo and he had to pass through the village of Ballintra to go to it. He was bringing a horse to the fair to sell and he started on his journey late the evening before the fair but only went as far as Ballintra and stayed in his friend’s house during the night. He was to meet another man that night, near a mill about one mile beyond Ballintra. When he came to that place he heard chains rattling up the lane but he could see no one. He tied the horse to the gate and went up the lane and still could see no one but the chains still rattled round him. He want back loosed the horse and went on his way to the fair and sold the horse.
As he was coming home again at the same place, he heard the same
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:19
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Leading them to a stream to drink.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:19
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There are cures for many diseases. Jack Crawford, Rathfragan and James Patton Killynangle have a cure for a burn they lick an ashleaf and this cures it.
Tommy Green Dromore has a cure for the jaundice; he makes the medicine for it out of whisky and herbs.
Morris Thomson has a cure for a sprain, it is some kind of a thread he makes.
Willie Lesslie Ballymagorty has a cure for evil the cure being to breathe on the person’s face three times in the name of the father, the son and the Holy Ghost.
Mrs. Michael barron Birrah has a cure for heartfeaver, the cure is a thimble full of salt sugar and meal baked in a little cake and eaten in three pieces going to bed.
David Johnston Copony has a cure for cancer.
Mrs. Danial Galaher has a cure for enycipilus [?].
William Strong Rossnowlagh has a cure for mumps – by putting the horse’s winkers on and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:18
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it is said that there are hidden treasures in this district.
These were put here by the Danes and they intended to come back for them, but when they were away they were not let back so the gold remains here yet.
There is one in Lurgan bairn [?] but before it is got, a life has to be lost trying to get it. It is a pot of gold in a hole in a rock. There is another in Glasbollie sults and there are bushes growing round it.
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2015-03-18 14:18
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September and come back in April. They are not songsters they build their nests in barns or eves of houses. They are a black green colour with a white breast.
The borncrake goes away at the same time as the swallows and it comes back at the same as them too. It is not a songster it makes a noise of “born-crake” and it is from its noise that is got its name, it is sometimes called the landrail. It builds its nest in the meadows and lays brown spotted eggs.
The cuckoo migrates in the month of July or in the beginning of August and comes back in April. The Cuckoo has a cry of cu-cu and it is from the cry she gets her name.
The cuckoo comes in April,
She sings her song in May,
In leafy June she changes her tune,
In July she flys [sic] away.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:17
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Bill. The blackbird builds its nest of clay at the bottom of a thick hedge. It lays a blue speckled egg. The thrush and the blackbird are both songbirds.
The starling may be seen on the top of a high tree or on a house top. The starling’s song is very sweet. It is a mixture of low calls and whistling and now and then a gentle chattering of teeth. Starlings live in flocks. They build their nests in the chimneys of houses. The nests are made of sticks and hay. The starling does not hop but walks. The male Linnet wears a gray suit during winter but in summer it has a greenish brown. It builds its nest in the shelter of a whin bush.
The robin is the tamest bird we have, it is brown in colour with a red breast, it makes its nest in a shady bank or old wall, the robin comes to our door in winter when many birds have gone away. The robin lays a white egg with brown spots. All these birds do not migrate.
The swallows are birds that migrate about
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:17
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in summer there are many birds to be seen and their songs are so mingled together that it is hard to distinguish one from another unless we know each one very well. In winter a bird is easier seen amidst the leafless tress and hedges then in amidst the thick summer foliage. Near a hedge a blackbird or a thrush may be found not perched up high but hidden among the brushwood at the bottom and they will always go to the opposite side of the hedge when they see a person.
Both the blackbird and the thrush love the hedge because they are timid birds and from its shelter they can see danger without being seen. The reason they like the hedge is because on a winters day they might be lucky to find at most a morsel of food. When startled the blackbird flees out with a loud call. The speckled brown thrush gives no call but flies shyly away.
The blackbird and thrush hops along. The male blackbird is black with a yellow bill, but the female is a dull brown and has a black
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:16
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Use it was hung up on the wall. I saw one in this district myself. There were two nails a little distance apart in the wall and in iron rod stretches from one to the other. There are two legs on the outside of the table which are fastened to the iron rod, and when the table is lifted up the legs fall flat with the table and it is kept up but a little board coming from the roof which turns in over it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:16
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the food the people had long ago was different from the food that we have now. In olden times they had four meals each day. Potatoes were eaten often and of potatoes were scarce porridge was eaten. The porridge was made from Indian wheaten or oaten meal.
Sometimes the people ate potatoes alone, but sometimes they had vegetables with them. The turnips were peeled and boiled. I heard it say that a cake was made out of boiled turnips and Indian meal and was only half cooked. Butter milk was taken as a drink when eating. Pea meal made from pea was used and it was kept in a sort of bag hanging from the rood. The people sometimes used to steep the hills of oats in water until it was fermented. This took about two weeks. The liquid was then strained off this and it was boiled until it resembled thin porridge. This liquid was called “sowins” and used as porridge. It had a rather sour taste.
In every house when the table was not in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:15
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An arch and wound in with finer rods. There is another way to make a basket, put sticks standing up and weave other thinner ones round them, starting at the top.
People used a rush with the green skin taken off it and it split in two, then it was sipped in some kind of oil, which used to make it burn longer. This was the kind of lights they used.
Sprigging was another very important and prosperous industry. It is carried on yet but not so much as it used to be.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:15
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the most important of the old industries which were carried on here long ago was weaving and spinning. There was a spinning wheel in every house which was worked buy the woman folk. Everyone used to make their own clothes. Linen and woolen were the materials made.
There were iron works too; cranes, crooks and ploughs were made. Earlier the ploughs were made of wood.
Thatching is still carried on in this district but long ago the people used to thatch with reeds and rushes and some of them do this yet. The thatch is put on and then it is kept down by a piece of sally stick called a scallop. Then the thatch is cut level so that the water can not get down through.
Basket making is still carried on and there are many people in this district who can yet make them. First a hoop is made to form the top of the basket and then the ribs are pit in in the shape of
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:14
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There is a field called “Sam’s Park” beside my uncle’s land and there us a treasure supposed to have been hidden there. The place was called “Sam’s Park” because a man named “Sam Lurgan” lived there, he used to sleep by himself and every night a wee man used to shake him in the bed. Then Sam got a man called James O’Donnell to sleep with him, but still the wee man used to come. One night, Sam got up and asked the wee man what did he want, he told him about the treasure and am want and dug for it, but all he saw was the place where the pot was. He then said that if the pot was there the gold was there so when they went the next night there were the fairies with the gold.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:12
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
These are the names which are usually given to cows, Dot, Speckle or Blackie. We say “Che” [?] when driving cows in or out of a field. We have calves at home and their names are Molly, Dot, Speckle, Blackie, we say “Suc Suc” when driving them. The cowhouse is a large house and it is called the byre. It has two doors, one on the back of it and one in the front and a path from one to the other. The cows are tied at the gable walls to stakes. They are tied by the neck. The tyings are made of iron chains but they are not homemade.
We have a horse at home and her name is Molly. We have goats to, and when we are calling them we say “nanny” or “gudy”. “Bhuch” is the usual call for hens, for chickens “birdie”. When we are hunting hens ducks or geese we say “sho”. When we call turkeys we call “pee pee”.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the sock and thistle are the most harmful weeds growing on the farm and they both spread rapidly and make the soil poor and bad, and to make matters worse they only grow in good ground. House-leek is used for sore eyes. Bogbean is used for stomach complaints. Thistles and pignuts are supposed to be food for cattle. Pignuts are little things like potatoes only much smaller they grow in dry places.
Some herbs were used as cures for diseases long ago but they are not used now as we have medicinal cures.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago people used to put the butter into a little barrel and put it under ground until they would get time to sell it in the market.
About a year ago men were working in a bog [?] in Ballydermott and after cutting for a while they came on a small barrel full of butter. The butter seemed fresh but the barrel was all decayed. They took it home with them but I do not know what they did with it but I know they did not use it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Broke his leg. After that it was closed up again and was never opened since.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago there were many old forts about this district but very few of them remain now. They were known by several names such as Lisses [?] Forts Cathair [?] rings or paths. There was once a fort about two hundred yards from my home but only parts of it remain now. It is circular in shape and there were four places to go out and in through. There is another of three forts in Killinangle which his about three hundred yards from the one I first spoke about. Sights were often now burning on there. Dr. Criton of Ballyshannon and Hagh Allagham went into the one in Killinangle. It was built in small rooms about six feet every way and there was a small entrance from one room to the other. They travelled through it for about an hour and they discovered some boxes which were a midctare [?] of eattles [?] and hamavis [?]. It was supposed to have been the Danes who built these forts for protection. It was a man who was ploughing who found this fort as he lifted the flag of the top off with the plough. He ploughed away that day and before night one of his horses
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:11
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
And in cold weather a bag of hay was put in the hole. The floors were made of clay some old houses in this district have still clay floors. Long ago the flowers floors were swept with heather brooms and were never washed.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the houses of old were nearly all thatched with corn straw heather rushes ben or flasc [?]. an odd house was slated these slates were heavy and called “borlagh slates” they were not nailed but were hung to the laths with wooden pegs. This kind of slated roof is now to be seen on one house in this district a house in Ballintra which is occupied by “Barron and Mc Grane Funeral Undertakes”. These old houses had usually a bed in the kitchen. It was always in the corner near the fire and was surrounded by a particular called an “out shot”. The fire was always at the gable wall. The chimney was made of mortar and stone and sometimes clay and wattles. Old people heard of houses having no chimneys but this was in very old times. Long ago there were no glass windows but holes in the place of them.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A man named James Boyle was coming home from rabling one night and as he was leaping over a ditch he saw the spirit of a man named George Allen who was dead one year on that day. the ghost did not speak but looked at him. James ran home and fainted several times on his way. He was very sick when he arrived home.
A year after that day James was coming over the ditch and he saw a pig running in front of him. He ran after it and it turned into a man. It was the spirit of George Allen again. James fainted when he saw it and when he came conscious it was away.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:10
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Her shawl to her brother but he was no swimmer and could do nothing for her. Her other brother who was a simmer was not there but he said if he had been there he would have saved her life.
Boating of wrack was customary of this time. Five people are generally in the boat. Two to cat the wrack two to take it in and one to pail out the water taken in by the wet wrack.
A Creel’s moth upwards was generally placed in the bottom of the boat no wrack was put in this creel so that when the boat was filled with wrack the surplus water would leak in to the creel and would be easily emptied. It is suspected that the Jiomney had forgotten the creel until they had their landing in it was not found in its customary place but tied to the stern of the boat. The oldest of the Jiomneys was called James and the youngest was not far advanced in his teens. It was he whom the father grieved for most of all because it was against his will he left home that day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:09
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
When the boat was ready to leave the girls had not arrived so a coat was […] on the blade of an oar as a signal to the girls who were on their way. The girls saw the signal and they were seen running down Birrah strand and boarding the boat at the sand gap. A third woman Mrs. Corron of Foyagh who had been going with them trned back on Birrah strand as her husband called to her not to go as some men had come to help them with their work.
Everything appears to have gone all right, until the homeward journey but as the boat advanced shoreward the people who were cutting seaweed on the rocks off the shore could see that the boat was weighing heavily in the water and its occupants getting into distress. When the boat was about a stone’s throw off Kilkey Point it was seen to quiver and sink and its occupants leap into the sea, probably hoping to get clear of the entangling seaweed which they had aboard and to chance swimming. The young people failed to swim ashore although I am sure the servant boy was a good swimmer and could have swam across the whole bay but he never came in alive probably he got entangled in the seaweed. Miss Madden waved
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:09
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
History of the drowning of the Jiomneys [?] and the girls and a servant boy on May 21st 1869 of Kilkey point in Donegal Bay, Co. Donegal.
Four young brothers named Jiomney who lived in the house now occupied by Charles sangan, Drumlongfish with a neighbors servant boy left their homes on Monday, May 21st 1869 for the purpose of going to the North Rock or to the Waste Rock which is off Rossnowlagh in Donegal Bay to car seaweed. When they reached the “Bar of Bunlin” where their boat was beached they found that a bank of blowing sand had accumulated between the baot and the […] stream so they took another boat belonging to a man named Gillespie of Inisfad. This boat had not been in use for some time and it was a little “gaisoned” and leaking from the effect of drying.
The boys had previously made arrangements with two girls one named Dollie Mc Gorrigleaf Foyagh and the other named Mary Madden of Birrah to take them out to the rocks for the purpose of gathering “dulce”.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:09
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
1. It is said that one would not take the whooping cough if one would eat the food that a ferret left behind. Or if one went under a donkey three times.
2. If a man marries a woman of the same surname as himself their children will be able to cure mumps. James Mc Groary, Durnish, Mrs. Corron Foryagh, James Gallaher Ballymagroarty.
3. the cure for a dog’s bite is to put some of his hair on the bite and it will get better.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In America they call the cabbage heads “tinkers”. Onnce upon a time a scotch woman went on a visit to America. One day the people she was staying with were having cabbage for dinner and the scotch woman was told to bring on two “tinkers”. She went out and started to search and when she was out a few hours she saw two ragged corner boys and she brought them into the house. “What kept you so long out?” said the American woman. “Iwas looking for tinkers” said the scotch woman. “Get the sharpest kife in the house and cut them fine.” Hearing this the two boys ran out and the scotch woman after them and followed them all day. then she came back the American woman scolded her but when she told the story she only laughed.
The next day the two women got a notice to attend the law and when the two woman told their story they set the whole court laughing.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:06
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And so it made a good strong rope.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:05
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
About forty years ago there was a nailor called Thomas Finch. He made nails of iron.
He lived in Balintra village about three miles from my home. He would sell the nails to the shop keepers when he would have them made.
The women of this district made their material from their clothes. They used to spin lint and then they would weave it into cloth. This clothe was very strong and warm. They also made their own due on the flowers. If they wanted yellow dye they would make it out of yellow flowers and blue due out of blue flowers. After dying the clothe they would spin it.
Gloves, stocking, socks caps jerseys and other things were knitted and then sold in town. The wool was spun to make yarn.
Creals [?], riddles chairs cradles and baskets were made out of rods. Strong rods were got and were weaved in and out through them.
Ropes were made of lint. The lint was plaited
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:05
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago, straw boys would go to the house of the bride after the weeing because the bride always had a feast on the wedding night. These boys were dressed in straw and they used to sing and dance. Now a feast is help in the wedding day and the bride and groom go away for a week or so on a holiday. This holiday is called a honeymoon. When they come home there is a big feast in the groom’s house. It is said if an old shoe is thrown after the married pair it would bring them luck.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago the people said that certain months of the year and certain days of the week were lucky for marriage but now people do not believe this a date and a day is fixed and the marriage takes place. May is said to be a lucky month and April is said to be an unlucky one. Saturday can be either. It is said a person born in April should marry a person born in June and a person bring in May should marry a person born in September.
Match making is seldom carried on now, sometimes old people are married that way. The way that matches were made was the man would go to the woman’s house and take a bottle of whiskey with him and ask the girl off her father. If he thought the bride was not good enough the father of the bride would give the groom land and money.
Often, before the wedding the bride and groom would go on horseback and would stay away for a few days. The bride’s father would go and take them back and then get them married.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:04
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Woman, with white robes, she was going up the land [?] with a light in her hand, and she went down straight into the ground and he never saw it no more.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:03
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
one time, a man, named Peter Mc Gonnigle, who lived about a quarter of a mile from my home was coming home from a wake. He had to come through an Alt in Glasbolly and when he was coming through it, he pulled a bush which the dead woman had planted. He took it to one of his neighbour’s houses and tied it to the door, to keep them in the house.
His cousin John Mc Gonnigle was with him one when John turned in his own reed, Peter heard a noise, he heard someone whispering to him, but he could see nothing and he could not understand it was saying.
When he come near his own house, he saw a tall black woman. He ran home and hot a gun and when he came back the ghost was still there. He […] a shot and the ghost turned into an animal and ran in home and went into bed but the ghost ran up the wall. He fired another shot and tossed it down. It came up the wall again and he fired the third shot and the ghost disappeared. He looked for a while and saw it again, in a form of a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Some people can take the butter away from the milk by witchcraft. There was a woman one time called Hagly [?] Coilins and she could take the butter of anyone’s milk. She lived about two miles from my home.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:01
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
the implement they used to grind the oats was “grind stones” which were called “querns”. Some of these grind stones exist yet. There is one of them at Mr. Mc Nulty’s about a hundred yards from my home. It is made of cement and there is a whole [sic] in the top to put the oats down through. The names of the different kinds of bread made were potato cake, boscly [?] bread, oat meal bread, and rye-bread.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 14:00
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time there was a man who went out to hang himself. He got a rope and put one end of it round his neck and tied the other end to a bush. He saw that this way was choking him and so he tied the rope round his legs and then again tied it to the brush. By this time a man has come up the road and he asked him what he was doing. He told him he was trying to hang himself. The second man told him that that was not the way to hang one-self. The best way was to put the rope round your neck. He said that he tried that but he nearly choked himself.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
long ago, there were people know [sic] as “Giants”. They were very big strong men about seven or eight feet in height. It is about a hundred years since any of these men were in the country but yet, some traces of them remain in the district, such as Giants graves.
The people say, that long ago, there lived a giant in a cave on the top of Largan Cairn [?] which is about a hundred yards from my home. Near this cave there is a grave in which this Giant is supposed to be buried and a stone chair was which was supposed to be used by him. Many visitors go to the top of this Cairn in the summer.
It is said that this giant threw a stone weighing about twelve hunder [sic] weights from the top of the Cairn to the acres in Corker which is about fifteen miles away. These giants used to go out fighting battles and they often fought among themselves.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:53
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago there was a man named James Doherty who lived in Glasbollie. He had a spinning wheel. He used to buy all the wool about here and then make it into thread and sell it in the markets. At an auction he sold the wheel and Mrs. Irinder [?] the Rector’s wife of Rossnowlagh bought it from him and she brought it home and put it in the front hall. She still has it. It is made of wood and iron and it stands on three feet. There is a big wheel and there are two belts on it. The lever is moved by the feet, this works the wheel. It is something like a sewing machine. The lipped wool was first washed and then carded it was then piled on the wheel ready for spinning into yarn. Long ago in Ireland and these hings were forgotten about.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:53
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
it is believed that there is a hidden treasure in Glasbollie Aults. It is supposed to have been hidden about a couple of hundred years ago in a field which now belongs to Brian Welsh. The treasure is said to consist of a pot of gold and the Lace of Dromore, which was hidden by a landlord who was living in Dromore. Nobody ever dug for it because they did not know what place in the field it was.
There is another treasure supposed to be hid in Finner Hill. Long ago one morning some people went out to dig for it. They dug all day and in the evening they came of [?] on a large flag. The next morning they went out and the flag was covered with blood. They were frightened and covered the hole up. There are lights seen there, ever since.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:53
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a big stone near the town of Ballyshannon, it is about six feet in length and three feet in width and it is said that a giant once threw it at another giant. There are many giant’s graves about here. There is one in James Mac Intyre’s field which his near Ballyshannon. There is another at John Joan’s of boolmore.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:52
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VII. It’s hard to leave my childhood home. The cradle of my birth to cross the deep blue ocean a wanderer on the earth.
VIII. and if I am spared, I will return in the years that are to come to well beloved Rossnowlagh and my dear Rossnowlagh home. This is a song composed by Mrs. Grey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:02
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Homestead, and I think it hard to go.
IV. It’s hard to leave the boys and girls, the friends I loved so dear, to cross the deep blue ocean a wanderer on the earth.
V. there may be skies as bright and blue. There may be flowers as fair, but the flowers that are in Rossnowlagh will never blossom there.
VI. and though I roam through other lands, Neath skies as fair and bright but my heart will often return again to where it is to night.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:02
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
I. Rossnowlagh, dear Rossnowlagh, My heart is twined in thee. Where ere I roam, from friends and home though are ever dear to me.
II. I stand to night, on Neightens height, and Rossnowlagh, I survey, with its green and virteous hill tops and its dark blue rolling bay.
III. I see, the dear old church, and the trees around it grow. I see dear old
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:02
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago people carried on business after mass. They did not give money in exchange for goods they bought, but gave cattle instead. Fairs were held at farmer’s yards and on the roads. There were many words used in buying and selling such as “boot” and “tick”. Boot, is used when you want a higher price for what you are selling and tick is used when you want something on credit.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:02
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was caused. It started about one p.m. and continued to midnight and a whin bush was seen to light on Dromore Hill, when lightening struck it. There was a severe blizzard about 70 years ago, and some drifts were from nine to ten feet deep and some houses were covered and had to be dug out.
Long ago, while a boat with seven men on board was fishing off the Mullinasole shore, a huge wave overturned the boat and all were drowned save one who managed to cling to the boat till help arrived.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:01
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Nearly every season storms occur and cause great damage to life and property. In the spring of 1880 there was a great storm, which came on round the coast without warning. There was a fishing boat with five people on board, two of whom [sic] were woman [sic] and the other three were brothers. They went out to the waste rocks, which are northwest of Carrickfad, Rossnowlagh. They went out for a load of sea-weed [sic], but they loaded the boat too heavy as her gunwale was almost level with the water and on the return voyage home the storm swept down and overturned the fishing boat and all on board were lost.
There was a severe thunder storm [sic] in 1933, one of the worst almost in memory and a of damage
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
as I was going through the guttery gap, I met my Uncle Davey, I put him in my pocket afraid the sucks might eat him. He began to bite me and began to beat him, I threw him in the guttery gap and told ducks to eat him?
A Frog.
As I looked over Derry walls I say my Uncle Davey. I bit [?] his throat and sucked his blood and left him lying easy.
A bottle of whisky.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:01
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And she prays to God to comfor her,
On the Isle of Arranmore.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:01
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
had to get out and shoved the snow away from in front of the house. There was once a man and he has spread out some flax to dry, and a great storm came, and he ran and lay on he flax and said, “Ah! My lint is all lost.” Not manypeople remember about the storm in 1839. They say it tossed a church and some houses.
There was a great storm in 1936. There were some people coming home to see their mother, and there rose a great storm and they were drowned and this is a song written about it,
There’s a broken hearted mother,
On the Isle of Arranmore.
Her eyes are dim from weeping,
And her heart is laden sore.
She gazes on the raging tide,
That mourns around her door.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:01
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Any accounts I heard of storms was from my uncle. About ten years ago there was a severe storm. It was in the month of January. The sea tides were very bad down at Innisfad. The tide came over the banks and into them. Up at Rossnowlagh, the banks were all damaged. There was a terrible (terrible) thunder-storm [sic] about fifteen years ago and it did much damage. There was a family by the name of Hamilton and their mother was killed in bed with the lightening. A calf was also killed in the byre and some of the house was tumbled down. They say when there is a far away ring round the moon, there is a near, at-hand storm. A long time ago, there was a great snowfall. When my grandfather was going to the creamery with the horse, he
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I see some sheep that are white, white, white, I see a horn that is bright, bright, bright, I see a field that is blue, blue, blue, and I tell you is true, true, true?
Stars and half moon in the blue sky.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:00
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Riddle me, riddle me, what is that over the head and under the hat?
The hair of the head.
Patch upon patch without any stiches riddle me that, and I’ll buy you a hat.
A cabbage head.
As I looked over Derry wall, I heard a dead man give a call. His face was flesh. His moth was horn. Such a man never was born.
A rooster.
As I went through Barness gap who did I meet but Dick red cap. A stick in his hand a stone in his throat tell me this riddle and I’ll give you a goat?
A cherry.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:00
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Weighed out into pound or two pound rolls. The buttermilk is used for drinking and for porridge. Long ago, the butter was kept in butts which used to hold about fifty-six pounds.
I heard of a woman who was churning and another woman came in and when she went out again there was no butter on the churn.
I heard of other people who could not get butter off he churn for five years, but the priest brought it back to them and they nailed a horse shoe on the bottom of the churn and it is supposed to bring them luck.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:00
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Not they are able to take the butter off the churn. In the winter it takes two hours to do the churn as it is one by hand, the dash is moved upwards and downwards.
Sometimes there is a handle which is turned round and the churn is worked in that way. Sometimes churns are worked by a beam up to the rood and there is a spring on it and there is another one going along at the roof with a hole in it, for the dash to fit up through and it is held there by a bolt. Then there is a handle on the end of the beam which foes along the roof and when you pull the handle it works the dash.
People know that the butter is made when the dash is clean. Boiling water is used to warm the milk when churning but too much water spoils the butter and makes it white. Whenever it is white it is “scalded”. When the butter us made it is lifted out into a wooden dish and called a butter dish. Then it is washed and when all the milk is washed out of it it is salted and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 13:00
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
We have a churn at home and it is two feet four inches in height. It is, one foot six inches at the top and one foot eight inches at the bottom. The sides are round and it is two years of age. It is sloping from the bottom inwards and then outwards again towards the top. The lid, churndash and the cap are the different parts of the churn. The churn, is made of many boards standing upwards called the staves. Then, there are bands of iron put round them called the hoops. There is a mark on the top of the churn and another on the lid and when the two are opposite, the lid is on straight.
The butter is made once or perhaps twice a week but swing to the heat in the summer it ripens quicker and so churning is done oftener in summer than in winter. My mother does the churning, but if strangers come in, they are supposed to churn for about a minute because it is said that if they do
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:59
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
I live in the townland of Rossnowlagh. It got its name from one of the O’Donnells called Nuala. This girl called it Rossnowlagh or Nuala’s Peninsula.
There are eighteen families in Rossnowlagh and these all added together number sixty three people. The most common name in district is Kelly. Most of the houses are slated but there are some thatched ones too. There are no people who can tell stories in Irish and very few who can tell stories in English concerning the Folklore. The houses are more numerous now than they were in former times, but there are in ruins now [sic].
The land is fairly good but hilly. There is only one lake but it is a small one.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:59
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Signs of Thunder
1. Fish go to the bottom of water when they hear thunder.
2. If the sky is a copper colour it is a sign of thunder.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:58
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people in this district believe, that, -
1) A dog eating grass. (2) Seals crying at night. (3) Loud noises from the sea. (4) A circle round the moon. (5) A blue blaze in the fire. (6) Loud noises from rivers. (7) Swans gathering together and coming to shore. (8) The moon looking red. (9) Crows gathering in fields are signs of a storm.
Signs of Frost
1. Swans crying at night. 2. Shooting stars. 3. A blue sky and bright stars and wild geese flying towards the mountains are signs of frost.
Signs of Rain
1. A clouded moon. 2. Seagulls flying in to land in fields. 3. Flying ants collected on roads. 4. A mackerel sky. 5. A pale moon, are signs of rain.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:58
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people in this district believe, that, -
1) A dog eating grass. (2) Seals crying at night. (3) Loud noises from the sea. (4) A circle round the moon. (5) A blue blaze in the fire. (6) Loud noises from rivers. (7) Swans gathering together and coming to shore. (8) The moon looking red. (9) Crows gathering in fields are signs of a storm.
Signs of Frost
1. Swans crying at night. 2. Shooting stars. 3. A blue sky and bright stars and wild geese flying towards the mountains are signs of frost.
Signs of Rain
1. A clouded moon. 2. Seagulls flying in to land in fields. 3. Flying ants collected on roads. 4. A mackerel sky. 5. A pale moon, are signs of rain.
Signs of Thunder
1. Fish go to the bottom of water when they hear thunder.
2. If the sky is a copper colour it is a sign of thunder.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:57
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called “ghouls” who used to sell them to hospitals for experimenting and finding out different diseases. It is said that they came with rubber tyred [?] traps and had their horses shod with runner and they always came out at midnight.
There are these vaults in Drumholm graveyard and the remains of the old church is still standing.
One day, two young men went to steal apples. Whey they were coming home, they went into a graveyard to share the apples and they began, “two for you and two for me.” While this was happening, the rector’s boy was going past the graveyard and he told the rector he hear God and the devil sharing the bodies.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:56
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There are two graveyards in the townland [sic] of Mullinacross, but one of them is closed. There is another old graveyard in Racoo, which it on the top of a hill, but it has not been used for the last century. There is another graveyard, which is in use at Ballintra Roman Cathoic church. It regards to the graveyard at Mullinacross known as Drumholm graveyard. There is a field at it, which was owned by my grandfather. At one time, he started to plough that field. It is said he had to kepp a boy knocking the bones of the cutter of the plough with a bit of stick, but when he saw it had been a graveyard, he stopped working it. Long ago, there used to come men to the graveyard who lifted newly buried bodies. They were
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:56
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got over the edge of the coffin and he nailed it in mistake. Then he turned away, but he was helf and it is said he dropped dead.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:56
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In the parish of Drumholm there is one church graveyard. It is about three miles from the church. The names of the townlands round it are Hilltown, Mullinacross, and Lacklum. Our church yard is still in use. It is about one acre in area and it is square. There is the remains of an old church wall in the graveyard. That is where the old church was before the new on was built.
There is a tomb-stone [sic] in our graveyard and the date on it is 1300 or 1700. It was owned by an old family or king who lived in Breccy.
There was a man who took a bet he could go and put a nail in the coffin in the vault at 12 o’clock at night. He was very much afraid of course and went in sidewats. The edge of his coat
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:56
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There were two clergymen buried there, the Rev. Philips and the Rev. Knox. The oldest person buried there is Jane Skanklin, aged 105 years, and she was buried on the 10th April 1765.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:56
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There are two old graveyards in this district, but one of them is not used. It has not been in use for many years. It is situated in Racoo, overlooking the village of Ballintra. There is no writing or figures on the tombstones. The graveyard, which is still in use is situated in the townland [sic] of Mullinacross. It is around an old monastery, which was founded by St. Adamnan [?] when St. Patrick was in Ireland. The west gable is still standing, but it is covered with ivy. The oldest tombstone is dates 1681 and is about five feet by one foot ten inches. It is situated on the eastern side of the monastery. On a tomb dated 1754, there is the figure of a vase and lilies growing in and round it. On another, dated 1755, there is another figure of a lion rampart and a shield.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:55
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and it measured 62 feet by 22 feet. An old wall, which is all covered with ivy, is all that remains now. One time, there was an old graveyard about a quarter of a mile below Bridgetown in the townland [sic] of Rushbrook and the man that owned the land that the graveyard was on ploughed it, and he ploughed up the human bones.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:55
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There is an old graveyard at Racoo. It is on the top of a small hill. Here, St. Patrick was supposed to build a church but there is no trace of the church to be seen now. The bishop of Elphin [?] and five other bishops are supposed to have been buried in this graveyard. A few unlettered stones and some mounds are all that now remain. There is another graveyard at Ballintra chapel, and near where the chapel now stands there was an old thatched chapel and the steps of the entrance door can still be seen in the graveyard wall a few yard inside the gate. There are two graveyards in the townland of Mullinacross. One is a Protestant graveyard and the other is a Roman Catholic graveyard. There was an old thatched church in the Protestant graveyard
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:55
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afterwards salted and made up in rolls. I never heard any old story about churning, only when you are churning and a neighbour comes in wanting a coal to light his pipe he would not get it till the churning is finished.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:55
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you good luck. It takes about one and a quarter hours in winter and in summer about an hour. Wll at my home we had these ways of churning. We have a barrel churn that rolled round and round. It is worked by hand too. Then we had a churn that the horse or donkey went rount the outside of the milk-house and the dash was attached to a beam inside and went down into the churn and churned that way. Some people say when the dash is clean the butter is ready and others see the butter gathered on the top of the milk. We put in some boiling water when we are churning about twenty minutes. If we put in too much, we would scold the butter and make it white. The butter is gathered in a lump and lifted into a dish made of wood. Then, it is washed in cold water and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:52
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people in this district believe, that, -
1) A dog eating grass. (2) Seals crying at night. (3) Loud noises from the sea. (4) A circle round the moon. (5) A blue blaze in the fire. (6) Loud noises from rivers. (7) Swans gathering together and coming to shore. (8) The moon looking red. (9) Crows gathering in fields are signs of a storm.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:52
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Of bags, while the tramps sleep in barns or old houses or at a haystack. The gipsies sleep in vans and travel in families.
The best known tinkers in this district are the Mallonies, the Smiths, the Tuils [?] and the Wards. Spagai, Simon boyle and Martin Mac Donough are the names of the local tramps.
Pedlars [sic] are much the same as gipsies only they have no vans but go about in carts. They sell clothes and delph. The pedlars of this district are Susan and Martin Evans and Barney Gildes.
All these travelling folk come to the towns and villages at the fair.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:51
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travelling folk still visit our home and they have been doing so for many years. There are three different kinds of them, tramps, gipsies [sic], and tinkers; the tramps are often called beggars. The tramps and tinkers are very poor but the gipsies are not so poor. Tinkers and tramps obtain their supplies by begging, they accept tea, suger, milk, eggs, meat, meal and flour and many other things. Gipsies do not beg, they sell small articles such as pins, needles, mats [?] and cloth. The tramps sell things but when they are in a house selling they beg for nearly everything they see. Some people buy from them and others lock the door when they are coming.
Traveling folk are not welcome because they usually stay about a night in one place. The tinkers sleep in tents made out
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:50
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Or sixteen eggs under each hen.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:50
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Were tied long ago by “borough” which are made by beetled [?] rushes [?]. the rushes were steeped and then beetled and plaited. We feed our cows with hay, hale [?], turnips and grass.
The calves are fed with milk and porridge and are kept in a house at night.
We call our horse Jimmy. The horse’s house is called the stable. The horse is tied to the manger with a rope. We give our horse hay and turnips.
We feed the cat and the dog one […] bread and milk. We call the cat “Floss” and the dog “Brusse” [?].
The hen’s house is called the henhouse. When we are calling the hens we call “chuck-chuck” and the ducks are called by “Wheet-Wheet” and we call the turkey by “Pe-pe” and the geese by “Goosie- goosie”.
We let about half a dozen of hens hatch every year. We put about fifteen
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:48
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We have a churn at home in Dromore. It is 27 inches high and 18 inches at the top and the bottom is about the size of the top. The sides of our churn are round. It is about forty years old, but we got it renewed a few times. We have names for the various parts of the churn. The upper part is called the “chim” and the “cap” of the churn and the “dash” for making the butter come on the milk. In winter, we only churn once a week for our own used, but those who do not go to the creamery churn twice or three times in the week and in summer my mother churns each day. It is mostly women that churn. If a neighbour or friend comes in, they help for fear of taking away your butter or then others would wish
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:48
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The cows, the calves, the horse, the goat, the hens and ducks, geese and turkeys, are the farm animals we have at home and the cat and dog are the domestic animals.
We have three cows and their names are “Horny”, “Spotty”, and “Nodlag”. Horny get her name from her long horns. Spotty get her name from having white spots on her. Nodlag got her name from being calved at Christmas.
When people are driving the cows they say, “Hip Hip” and they say the same to the calves but when they are calling the clatter they say “Suck Suck”
The cow house is called a “byre”. The cows are tied to stalks by chains. The chain is put round their neck. Sometimes cows are tied by the horns but that makes them look old [?]. some chains are made by the blacksmiths. The cows
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:48
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to an hour to churn. In winter, hot water is used in the churn and in summer cold water is used. When it is taken from the churn, it is put into wooden tubs called “butts” and salted. Then it is made into rolls and sold in market. It is said that butter can be taken from the churn by witch-craft [sic]. The butter milk is used for making porridge and is also used for drinking at a dinner of potatoes and salt.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:48
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There is no churn in our house, but there is one in my aunt’s house. It is about sixty years old. It is four feet high and at top and bottom it is sixty inches in circumference. It slopes inward from the bottom to about two and a half feet and then slopes outward again. The circumference in the centre is forty inches. It is bound round with hoop iron four inches apart and it is made of oak wood. There is a lid on top and a hole in it through which the churn dash goes up and down. Butter is made twice or three times in summer and once or twice in winter. My aunt does the churning and makes the butter. When a stranger comes in during the churning they are supposed to churn for a minute or two.
It takes from twenty minutes
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:47
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Leather was never made in this district. Boots are not made locally but they are repaired locally. There are three shoemakers in this district and some of their people before them have been shoemakers. Some people can repair their own shoes. There are less shoemakers in this district now, then there was long ago.
Clogs are not much worn now but years ago, many people wore them.
Long ago, when people got a new pair of shoes they would eat hardly anything, for twelve days, as it was the custom.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:47
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a person would churn for hours at their milk and get no butter. Their neighbour would churn and they would have twice as much as they should have. The person who lost the butter would apply some of the remedies used, one of which was to go to the accused person’s field and collect six white stones from off their land and bring them home, put them in their empty churn, and pour boiling water over the stones, repeating, “In the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.” [sic] They then churned as usual and their butter was restored. The one who could take butter from their neighbours are called “buff the Butter.” Churns are about four feet high.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:47
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About forty or fifty years ago people did all their churning themselves when there was no such thing as creameries. At nearly every farmhouse there was a dairy or milk house where they kept all their butter and milk. At one time the people churned by hand with a churn dash then they began to churn with horse churning. Machines wrought on the same principal as a horse-thrashing mill. The farmers kept their butter in what they called “butts” which were made of oak and hoops of split rods made by the cooppers [?] who lived in the locality. The butts were made of different sizes, some of them holding fifty-six pounds. There was an old superstition that some people had the power of taking their neighbour’s butter by witch-craft [sic] for example
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:47
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Long ago, it was only adults who wore shoes and some people never wore them at all, but wore things like stockings on their legs, these stockings were called “Marteenes” but they had no soles in them. There was a loop which went round the big toe. Nobody goes barefooted now, except the children, and they only in summer [sic]. About the first of May the children leave off their shoes, but some do so on Good Friday, because it is said, that if one leaves off his shoes on Good Friday he will not take a cold.
Generally, people wash their feet in luke-warm water and some people put washing soda in it to make it soft. Long ago people would not throw out water at night, because they believed that it would drown the fairies and bring bad luck.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:47
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mayflowers on their door steps [sic] to keep the fairies away.
One man had a cow and it was a rambling cow. He put a chain round her horns and leg and the fairies took it off and kept it. Soon the man went to look for it and he saw it at a fairy fort near Drumholm graveyard. When he asked for it, it was flung it round his legs.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:46
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There is a fairy fort near upper Bridgetown and one morning when a man was passing it on horseback they lifted him off the horse and let him fall on the ground. Most of the fairies dance around sciog bushes.
A man named Clarke was digging around a fort on top of his hill and he found a pipe through the fort which the fairies went into, and there was a fishing rod and a chain in it. When people are in a field or bog fairies after take them away to their home and play music and dance. Then they would take them away to all the forts in the earth. Then they would bring them home again. On the last day of April some of the Irish people throw
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:46
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who would cut it, but nobody would cut it so the road had to be made a different way.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:46
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people would not cut down the sciog bush because they thought it would bring bad luck to them. Some years ago, it was tossed by a storm and it can still be seen lying, rotting on the ground. It is said that from a fort, another can be seen and from these the fairies signaled one to another and it is also said that there are tunnels from one to another and when they were attacked they escaped tot eh next fort.
One day a man cut down a sciog and blood ran out of it, but he cut it down. Sometime after, his hair began to fall off and he was left completely bald by the fairies. When a road was being made in the townland [sic] of Foyagh, a large sciog bush was growing in the way. Five pounds were offered to the one
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:46
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Long ago, people would not cut down “sciog” bushes or take branches off them because they believed it would bring bad luck to themselves or some of their animals. The sciog bushes are mostly growing around or beside the forts. There is a large fort on Lurgan Bairn. There are sciog bushes beside it around which the fairies danced and played music. There is another fort beside Rath mill. It is circular in shape and large mounds of earth around it. There is a fairy fort on each of the following townlands [sic]: Millinacross, Tullywee, Tullygallon, Trummon, Mullinacols, and Roscilly. There is also a fort in Muruagh beside our byre. It is circular in shape and there is a large sciopg bush beside it, round which the fairies dances. The
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:46
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There is a fairy fort in the townland [sic] of Glasbully. There is another fairy fort near Ballintra. There was once a fair fort in the townland [sic] of Innisfad [?], but it is now covered in. Fairy bushes are called sciog bushes. There is a sciog up Mullinacross road. After lights are seen near fairy forts or sometimes churning is heard. Fairies do not like grown up people near them or men. It is said that their spell is broken if this happens.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:46
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At this fort there are often lights seen. There is a fort near Bridgetown station and there is one at Mullinacross and near this fort is a sciog bush and sometimes there are lights seen and music heard at it. Some people think that if you scatter mayflowers on the window sills [sic] on May Eve, it will keep the fairies away from the house.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:45
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On a small hill in the townland [sic] of Glasbuly [?] there is a fort called “Ard Fathadh.” This fort is larger than most of the forts in the district. It is round in shape and the outside circumference is 870 feet. There are scoig bushes growing round the outside of the fort. Long ago, there lived a king there and he had an underground tunnel from the fort to Racoo graveyard where there was a little church founded by St. Patrick. There was an entrance into the fort, but it is now closed up. Some years ago, there came men from Dublin who dug up some of the fort and they found seales [?] and some bones.
There is another fort on a hill near Ballintra [?] station.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:45
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disappeared and could not be got untill [sic] he was coming home and it was left back in the same place as he had it at dinner-time [sic]. An old man lived in grandfather’s house. One day he had been to his friend’s house a few miles away, the old lady there had some nice sprigging thread and he wanted some of it to put on his fishing rod for his hooks. She said when she had finished she would leave him what would do. So, next morning, when he got up and went to take a smoke out of his pipe, the thread was rolled round the pipe for him.
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2015-03-18 12:45
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grain. Then, when my father’s house was being built, they were going to build it on another site. The spades were removed and left in the place in which the house is now built for three nights in succession. It is said the fairies were under he place and did not want to be annoyed. The Danes built all these forts or made them up and then they had them in line with each other. Some distance above Ballintra [?] my grandfather cut some branches off one of these trees and when he went in to his dinner, he left his hat down beside him and it
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:45
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There are not so many fairy forts or rings around here. Over on Lurgan Bairn [?] there was supposed to be some and on Glasbolie Fort. These two places are in sight of each other. Any I have seen are circular. On Lurgan ring there are stones and rocks and on Glasbolie fort there is a big round and plenty of thorn bushes. At my home, in Bornhugh, there were fairies on the site of an old schoolhouse and at night there were lights and music in it. In my great, great grandmother’s time, there was a fairy who came to her for the loon of meal and she had a small red coat and cap on her. So she returned the meal, and my grandmother did not use it and she came back and told her it was the top of the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:45
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the work of fairies as it was at Christmas and no one could have goslings at that time of the year.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:44
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People do not talk of fairies as much as they used to years ago.
There is one large fort in Glasbolly [?]. It is said it was built by the Danes, but it was said that fairies could be heard playing music there at night. One day, the owner of the land went to cut a scoig [?] bush on the side of the fort and as he was cutting he lifted his axe to look at it, it was dripping blood. He stopped cutting then, but that night some of his best cattle died. The fort is circular in shape and is surrounded by a high fence of earth. In one of Charles Moore’s fields, called “The Monastery Field,” there were always fairies and lights could be seen at night. One day, a man was working near to the cave when there appeared a little gosling from under a large stone. The man said it must have been
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:44
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There is an old story around here about a giant who lived on Barnes Mór [?]. He could lift a stone any weight and throw it any distance. A band of robbers or warriors used to live in an old house on a hill called Hilltown in Drumholm, not far from Drumholm graveyards. When there was a burial, they would go that night and open the grave and lift out the coffin and take out the corpse, which they would sell to a doctor for a sum of money. It is said a doctor had two children and he sat himself for several nights next to the grave in case the robbers would lift the bodies.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:44
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is a huge stone which is called “Tamlaght Stone.” It sits on four small ones and can be seen for a long distances [sic]. Some distance away is another field there is another one. It was said that the giants had an under ground tunnel from one to the other. The giants threw them from Slieve Gallon mountains, which is six or eight miles away.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:44
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There is not so much known of giants round Ballintra [?] or the district. They say that there were giants on Barnes mountains and on Breecy mountains and some miles above Pettigo there is a field that is just filled with giant’s graves and big stones. There was a giant said to have been buried on a hill down beside out grave-yard [sic] in Drumholm. Some years ago, there was a visitor there and he got the people to dig it up and they only got a flint-hatchet and some bones.
At my home in Barnhugh, there is a giant’s stone on the top of our hill. It was said that the giant threw it from Breecy mountain five miles away and there it remains. Then at my Uncle’s in […] there
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:41
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kind of general or ointment in it. They dug for another day, but they could not get anything more so they left it then. There is a large stone beside the grove and it was said to have been thrown there by a giant that was buried near Glasbuby [?].
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:41
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There is a story told of a giant that was buried on a hill called the Brosh in the townland [sic] of Mullinacross. This hill is near Drumholm graveyard. I never could hear where this giant lived or how it came to be that he was buried there. When the giant was being buried, there was supposed to be many things that the used for fighting put into the grave with him. Some years ago, people heard of this grave and of the things that were buried in it with the giant. Some weeks after, five men came to dig up the grave to see what they could get. They dug for two days and didn’t find anything. On the third day, [they?] got bones. They kept on digging and the next day they got a stone hatchet and a box with some
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:41
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at her younger sister’s wedding should wear a green garter, if she does, it will bring her good luck. This is another rime [sic] which the bride should remember.
Married in green not fit to be seen,
Married in yellow ashamed of you fellow,
Married in red you’d better be dead,
Married in black you’ll wish yourself back,
Married in brown you’ll live out of town,
Married in grey you’ll live far away,
Married in pink on you he will think,
Married in blue your love will be true,
Married in white your [sic] married all right.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:41
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“Something old,
Something new,
Something borrowed,
And something blue.”
On the way to the wedding the bride should leave by the front door, not the back one of her home. It’s is lucky if she first puts her left foot over the doorstep and once outside, she should not turn back for anything. If a black cat crosses the bride’s path, she shall have happiness wherever she goes. For her bouquet, any of the following are lucky, lilies, roses, rosemary, sweetpeas, and white heather. When honeymoon time comes, the newly-wed [sic] couple should take with them any old shoe which has been thrown after them. Thrice a bridesmaid never a bride [sic]. A girl who is a bridesmaid
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:40
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
wedding day to do nothing to break her luck. An old custom is “Good fortune when I become his wife will mean good fortune all my life.” It is very unlucky for the bride if she tries her bridal dress on before the wedding day. It is also unlucky if she looks into the mirror when she is fully dressed on her wedding morning. Lucky is the bride the sun shines on, if the sun does not shine the bride need not worry if she circles her left hand three times round her heart. It is most fortunate for a bride to hear a bird singing on her wedding morn. If a bride-to-be should see her bridegroom-to-be before the service on the wedding day, the bride should turn her ring once round her finger and this will bring her happiness. Every bride should remember this rhyme,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Marriages usually take in the summer here. May is said to be a very unlucky month to be married in, and Saturday is an unlucky day. Sometimes matches are made in this district. When money is not plentiful, some people give cows and sheep or piece of land. Marriages never occur in houses now unless by special license. On the night of the wedding there is sometimes a feast or sometimes the young couple go on a honeymoon. It is an old custom for the feast to be held in the bride’s home. It is also very unlucky if they get a wet wedding day. It is unlucky for the groom if it is a wet morning, and it is unlucky for the bride if it is a wet evening. It is also very important when the bride-to-be is preparing for her
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
People generally get married in Summer or Autumn. The 13th of any month is though unlucky to get married on. Friday and Monday are also counted unlucky. There are some matches made in this district and money is generally given as fortune.
It is an old custom for the young men to dress themselves up in straw and go to a wedding house and one of them to go to the door and hand in an empty bottle to get it filled with whiskey. If not, they would some harm.
About forty or fifty years ago it was an old custom for the girl and boy who wanted to get married to run away. Then their parents would come and get them married.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
customs now kept at marriages. The bride hadn’t to leave her home to the last one on her wedding morning. Another old custom was to have something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue given to her on her wedding morning. Mostly all the feasts are held on the marriage day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
People usually get married in the month of June. It is a nice time of the season. The month of roses.
The days of the week we say are unlucky are Monday for losses, Tuesday for crosses, and Wednesday the best day of all, Thursday for health, Friday for wealth, and Saturday no day at all. The month of February is unlucky unless in a leap year. There are not many matches made round here. Long ago we heard more of match-making [sic] than now. The bride’s father would go to see what kind of a place or way the husband to be had. Then there was a big night, the night the young man asked his bride. There was plenty of whiskey and all sorts to eat.
There are not many
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In olden time fairies were seen very often about an old house in the Derries. When people went by they used to shine a light out at them. The fairies were seen dancing and singing around a mound or a fort behind the house. They are not seen very often now.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Looked round again he had the old woman torn to pieces all but her legs. When he saw this he threw the legs away. Then there was a wise man said if these legs got water they would be two huge wild beasts. Then someone threw the legs into the lake and in some time the beasts grew. Saint Patrick on this time was on his mission through Ireland. On hearing of the beasts Patrick came to the lake and killed the beasts. Their blood reddened all the and ever rince this lough is called lough Derg diarg or the red lough and people go on a pilgrimage every year to that lake.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a large stone in my district that is supposed to have been thrown by Fionn Mac bumhall. This stone was on a hill about a mile distant. Fionn was angry with another giant and in revenge he threw this stone. But the stone did not hurt the giant it alighted a big drain and there it remains from that day to this day.
There is another story about Fionn Mac bumhall. About the time when the giants were a pulling out if Ireland Fionn fearing the huntsmen took his mother with him and ran from Pettigo in the direction of a large lake in the distance. On his way to the lake there was many thick hedges and firee [?] thoms. But Fionn ran through them all and when he
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
On Christmas eve my mother always goes to buy things for Christmas. The children hand up their stockings for Santa Claus. On Christmas day the people go to church. It is the custom to have a goose or a turkey for dinner and a Christmas pudding after. On St Shephen’s day the boys used to go out hunting the wren, and saying rhymes.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:21
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
these are the most harmful weeds on our farm at home. Nettles dockings chicken-weed and hemlock. These are harmful because the spread quickly over the land. They are also good for cures. Nettle tea is good for measles hemlock is very good for a hurt hemlock is also good for a hurt. It only grows on rich land.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:21
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
My district is called Tievebrack. There are four houses in it. There are three of them thatched and one of them slated. There are about twenty two people. It is all a hill. There are three rivers in it. The people are all farmers. It is all good land. The name Tievebrack means the hedge of the badger. It is situated five miles off Ballintra and eight off Pettigo.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:21
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are several proverbs used in my District.
1. Better late than never.
A stitch in time saves nine.
Slow but sure.
It’s better frost than always raining.
Sow in Spring reap in Autumn.
Blessings are won by a good deed done.
It’s a long road but there’s a turn in it somewhere.
Never leave till tomorrow what you can do to-day.
Empty vessels make most sound.
Fore-warned is forearmed.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The horse is a big animal, he is useful for drawing turf and other jobs. The horse eats hay and corn. Nearly every farmer keeps a horse. There are two kinds of horses a race-horse and a working horse. There are big horses and wee horses the wee horses are called ponies. There are different colour of horses white horses black horses and other colout. About every three months the farmer gets his horse shode [sic] with the blacksmith.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
in olden time fairies used to be seen every night. The used to have little lights and the lights were always seen in glens at the foot of a steep hill. When people would pass by they used to put the lights on them and run away. These fairies were never seen in day light.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
see their future wife or husband looking over their shoulder.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Hallow E’en comes on the last night of October. It is an old custom to eat nuts and apples. Most people make a barm-brack and put a thimble a ring and a piece of money in it.
The person who gets the thimble will never be marries. The person who gets the money will be rich and the person who gets the ring will be married first.
On Hallow E’en the boys and girls dress in old cloths and go from house to house for nuts and money and apples.
Long ago the people played a lot of games on Hallow E’en such as burning nuts together.
Long ago the young people used to peel an apple before a looking glass at midnight and they would
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1. Better late than ever.
2. A stitch in time saves nine.
3. An empty vessel makes most sound
4. Blessings are won by good deed done.
5. Never leave till to-morrow what you can do to-day.
6. Fear draws infection
7. Sow in Spring reap in Autumn
8. It’s a long road but there’s a turn in it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The houses were all thatched in olden times. Straw was used for thatching. Corn was sowen and when the grain come off the straw then was used for thatching. The old houses had a bed in the kitchen. It was placed again wall. Long long ago the fire was in the middle of the floor. The floors were made of clay. Half doors were used long ago. All the fires were of terf. Candles were used for light.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
there are several proverbs used in my district
It is a long road but there is a turn in somewhere.
Fear draws infection.
Never leave till to-morrow what you can do today.
A stitch in time saves explosions
From war be aware.
Better late than never.
The first is the luckiest
Blessings are won by a good deed done
Empty vessels make most sound
Two hands are better than one
If you will not sow in Spring you will not reap in the Autumn.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are several proverbs used in my district.
Better late than never
A stitch in time saves nine
Never leave that what you can do today till to-morrow
Fear draws infection
It is a long road but there is a turn in somewhere.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
He saw a bush with apples on it he took no apples of it and left to apples on it
A. there was two apples on the bush he took one apple of it and left one on it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I walked until I got it when I got I sat down to look for it when I couldn’t get it I (sat) brought it home with me.
A. a thorn when you get it in your foot.
Down in the meadow there is a press and in that press there is a cup and in the cup there is a drop and all the world will get a share of that.
A. death.
I have a wee horse and he’s tied to the wall he’d eat all the fodder [?] from this to Donegal.
A. fire
The man that made it didn’t want it the man that wanted it didn’t use it the man that used it didn’t see it what it was.
A. coffin.
There was a man he had no eyes he went out to view the sky
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago there were no shops in the district. People had to go to the nearest town to make purchases. Money was given by some people for goods and others gave work. In olden times old women used to go round with baskets selling tea and sugar. They came round once every week. Men used to come round with […] and bring away the eggs also.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
What’s all pains and never complains.
A. a window.
Whats black and white and red all over.
A. a news paper
House full a room full you couldn’t get a spoonful.
A. smoke.
A long black arm and a half shut […]
A. crook
What is in every mountain but not in any hills in Amsterdam its common and in Rome it does appear its twice in every mountain but its not in 7 years.
A. the letter M
The king of England sent the queen of Spain something that had no bones blood or flesh
A. ring.
Whats think and can’t be cut.
A. water.
I have a we house and it wouldn’t
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Why does a hen cross the road.
A. because she wants to get to the other side.
Whats full and yet it hold more.
A. a pot full of potatoes because when it is full of potatoes and it holds water.
Blackie and whitie went up the hill.
A. a hen when she layed an egg.
What has eyes and can’t see.
A. a potato.
Spell black water with three letters.
A. ink
Headed like a thimble tailed like a rat you can guess forever but you can’t guess thath
A. a pipe
Why is a black hen more clever that a white hen
A. a black hen can lay a white egg but a white hen can’t lay a black egg.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A. Sun.
A wee round red thing ha ha ha
A. a haw.
As black as ink as white as milk it hops on the road like hailstones.
A. a magpie
Spell a broken down ditch with three letters.
A. gap
A hard working father a lazy old mother and twelve young children all the same colour.
A. a clock.
What tide does father Christmas come in.
A. the yuletide
Its long and its narrow and not very wide and it wears a green border on every side.
A. road
What goes up when the rain comes down.
A. an umbrella
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Two dead men fighting, two blind men looking on two cripples away for the doctor two dumb men calling come on.
A. a lie.
In my father’s garden there is a bunch of swans no one can count them but God’s own hand.
A. hairs of your head.
What goes through the wood and through the wood and leaves a white rag on every bush.
A. the snow.
I went between two woods and came back between two waters.
A. carrying two pails of water.
London Derry Cork and Kerry spell that with out a K.
A. that.
What goes round the house and round the house and looks into every hole.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is one Holy well in the parish. The name of it is the Abbey well. People visit this well on the 29th of June and the 15th of August. They go round the well three times and say prayers. Some people say that Saint Patrick made this well with his foot. There is a hawthorn bush at this well.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:15
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In olden times people used to go in the bare feet to school wen [sic] unto this day some children go bare footed in the summer. In olden times people used to wear clogs in the winter and go in the bare feet in summer. Clogs are big boots with big thick wooden soles on them.
In olden times people did not wear shoes until they were about fourteen years of age. Some people wear clogs but they are not very common now-a-days. Their [sic] are more shoe makers in the country now than what used to be in it in days gone by. There is no one in my District which makes leather.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are many different names given to fields and hills in my district. These are some of them. the Rushy field this is a field beside our farm it was given this name because rushes grow in it. Ned’s field this was given its name because a man called Ned owned it long ago. The horses’ field it was called this name because horses was [sic] kept in it. The Forth Hill this was called this name because long ago a great fight was on this hill and a big stone was placed on the top of it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
picking flowers. I amuse myself in Autumn by gathering nuts, apples and berries.
This is how some of the games are played. Blind man’s buff. Any number of people can play this game. Some boy or girl puts a cloth over his or her eyes and catches soeone. The person who is caught must put on the blind.
Tig is played by some one running after the others and whoever is tug must be the tigger.
Hide and seek. Two or more people play this game. One is the seeker and the others are the hiders. The hiders hide somewhere and the seeker looks for them. the person who is found first must be the seeker.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The games I play are,
Tig
Blind mans buff
Hide and seek
Sally Sally
Four corners
Snakes and Ladders
Snap
Draughts
Ludo
Dominoes
Colours
Round the valley
I amuse myself in Spring
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are no tailors in my District. There are tailors in Ballintra. These tailors live in Ballintra. Cloth is not spun now but long ago it used. Socks and stockings are knit locally. Most people get their clothes made with the tailor but some buy them in the shop. The shop in which clothe is sold is called drapers shop.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a school near this school called the Ole Hill. Long ago when the Ordanence [sic] Surveyers [sic] were making the land, they put a big pole on this hill and ever since it is called the Pole Hill.
There is another place called Carrie ns Croc. It is an Irish name which means The Rock of the Badgers. Long ago it was supposed to be inhabited by badgers.
There is a cave in Brownhall called the Pipers cave, it is said that a piper went into this cave and never came again. He was heard playing his pipes a mile from where he went in.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In my district there are stories of the men of Fionn Mac bumhall. These men are called the Fionna. There are stones of immense size supposed to be thrown by Fionn. However these stones are very plentiful all over the countryside some in rivers others in glens and on hills. There are Danish forts on a lot of hills. No one ever destroys these forts. There are small trees growing in rocky ground these are fairy trees.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:09
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is one tailor in this district. He works in his own home and does not travel from place to place.
When people want clothes made they go to the tailor and he takes their measure and then makes the clothes for them. The implements that the tailor uses are a spool and needle and scissors and tape and sewing machine.
Socks and stockings are knitted locally. There are no spinning wheels in this district now.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Black-smiths but they are paid for shoeing the horses and donkeys. The blacksmiths a very strong men.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are two black-smiths in the Parish. One of them has a small forge, the other has a big one. The big forge is in Ballintra. The black-smith is called Dan Maeberty, he shoes donkeys and horses. The implements which he uses are anvil bellows hammer iron and nails. He also keeps a big fire to heat the iron. He makes ploughs shovels harrows he also mends these things when they are broken. The water that is in the forge, is used for cooling the iron. Gifts are given to the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Made of turf [?]. Candles were used for light.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The houses were all thatched in olden times. Straw was used for thatching. […] was sowen [sic] and when the grain comes off the straw then was used for thatching. The old houses had a bed in the kitchen. It was placed against the wall. Long ago the fire was in the middle of the floor. The old floors were made of clay. Half doors were used long ago. Some have half doors yet. All fires were (all)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[In Irish, Needs Translation]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Is called a stable. The farmers sell the pigs and gets [sic] money for them. The pighouse is called a sty. The sheep are kept for their wool. The sheep graze on the hillside and on the mountains. The famer keeps two kinds of sheep.
Long ago when people were milking the cows they used to sing and this made the cows give more milk. Some people still sing.
Long ago people used to rise early on May Day and get a broom and wet the broom with dew. Then hit each cow three times with the broom. This they said brings lock on the stock.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
to unearth this treasure, but some time ago, men digging round the old ruin, came on the bones and skull of a man. When the men saw this they continued digging until they were near the old wa[...?]
But just then they heard a voice calling out behind them, and looking round they saw a man dressed like a monk. On seeing the man the men dropped their tools and fled
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About three quarters of a mile from Donegal town on the road to Ballyshannon there is the (a) remains of an old monastery at a place called Maherabeg.
There is supposed to be treasure hidden among the ruins of this old monastery. This treasure is said to consist of golden vessels and chalices which are supposed to be of (golden) great value. Also amongst the contents of the treasure is a mass bell of solid gold.
The treasure was hidden the Franciscan monks before they fled at the approach of the(u) English soldiers.
No attempts have been (ma) made
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The cavern has been partly explored but is very hard to get into, as the water is deep near the entrance but the cavern widens out as you penetrate it and along the side of the brook is a stone ledge
This tunnel is sometimes called the “Fox(e)s Hole” but the “Priests Hole” is a name which is used often.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About two and a half miles from Donegal (a) town is a little bridge called Miss Jennie's Bridge. About two hundred yards on the right bank, above the bridge there is a tunnel called “The Priest's Hole.
It is called the Priests Hole because, during. The time, when the priests were hunted a pried hid here. (It) The tunnel was formed by (N)a little brook which is the over flow from Lough Banagher.
In this hole the priest is said to have hidden his chalices and vestments in a chest. The chalices are of great value and carved from solid gold and studded with diamonds and pearls.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
plunderers are said to have [plan?] The treasure is said to be under a spell, and anyone who interferes with it will die a terrible death within six months.
To this day it is said that if we dig down on the hill side, we will come on the bones of some of the (b) men who fell in the battle.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About three quarters of a mile from Donegal there is a hill called Aro(o)ey Hill
Long years ago there (was) a great battle, was fought on the side of the hill. This battle was fought between the O'Donnells and some other clan who were returning from some plundering expedition.
When they saw that they were likely to be defeated they buried their treasure, which is very valuable and consists of golden coins, precious stones and golden vessels. This treasure is supposed to be buried somewhere on the hillside and marked by a small thorn bush which the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
for when the treasure hunters had dug down (af) about four feet the sides of the hole always caved in, or stones fell from the top of the old walls and narrowly escaped hitting one of the seekers after the great wealth
People who live in the neighbourhood say that lights are often seen on the little island on dark nights. As this island is now uninhabited, it is the home of thousands of wild birds, who find peace and security on this little Island, that once was the home of the great, O'Donnells.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About three and a half miles from Donegal town is situated a beautiful and picturesque lake called Lough Eske. In the Lake there is a small and thickly wooded island on which the O'Donnells had their summer residence – part of which still remains
In this old ruin the O'Donnells are said to have hidden their treasure – about two yards from from[sic] the stone fireplace which is very large and beautiful
The treasure is supposed to consist of golden coins and vessels, and is valued at several thousands of pounds. Many attempts have been made to unearth it but none has been successful
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
V
I still could keep writing but
Where is the use,
You may think that I am trying to
Make an excuse
To all of you people, Best Wishes,
I send
And I hope I've said nothing
In this to offend
I'll finish my ryme, Pat, God Bless You
I say,
The fire burns bright and the
Cold is away.
If your cart should run short,
But I don't like to bother,
At some future date, you might
Send me another.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:03
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The farm animals are the cow
horse
donkey
pigs and goats and sheep.
The domestic animal is the dog.
Our cows have not got names. When we are calling home the cows we say “che che”.
The cowhouse is called a byre. The cows are tied by the neck. Some people hang a cross in the byre to bring luck on the stock. Many people (hang) make the sign of the cross on the cow when they are milking.
The horse is very useful to the farmers. He is used for mowing, ploughing, harrowing and drawing home the turf. The horsehouse
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:03
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
What can you expect from these
Student of pelf[sic],
Sure, you know that they won't
Pay the stephens itself.
IV
Now “Old Neil Mulreany could easily
Afford,
If he had any guts for to send
me a load.
But I don't like complaining although
I feel sore,
So long as I can keep the Wolf
From my door.
I am thankful at Heart that I still
Can rely.
On (l) some man in my Parish, you
will not deny,
The priest would feel happy and
Could pay his bill,
If he had all his people like
“Mickey and Phil”
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 12:03
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
“Old Tat's” short of help, he got
Married too late
And I'm sure he (regets[sic]) regrets all
The time he did wait.
But, Johnny McGlinchey, I can't
Understand
He wastes all his time, running
After the land.
III
There's “Racken”, McCadden, “The Fister”
And Wark.
If they were any good they would
Send me a (load) cart
But I know this trio of scoundrels
Too well.
And sooner than help me, they'd
See me in.....
With John and “Wee Myles at the
Poteen they sip
But they'll know the result of
This cursed drinking yet
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Boys and girls long ago made toys for themselves and some make them yet. Girls make daisy chains out of daisies. Boys used to make tops and kites [?] out of wood also spinning wheels, from a old spool. Girls make toys out of wood and cloth. Snares were made for catching rabbits with a piece of wire and a stick.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are many different names given to fields and hills in my district. These are some of them. The Rushy field this is a field beside our farm it was given this name because rushes grow in it. Ned’s field this was given its name because a man called Ned owned it long ago. The horse’s field it was called this name because horses was [sic] kept in it. The Fourth [?] hill this was called its name because long ago a great light was on this hill and a big stone was placed on the top of this hill.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Dangerous river because there are some very deep holes in it one hole has been called the pepper’s [?] hole.
My own district is taken after an Irish name. Derries is my district which means a plantation of oak trees.
The names of some other places are the Och mountain, Poll hill, Breesey hill. Also there is a wood near my district it is called (l) Brownhall, and in the wood there are a lot of caves and there is underground river which flows under the rocks. Also there is a Wishing well in it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are some old Irish names of districts round my district. The one that is most common is called Carnay na broc. In carrcauj nab roc [?] there runs a big river which is called the black water.
It is a very
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago there were hardly any boots worn unless in winter. The children go on bare feet in summer not but not in winter. Some people never were [sic] boots at all. After washing their feet the people throw out the water. There are no boots made in my district, but there is a man in my district that repairs the boots. Blogs [?] were worn long ago but they are not worn now. Leather is not made in my district.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
We have a churn at home. It is made of wood. We churn twice each week in summer but in winter only once. Two people do the (work) churning it is done by hand now but long ago it was done by foot. When strangers come into the house when churning is going on some of them help to churn or if they don’t they do things in the house. My mother takes off the butter with a butter spade. She puts it in a butter dish. The butter dish is made of wood. She makes it into a roll with the butter spade. She then puts in into small found butter dishes then it is ready for use. The milk that is left after the butter comes off is called butter-milk. This is used for making bread. It is also given to calves.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are two holy wells in this district. One of the, is called the Abbey well and the other well is near Lurgan [?].
Many people visit the abbey well on the 29th of June and on the 15th of August. Everyone who visits this well goes round the well and says prayers. It is said that Saint Patrick made this well with his foot and blessed it and ever since there is water in it.
Many people have been cured by drinking this water. Everyone who visits this well leaves a piece of cloth near it.
There is a hawthorn tree near it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In nearly every house there are some article placed in the house in honour of a Saint. On the 17th of March people wear a shamrock in their hats to honour St Patrick. On the first night of January people make crosses in honour of St Bridget. On the next day there is one placed in the house and one in every outhouse. On Palm Sunday people carry a piece of palm because when our lord was riding into Gerusalem [sic] on an ass. He put palm under the donkeys feet and that is why Palm Sunday kept that is the Sunday before Easter crosses are made with rushes on the last night on January when they are made holy water is sprinkled over them and then the [sic] are put up in the house.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Marriages take place mostly in Spring and Summer. Marriages don’t often take place at shrove [?]. The month of May is said to be an unlucky month for a marriage. Tuesday is also an unlucky day for a wedding. There are no matches made in the district now but long ago the used to be mad. Money is not given as dowry nor is cattle or goods ever given. Long ago marriages took place in the house of the boy or girl who is getting married this was done for a good many years. When two people come out of church the people throw rice on them. A wedding feast is always held in the house of the bride. Straw boys do not visit the house now. The people do not go home on horseback.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One night a man was asking, walking up the road to his neighbours house. He saw a small fairy man dressed in red and green. The little man came up to him and asked him for a half crown for the fair that he was going to next day. The man gave him the money and the fairy said he would pay him back his money. On a certain night the man gathered all his neighbours to his house to see the wee man. But the wee man did not come. The next night this man was going up the same road and he saw the fairy and he came up to (him) the man and caught hold of him ( and more fairies came and they beat him for gathering all of his neighbours to laugh at the fairy man. The man
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
man had to be carried home that night and he did not get his half crown because he told his neighbours to come to see the fairy man.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One night a man was asking, walking up the road to his neighbours house. He saw a small fairy man dressed in red and green. The little man came up to him and asked him for a half crown for the fair that he was going to next day. The man gave him the money and the fairy said he would pay him back his money. On a certain night the man gathered all his neighbours to his house to see the wee man. But the wee man did not come. The next night this man was going up the same road and he saw the fairy and he came up to (him) the man and caught hold of him ( and more fairies came and they beat him for gathering all of his neighbours to laugh at the fairy man. The man had to be carried home that night and he did not get his half crown because he told his neighbours to come to see the fairy man.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Of potatoes that are grown on our farm Arran victory, Kerrs pinks and Suttons. These are the names of potatoes that are grown in our district Arranvic Champions, Kerrs pinks, suttons, dates, epicures, flounders, and premiums. The potatoes are dug in autumn. The farmer gets 4 or five men and they gather them. The potatoes are (dug) kept in a pit in the field. There is a whole made deep down in the ground and the potatoes are put in them. they are covered with rushes and then clay in put on top.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Potatoes are grown on our farm. We sow over one acre f potatoes every year. The ground is not manured in any way before being turned upp. Some of the potatoes are (soln) sown in ridges and others in drills. My father prepares the ground for.. a spade is used when the potatoes are put in ridges and a plough is used when the [sic] are put in drills. Spades are not made in the district the [sic] are bought in a shop. When the farmer is putting in his crop he gets five or six men to help him that evening he pays them or he will give them a day instead. Wooden spades were used long ago but there or [sic] none left. In the summer the farmer has to weed the potatoes. When the leaves are green he sprays them. these are the names
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Boiling a still
But Owen's Paddy will get some in
Spite of the deal
And he won't be particular whose
Turf he will steal.
You might like it better if the
Turf were your own.
As your peat has a flavour that's
Almost unknown.
But you'll have consolation to know
That instead,
The priest's feet are warm when
Going to bed.
I am sure in your neighbourhood
Other men could afford
Much better than you, to send me
a load.
“Old Mac” and the “Rooster” and “Wee
Jamie Brian”.
But the latter would not take a Creel at a time
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Some old men never made tea in their lives. Tea was not used in this country till about 80 years ago for about twenty years after the tea was used in Ireland it was only seen on feast days such as Christmas, Easter and other feasts. It was a custom of the people in olden times to eat eggs on Easter Sunday.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In olden times people used to eat different food than is eaten now. About three meals the old people ate in the day. These were the meals oatmeal porridge and potatoes fish butter and the drunk some milk also. The bread the [sic] ate was oat bread baked on a table and well hardened in front of a fire on a bread iron. People always worked before having meals some people had porridge in the morning and others in the evening. Long ago the people never ate late at night. The people used wooden vessels before cups were made. The wooden vessels were called noggins or piggins. The table was at the side of the wall with its end by the floor, when the meal was over the table was lifted and hung on the side of the wall.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Dear Pat, many thanks for your big Cart of turf
But I trust that without it you
Will have enough
I never forget a good turn at least
And you're not doing wrong
When you're helping the (Priest
It's hard to expect at this time of year
With coal not too good and
the price very dear.
But I hope to repay you at some
Future date,
If only at Clare by escaping
The plate
II
I know you're a man who likes
a wee drop at will
And your('e) turf would be useful for
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
was called a sidetable.
After the tea came to Ireland it was not used only on feast days, such a Christmas, Easter and other feasts. Long ago people ate eggs on Easter Sunday.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In olden times people used to eat different food than is eaten now. Some people ate twice and others three times a day.
They used to eat oatmeal porridge and oat-bread and fish and potatoes and and [sic] they drank milk. They did not eat bacon because they said it was not clean. Wooden vessels were used before cups. Tea was not used in Ireland until over eighty years ago. In olden times people kept the table behind the wall. This table
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About fifty years ago there lived a woman called Mrs. O Mahony in the parish of Killymard. She was very fond of style, and every Sunday she went to Mass to show off her finery. For each Mass she went to, she dropped a pebble into a box. At the end of the year she opened the box but there was only one pebble in it, because she only once heard Mass devoutly, instead of being at least fifty times. This astounding incident made a great impression on the poor woman who afterwards became a daily attendant at Mass which was heard by her with all possible devotion
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Butter and milk. On special days which tea was the old people would all go together about 10 or 12 of them and get what tea would do them for that day. Meals were eaten three times each day. Breakfast, dinner and supper. The breakfast was oat bread and milk. The dinner was of potatoes, salt and also milk fish was also eaten. On feast days such as Easter and Christmas beef was eaten. The supper was oat porridge. The table was placed in the middle of the floor and the people sat around it. The people did not eat late at night and they always did some work in the morning before eating. The vessels which were used, before cups were made of wood they were bigger than cups.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
man “Didn't I tell you the devil was in her” The (l) cow ran away out of the byre as if she were mad. But when the man looked in the bottle what was in it but [intriol?].
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
During the summer months the farmers spray their potatoes and weed them. In autumn the farmers dig their potatoes and then they dig a hole about six inches deep and put the potatoes in it then rushes over them and clay to keep the frost from killing them. The pits are about 14 feet but sometimes they but them in barns, these are the names of some of the potatoes which grow in my district. Food.
The food which was eaten in olden times was different from now. Tea was first taken about 84 years ago. It was only taken on special days for a long time such as Easter and Christmas and marriage feasts. The food which the people eat every day was potatoes, oat porridge and hard oat cake which was eaten with
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are potatoes grown on our farm. It is a crop that is found in plenty on almost every farm about the district. My father prepares the ground for this crop. The ground is not manured in anyway before turned up. The potatoes on our farm are sown a ridges but many other people sow them in drills. When they are put in drills a plough is used but a spade is amoung [sic] all farmers.
The farmers are all very busy in spring to get their crops in before it is too late. When the farmers are putting in their crops they get five or six men to help them to get the potatoes set, and then he pays them or else he goes and helps them.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Of a man. It was my brother who saw it and he told me about it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
It is the custom of everybody who is taking cattle to any place to less them with holy water before they leave. This is done so that no evil spirit can stay in the animal and so that it will prosper with the owner
Once upon a time a man bought a cow in the fair. When he brought her home he asked his wife for the holy water. He shook a drop on (her) the cow but she began to jump and roar. “The devil is in her” said the man. He shook a few more drops of Holy water on the cow, but she jumped and pulled so much that (h?) she broke the chain. “Now” said the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a road running from Carnhugh to Pettigo and one to Ballintra and some other ones. The road into Carnhugh is not a very broad road the name of it is Carnhugh road.
There is a big bray on the road going into Carnhugh and there is a ghost supposed to be seen on it. There was a light seen and also a vision in the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time two families quarrelled about the ownership of a house and farm of land. They went(o) to law (af) about the matter. The family that win the law – suit moved into the house.
The other family then began to work some unnatural witch—raft on them. All the furniture, was kept moving Even the dishes and plates were kept moving on the dresser. At last the family sent for the priest, to bless the house. When the priest was finished blessing the house, a large black dog was seen leaving it. The people of the district say the black dog was the devil in disguise.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
going into Ballintra. This road is dark and lonely and often fairies and ghosts are seen on it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One evening a man went to a neighbours wake. He left the house about midnight and proceeded on his way home. There were two ways by which (they) he could go home. On(e) one of these ways there was a fort but the road was seldom used.
As this road was much nearer he made up his mind to go home by it for once. He did so and so he came near the fort something strange came over him and he was made walk (ou) round the fort until dawn by some supernatural force. People always avoid passing by a fort
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One night three girls were returning from a dance. On going over a certain hill they had a great view of the valley before them. Not far from them they saw a great fire. Thinking it was a man making potteen, they said they would go and see him working.
When they reached the place the fire was not to be (found) seen at all. Next day they looked at the place, but there was no signs of a fire. The people of the district never go near the place as they believe the fire was a fairy fire.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time there was two fish in a well. Nobody ever touched them, becase everybody believed that the fish were not natural and that it would be unlucky for anyone who touched them.
At last two boys determined to catch them. So they went to the well (d) resoled to catch the two fish and to prove that the belief of the people of the district was not true. They caught the fish, brought them home, and put them in a pan. But the fish suddenly began to move in the pan and the boys were terrified. They put them back in the well again.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time a widow was evicted from her home by a landlord. She knew the person who was getting the house and so she determined to have revenge on him.
Before she was put out of the house, she put on a good fire. She then got some black sstones and coated the fire with them. She then cursed the man and his children
One day the man was kicked by a horse and killed. Another day his two children fell into a river and were drowned.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time a small woman wearing a red shawl came into a house. She never spoke, but she helf a green leaf in (K) her hand. When the woman of the house asked her what she wanted, she stretched out her hand with the green leaf in it.
The woman of the house went to the dresser, and got some butter and put it on the leaf. The (little) small woman then went to the door and then outside. She was followed to the door by the woman of the house, but the little woman was not to be seen. The family had a great deal of butter on the milk for the whole year
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the house and return(ed) to its former place undamaged. Everything used to move about.
At last, the man, (wo) who was a protestant, sent for the Protestant Minister, to see if he could change the situation. He came but it was no use, the disturbance continued. The man then sent for a priest. The priest came, and after some time, he made everything night again, and nothing disturbed the usual routine of the family.
But the story has a sad ending. As the priest was returning home, he fell from his horse and he was immediately covered with manure. He was carried into a neighbour's house and washed but, alas! He never recovered and it is said that he died barking like a dog.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are many ghost stories told in the country. Some are true and some are not, but here is one, that I have been told is true.
Beside the road and on a the hill on which the fort of Drimrooske is situated, there used to be an old house. A man called Davis lived in this house. Everyday strange things happened in this house. The delph[sic] used to (ju) jumped off the dresser dance round the floor, and return to it place unbroken. The man's used to follow him upstairs. The furniture used to move about
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the river Eske, and the river's norse can be heard (f) at the Mass Rock. The Mass Rock is in a small (l) hallow – between two small heights in the land.
There are whin – bushes growing very near it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In the townland of Drumeenagh there is a large rock, and it is said that it is a mass Rock. It is situated in a very lonely locality and it is one[sic] the edge of a wood. It is on the the[sic] land (ow) of Mr Hugh Morrow of the Haugh.
They rock is about four feet high. It sides are round and it (is) has a flat top. It is sheltered by a huge (a) thorn tree which grows at its side. No branches grow on the tree over the Mass Rock, that would disturb anything placed on it
It is not far from
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
woman was not put to death
Some time later word reached the French that the (Englis) English were in the bay. So they the anchor chain and left it behin(g)d. This chain is still to be seen at one of the entrances to Mr. McGowan's house in Donegal town.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
home again he told his wife not to give the French, (u) a loan of the pot again. When the wife told him that the soldiers would take it in spite of her, the man told her to hide it. So the woman hid the pot.
The next day when the soldiers came for the pot, the woman told them it was broken and that she had thrown it away. The soldiers went back and told the captain the story that the woman told them. The captain did not believe the story and he sent the men down to search the house, with orders that if they found the pot they should kill the woman. The soldiers searched the house but they did not find the pot, and so the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is one big road in my district, it leads you to Rockhill going down by Ballintra, Lignanorning and Ballinakellew [?].
There are some old roads which are not much used. There is one called White Rock this road leads through a bog, it is not much used now. Long ago when there were no good roads the people used to go this old road when the [sic] were going to the bog. There is a narrow road going through big park
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Fairies seen on it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a big road running right through this district. It goes from Carnhugh to Ballintra. It is called the Derries road. Some parts of this road are narrow.
There are many roads branching off the Derries road. There is one going to Pullinarany and one going to Garvanagh and one going to Ballyshanners and another one going to Rockhill.
There are also many lanes going from the Derries road into fields and houses.
There are many old lanes and roads in this District that were used long ago but are not used now. There is one old road in this district and long ago there were supposed to be
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time some French ships sailed up the Donegal Bay and landed at Donegal town. They camped on Drimcliff and collected their food from the people who lived in the district
At the bottom of the hill there was a thatched house. Every day the soldiers used to go down to the house and get a loan of a pot which they used for boiling potatoes. At this time the man of the house was not at home and so his wife gave the the[sic] pot willingly enough
When the man returned
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The world for to reign
Some noble lord might fancy you
great riches to enjoy.
So do not throw yourself away
For a poor labouring boy.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As I roved out one evening
It been on a blooming spring
I over heard a damsel fair, most
glorious she did sing.
Saying cruel were my parents for they
did me so annoy
The [sic] would not let me carry with
my bonny labouring boy.
II
Say”s [sic] the mother to the daughter
your talk is all in vain
so marry a poor labouring boy
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
During the famine there were no potatoes at all to be found. A man erected a mill for grinding up the decayed potatoes and making boxty, in a field owned by William Stephenson. He got water to run the mill by (co) changing the course of a brook called “The Curraic Shough” and making it flow into a smaller one
After the famine the mill fell into disuse because it was not needed. Later on it was tossed and the stones were carted away. Some flags and rocks are still to be see where the mill used to be
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a tradition of how the parish of Drumholm got its name. In the townland of Dromre there is a green knoll between two small lakes. In the time of the Danish people in Ireland there was a battle fought between these two lakes. There were thousands killed and there is a large height in which they are buried. Then the governor told the soldiers to drum home and this potatoes [sic] parish has been called Drumholm since.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One day the landlord's agent his wife and his son were at Mountcharles, bathing The son got into difficulties and before help could reach him he was drowned. [symbol]
Seeing that her son was drowned, the agent's with was also going to drown herself, but fortunately some people prevented her doing so.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is an old fort on a hill about half a mile from this school. It was called Tubber Fort.
Long ago when the Danes were invading Ireland, the Irish people built this fort to protect themselves from the Danes, it was supposed to be one of the biggest forts in Donegal.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time there was a poor widow who had seven children and she had no money to pay the rent. This woman lived near Mountcharles and so she went to the landlord's agent – a man called Pomeroy, to see if she could get in[?]. She told him that she (s) [ha?] no money to buy food for them either.
But it was all useless, the landlord's agent told her that she would have to pay the rent “Then what will I do with my children” asked the widow “Drown them” replied the agent
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
He drank it. When the man came back the horse was lying as if he was dead. He took out his knife and skinned him. He took him away and covered him with leaves and grass. He went to Ballybofey and sold the skin and came back home. When he came awoke next morning the horse was back and no skin on him. He was so content to see the horse back that he went away and killed three sheep and skinned them and sewed the skins on the horse with sally rods. The horse lived on and every year he clipped 20 lbs of wool off the horse. The sally rods grew and he cut them also and sold them.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
however, she was only running on three feet for the other leg was broken by the arrow
At last she (was) limped into a little hut at the top of the mountain. For a long time the king and all his followers were afraid to go into the hut, but at last the king himself rushed in. What he saw when he entered made him fall, and he was not able to rise again, because his left side was paralysed[sic]. What he saw was an old woman with long bonny[sic] fingures[sic], not the hare, that he (ha) saw go into the hut.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
a long time ago a whiskey maker lived in the Gap [?] of Barness. He used to bring his whiskey to Ballybofey on horse back. He has a crutch on the horses back and a creel in each side and in each creel there was a key. One day he was going to Ballybofey he met the Revenue Officers out in search of whiskey. He left the road when he found them and hid. When the officers saw the horse, they came and looked in the creels, they took out the key and spilled it on the the [sic] road. The horse was dry and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One day a king was out hunting on a mountain, and he rose a hare which was lying in some heather. The hare immediately [bega?] to run for the top of the mountain and the king followed.
He fired an arrow at her. It struck her but she only tumbled over and in a [mind?] she was up and off again. The king fired again, but the same thing happened, every-time was the same.
An old man then came up to the king and told him that the (I) have was an old witch, and she could be killed only by a silver kipped arrow. The king then took a silver tipped arrow, fitted it, and fired. The arrow hit her and she fell over again, but it was not long until it was running again. But this time
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Most of the houses in the houses [sic] in the Derries are thatched.
My father told me about fairies which were seen in a field about 50 or 60 yards from this school. The field id rocky and there are nut bushes growing in it. Long ago the fairies were seen dancing in the field and there was music heard. They were never heard or seen only in the morning and late at night. About 12 o’clock every night there are about 20 lights seen there.
One night a few years ago there were two people coming through the field and they saw a light in a tree but they did not see anybody, but after a little blue man with a red cap running into the tree.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:48
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
lays the golden egg.”
“I'll say the black one” said the landlord. Then each goose laid an (gol[sic]) egg but it was the black one that laid the golden egg “I'm right” exclaimed the landlord. “Now, are you giving me anything” asked the (landlord) woman of the landlord, for he had changed into a man again when he had guessed the right goose
“You can take the black goose” said the landlord. So the woman got the goose, and she went her way and the landlord his.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Derries is my own district. There are 17 houses in this district. The population of Derries is about 60. There are four or five old people in the Derries. None of them speaks [sic] Irish. There is s treasure supposed to be hidden in the Derries but the place is unknown. It was called the Derries because it was an oak forest long ago. There were far more people in the Derries long ago. There is one big lakein the Derries called Lough Rath. There is 463 acres in it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[symbol] Once upon a time a landlord was going along the road and a woman asked him for alms. [The?] (woman) landlord refused and he hit her with the whip. The woman then prayed and he changed into an ash tree. “Now” asked the woman “Will you give me anything” “No I'll not” The landlord replied “Well then you must die” said the woman cooly. The landlord – now in the form of an ash tree – begged for mercy. The woman then made some signs, and before her stood three geese. One was black, another was white and another was grey. “I'll spare you” she said “If you can chose the goose that
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Q. What animal would who like to be on a cold day
A. A little 'otter
Q. Why is a barber a mean man
A. Well if he isn't scraping he's sponging
Q. Why is it dangerous for a clock to be at the top of the stair
A. It might run down and strike one
Q. Why is a camel a bad tempered animal
A. Because it always has its back up
Q. Which bird is a joke
A. A lark
Q. What part of the fish weighs most
A. The scales.
Q. Why should you carry a watch when you are crossing the desert
A. Because it has a spring in it
Q. Why does an untruthful boy have to keep his word
A. Because no one will take it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Question. What can cross a river without getting (get) wet
Answer. A shadow
Q. What has three feet but no leg
A. A yard ruler
Q. When is a mouse like a pony
A. When it's in a trap
Q. Why is a banana like a jersey
A. Because it's easy to slip on
(A) Q. Why is a watch like a river
A. It never runs far without winding
Q. Why is a telescope like time
A. Because it brings things nearer
Q. What is the difference between (and) a tailor and a groom.
A. One tends mares and the other mends tears.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Q. Why is a village cobbler like village Parson?
A. Because he attends to the soles (souls) of the people.
Q. Why is an egg like a young horse?
A. Because it is not useable, till broken.
Q. Why are fixed stars like, pens, ink and paper?
A. Because they are stationary. (stationery)
Q. What parts of speech are shop-keepers, most anxious to sell?
A. Articles
Q. Why is a dog biting his tail like a good economist?
A. Because he makes both ends meet.
Q. Why is a gun-smith's shop like a chicken-pie?
A. Because it contains fowling pieces. (fowl in pieces).
Q. Why is a railway carriage like rope-dancer?
A. Because it goes on a line.
Q. Why is a boy dog with a broken leg like a boy at arithmetic?
A. Because he puts down three and carries one.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Question. Why is latitude like a clothes-line?
Answer. Because it stretches from “Pole” to “Pole”.
Q. Why is a used-up horse like a bad (bad) play?
A. Because it can't run, and won't draw.
Q. Why is a circulation library like a factory chimney?
A. Because it is constantly letting out volumes.
Q. Why are conundrums like monkeys?
A. Because they are far-fetched and trouble-some.
Q. Why are cowards like butter?
A. Because, when exposed to fire, they run.
Q. Why is a hare, run to death, a very bold animal?
A. Because it always dies game.
Q. why is bread the first necessary of life?
A. Because it is always kneaded. (needed).
Q. Why is a sick Jew like a diamond-ring?
A. Because he is a Jew ill. (jewel)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Q. Why do while sheep eat more than sheep?
A. Because there are more of them
Q. Why does a baker wear a white hat?
A. To keep his head warm
Q. Why do we go to bed?
A. Because the bed won't come to us
Q. Why is a good conundrum like an Irishman
A. Because it is quite pat
Q. Why is a rheumatic person like a glass window?
A. Because he is full of pains (panes)
Q. Why is a good story like a rublic[?] bell?
A. Because it is often told (tolled)
Q. Why is it dangerous to take a walk in the woods in spring?
A. Because then the trees are shooting
Q. Why is a grave digger like a waterman
Because he handles sculls.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Q. Why is a man who runs into debt like a clock?
A. Because he goes on tick
Q. What animal would you like to be, on a very cold day?
A. A little otter.
Q. What should you keep after you have given it to another?
A. Your word
Q. What kind of portrait should a teetotaler have?
A. One in water-colours
Q. What class of people is not likely to die of enlargement of the heart
A. Misers.
Q. Where was the first nail struck?
A. On the head
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
My own District is Carnhugh. There are some lakes in my District. There are not so many people living in it now as what used to live in it in days gone by.
There are not so many slate houses in my District as thatched ones. There are none of the people in my district can speak Irish because there were no Irish long ago when other people were at school.
There are not so many old men and women living now as what used to live in it. There are only a few living now and they are over seventy and eighty years of age. There are fairies supposed to be seen on a mountain in my District the name of Durahine [?].
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:43
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
never possessed, and yet gave two to each of his children?
A. Parents.
Q. On what food should a prize-fighter train?
A. mussels.
Q. Why does a railway-ticket-inspector cut a hole in your ticket?
A. To let you pass through.
Q. Of which sex is the Post-office?
A. The mail sex.
Q. What is most like the half of an orange?
A. The other half.
Q. Why is tea in a pot like a watch going to your uncle's?
A. Because it goes up the spout.
Q. When does a farmer act with great rudeness to his corn.
A ([Nusur?]) When he pulls its ears.
Q. When is a lady like a trout?
A. When she takes a fly that (leaves) brings her to the bank.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:42
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
and then he went up a field and went across a hill. When he came to this field he made a hole deep down in the quarry and hid his gold in it, he covered it up and went away, and so it is said that the gold is there unto this day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The people in Lignanorig [?] are all young now, only one old man whose name is Tom Farrell. This man is over eighty years of age, and he lives alone in a small thatched house. He works very hard and he is never ill except for a cold, and he attends church every Sunday. This man cannot speak Irish, because there was Irish taught when he was at school.
There is a story told long ago about a bag or pot gold hidden in a field in the Derries. Long ago a man came riding on a horse as far as a certain house a piece away from this field. He tied his horse to a tree and took a bag of gold with him and came down the road, a bit
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Lignanoonig[?] is the name of my own district. It is a small place. There are not many houses in it now as there here long ago. There are 7 houses in it now, and long ago there were 14 or 15 in it. The houses are nearly all small thatched except 2. The parish in which Lignanorrig [?] is in is Drunholn [?]. There is one big lake in it called Lough Rone. There are some small rivers in it also.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:42
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Q. In which month do ladies talk the least?
A. February, because it has the fewest days.
Q. To what eye is everything invisible?
A. The eye of a potatoe[sic].
Q. What smells most in a druggist's shop.
A. The nose.
Q. If I shoot at three birds on a tree and kill one, how many will remain?
A. None; the other will fly away.
Q. What relation is your Uncle's brother to you if he is not your Uncle?
A. Your father.
Q. What animal has the most brains?
A. The hog, because it has a hog's head full of them.
Q. Why is a lucky gambler (like) a very agreeable fellow?
A. Because he has such winning ways.
Q. What is that which Adam never saw,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:42
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
And lots of tufts of butter [?] were unearthed. The roads into the bogs are very bad, but indeed it is a place to be proud of. There is one national school in the Derries and lots of fine scholars been sent well educated from it. There were also fairies seen around the districts. There are about 14or 15one storied houses and about 4 two storied houses in it.
Long ago people could speak Irish, but not many people over 10 can speak Irish in this district. Mrs O’ Donnell, Rock-hill, Ballintra is over 80, and she can speak Irish.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the Derries district is situated about two miles on the mountainous side of Ballintra. It has 3 fine lakes. Their names are Lough Ragh, Lough Rone and Thulagh, and they are very much used for fishing. Lots of people from Rossnowlagh and other sea-side places come there for a day’s sport with their fishing rods, others have a rowing-boat. There os a lot of boggy ground around the Derries, and peoplecome for over 10 miles to get their supply of firing [?]. There are a lot of fir stacks […] under the bogs. One time where the boggy grounds are now, was a […] of forest, and lots of […] human homes were found
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:41
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Question. When is a cradle in a passion
Answer. When it is put out
Q. What is the difference between an oak-tree and a tight boot
A. One makes acorns, the other makes corns ache
Q. Which is the lightest place in Ireland
A. Cork
Q. What is the worst kind of fare soldiers can live on
A. War-fare
Q. Why did Adam bite the apple
A. Because he had no knife
Q. Which is heaviest a pound of lead or a pound of feathers
A. Both the same
Q. What is that (you) which inverses the more you take from it
A. A hole.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
More houses in the Derries. but people went to Avenia [?], but the people can see the old ruins yet. There is a river flowing through the Derries, it flows from Lough Verg [?] and flows into Lough Rath.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
my own district is in the Derries. it has got that name because in years gone by it was in plantation or a forest.
It is a large townland, a river separates it from the next townland. The Derries is in the parish of Drumholm. The most of the houses are all thatched except a few. The Derries is situated as a foot of a mountain called Bradley. There are bogs to be found in the Derries.
The school is in the center of the Derries, it is a very old school. There are three lakes in the Derries Lough Rath, Lough Polka [?] and Lough Rhone [?].
In years gone by there were
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:41
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Q. What is that which ladies look for but never wish to find?
A. A hole in their stockings
Q. What is a trout like lying on a gravel path?
A. Like a fish out of water.
Q. What is that, which makes everybody sick but those who swallow it?
A. Flattery
Q. What Christian name is spelt[sic] the same way backwards (as) and forwards?
A. Hannah.
Q. When is an ox not an ox?
A. When it is turned into a meadow.
Q. Why is a doctor like a woodcock?
A. Because he has a long bill
Q. What is that which is often brought to table, often cut but never eaten
A. A pack of cards
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Q. What most resembles a cat looking out of a window?
A. A cat looking in at a window.
Q. What did Adm first plant in the garden of Eden?
A. His foot
Q. What is the weight of the moon?
A. Four quarters
Q. What belongs to yourself, and is used by everybody more than yourself?
A. Your name.
Q. If you throw a stone into the water what does it become before it reaches the bottom?
A. Wet.
Q. What were the first words Adam said to Eve?
A. Nobody knows.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
saw ere-a-rat. (ararat).
A. Where was Adam going when he was in his thirty-ninth year?
A. Going into his fortieth.
A. What is that which cannot (go) be right, but never wrong?
A. An Angle
A. What key is the stiffest to turn?
A. A don-key.
A. What key does most harm?
A. Whis-key.
A. What bar often (shuts) opens but never closes?
A. A crow-bar
A. What game is like the motion of a vessel in a storm?
A. Pitch and toss.
A. Why does a dock put its head under the water?
A. For divers reasons.
A. What is that, which if you name it, you brak[sic] it.
A. Silence.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[text in margin not legable.]
Which dress lasts a lady the longest?
Her house dress because (it lasts) she never wears it out.
What is that which everyone can divide, but no one can see where it has been divided?
Water.
When is a prisoner like a gun?
When he is discharged.
Which of the feathered tribe would be supposed to lift the heaviest weight?
The crane.
Why is it always dangerous to take a nap in the train?
Because the train always runs over sleepers.
How many sides are there to a tree?
Two, the inside and the outside.
Why was Noah in the ark like a disappointed rat-catcher?
Because (h) it was forty days he (was)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:40
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
the cancer plaster. It is also said that it can cure the whittle and the rose
Plantain-leaf is said to be another herb in cancer plaster. Crow's-toe and the yarrow are two more herbs in cancer plaster garlic is used for curing many things uncluding coughs and sore throats. It is also used for curing many diseases in cattle.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Here are some of the herbs that my father knows, water-cress, bog bine, mountain sage neamony, cuckoo sorrel dockana leaf, and garlic
Water-cress is used for curing skin. Bog bine cleans the blood. Mountain sage can cure coughs. When young calves are sick neamony is said to be able to cure the(n)m. Cuckoo-Sorrel is said to be able to cure the whittle.
Dockana leaf is one of the many cures for the rose Chicken-weed although a weed is said to be contained in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
are nearly all thatched. There are only a few slate houses around here. Some of the houses are very small, only one storey [sic] in height, and there are some very big houses two stories in height. The name of my parish is […].
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the name of my own district is Pullinareny [?], and my house is situated in the center of it. There are not many bogs to be found in my district and there are not many people living here now and nearly all young. There are not many people over seventy years old. None of the people in my district speak Irish. There is one great river in my district called the Black Water, it flows out of Lough Rath and flows down the center of Pullinareny [?].
The houses in its district
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:40
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
applied to the boils it will banish them. Another cure for boils, is to rub some archangle tar on them.
Toothache: When a stone is boiled accidently[sic], it will cure the toothache, if rubbed on the effected part. Another cure for toothache is to rub the gizzard of a hen on the effected part three times, (In) and while rubbing say In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy ghost. Amen. “The gizzard should then be burried[sic] and never be dug up again.
Red water: Give the animal a drink of blue-till water and it is cured
Gape: The gape in birds is cured by lime
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Sprain: Chicken weed applied hot can cure a sprain
swelling: Hot bran […?] applied to a swelling cures it.
Sore ear: Hot oaten cake softened and the poultice applied to ear, cures a sore ear.
Swollen leg: For swollen legs apply poultice of cows manure.
[Drul?]-mouth: the first son of a father and mother whose surname is the same blesses the child and also kisses the child.
Reumatism[sic]: Carry sulpher[sic] in your pocket and avoid getting it wet. Also carry nut-meg in your pocket
Boils: Brown – soap, cruds[sic] of buttermilk, brown – sugar and some sweet milk mixed (to boil) together and if
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
that is vacant now, and there is a ghost in it, Willie Thompson and my uncle saw it. There is also a ghost on the Pettigo – Donegal road, it is ghost is Albert Flooel [?]. this man was going to Pettigo the Saturday before Hallow E’en and he was struck by a lorry and died instantly, and he has been seen several nights since.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:39
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
some nettles and boil them until the water turns brown. Then take it of[sic] and let it cool, and then drink it all and (I) the measles go away.
[in margin: For evil] The seventh son of a family who are all of the same sex can cure this disease by blessing the person inflicted with holy water.
[in margin: Rheumatism] The cure for rheumatism is to boil (dandy) dandelion leaves and drink the water of then.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
My own district is Big Park. There are a lot of people living in it. The west part is all hills, but the eastern part is level. There is a lake in it and people say that there is buried gold in the bottom of the lake. The lake is overhung by a hill and a steep rocky cliff, and on the other side by limestone fields. The county road is about a quarter of a mile from my house. The lake name is Trusk [?], it is unfathomable.
There is a house in Big Park,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[in margin: toothache] People who have toothache and wish to be cured go to a blacksmith and beg for a donkey's shoe which they rub on the tooth three times.
[in margin: mumps] Any person being the first born child of a father and mother of one surname can cure the mumps. He or she puts donkey's winkers on the suferes[sic] and leads then to a well where they take three mouth fulls of water and bliss[sic] them – selves at the same time. This is done for three days and then the mumps disappear.
[in margin: warts] A cure for warts is to rub the warts with a black snail and then hang it on a bush and as the snail withers so does the warts.
[in margin: measles] The cure for measles is to pull
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[in margin: Cure for bats in horser] The cure for bats in horses, is to boil a called Burroots and give it to the affected.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[in margin: sore or weak eyes] The cure for sore or weak eyes is called, “[hauselick?]”
a herb which, is usually found on the eves of old thatched houses.
[in margin:[cure?] for a hurt] The cure for a hurt is a herb called “[cumpary?]”, from which a poultice is made and placed on the hurt.
[in margin: [cure?] for a cut] The foremost cure to stop a bleeding cut is a herb called Slauna, which is found in the edge of a (streom[sic]) stream.
[in margin: [cure?] of the rose] A person whose parents are of the name of McCahal draws a little flood from hand or food, and, with a little butter makes a poultice.
[in margin: [cure?] for Red water] The cure for red water is a herb called bloodweed. This herb is found on old banks, and is pounded and given to the beast.
[in margin: TB] a herb called wall cress is used as a cure for Tubercoloses[sic], Bacilli.
[in margin:[cure?] for nettle [wash?]] The (f) cure (to wash) for this, is to wash your hand in the groop in a byre.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A hard boiled [sic] egg is often used for a head ache. The egg should be applied to the forehead, and left there until it is cold.
A whipping with a bunch of nettles is good for hiptena [?]. Laurel leaf and daisy roots are good for a burn, also fresh hilter [?] is good.
Rub of a person’s hand is the “Three Best Names” for a sprain is a very good cure.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A small plant the name of Hemlock is a good cure for a sore. A cure for a bleeding nose is to lie on your back and hold a wet cloth on your forehead.
Canon [?] oil is good for burns, it is put on, then a cloth put over it.
Green Rue is used for all kinds of poisons.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:32
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
would cure a sore throat.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Strong black tea is good for sore eyes. Vinegar must be put into your tooth to cure it. If you get boiling water and put salt into it, it is a cure for a sprain, but you must keep your hand or foot in it for an hour.
Nettle tea is a good cure for measles. Roasted salt put into a cloth a tied around your neck
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:32
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
donkey three times.
A cure for jaundice, boil worms and drink the soup.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:32
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
person who has the cure and he or she gives you a glass full of oat meal. You put it on your heart three mornings after each other. The first morning there is a small hole in the center of the meal the second morning a bigger hole and on the third morning there is a large hole in it. Every day after it the meal gradually gets smaller o your heart gets better.
There is a cure for nose bleeding you take three hairs out of the top of your head and place them on the bridge of your nose, and put cold water on the top of your head. Then you will get better.
A cure for whooping cough is to go over and underneath a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In olden times and even now a days people have cattle die with a disease called blackleg, and they used to put a leg of a cow or calf in the chimney, this they said kept the other cattle from dying.
Any person whose parents are of the same name have its cure. It is for a disease called “mumps”. They put a horse’s bridle on the person affected and leads [sic] that person to a nied [?] to drink. When the person drinks three mornings after each other three mouthfuls of water, then they get better.
There is a cure for heart fever. Some people have its cure. If you have its disease you go to
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:28
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
well filled up with those people who were asked to the house. Eating, drinking and dancing went on as mentioned before till morning.
All who were invited to the wedding were expected to give a party later to the married couple which they always give.
It was always considered lucky for the bride to wear something borrowed on her wedding day.
A wedding of jaunting cars was a very nice spectacle, which has died completely out within the last twenty years. Motocars (mo) now take their place. Big weddings have also gone, a big wedding being too expensive an item, nowadays owing to the cost of food especially drink which of course no wedding, would be a wedding without.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:28
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and as often as not led to fisticuffs.
After starting for home some half tipsy fellow would shout to the car before to let him past, when the whipping and driving began. The best horse got first. Then began the arguments about their respective horses. However as a rule they (rule) reached home without any accident though sometimes a horse often ran away, smashing the car, this was often due to shots being (fined) fired on the party leaving home. The horse’s became excited and owing to the noise, wouldn’t settle down that day.
An accident of any kind occurring at a wedding was considered a very unlucky omen, and indeed if often proved itself to be.
On reaching home the car drivers were paid for their cars. This was done not by the bride and groom, but by the guests who had engaged the cars. They were given their dinner and a drink, they then went home.
The wedding party then went into the house, which was already pretty
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:28
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
For the big day. The horses were fed for the event and groomed of the best. One the morning of the wedding the brides party went to her house, and the grooms party to his house. In a short time, the car owners began to arrive, with dancing, prancing horses, all decorated with crochet and ribbons.
The bride got in her car with her best man and maid the other cars fell into line after. The same applied to the groom except that he always did his utmost to reach the church first.
After the ceremony the wedding party generally drove to some neighbouring town, where previously arrangements had been made for breakfast and refreshments for the party. On leaving the church the bride and her best maid had to take their places on the groom’s car, the car’s of the grooms party then leading the way.
The wedding party generally remained in the town for three or four hours before returning to the house of the bride.
The homeward drive often proved very excitable, sometimes disastrous too.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:28
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for refreshments. They then proceeded to the home of the bride where an elaborate reception was always held. The bride provided at all eatables, the groom all the drink, that was whiskey and wines. After the dinner the house was cleared up for dancing which continued all night. The guests then departed. The bride generally remained in her own home until the following Sunday.
Later the jaunting cars came into evidence at nearly all country weddings. This period would be roughly between twenty five and fifty years ago.
A jaunting car wedding was a very exciting affair. If the bride and groom were very popular, they generally had a very big wedding. The bride asked her party as in the older weddings, and the groom asked his a boy and girl from every house in the neighbourhood were asked to drive to the church with the bride and groom. Others were asked to go to the wedding house.
Preparation had to be made a few weeks before the wedding so as to give due notice to car owners to have their horses ready
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:28
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The runaway marriage were condemned chiefly on account of the frequent quarrellings that began at a runaway, and often ended in serious fighting between different tribes of the people. Poteen was made on every hill and glen. It was cheap, a gallon only costing a few shillings. Therefore it was used like dish water at all gatherings. This made matters worse if any contention atall [sic] arose on either side. The church didn’t like this state of affairs and tried to condemn this practise. They eventually succeeded. They made a rule that marriages should take place in the morning instead of any time during the day. Immediately after the runaway period the wedding party walked to the church. The groom invited a (meer) number of his friends, who walked to the church along with him, the bride did the same. The groom and his party were supposed to be in the church first, if not ill luck was believed to be in store for the newly married couple. Therefore the groom always made sure to get there in time. After the morning the wedding party called at some inn
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:28
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then in the cradle of eighteen months.
This child’s father was supposed to be the worst of the three brothers in the opposing his marriage with his sister, and was certainly the worst in administering the thrashing that he got.
The families of all parties concerned in this tale, are still alive in this parish.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:27
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the cradle (of eighteen months) started off to the house of the runaway, pretended friendship and invited the young pair back to the girls home to make arrangements for the wedding and fortune. When they reached the girls home, one of the brothers shoved the girl inside, shut the door and turned to give the young fellow the thrashing of his life.
They then closed their sister in a room and sent for the man whom they had chosen as a suitable match for her. The wedding took place in less than a month. A short time after her marriage the poor girl lost her reason. The neighbours said it was due to her forced marriage. She improved later, though she never was the same, even though she lived to be an old woman.
The fellow who first ran away with her lived on for about twenty five years without troubling about ever getting married again. At last he give the neighbours a shock, by marrying the daughter of one of the brothers of the girl he ran away with twenty five years before, who was the baby
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:27
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on Sunday after mass. The relations on each side were there again, and accompanied the bride and groom to their future home, where another big night was again held. When a girl got married then, even though she was but eighteen years old, she had to put on a black cap with white borders, and a shoulder shawl, or else disgrace all belonging to her.
A story is told about a runaway, and about one of the last runaways too, that took place in this parish. It seems that a young boy and girl took a notion they would get married, so they planned a runaway, The girls people had another more suitable match for their daughter. so they though, but she thought differently and arranged to run away with a boy of her own choice. The runaway took place one night to the house of some of her friends. The usual crowd followed and a big time took place. News was brought to her people who were furious when they heard it. However the three brothers, one of them who was married and had a baby girl of eighteen months old in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:20
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satisfied went, to the house of the runaway brought home the pair, made all arrangements for the wedding which took place a week later.
If the immediate relations were not satisfied, the runaway pair were left to their own devices, the girl remaining in the house she was in, until the boy was able to fix up a little house and get married. Often times if the girl’s parents were unable or unwilling to give their daughter any dowry, they adopted this attitude so as to get out of making any marriage arrangements.
The marriage took place any time during the day, from ten in the morning till ten at night. The wedding was held in the bride’s house, where eating, drinking and dancing were carried on till morning, the guests then generally went home, the newly married pair remaining till the following Sunday. The taking of the bride to the future home then took place, this was called the Drag home and took place
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:19
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Between seventy and ninety years ago, runaway marriages were the custom in this district. Whenever a boy and girl took notion of getting married they started off to some friends house, this was called the runaway. The news at once went round, and the relations on each side followed, bringing both food and drink to the house of the runaway, where feasting, dancing and free fighting were indulged in. Oftentimes big fights that were kept up at the local fairs and markets for a couple of years afterwards, began at one of these runaways. The dispute often arose among the relations of the would be bride and groom, as to whether such a man’s daughter was an equal for such a man’s son and vice versa. Other times it arose over the dowry or fortune of the bride which some times was given in cash. Other times in cattle or sheep.
News of the runaway was brought to the parents and brothers of the would be bride and groom. who if
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:15
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are all eagerly waiting the arrival of Santa Clause. People give and receive presents, and cards, and wish each other a Happy Christmas.
The feast of New Year comes next. There isn’t much fuss about this festival. The old people wouldn’t allow the house to be swept out on that day, or the ashes to be put out. All is lifted and felt over till next day. They would neither borrow, lend, nor even give an alms on New Year’s Day. They thought that if they lent anything they were giving away their luck for that year. The same applied to borrowing. If you borrowed anything on that day you were supposed to be borrowing for the next twelve months
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:15
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And the hoof of a mule With two quarts of ganders milk all mixed together in an old sows bladder. With a peacock’s feather, taken mine hours, mine day, mine fortnights, before days.
If that doesn’t cure him, I’ll ask no pay” He then says, “Rise up dead man and fight again.” Cromwell jumps to his feet. The others still outside come in on turn an turn till they are all in side.
They have a musician with them who strikes up a tune, and the others do a dance, they also sing, after which Tom Funny presents his lor to the woman of the house who generally puts in a shilling. They then depart to the next house, wishing all a happy Christmas and New Year. The week following Christmas Day. The mummers have a dance and big night in some house to whom they invite all their friends.
The houses are decorated at Christmas, with holly and ivy. The children
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:15
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My fist is made of knuckle bone, I command you to the field.”
Cromwell says. What are you but a poor boy who fed the King horse for seven years with dry oats and hay sir?”
George. “You lie sir, you lie sir.”
Cromwell “Take out you sword and try [?]
George “I’ll stab you through the heart and encourage you to die sir.”
Stabs him. Cromwell falls.
The doctor is called. He enters saying “Here comes I wee Doctor Brown The best wee Doctor in the town. He is asked what he can cure. “I can cure the plague within, the plague (whito) without, the palsy or the gout, If the are nine devils in I can knock eleven out.” He is asked what he recommends in this case. He says
“The lights and the livers of a we creepy stool, the tongue of a frog
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:14
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I count myself a jolly young man If you don’t believe what I say Enter in Big Head hill clear the way.”
“Here comes I Big head, If my head is big, my body is small I’ll do my endeavour to please you all. If you don’t believe what I say Enter in Oliver Bromwell he’ll clear the way.
“Here comes I Oliver Bromwell with my long Copper (noise) nose, I conquered all the nation.
As you may suppose, I made the French for to tremble, and the Spaniard for to quake and I beat the bloody Dutchman Till I made his heart ache. If you dont believe what I say enter in Prince George he’ll clear the way.”
“Here comes I Prince George from England I sprung. I am one of the hardiest champions ever christened dumb. My head is made of iron, my body made of steel,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:13
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In comes a we small fellow dressed as a bird saying.
“Here comes I the wren, the king of all birds. The more I’’m small my family’s great Rise up landlady and give us a (treat) trate.
If your trate it is (good) the best, I hope in heaven your soul will rest. And if your trate it is too small it won’t agree with me atall[sic]. If you don’t believe what I say Enter in Devil Doubt he’ll clear the way.”
“Here comes I wee Devil Doubt. One leg in and other leg out. Money I want, and money I crave. If I dont get money Ill sweep you all to your grave. If you dont believe what I say Enter in Belzeebub: He’ll clear the way.”
“Here comes I wee Belzeebub Over my (sholel) shoulder I carry my club.
In my hand a frying pan
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:13
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I wish you all a happy Christmas and a glad new year.
If you dont believe what I say Enter in Jack Straw: he’ll clear the way. This fellow has a sheaf of straw on his head.
“Here comes I Jack Straw, such a man you never saw, through a rock, through a reel, through a (reel) an old spinning wheel. Through a bag of water, through a sheet of pepper. Through an old womans shank shin lon [?]
Such a man was never known if you dont believe what I say Enter in Tom Funny he’ll clear the way.” In comes Tom Funny he is the man who carries the money for saying
“Here comes I Tom Funny.
I am the man who carries the money, my box is dumb and cannot speak Reach your hand with what you like. All silver, no brass, bad halfpence wont pass.” “Enter in the Wren hill clear the way.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:12
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people about twenty or thirty years over these events is almost gone. They are treated now as everyday happenings.
Xmas is the last Feast of the year. A month before the feast, we see signs of its approach. In this district we have no wren boys as in other places, Instead we have Mummers. Mummers are the young boys of the place who gather up together, dress themselves in old clothes, cover up their faces, put on tall hats, and go out to gather money for a big night around Christmas. These boys each play a different part, they have a Rhyme suitable for each. They go into the houses as follows. First man to enter calls himself Room. He says
“Here comes I room give me room to rhyme Till I show you some activity about this christmas time. With my pockets full of money and my barrels full of beer
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:12
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go outdoors, throwing cabbage, tying doors, stealing carts, are some of the tricks played. Filling your mouth with water, going to your neighbours house quietly and listening to hear whose name may be mentioned in their conversation. That name is supposed to be the name of your future companion. Taking a ball of wool and going to a limb kiln at midnight, throwing in the ball, holding one end in your hand and asking ‘Who holds my ball” is a trick also supposed reveal the name of your husband or wife, but I never heard any trying it.
Tying up a cabbage head over the door and watching for the first person who enters next day is a trick still played. The first to enter hears the name of your intended.
Indoors a great feast is generally held, potato cake, apple cake, barn brack, and lorty bread in some places makes the night a real Hallow Eve.
As in almost all the other feasts the enthusiasm displayed by the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:11
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anything that will burn and bringing it to whathever [sic] place they intend making a fire. Generally the fire is made on a hill. In the evening the firewood and turf are piled up and set alright. The young all gather together bringing some musical instrument; a violin or melodeon, they (dace) dance and sing and make fun till all is burnt out. Besides the fire on the hill, a fire is half burnt out, the man of the house comes and takes a bucket of coals from the fire. He goes to his fields and throws a cook into every crop he has, that is in his potatoes, oats, grass, turnips, and any other crop he may have, each gets a coal from the Bonefire. This is done to bring luck on his crops.
Hallow Eve is then the next feast. Apples and nuts are got especially for the younger children. Roasting nuts, playing snap apples, and diving into water are most of the games played by the young folk. Bigger boys and girls
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:08
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and tricks used to be played. It was supposed that if three holes were cut in the ground with a black handled knife after sunset and putting and putting, the name of your three best friends on each hole. In the morning if a cuiteog [sic] was found in any of the holes it was supposed to be the scairne [?] of your future husband or wife.
Pulling the Yarrow herb, putting it under your pillow, sleeping on it and saying the following rhyme.
“Good morrow, good morrow fair yarrow and thrice good morrow the thee I hope before this time tomorrow you’ll show my true lover to me.
Your future spouse was supposed to be revealed in your dream.
The bonefire [sic] night, St John’s Eve, commert [?] This custom is largely dying out also, except in mountain districts. For a week before the Bonefire [sic] the young people are gathering firing of every description, that is turf, wood, furze, --
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:08
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ceremonies; those who don’t fast and obstain from twelve oclock. At three o’clock the rosary is said in each house.
On Easter morning, the children rise very early expecting to see the sun dance. The breakfast is then got ready, as pot is filled with eggs and boiled, the children try to see who can eat the most eggs. They then go to mass, when they return the dinner is eaten. In the evening the younger people gather together and have what they call their Easter Feast. This is made out doors, if the weather be at all favourable. Eggs are boiled, tea is made and all sit down and have a big feast. After the feast, they generally get a violin or melodeon and dance for hours, and then each person goes home.
The next feast held long ago but not here now was May Eve. In the evening, May Flowers were gathered and scattered round the windows and doors of the houses. Games
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:08
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the rigid fast observing during Lent is almost dispensed with.
This day finishes up the marriages for the year. A local saying here to the bachelors after cock Tuesday is: “Did you let the cock crow this year again,” meaning he didn’t get married. The Sunday following is called Smut Sunday it’s supposed that any girl who isn’t married before Lent wears a smut on that Sunday.
On St. Patrick’s Day everyone gets a bunch of shamrock before starting for Mass in the morning. After mass mostly one or two of the local lands march through the town, playing old Irish airs, as “St. Patrick’s Day” and “God Save Ireland.” The grown up people like have a drink on that day, They call it “drowning the shamrock”
Holy Thursday some years ago, was a day for cutting hair, and nails, During Lent no one gets hair cut, or their nails until Holy Thursday. On Good Friday only one who can goes to church to attend the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:08
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The principal feasts in this district are St (Bridg) Bridigd’s [sic] Eve, Shrove Tuesday, St Patricks Day, Holy Thursday, Good Friday, St Johns Eve, or the Bonefire night, Hallow Eve, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year.
On St Brigid’s Eve, a sheaf of green rushes is cut and left out side the house, until after dark, After dusk the rushes are brought into the house in St (Bride) Brigid’s name. Each one then makes a cross with the green rushes. Next day holy water is shaken on the crosses, one is then put in each (room) room in the house, and one in the out house, all the inmates and all the animals are placed under the protection of St. Brigid’s. After the making of the (making) crosses on St Brigid’s Eve a feast in held in house.
Shrove Tuesday, or bock Tuesday as it is here called, comes next; It was always kept a great feast day long ago but not so much now, since
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:07
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cow. Not long after she had enough to buy another cow
The man wondered where she was getting the money. He asked her about it. At long last she told him about the red haired woman coming in and telling her what to do. As soon as she told the secret the two cows died again and they became as poor as every they had been before.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:06
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Long ago a man named Lyons lived with his wife in Finmore. They had a big stock of cattle. One day the man went out to the lyre and one of the cows was dead.
The next day another one was dead.
They all died out but one. He said he would sell her in the fair. The next morning he set off to the fair with the cow. During the time he was away to the fair there came a red haired woman into the house. She said to the woman of the house. “This man is away to the fair today with the cow and he will sell her for thirteen pounds.”
“If you would not sweep out the house on us or wet the ashes with dirty water, or clean out the byre after sun set your cows would not have died.” She told her to keep the secret to her self and never breath a word to anyone: The next morning when she looked (lool) in the bowls they were full of half crowns. She lifted them and left them aside. Next morning the same thing happened. When she had enough to buy a cow, she gave it to ma [?]
He went to the fair and bought a new
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:06
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Where dauntless Hugh once trod.
For the powers of hell shall never prevail against the church of God.”
VIII
There are a few I’ll (man) name for you.
Before my song does end
Bob Millar’s one a cleargy man
From Luther did deseend [sic]
A Cooper and a pauper’s clerk,
Inside the workhouse wall
These orange pills, they must keep still
Or leave old Donegal
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:06
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From Inver to the Mall.
Will let them see no tyrany [sic]
Shall rule old Donegal
V
We heard great noise about the boys
That came from Castlefinn
They swore they’d toss our Chapel
When ever they’d come in
But in the field they roared and squeeled
Like a pack of hungry hounds
These orange dupes they longed for soup,
But dare not face the town
VI
When those orange folk that day awoke
It filled their hearts with fear
To see the crowd assembled before the day did clear
Their work house chief got no relief
From Dublin’s royal hall
For the order came was stop your drums
While going through Donegal
VII
God bless our noble burale brave Father bassid [?]
He addressed his congregation and this to them did say
“We soon shall see Terconaill free
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:06
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who lately did assemble
near the town of Donegal
II
It being on the twelth [sic] day of July
As you may understand
These Willimites they did unite
With flags and orange bands
To walk out town both up and down
And open their new hall
And march in grand procession
Through the town of Donegal
III
Up from Strabane these orange clan
Sent word to all around
They told us to (sun) surrender,
For they would march the town
Their cry was trapists [?] stand aside.
And down with Popery
For on church and hall in spite of all
Well plant our orange tree
IV
Tryconsill cries awake my boys
Around each hill and glen
Come rally round into the town
Your nights for to defend
From Lough Ernes shore to Barnies Mor
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:06
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In the morning at daybreak when the resident Orangemen awoke and saw the town packed with men, they began to realise that things did look serious.
Mr. Pearson the workhouse clerk and chief mover in (organation) organising the orange parade, immediately had a message dispatched to Dublin castle. In the meantime the trains began pouring in the orangemen from other parts of the County who were met at the station and sent to a field outside the town to await a reply.
The reply came. “No orange demonstration in Donegal.” Of course they were allowed to walk right through the town, but no drum could be touched or flag raised.
The following poem was composed by a man named Johnny Mc Glinchey, Driminadagh, who is still alive.
Come all ye Roman Catholics
I Hope you will attend
I crave your kind attention
To these few lines (few lines) I pen
Concerning loyal orange men
As they themselves do call
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:05
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In the year 1898 the Orangemen of this County decided to hold their 12th of July demonstration in Donegal town. The Catholics resented an orange procession marching through their historic town, and playing their party tunes around the ruins of the O’Donnels Castle.
They consequently sent an appeal to the Catholics throughout the County to send help to put a stop to any Orange demonstration there. For weeks before the orange party were preparing for the march, and sending challanges as to what they would do.
The catholics organised and made preparation against this invasion. The night before the 12th saw Donegal and the vicinity a moving mass of people. Every man who could go went there; armed with old saythes, hooks, blackthorns, picks, etc.
Accomodation [sic] was found for them in the town and neighbourhood. In the meantime (the meantime) the Authorities got wind of trouble, so extra police, soldiers, and mounted cavalry dispatched to Donegal.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:01
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The cure for heartburn is to take three
sips of water, and a pinch of baking soda
[in margin: Sore throat] The cure for a sore throat is warm [sand?]
in a saucepan, and put it in a stocking and
tie it round your neck.
[in margin: Warts] Tie a silk thread round the base of the wart
Another cure is to write your name on a piece
of paper then throw it away and the first
person to lift the paper gets the warts.
[in margin: Hoarseness] The cure for hoarseness is to eat a slice of bacon.
[in margin: Measles] Neltles[?] boiled or stewed in water sewed up on neltles[?]
lea is a cure for measles. Boglean[sic] is used for purifying blood.
[in margin: jaundice] Dandelion juice is a cure for the yellow jaundice
(T) Tansy is a small flower which is made
into tansy tea. Then it is given to
delicate people to strengthen them garlic
is a small bulb the shape of an onion
which is used for curing influenza, rheumatism
and sore throats. It is eaten whole.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[in margin: oils] The cure for boils is to
get a small piece of tobacco and
dip it in salt water and
the put it in a cloth and
tie it round your neck and then
the boils will disappear.
[in margin: whooping cough] It is said that mares milk
is a cure for the whooping cough
[in margin: mumps] The cure for mumps is to go
under a donkey's belly three times, and say
in the name of the father and of the son and of the holy ghost.
[in margin: ...toothache?] The cure for the toothache is to take a
pull of a pipe or a cigarette.
[in margin: Rheumatism] The cure for Rheumatism is to take a
a cup of boglean[sic] morning and night
[in margin: headache] The cure for headache is to get a slice of
a lemon and put it on a bandage and tie it round your head.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
we'll hammer.
And sweets the yoke and papish for[?]
It, its ne'er shall stain our banish[?]
An old scotch grey from beyond
the brae, spoke for all her
clucking.
“Give me a rope and I'll hang the [...?]
And all his priestly backins
A Dorkan tall from near Brown [Ha..?]
proposed a rewolution
That Chapman's pills we'll cure the
rills, and save the constitution
I am very sore says old Dromore
And much prefer the lotion
But if your wills is for these pills
I must suppot the motion
Then like an April blast,
The motion it was past.
There'll be no contention
The blinking cock, from Doonan Rock
Soon adjourned the hen's convention
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 11:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The hens created the other day,
In Donegal, in the Temperance hall
They cocked their feathers, for
the coming fray.
They had coach and chinas[sic], and
black faced Dinas
And ugly Dorkans from near
and far
And the warlike hen from bonny
glan, made the rafters ring
with the notes of war.
O, it was cheering, to see them
sneering at the monsterous egg
that old Gladdy laid.
For I'll despatch it, for its
cackle cackle the hens hurraided
Says old “Macaine beaz” we'll
smash that egg and Gladdy too
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Splendid mirror in which to view
Reflected nature inverted, seen
Fleecy cloud and ethereal blue
XIV
River and lake and dell and grave
Delight entrance and overpower
Impress with awe or charmed by love
of mountain grand and mossy bower
XV
Oh! what a lesson here to learn
From the river rolling to the sea
That man alike is onward(rd) borne
To boundless vast eternity.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The homestead's dotted o'er the plain
The mansion on the sloping lawn
The rural church half hid between
Unbrageous[sic] foliage, overgrown.
X
Here spring her early visit makes
as seasons roll with changing times
While summer her last look she takes
Before she leaves her climes.
XI
Oh! calm retreat! Oh! Sylvan scene!
Inrapt[?] delight in which I gaze
Where is the equal to be seen
Of crystal lake and silvery Eske.
XII
The crystal lake encircled round
With towering mountains to the sky
Nature impressive and profound
Inspires with awe and majesty
XIII
Of crystal lake, sublime serene,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
V
Delightful place, enchanting scene
Where'er I walk, where'er I look
The waving grain, the meadow green
Fairy dell and murmuring brook
VI
The warbling songsters of the grave
Pour forth their soft melodious lays
The piping thrush whose notes I love
Carols with lark its markers praise
VII
The bleating sheep and lowing kine
Browse o'er the fields or seck[?] the shade
The cuckoo's voice in summer times
Is heard in grove and grassy glade
VIII
The primrose sweet and violet gay
With glossy leaves bestrew the ground
The daisy meek with flowers of may
Bloom forth in beauty all round
IX
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Behold the river gently flowing
Or rolling onward to the main
Rushing, rippling and bestowing
Life and oerdure[?] in its train.
II
Fed by rills of far off mountains
With their cloud capp'd snowy peakes[sic]
Or by many hill-side fountains
Or from hill embosomed[?] lakes
III
O'er its peddly bed forever
Clattering, babbling, rolling on
Leaping, laughing, stopping never
Until the ocean (be) goal is won
IV
On its banks is rich profusion
Wild flowers bloom o'er hill and dale
Tangled and strewn in wild confusion
Diffuse their fragrance on the gale
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This building situated some miles from Donegal
a trading town of wide renown the star of cities all
A J.P. Of honour adjacant[sic] does reside
His name is D. Connelly, in him you may confide
His grand domain with splendour, does decorate the vale
Where the partridge and the pheasant, does sing their evening tale
For the want of education, I now must stop my pen
The name of this vacinity[sic], you'll easily comprehend.
IV
The poet's name to mention lives near to Donegal
His talent's great can't half relate the praises due
to all
The hills will spring with oerdure[?] green, when he
is far away.
For death's command does tremblingly forbid him longer
stay.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
So the tide swept down the water gate
So then the tide gave another turn
and swept away Pat Bell's wee churn
Run boys, etc.,
VII
Andy Boleman scratched his head
merciful God what'll I do with my bed
Andy run but he soon retired
And he dropped the pack at Pat Bell's byre
Eddy Byrne was stout and young
And he ran off with Peggy Quinn.
Run boys, etc.,
VIII
Jamie Bunningham say it's fun
But when he saw the tide he then did run
Said Jamie to himself its no great toil
and I'll save the life of Jamie Boyle
Jeby Kennedy, she cried for (k) heep
So the tide dashed her up to the upper shelf.
IX
Patrick Brogan was the best of the spree
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
When George came in his heart did jump
To see McClure and Bell McBlunk
(w) George came up to give William a drag
O! stop stop said William, the water's in my tag.
Run boys. Etc,
IV
Indeed the row wasn't last on the page
We had Mary Ann Hegarty and Jamie Maguire
But we thought the world was at an end
When we heard the roars of Willie Glen
Run Boyz[sic], Etc,
V
With that the tide gave another gush
and swept (the) Biddy Harvey under the lush
When the tide did cease the wind got able
and it knocked down old Mc “Geever's” gable
Run boys, ect.
VI
When John McHugh (the flood) did see the flood
He began to make a battery of mud
But John, he made the ditch too straight
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Charles Doherties house was low
and into it the flood did flow
Siad Charlie to himself “I'm brave and big
I'll do all I can to save my pig”
He gave three (year) roars and 'twas no wonder
He frightened the wife of mr. Hunter
Run boys, run boys, run away [above text: chorus.]
For your life's in danger this very day
II
Dan Mac Collion's eyes did kindle
When he saw the tide[?] come over the fennel
Said Mary to Dan it might do some harm
So they took a child in every arm
Run boys, run boys, etc.,
III
Old Mac Clure sat at his dinner
With a gooses heart, and a gander's liver
With that the tide came up the floor
“O faith I'm done” said “old Mac Clure”
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As the coffins were being lowered down in the cold damp clay
For the souls of whose beloved young men all fervently did pray
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As the coffins were being lowered down in the cold damp clay
For the souls of whose beloved young men all fervently did pray
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
On the treacherous waters there rose a sudden squall
Without a moments warning their little boat went down
They were flung into the waters and all but one was drowned
Paddy the sole survivor quickly swam far aid
To the coast guard station and a fruitless search was made
Alas the greedy waters had claimed his comrades all
Who but a feur short before had sailed from Donegal
After days of weary searching the bodies were all found
To pay to them a last respect their friends all gathered round
The day of their sad funeral they came from near and far
From Killymard Mountcharles and all around Drumbar
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Come all you sons and daughters of loving mothers dear
A sad and mournful story now I must let you hear
Concerning nine young gallant men that aboard a little you'll[?]
Went off one sunday evening from the quay of Donegal
They halted first at Muckross their spirits light and gay
There three of them remained a shore upon that fateful day
Then on to mullinasole the nest of them did said
But only Patrick Brogan returned to tell the tale
Their returning home that evening is saddening to recall
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Here's a health to bold Shinaghan whither or how
Let us pray may he never lose[?] head worm or still
On that sanctified place they call Keelogs hill.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
And she threatened that [above text: through] (true) him she
let in daylight
That his creed was all cowards
she told him to note
and dared him to tromp on the
tail of her coat
V
Next day she woke up with a
bad broken hern
And began for to curse the
day she was born
She cursed barley and Kithy and
proteen likewise
An' cursed all still-tinkers under the shic[?]
VI
And Paddy ahaisge[?] if merry[?] you'll have
I'll bring you each year a pint heifer calf
For I am right honest though fond
of a spree
On sure Paddy “ms Couchal” your as
fond of it as me
VII
Nour[?] we'll drink and be merry and
forgive the cow
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There's a man in Ardaghey[?] both proper and tall
Oh he's one Paddy Shinaghan we do him all
For he brews the cordial that does excel all
Sure he beats all the Doctors around Donegal
II
Now Paddy the rascal of late it has been
With steam and hot water he brewed his poteen[sic]
He left it in barrels as I heard them say
But his cow took a notion of drinking that day
III
When the cow, sure the notion did take
she first broke the coroch[?] and then
pulled the stake
She drunk at the barrels till she
drunk her fill
I tell ye, she didn't leave much of the still
IV
Then she hiccupped and staggered and
axed[?] Pat to fight
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Directs them as they raise on high
A temple to the Lord
VI
And there it stood for centuries
And there it stands to day
As witness to a well-kept vow
And Gods mysterious way
Of dealing with his creatures
To work his glory's end
In ways so full of mystery
We fail to comprehend.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
With gratitude to God
Three times he bowed him to the eath
And thrice he kissed the rod
And vower a vow most solemn
Should God prolong his days
On that same spot on which he knelt
A church to him he'd raise
IV
Years passed and still with firmness
The brave man kept his vow
The storms have long subsided
And all is calmness now
The sea has ceased is roaring
And over hill and glen
The gragant breath of Summer
Breathes soft and sweet again
V
And by the sunny seaside
The builders' hammers ring
And stalwart wooden willingly
their sharpened axes swing
While by a grey – haired mariner
By gesture and by word
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
See, yonder where the old church walls
life up their heads on high
Like a ship's grey sails in the moon's pale light
Against a starry sky
And where the tall, white gravestones stand
Above the grassy lea
Like spectres[sic] on a spectre[sic] ship
upon a lonesome sea
It was there, so runs the Legend
That you might hear to day
Where a sailor rescued from a wreck
Fell on his knees to pray
To the good Lord who saved him
From out the salt sea wave
And from the bitter pangs of death
And from a watery grave
III
And there with heart o'erflowing[?]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
your scheming face again to me
In spite of all the winds that blow,
I'll hang you on the nearest tree?”
XI
Now, vain alike were tears and prayers
They bore him to the water side,
And on a tree they hanged him there
Lest one would say O'Donnell lied.
If eer through Barnesmare you go,
You'll see a navine deep and long,
Along whose bed the waters flow –
'twas there the hanging deed was done.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
And when they all had supped and fed
He brought them poteen[?] from the still.
'Twas then O'Donnell started up
To drink a toast, but thus he said
“Before I quaff this flowing cup,
pray tell me who you may be.”
IX
“ 'twas I , my noble chief, 'twas I.
That five long dreary years (ago) to day
I woeful plight condemned to die,
and that, too, by your lady gay,
an end perhaps I rightly earned,
But you in merey[sic] set me free,
And ever since my heart has yearned
To show my gratitude to thee.”
X
“You wretch, how dare you till me so?”
O'Donnell in his rage replied;
“Did I not till you long ago
(and who shall say O'Donnell lied)?
That on that day you dared to show
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
'Twas done, and five long years
went by,
Till on a day in jovial (moood) mood
To bugle call and beagle cry
O'Donnell hunted in the wood;
And in his train were chiefs and knights
Of valour and of high renown,
All heroes of a hundred fights
The best in all the country round
VII
It chanced that ere the chase was done
When hunting hard beyond the lake
a sudden storm with sleet came on
Which made the stoutest heart to quake
When sore distressed by wet and cold
Your welcome to my humble shade.
VIII
He brought them milk, he brought them bread,
And big them bide and eat their fill,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
To take O'Donnell's servants in
She stamped her foot and
swore an oath
And to the hangman thus she spoke,
“Go make him fast and be
not loathe
To hang him on yor
gnarled oak”
V
O'Donnell hearing what she
said
And having pity on the knave
He big them hang a dog instead
And strict directions thus he gave
“Go dress the dog in Paddy's clothes
That as he dangles from the tree
Yon ladies gay may well suppose
It is the scheming knave they
see.
VI
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Or shot an arrow from a bow.
'Twas there his vassals yearly met,
Their tribute to their chief to pay
And woe to him who dare forget,
His tribute or his tribute day.
III
Some brought him sheep, some
Brought him kine
From off the verdant hills around;
Some brought him fish some brought
him swine
That in that favoured[sic] place abound
But once there was a cunning boar
Who tried to do O'Donnels cook
By bringing to the castle door
A wasted salmon from the brook
IV
Now, O'Donnell had a lady fair
A judge of all with scale or skin
And woe be to the boar who'd
dare,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Where flows the Eske from lake
to sea
By wooded bank and flowery
glade,
'Neath many a berried holly tree
By sheltered nook and silent shade
'Tis there O'Donnell's castle stands,
Beneath whose walls the waters
glide
O'er rugged beds of rocks and sands
To mingle with the saline tide
II
'Twas there O'Donnell held his
court
A prouder man than he I trow
Ne'er wrelded[sic] in war or sport
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The salt waves are singing their song on
thy shore.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
And gilded with light the green trees that
adorn
Its banks were the streamlets roll down from
the hill
And I throught, what a pity such glories
and wasted
As abound in thy valley. What priceless wealth,
Doth thou hold in thy bosom unviewed[sic] and
untasted
By thousands whore pining for pleasure and healt[?]
Sweet vale of the Eske, oh, how varied thy
scenes are
Of fen, moor and meadow, of stream lake and bowes[?]
and how charming thy hedges, thy walks and thy
lanes are.
While out from the green wood [?] castle and tower
Round thy head in bold grandeur stand up the
blue mountain
as a sentinel to guard thee, securely and – sure
at thy feet low and sweet as the voice off
a fountain
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Sweet vale of the Eske, oh, how sweetly I
Love thee,
When the sun in its glory sinks low in the
west,
And the dewdrops like tears from the blue
sky above thee
Are falling to water the flowers on the thy breast.
With what magical power thy enchantments
have bound
With what calmest of feeling they mellow
my heart,
As I dreamingly gazed on the scenen[sic] all
around me
Unto I, like thy daylight, seened both to
depart
I have stood by they lake, when the first
light of morn
Stole down o're its waters so placid and still,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
VI
And you never saw such fighting
so they had about the lighting
Until a bold promoter, stood up about them all
and spoke in words so tender
That he made them all surrender
To the paying of the taxes in the town of Donegal.
VII
So the opposition lowed
apologized, and vowed
They were sorry for the trouble they had
given after all
and at once gave up their pranks
and proposed a vote of thanks
To (me) the men who'd light the alleys and
the streets of Donegal.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
and he wouldn't charge a penny, not at all
For the patriotic feature
Was so prominent in his nature
He would give his soul and service to the town
of Donegal.
IV
But there arose an opposition
who got up a great petition
which predicted many evils great and small--
How the raising of the taxes
would be sure to rob and vex us
For the blooming gas and water in the
town of Donegal.
V
So a meeting was proclaimed
and a certain night was named
when promoters and objectors were to meet in
Crawford's hall
And the wasn't a man or wean
From Ruction Row to Blabber Lane
But gathered there to champion their rights in Donegal.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
on the snow and the ghost went away a few yards from Johnny.
He did this till he had the ghost about a hundred yards out the road, and then it disappeared from his sight. Johnny walked home hard then. There is a man named Anderson living there at present, and they say the ghost is there yet.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
It was when the days were longest
and human fancy strongest
That a scheme began to tickle and to crawl
In the cranium of a man
Who thought he'd found a plan
To light the streets and all of the
town of Donegal.
II
So he laid his scheme before
Some half a dozen more
Who proclaimed with (accamlation) acclamation one
and all
That it was the very thing
That was sure in time to bring
The glories of a city to the town of Donegal
III
and McGlinchey swore by japers[?]
He would post up all the papers
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
that the house was said to be haunted.
Johnny Mc Cafferty the man (that) who sat up with Mowbray was coming from rambling one night; from a house named Mc Garrigles in Dromore. The same night it was snowing very heavily the people had a foot path in the middle of the road. Johnny was coming at Mowbray’s gate. When all of a sudden sudden [sic] who did he see, but old Mowbray before him in the snow.
Johnny went off the path to get past on the other side of it, but as he did so Mowbray was before him again. He went up nearly on the ditch, but it was all no use. The ghost stood there with a grin at (Johnny) him Johnny did not know what to do. He had a stick in his hand. A thought struck him at last. He took out his beads and stretched his stick across the ground making the sign of the cross
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
To thy throne we turn
Let thy rays descending
Through our 'island burn
God of peace preserue[sic] us
Just as we are strong
Let no anger serve us
To one act of wrong
God of peace provide us
Straight from heaven above
With thy grace and guide us
God of peace and Love.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
My God how wonderful thou art
Thy majesty hour bright
Hour beautiful thy mercy seat
In depths of burning light
Yet I may love thee to O Lord
Almighty as thou art
For thou has stooped to ask of me
The love of my poor heart
No earthly father lowers like thee
No mother half so mild
Bear and forbears as thou hast done
With me thy wilful[sic] child
God of peace before thee
Peacful here we kneel
Humbly to implore thee
For a nations weal[?]
God of peace low bending
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
My God how wonderful thou art
Thy majesty hour bright
Hour beautiful thy mercy seat
In depths of burning light
Yet I may love thee to O Lord
Almighty as thou art
For thou has stooped to ask of me
The love of my poor heart
No earthly father lowers like thee
No mother half so mild
Bear and forbears as thou hast done
With me thy wilful[sic] child
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
They gave three cheers that the cooper was “beat”, when they reached Ballybofey.
VI
It was on that night of Ned's defeat our two bands they did play
Through streets and squares and every where until the break of day
The tunes they played was Perjured Ned and all that he had sworn
It is published in the “Public Press” that they would swear no more.
VII
So now to conclude and make and end I have no more to say
Long live our Irish heroes round old Ballybofey
And if we are challenged any more we will be sure to give him call
We will kick those orange repales round old Donegal.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
orange clan.
Alone Scarfe[sic] the orange rath obeyed oldHammends call
He thought to convict our hero brave that day in Donegal
IV
But now thank God false evidence is surely found to fail
They rose a theer, my boys don't fear you arc feet from Derry jail.
My heart did leap up just at that very time
when I head mine-sworn Hammend, He had to pay a heavy fine.
V
False evidence is very bad the aorupture[?] does us tell
But let the rowdy away and let him off for
when the trial it was over, our hero's rose a cheer
They mounted their grand waggonette without either dread or fear.
They sung the “boys of wesford”, “Garyomn” and Partricks Day
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
On the 18th day of August as I understand Excursions came from Derry, Stranolar[?], and Strabane Our Engines ran so beautiful our steam car loaded all To commemorate all '98 that day in Donegal
II
[symbol] menimen he's a herolet him go where he will He always proved himself a man when he met Johnny Bull
Or any of his off springs, if they would him oppose. A night had sling he landed in and brok[sic] Old Hammends knose[sic]
III
They brought him to an orange residence, the cry was raised “he's dead”.
It was Bhapmans[?] I understand that dressed the bloody head
I pray to God to bless us all to bless our Irishman
For if everyman was like him we'd have no
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
God Bless our noble curnte[sic] Father Cassidy
He addressed his congregation
and this to them did say
We soon shall have (our) Tyrconnail free
Where undauntless[sic] once you trod
For the powers of hell shall ne'r prevail
Against the church of God.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
and down with Papery
For church and hall in spite of all
will plant our orange tree.
III
We heard great word about the boys
That came from Bastlefin
They swore they'd toss our chapel
When ever they'd come in.
But in the field they roared and squealed
Like a pack of hungry hounds
These orange troops, they longed for soup
But dare not face they town.
IV
Tyrconaill cries around me boys
around each hill and glen
Bone really round to our town
our rights for to defend
From Lough Erin's shore to Barnedmorl
From lower to the mall
and will let them see no tyranny
Shall rule in Donegal
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The following poem was composed by a Mr. Mac Glinchey about the twelth[sic] of July 1898, when the “Orangemen” were going to open a new hall. The name of this poem is the “Big Twelth”.
It was on the twelth[sic] day of July
as you may understand
these orange knights they did unite
with flags and orange bands
to walk our town both up and down
and open their new hall
and walk in grand procession
Through the town of Donegal.
II
Up from Strabane these orange clan
Sent word to us all round
They called us to surrender
Or they would toss our town
Their cry was “Papiets” stand aside
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Some years ago there lived an old woman in bastle Street and she paid particular decotion to Our Lady as she was a very religious woman. One day she was telling some boys how she knew her prayers were always heard, when someone brought her flowers. But this time she had no flowers and as the Novena was almost at an end she was afraid her prayers were not heard. So the boys decided to play a trick on her. It happened that one of her friends had a great love of flowers and at this particular time had a lot of them in her garden. The boys then stole some flowers from the garden and put them in the window of the woman. When the woman woman[sic] wakened up in the morning she was astonished to find the flowers in the window and thought that a miracle had been performed.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time Paddy the Irishman was driving a Scotchmen through this country. When they were going along the road a donkey started to rear. The Scotchman then said to Paddy, “what is that he's singing”, and Paddy answered, “He's singing [above text: Johnny] (Paddy) I hardly knew you.”
One other day (pa) Paddy was walking through the street of Scotland and he lost his way. He met a Scotchman on the road and he asked him where would that road take him. The Scotchman said that it would take him to hell. “Well” said Paddy “by the lay of the land and the look of the people I must e near it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time as (p) Paddy the Irishman was (coming) thatching his house, a gentleman came along the road and Paddy noticed that he was bald. The gentleman asked Paddy what he was doing, and Paddy answered that he was “that-ching'. (and) Then the gentleman said, “come down here and have a trial,” (he) pointing to his head. Then Paddy said “I am sorry, but it is a slate it wants and not a thatch”.
Once upon a time there was a man who lived with his little daughter in a cottage. One day the father put a saucepan of milk on the fire and he told the child not to let the milk boil over. He was hardly outside the door however when the milk started to boil over. Then the little girl shouted “Oh Daddy Daddy the milk is bigger than the pot.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time there was a carpenter in (Rilkar) kilear. He was a very cross man and would not speak to anyone. One day a man met him when he was coming home from his work and asked him where he was working to day and he said, “I was putting stairs in the master”
Once upon a time there was a mistress who had a French nurse. Once[sic] night when she came from aa card party, she said, Did the children behave themselves when you bathed them. “Yes!” all but the biggest boy.” “He kicked and fought before I could get him into the water.” “Which big boy” asked the mistress. “The big boy with the glasses and the curly hair” answered the nurse. “Goodness grace (an) said the women, “That's not my boy that's my husband.”
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
“you complain of bad trade and pay a man a thousand a year to take care of your worries.” “where are you going to get the money anyway”, “well”, said the business man, “I reckon that's going to be his first worry.
Once upon a time a (worm) woman came before a Governer[sic] of a jail and said, “I want my (G) husland[sic] pardoned.” “what is he in prison for asked the Governer[sic]”. “For stealing a ham” answered the woman. “Is he good to you” said the Governer[sic] “No sir he is a worthless man” said the woman. “Then why do you want him pardoned. “Because” said the woman “Your honour we have run out of ham”
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A doctor prescribed three pills for a sick Labourer, sending them in a box marked, “The whole to be taken immediately”. Balling at the house that evening he found no improvement in the patient. Enquiring[sic] of the wife of the patient wheather[sic] she had given the pills [?] her husband, he got the reply; “Sure I gave them to him but perhaps the lid did not come off yet.”
Once upon a time a business man said to his (we) friend; “Life is not worth living, it is just one trouble after another.” “But I am going to try out a new scheme.” “I've engaged a young man and whenever I have a worry I am going to pose it on to him and he will have to take care of it”. “Now that is a very good idea, but what are (a) you going to pay the man”. “A thousand a year” said the business man. “what is that,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time an inspector asked a lady teacher if her class had been taught to distinguish different noises and sounds and when the teacher said they had, he said he would test them. The children were all made shut their eyes and then the inspector made a slow whistling noise. “what is that now” he asked. There was dead silence for a few moments and then a little boy jumped up and said “Please sir you kissed teacher”.
Once upon a time a band was rehearsing a new king of music. The music however was (spoild) spoilt[sic] by the (new) saxaphone[sic] player who was a new member. “What on earth do you think you are doing” roared the (so) conducter[sic], “You were a couple of bars ahead of everyone else”. “Sorry sir” said the(ir) new member, “but I used to play in a street band and the one (o) who finished first took round the hat.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
who was going away on business, and his wife asked him if she could go with him. The judge told her that she could go if she would take no landlores[sic] with her. When the train had left the station the judge (said) saw what he thought was a landlor[sic], sitting under his wife's seat. He was very angry and after letting down the window he threw out the supposed landlor[sic]. Next morning when he was ready to go to court he asked for his wig, and then his wie answered, “You threw it out of the window yesterday when we were on the train”.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time there was a circus coming to Donegal. Two elephants were to accompany the circus, but when the circus arrived there were no elephants. Two men were standing in the circus field when the circus arrived and one of the men said to the other man “why did the elephants not arrive.” “Oh” answered the other man “they were delayed at the border because their trunks had to be searched.”
Once upon a time there was a boy who was sick and the doctor told him that he would have to go to the hospital, because he had appendicitis. Next morning when the nurse came into his ward, she asked him if he had got pyjamas[sic]. “Well” said the boy “the doctor told me I had got appendicitis, but I must had pyjamas[sic] too.
Once upon a time there was a judge
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Lord Jesus thou art king of kings
Eternal is thy reign
Against thy way men plot, win things
Which pierce thy heart with pain
But thou would'st win our hearts to thee
As loving prince of peace
Who has come down our friend to be
And who hast died for our release
Beneath thy rule let us abide
Make this a home of peace
Thy loving heart be still our guide
till our trails cease
We hail thee then as I brist[?] our king
our Saviour and our God
O ur[?] joy in life
O ur[?] hope in death
O ur[?] Loyail[sic] king and loving king.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Sacred heart of Jesus I place
my trust in thee
Whatever may befall me lord
Though dark the hour maybe
In all my joys in all my woe's
Though not but grief I see
O Sacred heart of Jesus
I place my trust in thee
This is my one sweet prayer dear lord
My faith my strong defence[sic]
And most of all in that last hour
When death shall call me hence
Ah, then sweet Saviour may thy face
smile on my face set free
Oh may I cry with rapturous love
I place my trust in thee
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time a boy and girl were asked to be sponsors for a baly in Clar. When they abrived[sic] at the church they forgot the name they were told to call the chil and they did not know wheather[sic] the child was a boy or a girl. When they could not think of the name they called it “Hughie” “annie” and it is called the same to the present day.
Once upon a time there was a mission held in a certain parish. One person who had been at confession (fort) forgot her penance when she came (at) out of the confessional. But she went back into the confessional the next day and asked the Holy Father what penance he had given her the day before. The Holy Father of course could not remember, but the old woman said: of course your [rema?] “Sure I was in after the woman who stole the umberella[sic].”
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
But after he had got his glasses and examined Paddy, well, he discovered the trick.
One time an old man named Ned Ford was employed in the Hospital every Sunday. Ned was seen going into a public house, with a can. The owner of the house kept cows and so the police thought he was going for milk. He went every day and continued for a long time, until at last a policeman asked him what was in the can. He said that it was full of sweet milk, but when the policeman took of the lid to look, he found to his surprise that it was full of stout.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time there lived a man in the “Bridge End” called “Paddy Ban”. He was called this because he was a baker and was always covered with flour. However at times he took two much drink and one Christmas night he took so much that he had to be carried home and put to bed.
One of Paddy's friends, decided to play a trick of Paddy's wife, and so he put a cow's liver under Paddy's shirt. After a while the damp felling made Paddy waken up. Shouting. His wife was (alarmed) alarmed and called in the neighbours who thought Paddy had the cramps. One of the neighbours got a hot poltice[?], but while she was applying it, she came into contact with the liver and though[?] Paddy was dying. But the doctor soon arrived. Then the light being bad and he being short-sighted, he said “tut,” “tut,” this is serious
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
From heart to hand His gentle blood
to glow
And those who say this prayer for his
sake
Three times by night, three times by day
the gates of Hell shall never see
Or never shall be damned.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
And dwell among the blest
O'sacred heart of Jesus /
That you may grant me rest.
Amen.
There are four corners on my bed
There are four angels overhead
Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
God bless the bed that I lay on.
II
God bide with us by day
God bide with us by night
God and Mary bide with us.
For ever and for aye.
A prayer to be said on “Good Friday.”
God bless Good Friday
It was on Good Friday Our Saviour
was crucified
The bloody Jesus go passing by with spears so sharp
That pierced (the) Our Saviour[sic] through
the heart.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
O God be with me wherever I be
and guide me where I am going
and hide me in thy sacred wounds
which for me are flowing.
Redeemer sweet I humbly pray
That this may (by) be my devotion
and guard me on my dying (bed) day.
Sweet Mary, Jesus and Joseph. Amen.
O'Sacred heart of Jesus
I place my trust in thee
I hope that when I leave this world
my soul to thee will flee.
II
O Jesus meet me with a smile
and don't send me away
But say come here I love you child
For ever and for aye.
III
That I may always live with you
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
O God be with me wherever I be
and guide me where I am going
and hide me in thy sacred wounds
which for me are flowing.
Redeemer sweet I humbly pray
That this may (by) be my devotion
and guard me on my dying (bed) day.
Sweet Mary, Jesus and Joseph. Amen. [end text]
[begin text] O'Sacred heart of Jesus
I place my trust in thee
I hope that when I leave this world
my soul to thee will flee.
II
O Jesus meet me with a smile
and don't send me away
But say come here I love you child
For ever and for aye.
III
That I may always live with you
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A number of years ago there was a man named (Mool) Mowbray living in Moneymore. He was a (Protes) Protestant man. He (was) took sick and died. There were no people living near, so two men named Michael Mc Grane and Johnny Mc Gafferty had to sit up with him while he was sick. He died and was buried. And after
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Glorious Patriarch Saint Joseph, help us with thy powerful patronage and place our petitions in Mary's hands that she may offer them to Jesus Christ. O Holy Virgin Mary who in order to insipre us with boundless confidence, hast been pleased to take thy sweet (m) name of “mother of Perpetual Succour.[sic]” I implore the to come to my aid always and everywhere in my temptatie(?) after all my falls, in my difficulties, in all the miseries of life and above all at the hour of my death. Give me, loving mother the desire, nay more, thy habit to have recourse to thee for I feel assured that if I invoke thee with fidelity then wilt be faithful to come to my assistance. Obtain for me then the grace of graces, the grace to pray to thee without ceasing and with child-like confidence that by virtue of the(?) prayer I may ensure thy Perpetual Succour[sic] and final preservance[sic]. Bless me O loving and ever helpful mother o pray for me now and [at the hour (above text)] (forever) of my death. Amen.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
he being one of the best runners in the district. My grandfather used to tell that any time he liked he could go out to the hill and catch a hare.
The ruins of his house and lyres still stand in Rathneeny Bar.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
dipping again till the required quantity of fat stuck to it.
Tallow candles and soap were made locally at least somewhere near by but I have no information about how or where the were made, but I know tallow candles were very much used as my great (granfater) grandmother often talked about how good the tallow candles were, compared with the shop candles used later.
My grandfather often described this house to his family when they were children and my mother described it to me.
My great great grandfather was not an native of Rathneeny Bar and he came from Ballykillone where he sold his own farm and bought this place in Rathneeny Bar from a man named bonolly. Its probably that that [sic] the dwelling house was then on the place when he got it, as later on he had lyres built separately and had the house repaired before he died.
He was famed for his running power.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
which indeed were very plentiful then. Rush-lights were the lights used except on special occasions that was what called a camp of spinners assembled or some special visitor, Tallow candles were then used, the candles were placed in a socket of the article called a sconce which also made to hold the rushlights.
The sconce was made of wood with a wooden sole which stood on the floor. It stood about four feet high and an iron top with a socket for a candle and two iron prongs like pincers which held the rushlight.
On the occasions of a camp of spinners the sconce was placed in the middle of the floor a tallow candle placed in it and the spinners sat round. It was said that better light could be had from a tallow candle than from our oil lamps. Bog splinters were used when searching for anything through the house.
The rushlights were got by almost stripping the rush and dipping the white into fat, letting it cool and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
O most loving Jesus, who didst follow by the surpassing virtues and the example of they home life, the household thou didst choose, to live in whilst upon earth, mercifully look down on this (h) family, whose members humbly prostrate before thee imploring they protection. Remember thatwe are thine, bound and consecrated to thee by a special devotion. Protect us in thy mercy, deliver us from danger, help us in our necessities, and impart to us strength to preserver always in the imitation of thy “holy Family” so that by serving thee and loving thee faithfully during this mortal life we may at length give thee eternal praise in heaven. O Mary dearest mother we implore thy assistance, knowing that thy (diving) divine Son will hearken to thy petitions. And do thou most
ball sinsearach (stair)
2015-03-18 10:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
accross [sic] the lower gable for the cows manure. The cows were tied to the stakes with there [sic] heads facing the kitchen fire and were driven out by the kitchen door. The fowl roosted on roosls [?] in the lower end and oftentimes on the revel tree over the cows heads. Coming into, the kitchen the cows were tied to your left hand the inmates to your right.
The fire was in the gabel between the kitchen and the room. What