Líon iontrálacha sa taifead staire: 1041 (Taispeántar anseo na 500 ceann is deireanaí.)
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2020-04-07 21:19
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Opinion of Wm. Bellew re Old Chapel in the Village of Ardcath - now a National School.
From an old document found in Mullingar dated 24th April 1807 (James J. Dunican).
The Parish Chapel of the Parish of Ardcath stood in a village called Cloghan in said Parish and it having become, about forty years ago, in a ruinous condition, the R. C. Parishoners had a meeting in order to enter a subscription to defray the expenses of rebuilding it at which meeting Wm. Dillon then of Manningstown... afterwards Sir Wm. Dillon, being one of the principal Parishoners attended and represented to the Rev. Nicholas Purfield the then P.P. and to the other parishoners who attended at the same meeting that it would be hazardous to rebuild the chapel in the old site as the ground whereon it stood was liable to be disputed by two persons who both laid claim to it and said that if they would remove the Chapel to Ardcath which is not more that half the distance from Manningstown than Cloghan is and consequently more convenient he him he would give ground to build it upon there next free forever.
In consequence of such proposal of said Wm. Dillon subs. were raised and chapel built at Ardcath in which mass has ever since, being a period of 36 or 37 years being celebrated and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 23:06
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Beside the well there were rocks found, and there were the marks where St. Ciaráin knelt and prayed. The rocks are not to be found there now. They were broken up for stone for the road by the men employed by the Meath Co. Council.
The well fell in some years ago and the well was found again by a man named Goulding who used to be working in Keenogue at the time.
Pilib Mac Giolla Seanan ó n-a Seán Mathair, Bean Ui Lorán, Keenogue (64).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 23:01
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St. Ciarans Well
One time a girl was playing at the well, and she saw a green ribbon tied to the bush, and she brought it home. A few hours leter she got a severe fall. People say it was the unlucky moment to go and take the ribbon...
Brian O'Locráin, ó n-a sean athair Séamus O'Locráín, Keenogue (63).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 23:01
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St. Ciarans Well
One time a girl was playing at the well, and she saw a green ribbon tied to the bush, and she brought it home. A few hours leter she got a severe fall. People say it was the unlucky oments to go and take the ribbon...
Brian O'Locráin, ó n-a sean athair Séamus O'Locráín, Keenogue (63).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 22:57
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Te is situated in the moat, and St. Brigid's Well in the Park, and St. CIaran's well in Keenogue.
Ronan O'Braonán ó Tommy Heavy (old age pensioner) of Garballagh, Duleek (70-80).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 22:57
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The Village of Duleek is famous for spring water. There is a well at the back of the moat, called Tobar Te, or the hot well. The old people say there was a pilgrimage to it. At the time about 200 years ago the original well was 20 yards farther up the hill. The man who owned the field ran the water in a shore, so that it cooled the water many degrees cooler than it was.

There is another holy well in Keenogue. It is under a thorn bush. It is called St. Ciarans Well.
One day Saint Ciaran's mother was sick. Every morning he would go up to ask her how she was and she would say she was worse. Then he would say: "Worse and Worse, you be". One day a woman came to see her and St. Ciaran's mother told her what her son would say to her every day, The woman said to her "Why don't you say you are getting on well?". The next morning she told the boy she was better and he said "Better and better you may be" and then she got better.
Peter
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 22:45
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It is situated in the moat, and St. Brigid's Well in the Park, and St. CIaran's well in Keenogue.
Ronan O'Braonán ó Tommy Heavy (old age pensioner) of Garballagh, Duleek (70-80).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 22:40
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The Wells of Duleek.
Tobar Mollish is in the townland of Little Garballagh. It belonged to Geraghty's of the East Commons formly. Over 100 years ago people would come in hundreds to it on the 1st Sunday of the harvest. The people would believe the cure of "eqa" (aqua) was in it. Everyone that would make a station would tie a bit of ribbon on the bushes round it. You would think it was a clothes-line with all the ribbon on it. On a very dark night there would be great lights seen round it, and the strangest thing about it is that on the hottest day in Summer no cattle would put their feet in it, although, there is nothing to protect it. It used to be surrounded by very large trees and there are only 2 left now. Even on the hottest day in Summer it flows over the fields. A man was cutting a tree one time, and he stopped to get his dinner, and when he came back it was standing as before as thick as four trees, and the mark of the saw in it. Nobody even takes a stick out of it because Thomas Heavey brought home a log out of it one night, and just put it on the fire. There was a fire in the grate at the time, and it burned away. A man saw a map of Garballagh 300 years ago and Tobar Mollish was on it. It would be about 5 yards square. Tobar
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 23:27
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Messrs Chapmans.
It was about this period, too, that Craig's Dublin Factory was purchased by Messrs. William and Woods who were previously employed in the Confectionery business at Parnell St. This firm transferred the jam manufacturing from Mespil Road to their Parnell St. premises. This firm purchased the fruit in the usual way in the Dublin market for several years. In the year 1906 the firm appointed an agent in Duleek to purchase large quantities of raspberries.
In the year 1910 the punnet system of marketing fruit appears in New Corporation Fruit Market, Dublin.
The old familiar "click-clack" of the weavers hand loom had by this time ceased in Duleek because modern power driven looms were now in operation - the large towns and cities turning out material at great speed and at a very lower price. The punnet system of marketing was found a very satisfactory method of sending the fruit to Dublin and the prices obtained were very satisfactory. The punnet was a very light chip-wood container which held a pound of raspberries. These punnets when filled with fruit were packed into a lease or slab which held 32 punnets.
The fruit sent to market in this manner was sold for dessert and bottling purposes, and was picked in a firm condition slightly under ripe. In 1915 Motor
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 23:09
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Sugar in those days was expensive, and jam a luxury.
As the years advanced production of raspberries increased and marketing methods changed. Dublins only jam factory in the year 1886 was Craig's of Mespil Road. This factory bought its factory requirements in the Dublin fruit market. The fruit required for the purpose would be sent by road in the ordinary way in kegs or barrels and would be in a riper condition than the fruit sent in tubs. The factory more or less stablilised the price at the market. It was about at this point, too, that the Dueek growers exported raspberries to Liverpool. The fruit was sent in large oak casks from Drogheda Harbour. These casks held from 8 to 10 cwt of fruit. The exporting of the fruit in this manner only lasted a few years as its district of Blairgowery and of the producing areas of Seollan and Hyand had extended their areas under raspberries and were supplying their home markets, and even sending quantities to Belfast and Dublin.
In the year 1892 there were agents appointed in Duleek by Belfast Jam manufacturing firms to purchase on behalf of the firm large quantities of raspberries. This fruit was sent out by rail from Duleek G.N.R. in kegs. The firms supplies in this manner were: Messrs Millan, and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 22:45
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representaton of a rare type, of which the National Museum of Ireland contains up to some 20 specimens whilst a few other ones exist in the Belfast Museum and amongst the Irish Material which found its way into the large museums of Britain. The battle-axe belongs to an advanced sub-period of the early Bronze Age, and can positively be dated about 1600 or 1300 B.C. Although the cutting-edge is not now as sharp as it must have been in the past, it must have been a formidable weapon when new, and it is a most welcome addition to the National Museum, which is under a great debt of obligation to Mr. Taaffe for the loan of it".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 20:28
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2. The Wells of Duleek St Ciaráns Well.
There is an ancient well at Keenogue, Duleek, called St. Ciaráns well and this is how the well got that name. There was a boy one time called Ciarán working in Keenogue. The job he had was keeping the birds out of the wheat. This time his mother was living in a little house in Keenogue, and she was very sick. They had a wake in the house, and she wanted a drink. When Ciaran came in for his dinner she told him she wanted a drink. At that time he had a little bit of a stick in his hand, and he put it in the ground, and the well sprang up, and when his mother saw that she told all the people that her son Ciarán made a well in the room by her side, they all looked surprised and would not believe him.
The Sunday after that, the Walsh's were going to mass and they left Ciarán behind them to mind the wheat. And they told him not to go to mass. Then he began to gather the crows and he put then in the barn. Then he went to Mass.
When Mass was over the Walsh's saw Ciarán and began to fight with him for leaving the wheat unminded. Then he told them he put them into the barn. When they went home they opened the barn door and out came all the crows. They knew that he was a saint and they called the well St. Ciaráns well. It is 6 feet deep. There is no wall round the well.
Séan O'Concubair ó n-a sean athair Risteard (76)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 20:28
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2. The Wells of Duleek St Ciaráns Well.
There is an ancient well at Keenogue, Duleek, called St. Ciaráns well and this is how the well got that name. There was a boy one time called Ciarán working in Keenogue. The job he had was keeping the birds out of the wheat. This time his mother was living in a little house in Keenogue, and she was very sick. They had a wake in the house, and she wanted a drink. When Ciaran came in for his dinner she told him she wanted a drink. At that time he had a little bit of a stick in his hand, and he put it in the ground, and the well sprang up, and when his mother saw that she told all the people that her son Ciarán made a well in the room by her side, they all looked surprised and would not believe him.
The Sunday after that, the Walsh's were going to mass and they left Ciarán behind them to mind the wheat. And they told him not to go to mass. Then he began to gather the crows and he put then in the barn. Then he went to Mass.
When Mass was over the Walsh's saw Ciarán and began to fight with him for leaving the wheat unminded. Then he told them he put them into the barn. When they went home they opened the barn door and out came all the crows. They knew that he was a saint and they called the well St. Ciaráns well. It is 6 feet deep. There is no wall round the well.
Séan O'Concubair ó n-a sean athair Risteard (76)
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2020-03-30 20:06
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delighted to see them put out and to see all their goods lying at the cross.
Hatch was an old tailor and lived in an old thatched house in the place where Patrick Clarke is living now.
Séan O'Concubair, ó sean athair Risteard na Cormíní, 76.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 20:05
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delighted to see them put out and to see all their goods lying at the cross.
Hatch was an old tailor and lived in an old thatched house in the place where Patrick CLarke is living now.
Séan O'Concubair, ó sean athair Risteard na Cormíní, 76.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 20:01
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There were people living in the house that Mr. Corry is living in now at the cross about 80 years ago. They were poor and they were not able to pay the rent. The Sheriff's name was Hatch. The people's name was Brannigans. When the Sheriff saw they were not paying the rent he put them out. Mrs. Brannigans husband was dead and she had 6 children, and did not want to go out. She had a big son who hit the Sheriff with a stick.
There was fighting over it, and one time when the Sheriff, who was called the Bull-drive Hatch, was coming up Culligan Street with his brother, someone fired a shot at him and struck his brother and killed him in an accident. The police were called, and they summoned young Brannigan but could not find him guilty. The two police put out the Brannigans. The Landlords name was Mr. Burton and he gave the house and land to the Sheriff for getting the Brannigans put out. The Brannigans were Catholics and Hatch was
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 19:45
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of the Connors, they built houses in it, and made the land good. The people around Duleek when they would be evicted the most often used to go to Drogheda and go on the boat to England.
Seamus O'Gormáin, Station Road, ó Liam O'Gormáin, Station Road (50-60).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:49
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Christmas 289
When the pudding is being made everyone of the family takes their turn in stirring it. It is said to be lucky.
In some houses, but very few, a candle is put into the window. They believe that the Blessed Virgin and Jesus Christ come into every house at midnight. The candle is to show them the way. The door is not locked that night either.
It used to be a custom that on the night of Christmas Eve, the family would sit around the fire and tell ghost stories.
Enda O'Boyle, Duleek, from his mother (50..)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:43
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Churning 288.
In every farmers house in Duleek long ago, they used to churn with the dash churn. The churns long ago were a lot different from the churns used now. Churning is a very hard job in Summer, because butter is very hard to make. There are not so many people making butter or churning now.
If you went into a farmers house and they churning, they would get you to dash, for you to churn a little for luck. When the butter would be made they had a wooden kind of a plate for lifting it out of the churn.
Then they would cut a bit of wheaten bread and put fresh butter for you to eat. You would think you never ate anything like it with the wheaten bread and the pure country butter.
Seamus MacCeonnaire, Drogheda Road, ó Seamus MacCeonnaire, Drogheda Road.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:36
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Churning 187
There are many houses about Duleek in which the churning is done regularly. Many people have churns in the house though we have none.
The churns that some of them have is a dash-church. This kind churn goes in a little bit down from the top and then widens out again. If you went into a house and they churning they would tell you to take your turn at the churning afraid you would bring the butter home.
Sometimes it takes longer than others to do the churning. When using the dash they move it up and down through the hole in the middle of the lid. They have to wait until the milk gets thick before they put it in the churn, and then pour in boiling water. When the butter appears on the handle of the dash they take it out with little wooden things and do not tip it with their hands. They put it in a dish and put salt in it after they washed it.
Seamus Gorman Station Road, from Thomas Gorman, Station Road. 66.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:36
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Churning 187
There are many houses about Duleek in which the churning is done regularly. Many people have churns in the house though we have none.
The churns that some of them have is a dash-church. This kind churn goes in a little bit down from the top and then widens out again. If you went into a house and they churning they would tell you to take your turn at the churning afraid you would bring the butter home.
Sometimes it takes longer than others to do the churning. When using the dash they move it up and down through the hole in the middle of the lid. They have to wait until the milk gets thick before they put it in the churn, and then pour in boiling water. When the butter appears on the handle of the dash they take it out with little wooden things and do not tip it with their hands. They put it in a dish and put salt in it after they washed it.
Seamus Gorman Station Road, from Thomas Gorman, Station Road. 66.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:28
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The cure for worms in a horse is to give it chopped furse to eat. For worms in a dog, give it finely chopped horse hair.
The cure for consumption is to drink plenty of goats milk.
There is a weed called 'Robin run the Hedge' and there is a cure for anything wrong with the lumps on it.
There is another cure for warts. If you find a hole of water lying in a rock, put the wort in the water and when the water is gone from the hole the wart will be gone too.
To eat leaves of raw dandelion is good for consumption.
And the cure for anything of the lungs is to eat plenty of raw eggs.
Seamus O'Gormáin, ó Liam O'Gormáin, Bóthar an Staisiún, Damhliag. (50-60).
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2020-03-29 23:26
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2. If you wash your hands in St. Ciaran's well in Carnaran (Kells) it will cure the warts.
The juice of dandelion will also cure warts.
Burns. When you get a burn on your hand turn around and hang your hand over the fire and it will take the force out of it.
Cuts. Wash your hand in paraffin oil.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:25
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The cure for worms in a horse is to give it chopped furse to eat. For worms in a dog, give it finely chopped horse hair.
The cure for consumption is to drink plenty of goats milk.
There is a weed called 'Robin run the Hedge' and there is a cure for anything wrong with the lumps on it.
There is another cure for warts. If you find a hole of water lying in a rock, put the wort in the water and when the water is gone from the hole the wart will be gone too.
To eat leaves of raw dandelion is good for consumption.
And the cure for anything of the lungs is to eat plenty of raw eggs.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:25
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Honey and the root of the daffodil pounded will draw forth thorn or ....
To get rid of warts: get an ... straw and put a knot on it, nd rub it on each wart and say ' in the name of the Father' ( 3 times) Then hen you have this done go and bury it and tell nobody where you buried it.
For a bad chest: rub butter that was churned on the 1st day of May.
For Chillblains: cut on onion into 2 parts and rub it on them and they will be cured
For a sore throat dip a silk handkerchief in spring water, and tie it on the neck and it will be cured in a couple of days.
For a burn: steep it with buttermilk every morning and evening
For the dry murrain in cattle: give the beast paraffin oil mixed with linseed oil
For the blood murrain in cattle: give the beast buttermilk with salt in it
Philip Sully, Balsara from James Curley (50)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:24
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The cure they had for pains in the legs was to lie on wheat chaff mixed with a little ... chaff
the cure they had for hiccough was to give the person a fright ..................................
The cure they had for warts was to wash them in forge water
The cure they had for heartburn was to drink butter-milk with breadsoda mixed in it
Sean OConchubhair ó na scanaiar Roscarna na Cuimini (76)
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2020-03-28 23:05
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elastic rock, of dark greenish colour, and was originally most carefully polished, as can be seen from the parts of its surface which have not been exposed to erosion by atmospheric influence.
On the upper and lower side there are two semi-circular cavities, which accentuate the skillful shape of the weapon, and the shaft hole passes right through the centre of these two depressions. The two depressions are both marked by a raised circumference which is ornamental by its deeply raised lines towards the centre portion of the axe itself, as can plainly be seen from the drawing accompanying the report.
The axe had been found some 20 years ago on the very top of that peculiar outcrop of rock which bears the local name of "The White Rock", and which is a well known landmark of the district.
At some other date there was found in close vacinity a stone hammer of oval shape, made of black basalt, a find which corroborated the conclustion to be drawn from the find of the battle-axe, that there must have been some prehistoric inhabitation on that site in the distant past.
The battle-axe is a most beautiful
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 22:57
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Bronze Age Battle-Axe
Found about 20 years ago on the "White Rock" about 2 miles from Duleek.
Dr. Mahon of the Museum, Dublin, gave the following description of the above axe to a representative of the "Drogheda Independent". The description was published in the edition of 16/2/'35:-
"A beautiful little axe, of large dimensions, with strongly-curved cutting edge, a well-drilled hole for the shaft and a protruding knob at the end, has been deposited in the National Museum, Dublin by Mr. Willian Taaffe, of Newtown, Duleek, Co. Meath.
The object is about 6 inches in length, and is made of a very
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 22:57
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Bronze Age Battle-Axe
Found about 20 years ago on the "White Rock" about 2 miles from Duleek.
Dr. Mahon of the Museum, Dublin, gave the following description of the above axe to a representative of the "Drogheda Independent". The description was published in the edition of 16/2/'35:-
"A beautiful little axe, of large dimensions, with strongly-curved cutting edge, a well-drilled hole for the shaft and a protruding knob at the end, has been deposited in the National Museum, Dublin by Mr. Willian Taaffe, of Newtown, Duleek, Co. Meath.
The object is about 6 inches in length, and is made of a very
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 22:52
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199.
Girls' School.
Late Teacher: Miss Griffin, died.
Before her: Miss Wall, died.
Before Miss Wall, Mrs. Fox.
Before Mrs. Fox, Miss Foran.
Before Miss Foran, Miss Quinn, a native of Drogheda to where she returned to teach.
Before Miss Quinn, Miss Catherine Madden, a native of Duleek.
From Mrs. White (70), Duleek Village, to present writer.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 22:50
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The Duleek School long ago was situated behind the Chapel and big oak and beech trees grew all around it. The marks of the doors of the old school are to be seen in the walls yet.
The school was different long ago from what it is now. You would not have to go to school every day, and you would have to bring 2d every week for coal for the fire. If you did not bring the money, you would be slapped, and put outside the school door. Miss Quinn was the first to slap the children for not bringing the coal money.
There was another school at the Churchyard. It was very low and thatched. It was given up, as everyone stopped going to it over 80 years ago. (Séan O'Concubhair, ó na Séan-Mathair as na Coimíní (70-80 years).
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 22:40
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Before the schools were built in the place they are now, they used to be situated at the Chapel Corner, and the marks of the doors are still to be seen in the wall. There used to be a very big attendance at school when it was there and there was not room enough.
Long before that the schools were in Daw's Lane and the roof at this time was thatched.
Seamus O'Gormáin, ó Tomás O'Gormáin, na Coimíní, Duleek. (50-60).
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2020-03-28 22:37
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198
Boys' School, Duleek.
The late teacher was John Kelly who died 1923. Before him was Mr. John White, who came from Navan. He lived all his time in Duleek with his sister Teresa where James White now lives on the main street. He came from Navan, and a woman called Kitty the Jiffe got all his property, even his watch.
A Mr. Kearney taught for years before Mr. White. The pupils would pay him 3d each a week. There was a hedge-scholar named Tom the Babbler before Mr. Kearney. I often heard my father say he was a good teacher. Whenever the boys met with a difficult spell he would say "Pass it by, you will never want it". This became a proverb in Duleek.
From William White, Duleek (Over 70) who told the present writer.
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2020-03-28 22:36
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198
Boys' School, Duleek.
The late teacher was John Kelly who dies 1923. Before him was Mr. John White, who came from Navan. He lives all his time in Duleek with his sister Teresa where James White now lives on the main street. He came from Navan, and a woman called Kitty the Jiffe got all his property, even his watch.
A Mr. Kearney taught for years before Mrs. White. The pupils would pay him 3d each a week. There was a hedge-scholar named Tom the Babbler before Mr. Kearney. I often heard my father say he was a good teacher. Whenever the boys met with a difficult spell he would say "Pass it by, you will never want it". This became a proverb in Duleek.
From William White, Duleek (Over 70) who told the present writer.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 00:46
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in the school. It was always in the night time that school was taught in those days.
At Garlow Cross the first mi:-
ll was erected in Meath. It was the first wat they found out how to grind corn. It was a French Lady who laid out the plan of it. Some of the stones are to be seen still.
Given by:-
P. Reilly (Farmer)
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross.
Written by:-
Clare Browne,
Proudstown,
Tara.
28th March 1938, A.D.
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2020-03-27 00:46
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Long ago there came men from the west of Ireland to help the farmers in County Meath to do the havest.
Two men were working with Pat McGraine and when he paid them they put their wages in a bag and hid it until they were going home. They were telling Pat that they all used to being together on a Sunday to go on their journey. At the end of the harvest they used to meet again and count what they earned.
Written by:-
Florence Kavanagh,
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
Given by:-
Pat McGraine (Farmer),
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
28th February 1938 A.D.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 00:42
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in the school. It was always in the night time that school was taught in those days.
At Garlow Cross the first mi:-
ll was erected in Meath. It was the first wat they found out how to grind corn. It was a French Lady who laid out the plan of it. Some of the stones are to be seen still.
Given by:-
P. Reilly (Farmer)
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross.
Written by:-
Clare Browne,
Proudstown,
Tara.
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2020-03-27 00:40
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13th March 1938.
Where the present Walterstown School is there once was an old thatched school. The mans name who taught in it was Darby. The teacher worked in Mathews in the day and in the night-time he taught
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2020-03-27 00:38
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stacked in plenty. Stone Puns used in older times for corn-stands can be seen here. The last of this old family died out some twenty years ago. Thus covering for all time a name that flourished and was honoured in the last century.
Walterstown is an ancient castle dating back hundreds of years. It once was the seat of DeLacy family. At that time the old road to be seen to-day started at the Black Lion by Danestown to Walterstown and ran from that to Tara. The lands known now as Fairland were De Lacy's property but Cromwell came and DeLacy fought for faith and his castle. So that was the end of a good family and a lovely castle now in ruins.
Given by:-
P. Harford, (Herd),
Danestown,
Balrath.
(50 Years).
Written by:-
Clare Browne,
Proudstown,
Tara.
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2020-03-27 00:33
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Many years ago there stood at Walterstown Chapel a flourishing Public House and a provision shop. The people who owned it were named Macken's. It stood where to day is built a new stone wall beginning at the chapel yard. The Macken family also owned a farm near Walterstown which contains St. Patrick's Well. This well suppllies good spring water in three different directions. They also ploughed this land and grew crops of oats, wheat and barley in days long before Free Trade came to this country. The American and other grain growing countries dumped millions of barrels of corn into this country leaving tillage-farmers to sow seed in their land. So that was the beginning of grain-land in this country. Nothing remains of Macken's today but old mud walls and the haggard where once corn was
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2020-03-27 00:27
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very close grown hedge of about 15 ft high. It had full grown thorns on it.
2nd February 1938.
Given by:-
John Byrd, (Farm Labourer).
Kentstown,
Brownstown,
Navan.
Writter by:-
Alphonsys G. O'Kelly,
Monkstown,
Brownstown,
Navan.
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2020-03-27 00:26
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James Boyle of the Glen, can climb a latter with a man and a sack of oats on his back One day he climbed a ladder with a sack of oats and Benny Derby on his back.
The castle at Walterstown.
Some years ago there were big buildings around the castle, such as sheds. Certain people knocked down some parts of it in order to get stones to build for themselves. One man the name of Boshell, who lived in Fairland and who once owned it, built a shed from these stones and he never lived to see th
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2020-03-27 00:23
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103
Long ago there used to be a forge where Jim Poland's House is now - in Walterstown near the Chapel. Bits of the bellows and tongs are still to be seen in Kitsey Hanlon's shed. Kitsey lived now next to Poland's Cottage. This forge was owned by Mr. Malone.
Long ago there used to be a forge, where my Daddys, Mr. C. Kavanagh's cow-house is now. This forge was owned by Mr. Macken.
There was also a forge in Fairland. The bellows are still to be seen there. Long ago there used to be a forge in every big farmer's yard. (25 January 1938).
Bail Marshmallow (on herb) and make a poultice of it and put it on the sores. This will cure the sores.
Writter by:-
Florence Kavanagh,
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
Given by:-
Patrick Magrane, (farmer - 78 years)
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
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2020-03-27 00:16
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Mr. Macken (R.I.P.) who lived near the Chapel of Waterstown, used to own the land in which is St. Patrick's Well. It is said that one day he, Christopher, brought home the stone, that was at the well, and put it into the hearth at the fireplace. From that day on, he never had a day's luck. (10 January 1938).
One night Dick my brother was sick and when Dorothy my sister went up to the bed, he was talking in his sleep. She began to laugh at him and Dick said "if you don't stop I'll cut your throat". Dorothy still kept laughing and he, Dick, jumped out of the bed and went to his coat to get his penknife. Dorothy ran downstairs to Mammy to the kitchen. Mammy got up and went upstairs and said to him, "Get back to bed". At that Dick woke up and said, "I am alright, I am alright". He then got back to bed. The next day he laughed at us when we told him what had happened. Mammy explained the meaning of this next day, to us. She said that long ago the Kavanagh's were a great Leinster tribe of Irish people. In their time they had to fight for their lands and their lives and were even ready to fight when asleep.
(10 January 1938)
Writter by:-
Florence Kavanagh,
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
Given by:-
Mrs. Kavanagh, (farmer's wife)
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
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2020-03-27 00:07
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Soak brown paper in vinegar and press it to the forehead. This is a cure for a pain in the head. Boil onions and eat them. This is a cure for boils. Press a hot iron to where the pains are to cure the pains or wrap red flannel around where the pains areand leave it on for a while. When taking it off you must take it off in pieces.
Written by:-
Florence Kavanagh,
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
Given by:-
Dorothy Kavanagh, (Farmer's Daughter),
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
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2020-03-27 00:03
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One night Phil Reilly (now living at The Rock, Walterstown) was crossing over to Harford's to cut Big Barney's Hair. Big Barney (R.I.P.) was a herd who lived at The White House gate-house. When Phil was going home that night, he saw a little man with a black hard hat stting on a wall at the back of Butterly's (like Paddy Butterly but smaller). Phil turned back and went home by the road. Next day he asked Paddy if he were out that night and Paddy said that he was not. (10 January 1938).
Written by:-
Florence Kavanagh,
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
Given by:-
Mrs. Kavanagh (farmer's wife)
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
(50 years)
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2020-03-26 23:59
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he ran away. The fairies overtook him and they were going to kill him but he begged for mercy. They picked him up and threw him across three fields and he landed in a manure heap near his own house. (11 January 1938).
Written by:-
Florence Kavanagh
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
Given by
Paddy McGrane (Farmer)
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
(40 yrs)
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2020-03-26 23:57
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Where Michael Byrd of the Trim Road (locally Slanduff Road) is now living, there used to be a forge. This forge was owned by Peter Fox. There was a shop there at one time too and it was owned by Michael Byrd's uncle. (10 December 1937).
There used to be a man who lived down the way of Brownstown. He used to go every night to play cards in Walterstown. He always brought a pack of cards with him, and it is said that no one should carry a pack of cards late at night. One night when this man was going home up by the churchyard, he met a man playing cards on a little table. The man with the table asked him to play and so he did. He could not beat him. When daylight came, one of the cards fell. The man who lived in Brownstown stooped down to pick it up and he saw that the man of the the table had cloven feet and that he was the devil.
Writter by:-
Florence Kavanagh,
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
GIven by:-
Michael Byrd (Road-worker)
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
(11 January 1938)
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2020-03-26 23:50
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At the time Paddy Wheeler lived in Walterstown, The Boushla River was full of trout. Paddy used catch them with his hand.
Written by
Mrs. Kelly, N.J.
Walterstown N.S.
Garlow Cross
Navan
05/05/1938
Given by John Byrd, (Farm-Worker)
Kentstown,
Brownstown,
Navan.
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2020-03-26 23:46
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Paddy Wheeler, who lived around Walterstown, used to be fishing and the bobbies used to be after him. This night he went down to Danestown Bridge and got under it. Two bobbies came along and Paddy heard one say "I don't think Paddy will come to-night". So they went home. Paddy never caught as many fish in his life as he did that night and he was never poor after that either. (6 December 1927).
Writter by
Florence Kavanagh,
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan
Given by
Michael Byrd (road-worker)
Walterstown,
Garlow Cross,
Navan.
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2020-03-23 01:06
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The Little Red Men.
John Mulligan (Uncle of Michael Byrd) used to ceidlide in Mary McGarvish in Runahan, where Paddy Harford now lives. Johnny was about 17 years at the time. One night he was coming home about 11.30 or 12 o'clock and when coming home through the Moate Field (near Kilshinny Road) a lot of little red man came between him and the house. He burst through them they were playing little concertinas. He jumped a wall a horrid jump. He was in his bare feet. The tracks could be seen the next morning of his feet where he jumped. He made for Pat Byrds house and Pat let him in and he didn't leave till morning. Pat would go home with him but he would not let him.
Written by M. B. Kelly, Monkstown, Brownstown, Navan.
Given by Michael Byrd, Walterstown, Garlow X, Navan. Road-worker.
23 November 1937, A.D.
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2020-03-23 01:04
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The Little Red Men.
John Mulligan (Uncle of Michael Byrd) used to ceidlide in Mary McGarvish in Runahan, where Paddy Harford now lives. Johnny was about 17 years at the time. One night he was coming home about 11.30 or 12 o'clock an when coming home through the Moate Field (near Kilshinny Road) a lot of little red man came between him and the house. He burst through them they were playing little concertinas. He jumped a wall a horrid jump. He was in his bare feet. the track could be seen the next morning of his feet where he jumped. He made for Pat Byrds house and Pat let him in and he didnt leave till morning. Pat would go home with him but he would not let him.
Written by M. B. Kelly, Monkstown, Brownstown, Navan.
Given by Michael Byrd, Walterstown, Garlow X, Navan. Road-worker.
23 November 1937, A.D.
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2020-03-23 00:59
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A Cure.
If there happened to come a lump now (God bless the mark) over your eye or anywhere, use a fasting spit rubbed onto a clay floor for three mornings. You rub it in with the centre finger (méar fhada) and rub it on in the name of the Father, Son and holy Gost. It wouldn't do to skip any morning. Michael says he saw this done by his mother.
There were two men going home one night. Jimmy Byrd (of Ardee R.I.P.) and Micheal Byrd his uncle. They were reading the stars. The uncle was pointing out some of them when what came across from Kilshinny towards the graveyard but a big white sheet going towards the graveyard. The two of them saw the sheet and the two looked back at the same time to see if there was another coming. When they looked towards the graveyard again the sheet had disappeared. That was about 11 0'clock in the winter. It was seen seven years before that in Kilshinny Lane when it was a road.
Written by M. B. O'Kelly, Monkstown, Navan.
Given by Michael Byrd, Farm Worker, Walterstown, Garlow X.
23 November 1937, A.D.
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2020-03-23 00:58
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A Cure.
If there happened to come a lump now (God bless the mark) over your eye or anywhere, use a fasting spit rubbed onto a clay floor for three mornings. You rub it in with the centre finger (méar fhada) and rub it on in the name of the Father, Son and holy Gost. It wouldn't do to skip any morning. Michael says he saw this done by his mother.
There were two men going home one night. Jimmy Byrd (of Ardee R.I.P.) and Micheal Byrd his uncle. They were reading the stars. The uncle was pointing out some of them when what came across from Kilshinny towards the graveyard but a big white sheet going towards the graveyard. The two of them saw the sheet and the two looked back at the same time to see if there was another coming. When they looked towards the graveyard again the sheet had disappeared. That was about 11 0'clock in the winter. It was seen seven years before that in Kilshinny Lane when it was a road.
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2020-03-23 00:57
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There is a well in our Parish in Caffreys Land. Caffrey's bought this land lately and it is said that St. Patrick knelt at this well. There was a stone there and he knelt on it when on his way from Slane to Tara and it is said he left the mark of his knees on the stone. He drank out of the well and they say that the cup he had was a bell, like what would be round a sheep's neck. There are three streams running from this well. One runs into the Baushla and the other two run into Danestown. It is said that the Wilson's who were living in my house at one time took the stone away. These people were Protestants. They were building at this particular time and it is said they have the stones built into one of the walls of the shed in the farmyard. These Wilson's owned Caffrey's land at that time.
Written by Clare Browne, Proundstown, Tara.
Given by P. Reilly (Farmer), Walterstown, Garlow X.
12th January, 1938, A. D.
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2020-03-23 00:52
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the cat jumped out and went away over the wall from that days to this Peter never saw the cat.
Written by Florence Kavanagh, Walterstown, Garlow X, Navan.
Given by Michael Byrd (road-worker), Walterstown, Garlow X, Navan. (50 years).
28th November 1937, A.D.
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2020-03-23 00:49
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There was once a griddle in the Glen. This griddle was bigger than any griddle. One day a girl bought this griddle for a lock of her hair. This griddle baked bread for all the people in the Glen. It would not bake unless they said a prayer over it. This griddle is supposed to be at Mrs. C. Harfords now.
Where the Baushla is now, there once was an old road and this road lead to Flanagan's (White House) which is now occupied by Miss Mary Butterly and Miss Bridie Butterly The present Skryne road was only a boreen then and it did not lead to anywhere. The Baushla now runs where this old road formerly was. It is over two hundred years since that road was there.
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2020-03-23 00:48
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There was once a griddle in the Glen. This griddle was bigger than any griddle. One day a girl bought this griddle for a lock of her hair. This griddle baked bread for all the people in the Glen. It would not bake unless they said a prayer over it. This griddle is supposed to be at Mrs. C. Harfords now.
Where the Baushla is now, there once was an old road and this road lead to Flanagan's (White House) which is now occupied by Miss Mary Butterly and Miss Bridie Butterly The present Skryne road was oly a boreen then and it fif not lead to anywhere. The Baushla now runs where this old road formerly was. It is over two hunder years since that road was there.
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2020-03-23 00:45
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Mrs. John Reilly a school teacher who lived in my own house used to go every evening for a walk up as far as the Five Roads. This evening she went as usual. When she was coming home a strange thing happened her. At Brien's there is a water drain. When she came to this drain she could not give one step across it. She tried and tried but no good. She went up as far as the Five Roads again and she got people called Brien's (herds) who lived at it to leave her home. She got home all right. Never again did she go up that road.
One day Peter Butterly was going to Navan. He had a round trap. He had a cat which he did not want. He put it into a basket and put the lid on it into a basket and put it at the bottom of the trap. What he meant to do with her was to drown her in the Boyne. Off her went. When he was at the little stone wall between Peter's house and Traynor.
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2020-03-23 00:39
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Merryman lived at the old castle of Walterstown. One day he was passing Walterstown with a horse and he was going quickly and the horse was frothing out of the mouth. Peter Butterby's father shouted at him "Why is the horse frothing out of the mouth. Merryman shouted back "Because he can't spit out".
Written by Alphonsus G. O'Kelly, Monkstown, Brownstown, Navan.
Given by John Byrd (farm Labourer), Kentstown, Brownstown, Navan.
2nd of February 1938.
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2020-03-23 00:38
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Merryman lived at the old castle of Walterstown. One day he was passing Walterstown with a horse and he was going quickly and the horse was frothing out of the mouth. Peter Butterby's father shouted at him "Why is the horse frothing out of the mouth. Merryman shouted back "Because he can't spit out".
Written by Alphonsus G. P'Kelly, Monkstown, Brownstown, Navan.
Given by John Byrd (farm Labourer), Kentstown, Brownstown, Navan.
2nd of February 1938.
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2020-03-23 00:34
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Collier the Robber
Long ago there was a noted robber called Collier. He was hard pressed with Police. They were following him, when he passed by a man ploughing in a field. Collier exchanged his clothing for that of the ploughman's. Soon his enemies who halted him entering the field and asked supposed ploughman if he had seen Collier. "Yes", said Collier, "I was talking to him some two hours ago, he is gone for that wood there. So the Police went on as told and Collier once more put on his own garments and the ploughman his and Collier went his way once more a free man. This happened over in "The Glen" Walterestown Parish.
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2020-03-23 00:33
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Collier the Robber
Long ago there was a noted robber called Collier. He was hard pressed with Police. They were following him, when he passed by a man ploughing in a field. Collier exchanged his clothing for that of the ploughman's. Soon his enemies who halted him entering the field and asked supposed ploughman if he had seen Collier. "Yes", said Collier, "I was talking to him some tow hours ago, he is gone for that woord there. So the Police went on as told and Collier once more put on his own garments and the ploughman his and Collier went his way once more a free man. This happened over in "The Glen" Walterestown Parish.
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2020-03-23 00:28
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to his knees in the dung. He rushed to the door of Pat Byrd's House and asked to be let in for God's sake or else he'd be killed. Pat Byrd told him to go off to his own house as it was only a couple of hundred yards away. He would not go but pleaded to be let in. Pat arose and opened the door and Johnny fell in on the floor and lay at the back of it for the rest of the night. Johnny told Pat Byrd that a lot of men wanted to push him off for the Crooked meadows and that he pushed against them and then jumped the hedge. (People could never understand then how he jumped the hedge that was in it then). "I'll tell the rest in the morning" says Johnny. But even after, when Pat mentioned the event, Johnny moved away. Johnny was never known to speak of that nights happenings during the rest of his life and he never went to Ceilighe in Runaham again. He'd hardly have been 30 years of age, when this happened. The hedge was a very close grown hedge of about 15 ft. high. It was never clipped. It had full grown thorns on it.
GIven by John Byrd (farm-worker), Kentstown, Brownstown, Navan.
Written by Alphonsus G. O'Kelly, Monkstown, Brownstown, Navan.
2nd February 1938, A.D.
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2020-03-23 00:15
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Johnny Mulligan, a carpenter who lived in the Drogheda Road, Walterstown, used to be ceilidhing up about Runahan (Kentstown Parish). One night he came home along the "Glánya" and out into the Moate field. (This field is in Farrells Land of Walterstown - it is a little moate, not as big as the Danestown one of Kentstown Parish - on the same Drogheda Road). On a path on one side of the moate, he saw what was like a lump of hay until he got near it. Then it opened out and turned into a lot of little men. They had music. They hustled Johnny off towards the "Crooked Meadows". He kept pushing against them and kept making for Pat Byrd's house. There was a very, very high thick hedge then between the Moate Field and Pat Byrd's house. Mulligan jumped clean across the hedge and down into a dung-heap. He sank
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2020-03-23 00:11
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Johnny Mulligan, a carpenter who lived in the Drogheda Road, Walterstown, used to be ceilidhing up about Runahan (Kentstown Parish) one night he cames home alog the "Glánya" and out into the Moate field. (This field is in Farrels Land of Walterstown - it is a little moate, not as big as the Danestown one of Kentstown Parish - on th esame Drogheda Road). on a path on one side of the moate, he saw what was like a lump of hay until he got near it Then it opened out and turned into a lot of little men. They had music. They hustled Johnny off towards the "Crooked Meadows". He kept pushing against them and kept making for Pat Byrd's house. There was a very, very high thick hedge then between the Moate Field and Pat Byrd's house. Mulligan jumped clean across the hedge and down into a dung-heap. He sank
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2020-03-22 23:54
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hill and got pains in his arms and died some time shortly after.
Writtern by Alphonsus G. O'Kelly, Monkstown, Brownstown, Navan.
Given by:- John Byrd (farm-worker) Kentstown, Brownstown, Navan.
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2020-03-22 23:53
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When a cat scrapes you, just pull as much "down" as would come with you at once and put it on the scrape. This will cure it.
Written by: - Alphonsus G. O'Kelly, Monkstown, Navan.
Given by: - John Byrd (farm-worker), Kentstown, Navan.
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2020-03-22 23:51
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22 November 1937
Peter McDonald and Joe Hoey have the cure of the "filthy mouth". Neither of them ever saw his own father. Neither of them was born when his father died. (Peter McDonald is now living in this parish. Joe Hey also lives in Kentstown Parish) Each of them has only to blow his breath into the sick person's mouth and it gets cured. Peter was born in American and his mother brought him home when he was three years old. They lived some time in Ardee. They are a long while in this parish and now live in a newly built house in the Green Road. Joe Hoey's father died before he, Joe, was born. His mother died when he was a few months old. His grannie left him his present place in Rynahan.
Written by:-
Alphonsus G. O'Kelly
Monkstown.
Navan.
Given by:-
John Byrd (farm-worker)
Kentstown,
Navan,
22 November 1937
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2020-03-22 23:49
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The Wells of Duleek - St. Ciarán
There is a well in Keeogue, and it is called St. Ciaráns well. It is said that St. Ciarán lived in Keenogue for years. There is a story told that the saint met his mother out in the fields one time, and she asked him for a drink. There being no well, near him St. Ciarán made a ring round on the grass, and a smaller one in the middle. Just then the ground began to get wet and the well started up and a little cup in it so that his mother can get the drink. That same well is to be seen yet in Mr. Loughnan's Field. It is said to have never run dry. The monks of Duleek are said to have built a little house over the well, so that it would be safe.
There is a well in Garballagh called Tobar Mollise. Garballagh is said to have been a little village at one time. There is a well in Downtown called the Cloch Liath.
In Shallow there is a well called St. Columcilles well. There is a statue of Columcille in the well wall.
There is a well called the Shamrock Well in front of Mr. Dowlings house.
There used to be a well near Traynor's shop called the Pound Well.
The big well on the East Commons is said to never run dry. This well was once one of the greatest wells in Ireland.
There is a well in Cruicerath called the Iron Well, Seamus O'Gorman na Coimíní, Fran O'Gormaín, na Coimíní (55)
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2020-03-22 23:47
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The Wells of Duleek - St. Ciarán
There is a well in Keeogue, and it is called St. Ciaráns well. It is said that St. Ciarán lived in Keenogue for years. There is a story told that the saint met his mother out in the fields one time, and she asked him for a drink. There being no well, near him St. Ciarán made a ring round on the grass, and a smaller one in the middle. Just then the ground began to get wet and the well started up and a little cup in it so that his mother can get the drink. That same well is to be seen yet in Mr. Loughnan's Field. It is sad to have never run dry. The monks of Duleek are said to have built a little house over the well, so that it would be safe.
There is a a well in Garballagh called Tobar Mollise Garballagh is said to have been a little village at one time. There is a well in Downtown called the Cloch Liath.
In Shallow there is a well called St. Columcilles well. There is a statue of Columcille in the well wall.
There is a well called the Shamrock Well in front of Mr. Dowlings house.
There used to be a well near Traynor's shop called the Pound Well.
The big well on the East Commons is said to never run dry. This well was once one of the greatest wells in Ireland.
There is a well in Cruicerath called the Iron Well, Seamus O'Gorman na Coimíní, Fran O'Gormaín, na Coimíní (55)
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2020-03-22 23:12
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That amidst all his poverty he kept for her.
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2020-03-19 22:39
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There are three saints whose names are mentioned in connection with the Parish of Athboy. They are St. James, St. Lawrence O'Toole and St. Lawrence the Deacon, who was martyrred in Rome.
St. James: There is a well called after him in Danescourt. One St. James Day, people visit the well, say the Rosary and drink water.
St. Lawrence O'Toole: Archbishop of Dublin came to Thlachta to urge the Irish to unite against the Norman Invaders. The rock on which he prayed is supposed to be the imprint of his knees.
St. Lawrence the Deacon: The church of Rathmore was dedicated to him. He was martyred in Rome in 264. A patron is held in Rathmore every year to commemorate his feast, on the 15th August.
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2020-03-19 22:38
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There are three saints whose names are mentioend in connection with the Parish of Athboy. They are St. James, St. Lawrence O'Toole and St. Lawrence the Deacon, who was martyrred in Rome.
St. James: There is a well called after him in Danescourt. One St. James Day, people visit the well, say the Rosary and drink water.
St. Lawrence O'Toole: Archbishop od Dublin came to Thlachta to urge the Irish to unite against the Norman Invaders. The rock on which he prayed is supposed to be the imprint ofhis knees.
St. Lawrence the Deacon: The church of Rathmore was dedicated to him. He was martyres in Rome in 264. A patron is held in Rathmore every year to commemorate his feast, on the 15th August.
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2020-03-19 22:33
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Ancient Roads, Fords & Ruins.
One of the great roads radiating from Tara in the days its greatness is supposed to have passed though a ford in the river near Athboy, Thleacthta. Evidence of the former existence of this road is found in a fieldto the south of the town called Danescourt. Just after the stile at the middle gate, near the S. E. Corner of the church-yard, one notices a brick slightly wider than the distance from fence to fence of an ordinary main road. It goes in a S. SW direction for a while and then turns more towards the west. It appears again in Mr. John Lynch's field at the western end of the town and on the left side of the road. The road interrupts but we can trace it again on the right side of the road in a field of Mrs. Murtagh.
Similar traces appear in the Deer Park, a field surrounding the ancient and historic castle of Rathmore. This is in an E. N. E. direction from Athboy. One of the boys saw such remains. in Mr Hughes field, Kilmessan.
On the left bend of the river about 300 yards S. E. of the road at Danescourt is to be seen the remnents of either an old road, or river which shifted its course.
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2020-03-16 20:21
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Underground Passages.
There is an underground passage from the Doctors' yard down to the churchyard. It was shut up with bushes and seventy years ago a stone wall was built to close it up. It was used long ago by the doctors at night for stealing dead - bodies. If the body was nine days buried they would not touch it. The relatives of the dead people would stay in the churchyard for nine days so that it would not be lifted. There would be young doctors in the doctor's house
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2020-03-16 20:18
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Churning
When a stranger comes into a house while the woman of the house is churning it is said to be unlucky if the stranger goes out without the churn a few times. The stranger, it is said, will bring the butter if he or she does not turn the churn a few times.
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2020-03-13 19:42
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famine. It is one of the oldest roads in County Meath. It is not used nowadays for any purposes. Thomas Roe, Clonmore, Kildalkey, who is dead about twenty years ago, worked hard making the road.
There was an old road going from Ballyfallen, to Kildalkey. It was made ninety years ago. The road is almost covered with grass nowadays. It was made to give employment to the poor at the time of the famine.
There is an old road from Clonmore to Frayne, Athboy. There are houses on part of it still, and the other part is closed up.
There is also an old road going from the Hill of Ward to Mitchelstown. No traffic goes on it now.
At Cannon's crossroads in Fraine every evening people would gather at the crossroads and dance there and play pitch and toss until dark.
Debtors Pass: It leads from Martinstown quarry to the centre of the town It was started by a man named John McConnell, who owed a debt in a shop which he did not want to pay. So he made this pass over to the centre
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2020-03-13 19:36
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Local Roads
There is an old road going from Otterstown to Ballivor. It is a narrow, backward road. No traffic goes on that road except an odd person walking on it This road was made at the time of the famine in the year 1846.
There is an old road in Causestown. It goes throgh three fields. It was used long ago for going to Delvin. It runs along a high hedge which was a great shelter for coaches. It is a very high road and it is now covered with grass. No one knows when it was made. It joins the main road to Delvin at an old crossroads. There was only one house on the side of the road. There is a heap of stones on the old road which was the material of the house. Each side of the road there is a little ditch.
There is an old road going from Otterstown, to Frayne. It is going across the fields, but it is covered with grass now. It was made about twenty years before the
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2020-03-13 19:31
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Famine Times
The people used to eat turnips because they had no other food. The Famine occured in the years 1846-47.
When the children would be coming home from school in the evening they woudl go out to their neighbours' fields and eat the turnips and mangolds. Many of the people died after this dreadful Famine.
The people ate turnips and Indian Meal Porridge. About three quarters of the town of Athboy died of starvation during the famine. A lot of stock also died during the famine.
There is a big square hill in Alley's field in the Hill of Ward. There is a big round stone on top of it. It is said it was one of the graves used in the years of the years of the Famine.
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2020-03-13 19:27
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by a little ridge in the ground which when walked on will make and empty sound. It was explored by a man names Thomas Gill but he failed to go more than five yards. A light was seen at the big fort and it went on till it went to the Churchyard and disappeared. The man that explored the tunnel lived thirty years ago.
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2020-03-13 19:15
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and lights were seen on it. There was also music heard on it. It is situated in Mrs. Lynch's field.
There is a fairy fort or a dun as it is called in Rathmore. It is a round fort with a big hollow all around it.
There are a lot of trees growing in the hollow. The way in, or the entrance in, is in the middle of the hollow. One time a man went down to see it and before he was half way in he was knocked dead with a black cat that was fired at him.
Out in Higginstonw there is a big hill in the middle of a field. There ia s big deep hollow in the middle of the hill. There are a lot of passages going out of the hollow, into the ground. A man put down a big rope one time and he was pulled in.
There are a lot of fairy forts in the Deerpark in Rathmore. There are seven round rings where ditches sunk into the ground with the years. They are in a round ring and the big one is in the centre.
There is a tunnel in the same field. There is an old castle there and it is from there that the tunnel is starting. It is marked
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2020-03-13 19:11
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XII Fairy Forts
There is a Fairy Fort in Rathmore, Athboy. It is inside a ring a trees in Parr's field beside road going from Athboy to Navan. There is music in that fort every Hallow E'en night.
There is a Rath in Rathcarne, Athboy. It is in a field which was divided a few years ao. On a hill in the middle of the field there were lit candles seen.
There was also a Rath in Rathcormac, Kildalkey. It is in a field owned by Mr. Potterton. One Hallow Eve night there were people seen dancing on it.
There is a fort in Dunderry in Mr. Newman's field. It is on a hill in the centre of the field. There are three houses on the hill, and there are trees around them. A man cut down some of the trees, and he died six months later.
There is a fairy fort at Balrath, Delvin. It is surrounded by a ditch. Cats
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2020-03-13 18:58
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Transcibed by: Thomas Farrell.
Weldon's Bush: This is called Weldon's bush because on a Sunday morning a man named Weldon cut his throat there.
Cloca Breae: This is the name of a boy about sic miles from Athboy.
Gailee: is the name of a bog about seven miles from Athboy.
Crocan Darye: This is the name of a field in Martinstown about three miles from Athboy.
Colla Lane: This is the name of a field in Martinstown about one mil from Athboy.
Transcribed by: Tom Glennon.
Park Grainne: This is the name of a field in Clonmore, Kildalkey.
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2020-03-13 18:57
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VIII Place Names
Transcribed by: Sean Cusack.
Córa: This place is situated five miles from Athboy. It is on the Kells road. It is a lot of fields together with houses in them.
Roisin: It is in Cloran. It is a little field with two houses on it. There is a hill in it called Roisin Dubh.
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2020-03-13 18:56
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Coill na Tuaithe: This is a field in Clonmore, Kildalkey. It is about two and a half miles from Athboy.
Transcribed by: Patrick Tuite.
The Gallow field: This is a field about two miles from Athboy. It is on the right hand side of the road on the main road to Kildalkey. It got its name when Cromwell was about Athboy. He used to have a gallows in the field to hang the people.
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2020-03-13 18:54
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VIII Place Names
Transcribed by: Sean Cusack.
Córa: This place is situated five miles from Athboy. It is on the Kells road. It is a lot of fields together with houses in them.
Roisin: It is in Cloran. It is a little field with two houses on it. There is a hill in it called Roisin Dubh.
Transcibed by: Thomas Farrell.
Weldon's Bush: This is called Weldon's bush because on a Sunday morning a man named Weldon cut his throat there.
Cloca Breae: This is the name of a boy about sic miles from Athboy.
Gailee: is the name of a bog about seven miles from Athboy.
Crocan Darye: This is the name of a field in Martinstown about three miles from Athboy.
Colla Lane: This is the name of a field in Martinstown about one mil from Athboy.
Transcribed by: Tom Glennon.
Park Grainne: This is the name of a field in Clonmore, Kildalkey.
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2020-03-12 23:10
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in Clifton got its name from a lot of ash trees that grow on it.
The Marriage Hollow so called as marriages were celebrated there every year.
Bridie Glennon,
Ballyfallon,
Athboy.
Told to me by:- My Father, James Glennon.
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2020-03-12 23:08
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Otterstown, on the land of Miss Ledwidth.
The Oliver which is in Quin's got its name from a fight that was there in Cromwell's time. The Well Field got its name because there is a well in it. The Yankys Field was called after a yank that lived there long ago. The Limekille Field so called because there was lime made in it. The Turric got its name from a river running through it. The Sugar Plot, The Stump, and the Quarry Field are all situated in Martinstown.
The Mass Rock in Connell's Field, is so called as priests said mass on it in the Penal Days. Samson's Rock was called after a man named Samson who lived there long ago.
The Rag Bush was so called as people used to tie rags on it, to cure warts.
The Treasure Bush, in Sheridan's Field, Martinstown under which there is supposed to be a treasure hidden. The Furry Bush was so called as there are a lot of furze growing around it.

The Firey Hill got its name from a fire being lit on it at a certain time every year. The Hill of Ward, where the ancient palace of Tlachtga stood. The Ash Hill in
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2020-03-12 23:06
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Otterstown, on the land of Miss Ledwidth.
The Oliver which is in Quin's got its name from a fight that was there in Cromwell's time. The Well Field got its name because there is a well in it. The Yankys Field was called after a yank that lived there long ago. The Limekille Field so called because there was time made in it. The Turricgot its name from a river running through it. The Sugar Plot, The Stump, and the Quarry Field are all situated in Martinstown.
The Mass Rock in Connell's Field, is so called as priests said mass on it in the Penal Days. Samson's Rock was called aftera man names Samson who lived there long ago.
The Rag bush was so called as people used to tie rags on it, to cure warts.
The Treasure Bush, in Sheridan's Field, Martinstonw under which there is supposed to be a treasure hidden. The Furry Bush was so called as there are a lot of furze growing around it.

The Firey Hill got its name from a fire being lit on it at a certain time every year. The Hill of Ward, where the ancient palace of Tlachtga stood. The Ash Hill in
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2020-03-12 22:55
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Local Placenames
The following fields belond to Mr. Waldron, Ballyfallon, Athboy.
The Forge fields which is said to have once contained a forge.
The Tenants field which got it's name from a lot fo tennant's houses that were built in it.
The Conacre Field so called as it was once let in conacres.
The Horse field,
The New field,
The High field,
The Little Curragh,
The Big Curragh,
Pottertons field which got its name from its owner.
The Green Field got its name from it's very green grass.
The Plover field was so called from the amount of plovers which ae always in it.
The last two fields belong to James Tuite, Otterstown.
The Smoothing Iron was given that name as it is the shape of a triangle. It is in
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2020-03-12 22:46
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also a lot of houses. Many lives were lost, and a great many cattle and sheep drowned.
On the 27th February, 1933, there came a great fall of snow, which lasted about a week. There were a lot of lives lost. It was impossible for traffic to travel and on that account there was no delivery or letters. There was also a scarcity of food and people living far out in the country could not get in to the town.
There were a lot of animals lost in the snow. There were also many damages - Telegraph and electric wires were broken.
The snow was very deep in places, where there were snowdrifts it was about eight or nine feet high.
Bernadette McHale
Martinstown,
Athboy,
Told to me by-
My father, Austin McHale.
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2020-03-12 22:41
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Some years after a fairly big rainstorm came. It lasted for three weeks and did a lot of damage. Some thatched houses in Fraine were completely flooded. There were no lives lost in Meath.
About thirty-nine years ago a big snowstorm came to Athboy, Co. Meath. The sky was very dull and grey, and snow was expected. At first it was only a few inches deep, but during the night it rose to a height of two feet.
Cattle and sheep were smothered, and many birds died of want.
About twenty years ago a great storm swept over Ireland; it lasted for near a week and knocked a lot of houses around Athboy, one being a house in Otterstown. Many ricks of hay were knocked and a few animals were killed.
Another stom occurred in 1902 about the month of August. It did not do much damage but a man was killed by it in his own garden.
On first of June 1929 there was a great flood and it lasted for two days. It flooded the roads and fields, and
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2020-03-12 22:36
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10-01-38 Severe Weather
One time about the wheat winter of 1850 Great Storms occurred in many parts of the world. There was a big one here in Athboy, Co. Meath, in December of the same year.
The sky was as black as could be and on account of all the news of oversea storms, the people prepared for a storm. It started up in Dublin and by degrees it came down here. It raged for about a fortnight, and in the end it finished off with a great downfall of rain.
During its stay, the storm overturned haycocks, blew down trees and did a lot of other damage.
There was a fairly big storm about four years ago, which did a lot of damage too. A shop window owned by Mr. Cusack, Chapel St., Athboy was completely blown in and smashed.
In 1850 there was a great thunderstorm in Athboy. The people were very frightened of the great rattles of thunder, which sounded like heaps of stones falling.
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2020-03-12 22:30
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it, bad weather is indicated, rain is indicated, if the stars fall, or if the clouds are black.
When the wind comes from Kildalkey (South) it brings most rain to our district.
When swallows fly high fine weather is indicated, also when seargulls fly inland, wet and stormy weather is on the way.
When dogs eat grass, rain is indicated, when the cat sits with her back to the fire it is the sign of a coming storm.
Wild Geese flying south indicates wet and stormy weather.
Cickets singing, dust blowing on the roadway, spiders creeping from their web, smoke puffing from the chimney, plentiness of snails and midges flying in groups, all indicates rain.
Smoke going up straight from a chimney indicates fine weather.
Maggie Tuite
Told by:- James Tuite, Otterstown, Athboy, Co. Meath.
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2020-03-12 22:25
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Lillie Fox,
Martinstown,
Athboy,
Told to me by:- John Fox, Martinstown, Athboy
26-11-'39.
Weather Lore.
When the sky is red at sunset especially when there is a tint of purple, indicates fine weather also if the sun goes down into a bank of clouds in the horizon bad weather is expected.
If the moon looks pale or dim, and if a circle surrounds
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2020-03-12 22:21
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note in your purse you double it and when you take it out, you find it increases.
What is it that you can keep after giving to someone else?
Your word.
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2020-03-12 22:21
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A Collection of RIddles
What is it that we value mor than life, fear more than death, the rich man wants it; the poor man has it and when we die we take it with us?
Nothing.
Which is it right to say the yoke of an egg is white or are white?
Neither of them, because the yoke of an egg is yellow.
Which does the black sheep or the white sheetp eat the most grass?
The white sheep because they are the more plentiful.
What is everybody doing over the whole world at the same moment?
Growing old.
Why is a ten shiliing note worth more than ten shillings in silver?
Because when you put the
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2020-02-17 22:55
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Festival Customs
St. Stephens Day.
is a great day for the youngsters and sometimes for the grown up men.
A crowd of boys arrange a party to follow the wren. The first thing they do is to change their appearance as much as possible.
They blacken sometimes blue their faces and hands. Others wear "eye fiddles" and simply look terrifying.
They wear the most outlandish clothing they find. Skirts, blouses and tall hats with feathers.
Someone of the party is a musician - melodeon, fiddle or mouth organ. Then the procession starts to visit every house within a radiud of 4 or 5 miles.
When coming near the house they start their rhyme:
The Wren, the wren the king of all birds.
St. Stephens Day is caught in the furze
Altho' she is small her family is great
So rise up landlady and give us a trate.
Some people invite the Wren Boys into the house and give them refreshments and money.
They sing and dance in return as usually have a "wren spree" in some of the local houses.
When small boys follow the wren they usually divide the proceeds.
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2020-02-17 22:49
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Local Marriage Customs
1. Shrove usually but the custom is dying out.
2. From Low Sunday to Advent except the month of May, which is supposed to be unlucky.
3. March & November are supposed to be the two luckiest months in the year.
About 70 years ago it was customary for people to get married in the parochial House.
Brides were supposed to wear:-
Something new
Something borrowed
Something blue for luck.
Old shoes and rice are thrown at the newlyweds but lately confetti is taking the place of the rice.
Collected from Miss Eliza Neill Oldtown, Navan.
Aged 73 years, M. C. Hickie
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2020-02-17 22:45
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The Lore of Certain Days (Lucky)
St. Patricks Day:
Every farmer in this area made a point of having some potatoes planted - even a ridge - before Patricks Day and all should be planted before May day.
Friday: was supposed to be a lucky day to begin any important undertaking or start work such as:
- changing residence
- starting to sow
- cutting hay or reaping corn
- housing cattle for winter
Good Friday:
Good Friday is the day for sowing parsley in this part of the country.
St John's Eve. 23rd June:
Bonfires were lighted on St. John's Eve on hill and a farmyard to bring luck on the stock.
Blessing Seed:- Before sowing wheat farmers get the seed blessed. Special prayers are said and holy water is used during the blessing.
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2020-02-17 22:38
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The Raheen
The rath or raheen referred to on the oposite page contains about 1 root of ground. It is round shapen just like the mounds on Tara and in places about 8 feet high.
Nobody would dream of interfering with it, levelling it out or cutting bushes as misfortune is supposed to forsake anybody who does so.
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2020-01-20 19:14
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He found himself on Slievenamon,
While sleeping down the mountain side
Gurgled a torrent one yard wide
"Here am I" thought he, tis quite plain
"But thanks I'm not away in Spain.
"Twill be my care no more to rove
At midnight hour by effin grove -
"But hark I must tell Mary Jane,"
Quote he and took the Road for Frayne.
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2020-01-20 19:12
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A Sisters Love: Scene between Tasso and his Sister: After the poet's liberation from Prison.
It was a roseate cerulean sky from which the warm day-god in the south west, with his golden head bending. Still westward, beamed on an Eden like landscape in beautious Italy. On the stoup of a handsome villa overhung by orange and olive trees, and round which trailed the clinging grape-wine, sat a lady book in hand reading aloud to an eager group of listening youngsters. The lady raised her eyes on a time from the book, and fixed them on the distant figure of an old man that slowly, and as it seemed laboriously, approached. At length he arrived, and both gazed intently on each other: at last the old man spoke - "And am I then so changed that you, too, seem not to know, or have forgotten the aged, worn out, injured man come here from to-die.
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2020-01-12 21:00
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A thousand thrones would I resign
With the wealth of every nation,
And little I'd wreck if 'neath the Line,
Or the Pole Star my station -
Adieu I dove-souled, Heaven blessings twine
Round thy rural habitation.
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2020-01-12 21:00
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A thousand thrones would I resign
With the wealth of every nation,
And little I'd wrecj if 'neath the Line,
Or the Pole Star my station -
Adieu I dove-souled, Heaven blessings twine
Round thy rural habitation.
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2020-01-12 20:58
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A Legend of Frayne
Prelude
Song - Air "The Irishman"
Fresh emerald rolled Sweet Mitchelstown
And there the golden day-god Spread
His glowing beams are sinking down
In glory on his ocean bed.
The milk-white lambkins frisked and played,
The ring-dove cooed and cooed again,
And Zephyrs Sighing Softly Strayed,
Along the daisy mantled plain.
Where rippling winds the green-fringed brook,
And water flags grow tall and Strong.
Some wayward fate that evening took
A Gaelic maid to muse along
But angel wildering beauties mild
A rustic muse may not explain;
That eve ambrosial well beguiled
Was raptured I by Mary Jane.
Her wavy hair like midnight fell
Adown her nect of ivory
And on chaste coral lips did dwell
Smiles, tokens of felicity.
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2020-01-12 20:56
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A Legend of Freyne
Prelude
Song - Air "The Irishman"
Fresh emerald rolled Sweet Mitchelstown
And there the golden day-god Spread
His glowing beams are sinking down
In glory on his own bed.
The mil-white lambkins frisked and played,
The ring-dove cooed and cooed again,
And Zephyrs Signing Softly Strayed,
Along the daisy mentled plain.
Where rippling winds the green-fringed brook,
And water flags grow tall and Strong.
Some wayward fate that evening took
A Gaelic maid to muse along
But angel wildering beauties mild
A rustic muse may not explain;
That we ambrosial well beguiled
Was raptured by Mary Jane.
Her wavy hair like midnight fell
Adown her nect of ivory
And on chaste coral lips did dwell
Smiles, tokens of felicity.
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2020-01-12 20:51
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The heath this night must be my bed -. Scott.
Ye vales ye strains, ye groves, adieu!. Pope.
Farewell for aye, e'en love is dead. Proctor.
Would I could add remembrance, too!. Byron.
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2020-01-12 20:50
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Dirge of an Exile Maid: A Ballad of '67.
Oh, ye must wander witheringly,
In other lands to die:
And where our father's ashes be
Our own may never lie!
- Lord Byron
Yet a tear my eye will moisten,
When by Anner side I stray
For the lily of the mountain foot
That withered far away!
-C.J. Kickham.
Where rolls the Mississippi wave
By praisirs o've the western stup,
They dug a Gaelic maiden's grave-
And there she sleeps her long, last sleep!
Her eyes were Heaven's eternal blue;
Her neck and brow like Alpine snow;
And dimpled cheeks a pink-pale hue
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2020-01-09 23:19
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To Mary Emmaline
On a sandy beach I lay at rest
And watched the bounding sea
With its scattered sails and billows dressed
In white foam leaping free.
T'was a sublime scene, a vision rare
Just sweeter wert thou nigh
With thy Autumn wealth of wind-tossed hair
And sparkling azure eye
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-09 23:16
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On Seeing a white rose on a Lady's Breast
It was a fragrant tender flower
that in the snowy bosom lay
Of me fair maid whose charms have power
To wile a cynic's heart away
And envied I that blossom gay
Its pillow on sweet Mary's breast
Where evermore I'd lain delay
And be beloved, remembered best.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-09 23:02
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To Maggie in Heaven
Oh say beloved departed one
If from that bright celestial sphere
To which - ah me! thy soul is flown.
Can'st thou commune with mortals here
Knowest thou how faithful fun sincere.
Were feelings mine for thee always.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-09 23:01
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old Abbey of St Dympna was repaired and kept from falling into ruin. In him Kildalkey has lost the trust and noblest of her children.
The funeral was of large proportions and the grandest and most imposing sight that was ever seen in the parish. His old colleagues and friends numbering some hundreds marched two deep wearing white sashes and green rosettes, and carried the corpse through the village by the new chapel of St Dympna's where he was a constant attendant of daily " Mass" to the cemetery at Kildalkey. R.I.P. The following are some of his poems:
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-09 23:00
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Local Poets by Patty Kealey.
There is hardly one in the parish of Kildalkey who does not know our famous deceased poet whose name is Mr. Patrick McNamee, Ballybrittas, Kildalkey.
Patrick McNamee was born about the year 1840 and died around the year 1902 at the age of 60 years. He was held in esteem by every grade of society.
From the days of his youth he identified himself with every movement in the parish - political or religious - that was for the well-being of the people.
He was an exemplary Catholic and an extreme Nationalist and took a leading part in the Fenian movement.
He contributed many strong articles at the time in furtherance of the cause to "the Irishman". He was well versed in several languages and his writings if collected would fill a good-sized volume. He was a strong supporter of the Land League and took a deep interest in the Gaelic Pastimes in the parish.
To him it was largely owning that the
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2020-01-09 22:54
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My Home District, by Dympna Corrigan.
I live in a district known as Moyrath. It is in the Parish of Kildalkey and in the Barony of Lunes. It is a very large townland containing about four hundred acres of land.
There are about sixteen families and fifty people living in it. The Black-lake river runs through part of the land.
The oldest person living in Moyrath is a woman called Mrs. Vaughan and she is about eighty-five years of age. She can tell some English stories.
There are no lakes Moyrath but there are some plantations and a few quarries. It is so called because long ago there was a rath in it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-09 22:51
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My Home District, by Olive Kealey.
My townsland is Kildalkey. There are eleven families in the townsland and about thirty four people.
Five houses are thatched and the other six are slated.
Mrs. Miggin, Kildalkey, Athboy, Co. Meath, Mr. Richard Slevin, Kildalkey, Athboy, Co. Meath can tell stories in English. Mr. Patrick Miggin, Kildalkey, Athboy, Co. Meath, Miss Lizzie Donoghue, Kildalkey, Athboy, Co. Meath has left and has gone to America.
Long ago there was a saint called Dealta and she founded a church and ever afterwards it was called Cill Dealta (meaning Kildalkey).
There is a river flowing through Kildalkey called the Turry.
Four fields from Kildalkey there is a very large wood.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-09 22:47
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in Cloneylogan is taken up by Plantations.
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2020-01-09 22:47
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My Home District, by Peggy McKenna.
Cloneylogan is the name of the townsland in which I live. Kildalkey is the name of my parish and Lune is the Barony.
In Cloneylogan there are nine families and about seventy four people. There is but one thatched house in this townsland and three two-storey farmers houses and the rest are either two storey or one storey or one storey cottages.
There were more houses in Cloneylogan long ago. About ten people emigrated to America from this townsland.
The land of Cloneylogan is very flat and fertile and being flat it has no lakes in it.
A stream called the Turry separates Cloneylogan from the townsland of Clonbarron.
About one acre and a half of land
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-09 22:46
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My Home District, by Peggy McKenna.
Cloneylogan is the name of the townsland in which I live. Kildalkey is the name of my parish and Lune is the Barony.
In Cloneylogan there are nine families and about seventy four peope. There is but one thatched house in this townsland and three two-storey farmers houses and the rest are either two storey or one storey or one storey cottages.
There were more houses in Cloneylogan long ago. About ten people emigrated to America from this townsland.
The land of Cloneylogan is very flat and fertile and being flat it has no lakes in it.
A stream called the Turry separates Cloneylogan from the townsland of Clonbarron.
About one acre and a half of land
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2020-01-09 22:43
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a well to supply them with water.
There are not very many rivers and the land is fairly good in the Wood.
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2020-01-09 22:42
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My Home District by Betty Corrigan
The place I live in is known as the "Wood". It gets its name because years ago here were large woods and forests there.
The Wood is situated in the Townsland of Kildalkey in the Barony of Lune.
It is not a very large place being only about sixteen families in it and roughly about seventy-six people.
The people over seventy are Mrs. Rose Baker, "Wood", Kildalkey, Mrs. Rose Kelly, "Wood" Kildalkey and another Mrs. Rose Kelly, Miss Mary Ledwith "Wood", Kildalkey, Co. Meath.
Mr. Patrick Newman, "Wood", Kildalkey, Mr. Laurence Gaffney, Kildalkey, the two Mrs. Rose Kellys and Mr. John Ward, "Wood", Kildalkey are very good story tellers.
Most of the people in the Wood live in very old thatched houses with a few exceptions.
Only two or three people from the Wood emigrated long ago to America. Nearly every house on the Wood road has
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-06 12:22
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Dirge of an Exile Maid: A Ballad of '67.
Oh, ye must wander witheringly,
In other lands to die:
And where our father's ashes be
Our own may never lie!
- Lord Byron
Yet a tear my eye will moisten,
When by Anner side I stray
For the lily of the mountain foot
That withered far away!
-C.J. Kickham.
Where rolls the Mississippi wave
By praisirs o've the western stup,
They dug a Gaelic maiden's grave-
And there she sleeps her long, last sleep!
Her eyes were Heaven's eternal blue;
Her neck and brow like Alpine snow;
And dimpled cheeks a pink-pale hue
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2020-01-06 12:18
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The heath this night must be my bed -. Scott.
Ye vales ye strains, ye groves, adieu!. Pope.
Farewell for aye, e'en love is dead. Proctor.
Would I could add remembrance, too!. Byron.
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2020-01-06 12:15
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Old School. Told by Mrs. Tyrrell, Baskinagh.
My other told me that where Thomas Hesnan lives was an old school. My Mother's father went to
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2020-01-06 12:14
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Chaptman and this man taught where Trimblestown castle now stands.
They spoke both in Irish and English but they spoke mostly in Irish because the old people knew a great lot of the Irish language.
They used quill-pens when writing and they also used slates and slate-pencils.
Mr. Bligh used to have night schools and children from all parts came to him and he made very good scholars out of them.
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2020-01-06 12:12
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Old Schools. Told by John Kelly, Kildalkey.
Long ago old schools were taught under the hedges. At Portanob there was a hedge-school in Mr. McMahons field and the school masters name was Mr. Bligh.
There was also a hedge-school taught at Trimblestown and the teachers name was Mr.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-06 12:10
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Old Schools. Told by James Corrigan.
Long ago there was school a short distance from the village of Kildalkey on the Trim road. Mr. Scott was the school masters name and he was a Protestant. He was a very good teacher and Catholics a well as Protestants attended his school. They came to him from miles around and he made very good scholars of them.
He had night schools and day schools. He was teaching at one end of the old Protestant Church where Mr. Thomas Hesnan has his carpenter shop.
The scholars wrote with slates and slate-pencils and the name of the school was "Mr. Scott's School".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-03 13:13
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Weather Lore
If a dog eats grass it is the sign of rain.
When there is a circle around the moon it is also the sign of rain.
When the leaves of the poplar are shaking down low it is the sign of rain and when they are shaking up high it is the sign of fine weather.
When there is a rainbow in the sky it is the sign of showers.
If the crows are flying low it is the sign of rain and if they are flying high it is the sign of a storm.
When a cat is scraping a tree it is also the sign of a storm.
If you saw a flock of Wild Geese it is a sign of snow.
Very red setting sun is the sign of frost.
A storm at sea is likely if seagulls come to land.
Soot falling loosely down the chimney is the sign of rain.
If the sky is very red in the south-east that is the sign of rain.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-03 13:09
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16. What is always behind time.
The back of a clock.
17. What walks with its head downwards.
A nail in your boot.
18. Headed like a thimble, tailed like a rat, you will guess many riddles, but you won't guess that.
A pipe.
19. Why does a cow look over a fence.
Because she cannot look under it.
20. Riddle me, riddle me, rooken, my eye is stuffed with a púcín, and I cannot see well with the wool.
The eye of a needle.
21. Why is a race-horse like a bar of chocolate.
Because the more you lick it the faster it goes.
22. Over the hear and under the hat you will guess many riddles but you wont guess that.
The hair on your head.
23. Said a child to its father "how does it come, that you are my father and I am not your son".
The child was his daughter.
24. Hink hank on the bank ten drawing four.
A woman milking a cow.
25. As I went out to the wheat field I found something lying on the ground good to eat - it was neither fish, flesh, meat or bone and in three weeks it walked alone.
An egg.
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2020-01-03 13:03
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and his dog.
Two, the dog has paws and the sheep have crubeens.
9. Little Red Nancy sits by the walls, eats all she gets but drinks nothing at all.
A Fire.
10. What is the wettest letter in the alphabet?
"T" because it is always in the middle of water.
11. Riddle me riddle me what's that over the head and under the hat.
The hair of your head.
12. The man that made it didn't want it,
the man that wanted it didn't use it, the man that used it never saw it.
A Coffin.
13. As round as an apple; as deep as a cup and all the king's horses could not pull it up.
A well
14. I have a little house and it would not fit a mouse. It has as many windows as the Lord Mayor's House.
A Thimble.
15. Black as ink and white as milk and it hops in the road like hailstones.
A magpie
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2020-01-03 12:57
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Riddles
1. Why is a schoolmaster like a postage stamp?
One sticks with a lick and the other licks with a stick.
2. Patches upon patches without any stitches - Riddle me that and I'll give you a pair of breeches.
A head of Cabbage.
3. Opens like a hall door,
Shuts like a latch,
You can guess many riddles
but you can't guess that.
An Umbrella.
4. What turns without moving?
Milk turning sour
5. What is the last thing you take off, going to bed at night.
Your feet off the floor.
6. Why is a bald-headed man like a greyhound.
Because they both make a hare (hair) go a long way.
7. What's the nearest thing to a dog?
A tree, because both have a bark.
8. How many feet has forty sheep, a shepherd
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2020-01-02 22:16
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Games I play at school
The Duke's Arrival. This is a familiar game in our school. IN this game no special number is needed to play. Out of all the children that are playing one child goes a little distance away from the rest and she is the Duke. The following are the words used in playing the game.
Duke: "There came a duke a riding, a riding, a riding.
There came a duke a riding y-o-u".
Other Children: "What are you riding here for, here for, here for? What are you riding here for y-o-u".
Duke: "I'm riding here to marry, to marry, to marry. I'm riding here to marry y-o-u".
Other children: "Marry one of us sir, us sir, us sir. Marry one of us sir y-o-u"
Duke: "You are all too black and dirty, dirty, dirty. You are all too black and dirty, dirty, dirty. You're all too black and dirty y-o-u".
Other Children: "We are just the same as you sir, you sir, you sir".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-02 22:05
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Holy Wells
About a half a mile on the north side of the village of Kildalkey there is an ancient holy well called St. Dympna's well.
In this well there is the cure of a headache and a toothache. It was founded by St. Dympna who lived near-by. The person must drink some of the water out of the well and in this way several people have been cured. Although it is now neglected and disused it was once respected by the people. Long agio it was visited by great crowds of people to obtain the cures and on the feast days of the Saint there was a great procession held and each person in turn knelt and prayed at the well.

It is seldom visited by anyone now and it is at present dry.
As years roll on this holy well will probably be forgotten altogether.
St. John's well is situated in the grounds of Warranstown College. It is about a quarter of a mile away from the Church and college.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-02 22:03
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Mr. Finegan's Field. Told by John McKenna, Coneylogan, Aged 63 years
In one of Mr. Finegans fields there is gold hidden. In that field also there is an old ruin and there is a man minding the gold.
A man named Mr. Kelly went to get the gold when he heard about it. He began to dig but got nothing. That night he was told to get up and go again to dig for the gold and he was told to bring something to kill and sprinkle the blood. He got up and brought a cock with him and he killed the cock where the gold was and sprinkled the blood.
Then he began to dig for the gold and he got it but he did not get it all.
This field is about one mile from Kildalkey and it is three fields from the road.
This was told by Mr. J. McKenna, Cloneylogan, Kildalkey. (Aged 65 years).
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2020-01-02 14:24
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Holy Wells
About a half a mile on the north side of the village of Kildalkey there is an ancient holy well called St. Dympna's well.
In this well there is the cure of a headache and a toothache. It was founded by St. Dympna who lived near-by. The person must drink some of the water out of the well and in this way several people have been cured. Although it is now neglected and disused it was once respected by the people. Long agio it was visited by great crowds of people to obtain the cures and on the feast days of the Saint there was a great procession held and each person in turn knelt and prayed at the well.

It is seldom visited by anyone now and it is at present dry.
As years roll on this holy well will probably be forgotten altogether.
St. John's well is situated in the grounds of Warranstown College. It is about a quarter of a mile away from the Church and college.
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2020-01-02 14:16
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Note: Brian Dolan lives at the Wood, Kildalkey. he is about 72 or 73 years. He got most of the "cures" from his mother.
John Ward, the Wood, Kildalkey, cures the burn. He licked a zollazún, and as a result can put a live coal in his mouth as well as cure the burn or scald.
(Zollazú is the name given locally to the lizard).
Laurence Gaffney, Kildalkey cures sciatica. He got the cure from the late Pat James Kelly, Portanab, Kildalkey, who got it from his mother.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-01-02 14:10
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making a grave for a friend and they dug up a crock of gold. They carried it home and hid it carefully. That night they went to bed and when one of them awoke in the middle of the night the room was lit up as if there was a wake.
They were both very much frightened and they got the crock of gold and ran back to the Churchyard with it and left it back in the grave where they found it.
Their names were Ruad and Liam Murray and they lived on the Ballivor Road.
Told by James Corrigan, Kildalkey, Aged 72.
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2020-01-02 14:08
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Rickard's Farmhouse. Told by James Corrigan, Kildalkey.
In the olden times it was the custom for farmers to keep a boy called "a poor scholar" who would come and ask for food and shelter in order to get his education.
In a big farm-house in Coolronan a poor scholar was sitting at the fire one night and a big pot was hanging on the fire. There were letters on the pot that no one in the house could read but the poor scholar. According to the writing there were pots of gold hidden in the moat near the house.
Next morning the people sent away the poor scholar and they dug for the gold in the night. When they were a while digging a white lady appeared to them and they were so frightened they ran away. It was never known whether they got the gold or not. The moat is still there to be seen and the name of the family was Rickards.
The old people long ago used to tell a story about gold being hidden in Kildalkey Churchyard. Two brothers were
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2019-10-27 20:59
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home about twelve o'clock at night. His attention was drawn to a small field along the river side and there he saw a number of men on beautiful horses and the horses wore shining harness, buckles and chains which dazzled in the moon light. He was terrified by what he saw. He was called on to stop where he was until the battle was over, and just as it ended the ground where he stood, opened like a tunnel and the horses galloped in and they all seemed to fall down. Then a man who seemed to be the leader and it is supposed to be Garrett Earl told the man on the road that he and his army were in this cave aslepp and will remain under this spell until awakened by a person who will be allowed to try and steal the treasures.
Garrett Earl's sword was found in the field where he and they army were sleeping and the old mill was often heard working at night and loads leaving it. This story was told to me by Mr. Charles Miggin, Kildalkey, Athboy, Co. Meath who heard it from his mother.
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2019-10-27 20:52
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Earl's Mill (told by Mrs. Miggin, Kildalkey, Aged 70 years).
There are ruins or walls known as Earl's Mill still to be seen on the road leading from Ballivor to the village of Kildalkey. They are supposed to be haunted. Hidden Treasures belonging to a general named Garrett Earl are said to be buried there. This man fell asleep there with his army, and it is said that every ten years the tramping of horses and the awful noise of Artillery are heard around the old walls.
One night a young man was coming
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2019-10-27 20:49
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flag cleared.
They were going to do as they were told the second time only one man was changed and some whisper went round that there was a life to be lost over it.
One woman found out this but she did not say anything until they men came for her husband and then she locked the door and would not let him out.
So then the whole thing fell through and the treasure if there yet.
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2019-10-27 20:47
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bedside and told him to go and dig for crocks of gold in "Kennys Hill" and told him the spot where he was to dig. He said that he was to dig until he would come to a big flag. Then he was to lift the flag and he would get the gold.
Next day Sean Brady and two other men Christy Lynam and Tom Kelly went as Sean Brady was told.
They dug in the place and kept digging until they came to the flag.
But when they were lifting the flag off the crocks of gold they imagines a terrible storm arose and two of the men ran away in fear. Then the other man went after them and when they all got together again they went home.
The next night the same man came again to Sean Brady and said that the money was there under the flag and that there was no delay in getting only to dig another little but off the grass and keep going down until they had the
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2019-10-27 20:43
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Hidden Treasures.
Told by Thomas Traynor, Trimblestown, Kildalkey, Co. Meath (Aged 70).
About a half a mile from the road on an avenue which is the main entrance to the Trimblestown estate there is gold supposed to be hidden.
This avenue is about three miles from Trim. While engaged in making a shore about fifty years ago two men called Christophe Jordan and Patrick Kennedy heard the jingle of gold. They started to talk to each other about the gold and how they would spend it when suddenly it disappeared.
It is said that when a person sees gold he should never speak until he gets it. There is a hedge on both sides of the avenue and it is a very lonely spot.
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2019-10-27 20:43
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Hidden Treasures
There is a hill named "Kennys Hill" near the bog of Freyne. Once there was an old man and his names was Sean Brady and he lived near this village.
One night a man appeared at his
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2019-10-27 20:41
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Richard Slevin was told this story by John Ward who heard it from Sean Brady himself.
Told by Richard Slevin, Kildalkey, Athboy, Co. Meath. (Age 55 years).
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2019-10-27 20:40
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Richard Slevin was told this story by John Ward who heard it from Sean Brady himself.
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2019-10-27 20:39
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Hidden Treasures.
Told by Thomas Traynor, Trimblestown, Kildalkey, Co. Meath (Aged 70).
About a half a mile from the road on an avenue which is the main entrance to the Trimblestown estate there is gold supposed to be hidden.
This avenue is about three miles from Trim. While engaged in making a shore about fifty years ago two men called Christophe Jordan and Patrick Kennedy heard the jingle of gold. They started to talk to each other about the gold and how they would spend it when suddenly it disappeared.
It is said that when a person sees gold he should never speak until he gets it. There is a hedge on both sides of the avenue and it is a very lonely spot.
There is a hill named "Kennys Hill" near the bog of Freyne. Once there was an old man and his names was Sean Brady and he lived near this village.
One night a man appeared at his
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2019-10-20 20:35
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known better to the people as "Red Kanes". Although simple minded, he was the best runner and jumper in the British Isles.
He was too simple minded to enter in competitions at Sports meetings. The only way people could enjoy seeing him run was to surround his house on a Sunday and pretend to beat him, at the same time making a passage for him to escape. When he would bolt for freedom people would follow him, crosscutting him at every angle. Even so he would easily out distance the crowd. When the people got tired they used to turn him into the bog to see him jump the clamps. He could jump twenty clamps of turf one after the other, that stood between five and six feet high and only two yards apart. People were content with this.
One day the champion runner of Ireland while training to run a race against the English champion, was running through Dalystown. He came upon Red Kane gathering sticks on Hanbury's hill. Red Kane thinking he was chased put the sticks on his back and started to
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2019-10-20 20:31
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John Byrne,
Brannockstown, Trim.
37 years.
Shopkeeper
Castlerickard (5 miles from Brannockstown)
His parents, 25 years ago.
Forty five years.
17/05/1938
In the seventeeth century there lived a man in Dalystown named Pat who was
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2019-10-20 20:28
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told her to look in it and on doing so she saw the face of a near neighbour woman. She got a fright and she never recovered from the shock and died in a short time after.
Meath had many songsters and rhymers. There was one very fine big man in the parish of Kilberry, whose name was Larry McKeever, and no matter what took place in his native parish he made a song about it. He composed the song while at work in the fields and always had his notebook and pencil to put his thoughts into song.
Maggie RIckard.
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2019-10-20 20:25
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Local Heroes.
Long ago there were many heroes in this place. Dangan produced the greatest wrestler in the British Isles in former times it was one of the most common sports at that times. Michael Bolgan its was his name. He was a very strong man, and was also famous for carrying weights. He was able to go into blacksmith's forge and get a piece of cod iron, and twist it into the shape of a horseshoe by the strength of his arms.
Our Parish. Boardsmill can boast of the greatest weight-thrower in the world. John Kelly was his name. He emigrated to America, and became the world's champion weight-thrower.
Not long ago at all athletic sports, there used to be long distance races, what we call marathon races, and one of the greatest runners was James Ratoath. In 1908...
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2019-10-20 20:24
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Local Heroes.
Long ago there were many heroes in this place. Dangan produced the greatest wrestler in the British Isles in former times it was one of the most common sports at that times. Michael Bolgan its was his name. He was a very strong man, and was also famous for carrying weights. He was able to go into blacksmith's forge and get a piece of cod iron, and twist it into the shape of a horseshoe by the strength of his arms. Our Parish. Boardsmill can boast of the greatest weight-thrower in the world. John Kelly was his name. He emigrated to America, and became the world's champion weight-thrower. Not long ago at all athletic sports, there used to be long distance races, what we call marathon races, and one of the greatest runners was James Ratoath. In 1908...
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2019-10-20 20:22
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Customs at wakes
In this part of the country long ago when a person died the men would go to the wake and stay all night and they often played games during the night. A game they used to play was called "Buboso". This is how they used to play it. Two men get together and one would get a bit of a stick and one man would hit the other on the hand and say "Buloso" and the other would answer "Buloso Sir. What's your oats a peg". The rates of the market from twopence to fourpence from fourpence to sixpence from sixpence to eightpence to tenpence all evenses, no odds". Buloso. Buloso is a man of honour, and fame and he earn his bread by this innocent game and if he doesnt do what his is told must be bet when ever he is bold.
Mary Nangle, Told to me by James Ennis, Castlejordan, Co. Meath.
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2019-10-20 20:13
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carried out at wakes. About twelve men used to join in service over the dead and this service was called an office.
Nan Carew, Ballinabrackey, Kinnegad, Co. Meath from Bessie Cooney, Ballinbracket, Age 25 years.
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2019-10-20 20:11
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Wakes
The customs that are carried on at wakes are different now from years gone by. Now when a person is waking all the neighbours gather into the wakehouse to sympathise with the relatives and friends of the dead person. It is the custom to have tea, minerals, and biscuits for the women that attend the wake, and there is generally drink for the men. The person that lays out the dead person always has to take whiskey.
When a person is being waked the women all go to the wake in the day-time and the wakehouse is generally crowded out with men in the night, and they all recite the rosary.
Long ago the customes were quite different. There were pipes and tobacco for the men and snuff left on a plate for the women. There used to be also gallons of whiskey and a barrell of porter. The reason why there is not so much drink now at wakes is because the drink got too dear and very few people are able to buy it.
This is another old custom that used to be
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2019-10-20 20:06
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Local Sayings
The man going to sow his corn puts a knot on a sheet for the seed and now one could take it off only the man that put it on. If a woman takes it off she will die, that year.
If you give away milk on May Day you will give milk the whole year round.
If you go into a house with anything on your shoulder, you have to go back on your back or you will have bad luck.
If you fall in a grave-yard you will die that year.
When a dog cries there is someone going to die.
If you go into a house to light your pipe when anyone is churning you cannot go out without taking the dash or you will bring the butter with you.
A Saturday beginning is a tedious ending.
If you cross a plough when a
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2019-10-20 20:05
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Gallows Hilln
Ainm an Duine dpuras an sgéal uanis:- Eiblín Ní Chormacháin
Do you know where Gallows Hill is - oposite the strand plantation. Well a very bloody battle was fought in that field. You know the hill was not always there. But now you will ask what put it there. Well there were so many killed in the battle - it was against the yeomen - that there could not be time to make graves for all of them so they piled all the poor dead creatures together and covered all up. A many a good hard working creature lost his life "them" times. But you know it was in Columbkille's prophecy that many should fall by them wretched yokes of yeomen. And sure the time of the Land League we used to have great snows too and leave it there if it wasn't myself that could fight. I 'member one night and we leaving a bonfire just to punish a fellow that was "agin" our league - a bit of an English "lad" came up and did'nt he ask me to dance with him and he my walking enemy.
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2019-10-16 21:51
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A Story
I remember Mrs. Tyrrell R.I.P telling this story about Mooney's Rath. The following incident happened about forty years ago. A girl of the Mooney family was dying on a spring evening and when the family saw the end approaching one went for Mrs. Tyrrell.
She went and took with her some candles to make sure she would have light as she never knew a light to be lit there. As she expected there was not a bit of light in the house. Naturally the first thing she did was to light one of the candles that she brought with her and to her horror she found that the girl was dead and no one with her.
She called one of the family by their name and very soon they were with her. She lit the second candle and knelt down to say the Rosary. There seemed to be a terrible draft on the candles and Mrs. Tyrrell was forced to stop the Rosary to see what caused the draft. She lit a third candle and went into a room where there was a window open.
Then the people of the house saw her going to shut the window they screamed and begged of her to leave it alone as it was the Fairy Pass. As she said she gave them the deaf ear and climbed up on the table where there were two crocks of cream betweem her and the window. When she had the window fastened securely it banged open again crocks of
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2019-10-12 22:43
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Don't put out the people of Toore they will pay. "I will" said the landlord and he went out. When he was out he took a pain in his his stomack and died going home. So the people were not evicted.
Father Moore was the priests name and when the curate came he was vexed because meat was fried on Friday. Mind you business says he "I am Parish Priest and I can do what I like".
Lizzie Coyne, Kildangan, from my father Thomas Coyne, July 1938. Kildangan, Kinnegad, Co. Meath.
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2019-10-12 22:40
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Landlords
There was an eviction in Clomore in this parish one time and Mr Tyrell was the Landlord. Father Kealy the parish priest of Ballinbrackey was at it.
Father Kealy and Tyrell were walking up and down during the time of the eviction. Tyrell insulted the priest and the priest said "The back of my hand on you Tyrell". In five minutes three bells began to ring in Tyrells ears and he cried out "Kealy, Kealy take your hands off me". The eviction was stopped and Tyrell was carried away in his motor car and died the next day.
Ever since the Tyrells are afraid of a priest.
Hamilton was another Landlord and he was going to Toure in this parish to put out the people there. He went up to the priests house and asked the priest for for his dinner. It was Friday and he asked for meat and when he had finished he said to the landlord I gave you your wish so you give me mine. What is it he said.
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2019-10-12 22:33
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Family Names in the District
Anderson
Birmingham
Bracken
Brennan
Cooley
Conlon
Coyne
Clabby
Coonet
Carew
Carroll
Daly
Dempsey
Dalton
Duignan
Dunne
Darby
Ennis
Froye
Glennon
Gill
Geoghegan
Haughton
Hickey
Hogan
Hackett
Kavanagh
Kelly
Keena
Leech
Logan
Lynam
Lynch
McNamee
Mitchell
McCann
McNamara
Moore
McCabe
Murphy
Mulvin
Monahan
McCormack
Neary
Nugent
Nangle
O'Mara
O'Connor
Pettit
Quinn
Smith
Tyrrell
Wyer
Walsh
Carr
Groome
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2019-10-12 22:29
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but the dough left on it could almost feed a pig. He gave it to the horse and the man went to the next house and asked for a white drink for his horse. The girl asked what was she to put into it. He said "Oh the dough on the breadboard will do". "Well" she says, "if it does you it will do me" and she ran for it but it was scrubbed as white as snow. So this is the woman he chose and they were married and lived happily ever afterwards.
Lizzie Boyne, Kildangan, Kinnegad, Co.Meath.
From my father Thomas Coyne.
September 20th 1938.
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2019-10-12 22:25
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A Story.
One time a young gentle man lived in Navan and he had three sweethearts and he did not know which to take.
He knew a very clever old woman and he went to her and asked her to advice him what to do.
She did so and told him to go out riding the next day on his horse and to go to the first girld he was in love with and to say to her "My horse is sick he wants a white drink and the dought left on the breadboard will do". He did so and came to the first girls house and said "My horse is sick would you kindly give him a white drink". She asked him was it flour she had to give him. Oh no the bread board will do. She ran for it and was cleaning it for half and hour. Well it could feed two pigs.
The man went away on his horse and he went to the next girls house and asked the same thing. Her bread board was not as bad
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2019-10-12 22:19
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and eaten hot.
From my mother, age 50.
Kathleen Gorman, Harristown, Kinnegad.
September 16th 1938.
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2019-10-12 22:18
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The different types of Bread
Oaten Bread:
This bread was made from fine oatmeal, a little salt and sufficient water to make it into a stiff paste about an inch thick.
This paste was cut into convenient squares and they were placed before the fire standing on end and usually sods of turf supporting them.
This method seemed to make the lightest bread, it was usually eaten cold with a plentiful supply of butter on it and milk to drink with it.
Potato Cake:
Pick out the best boiled potatoes first peel them then mash them finely.
The way the old people used to mash them was to put the potatoes on the and press them out with a quart tin saucepan after sprinkling them with salt.
This done flour is added to the potatoes and the more flour that can be mixed to the potato the better and lighter the cake.
Then it is cut into quarters and eighths and baked on a very hot griddle, when baked they would be buttered immediately.
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2019-10-11 21:02
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and I believe you reported it. It may be said the priest. If you don't prive it I shall kill you Immediately the priest took out his stole and book and went to the fire and knelt down. After some time his father appeared and the priest said to the young man is that your father. Yes. Which will I leave him here or put him back where I got him, for if I leave him here, you shall be annoyed with him. O Put him back. After that they all passed away and the mansion mouldered away. At this very moment the track of the cloven foot is to be seen on the door step in Joe Murrays.
Agnes Clarke.
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2019-10-11 20:59
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could not get it and many of them were drowned. The girl is said to appear every night.
Mary Nelson,
from
John Nelson,
Summerhill,
Enfield,
Co. Meath.
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2019-10-11 20:58
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Long ago when the English came to Ireland they sought all the treasures. On coming to the Bell Hill they went to a Norman Castle in which a man named Lynch lived.
When one of the servants saw them coming she ran and got a crock of gold which was stored away. Before she had time to hide it the English captured her and demanded the gold. But she refused it and said she would be shot before she would give it. There was a hole of water nearby and she threw the pot of gold into it. She was then shot and the soldiers thought it was easily found but when they looked for it they
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2019-10-11 20:55
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it was the dead priest that they saw because he could not rest when they were dancing upon him. The priest had to be taken up and buried someplace else.
Rosaleen Hughes,
From:-
Margaret Duffy,
Summerhill,
Enfield,
Co. Meath.
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2019-10-11 20:54
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There was a dance in a house one night on that same night many years before that a man died in that house. At about mid-night a relation of the dead man was standing on the road. She saw a ball of fire a few yards away it was rolling very fast. She called out all the others out of the house. No on could see it only the dead man's relations. I seemed to be rolling towards them very fast but still it did not move. The next year on the same night they had another dance and all who were present at the dance saw the ball of fire. It is seen every year in the same place.
Ellen Nugent,
From,
Christopher Dowd,
Killnagrass,
Trim,
Co. Meath.
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2019-10-11 20:50
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and they got into a conversation about hunting. They came to the village and had chats with their friends but the gentleman and devil hunted all day together, and they came to a fork tree and the devil cut right through, but the other tried and he failed.
After their long days hunting they returned to Brem Hall and they had a banquet. After the banquet they had card playing and this stranger got in for a game of cards and he won every game. Among the guests was one Roman Catholic, a card fell and he stooped to pick it up and he saw the cloven foot and after some time he informed the lady of the house and she broke the news to the others without he hearing. The Roman Catholic made his was out, and he went for the priest and the C.C. came and he could not banish the devil. They went back to see if P.P. had come home an he had, and he came to the castle and all the people had to walk behind him, and he asked the devil where would he put him and mentioned several places in the house. But the priest said I will put you under the hearth stone he took out his stole and book and started to read and immediately he disappeared. After that the boss of the house died and his son came on for the owner of the mansion he used to have banquets and he invited all his guests including the C.C. after the dinner been over the owner of the house said to C.C. there is a report about, that my father is in hell
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2019-10-11 20:48
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and they got into a conversation about hunting. They came to the village and had chats with their friends but the gentleman and devil hunted all day together, and they came to a fork tree and the devil cut right through, but the other tried and he failed.
After their long days hunting they returned to Brem Hall and they had a banquet. After the banquet they had card playing and this stranger got in for a game of cards and he won everey game. Among the guests was one Roman Catholic, a card fell and he stooped to pick it up and he saw the cloven foot and after some time he informed the lady of the house and she broke the news to the others without he hearing. The Roman Catholic made his was out, and he went for the priest and the C.C. came and he could not banish the devil. They went back to see if P.P. had come home an he had, and he came to the castle and all the people had to walk behind him, and he asked the devil where would he put him and mentioned several places in the house. But the priest said I will put you under the hearth stone he took out his stole and book and started to read and immediately he disappeared. After that the boss of the house died and his son came on for the owner of the mansion he used to have banquets and he invited all his guests including the C.C. after the dinner been over the owner of the house said to C.C. there is a report about, that my father is in hell
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2019-09-27 14:52
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table with a cloven foot and disappeared in the shape of a bullock while the cold sweat rolled in heaps off poor Mick. Anyway he got home and the minute he got inside his own door he fainted and alanna machrise he lay in a swoon for a week and they got priests and doctors to find our his complaint.
They said it was a troubled mind.
But he began to speak and told the priest all and the good father blessed him. But he never did any good and he died in three months time after suffering 'fierce' - God rest his soul and ever since I have dread of that field.
They said that long ago during the penal times that mass was said under the Whitethorn every time that the priest could get a chance.
From an old woman named Mary Mitchell (Mrs. Mary Bracken who is about 88 years old). Ballinabrackey, Co. Meath.
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2019-09-27 14:47
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in you know and the minute that he reached the 'auld' whitethorn what do you think did he see but the 'quarest' thing ever was heard of - a table and it spread out under the tree and a deck of cards on it and a man, and the man asked him if he would play and he said he would. So anyway they played for some time and then Mick let a card fall and in stooping to pick it up he saw the man had a cloven foot. So poor Mick began to shiver and no wonder. But in the meantime he knew that he was safe for hadn't he a rosary in his coat. So it seems that 'ould Nick' knew this for he said, 'You Mick are the best player of cards that I met' but Mick said nothing. Then he asked Mick if he would like to keep on winning and of course poor Mick said that he would to boast to his companions. So said 'himself',"you Mick will win at every card table you go to until I meet you here this night twelve months and then I will bring you a good card table where you'll win money that fire will never burn nor will anyone in this world ever be able to spend it so be sure now and meet me here". Without another word he struck the
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2019-09-27 14:38
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The Mass Field
It was the night my mother died. I will never forget the wake she had. There was 'lavins' of drink. The men had plenty drunk that night and smoking and 'ateing'. Well it was on that blessed night that the heart and soul were frightened out of poor Mick Mitchell and he returning home from the wake. He never did a day's good after and no wonder for as you know the field they call the Mass field, well the poor chap had to go by this and on his way home and did you ever see the bush just as you cross the middle ditch - the whitethorn this side of Kitty's bush - well to be sure Mick Mitchell was a grand chap - the greatest music man you could find and leave it there if he couldnt dance a reel or sing a ballad, and he only about twenty years of age. He was one of the best lads that employed a card. Well anyway he was going home from poor mother's wake to be sure and she his real aunt and he had some of itself
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2019-09-27 14:37
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The Mass Field
It was the night my mother died. I will never forget the wake she had. There was 'lavins' of drink. the men had plenty drunk that night and smoking and 'ateing'. Well it was on that blessed night that the heart and soul were frightened out of poor Mick Mitchell and he returning home from the wake. He never did a day's good after and no wonder for as you know the field they call the Mass field. Well the poor chap had to go by this and on his way home and did you ever see the bush just as you cross the middle ditch - the whitethorn this side of Kitty's bush. Well to be sure Mik Mitchell was a grand chap - the greatest music man you could find and leave it there if he couldnt dance a reel or sign a ballad, and he only about twenty years of age. He was one of the best lads that employed a card. Well anyway he was going home from poor mother's wake to be sure and she his real aunt and he had some of itself
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2019-09-27 13:06
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Place
Name: Blane
Where: Murray's Land, Coolronan
Des: A field of course on one side. A river on the other side.
Name: Derralee
Where: Opposite Keoghs, Coolronan
Des: A dark wood with runs through it.
Name: Pollwee
Where: A wood behind Keogh's, Coolronan.
Des: Wood with deep cut turf. There is
Name: Gelltha Wood
WHere: Coolronan
Des: A little bog road
Name: Killoo
Where: Keogh's bog in Coolronan
Des: A big part of the where turf is cut.
Name: Moat
Where: A high mound behind Ludlow's in Rathkeenan.
Des: Also called a Rarchín - mounds. I don't see sy
Name: Scrúggán Hill
Where: In Grangemore Bog
Des: A steep hill in of trees and bushes. There are some there are stones
Name: Raheen
Where: In Rickard's field, Coolronan
Des: A small round large stones
Name: Dúnán
Where: In Rathkeenan
Des: A field about 8 in the middle
Name: Cul-yeen
Where: in Baskinagh, Kellet Estate
Des: A marshy field
Name: Aha moor or Ahar moore
Where: Rathkeenan, belongs to T.E. Potterton.
Des: A field about 20 a small stream.
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2019-09-26 00:18
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This is Stanley Hill.
These trees mark the resting place of poor people who died from Cholera. There was a Hospital beside this hill for the treatment of the victims of the dread disease. The trees were planted there so that it would not be dug up in after years.
The same circumstances surround the place called Coyle's Wood on Stackallen Road. Trees mark the burial place of the Cholera victims and guard them from interference.
At this place in Rosnaree, there was a ford across the Boyne in old times.
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2019-09-26 00:15
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amunition of the boys who were "on the run".
There is a lone bush a couple of hundred yards away and it is said that there was an emergency entrance under it.
V. Quinn.
Miss Donnelly's Stories.
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2019-09-26 00:13
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MIONNBHAR NA BOINNE
Folklore Competition.
I promised some time ago to say a word in this column on the Folklore Competition at Feis na Midhe. Since then the word has been said by an expert in the subject - a man to whom this work of saving the national tradition is indeed a labour of love. It is a thousand pities that every man, woman and child in the county had not the privilege of hearing Mr. Dulargey's lecture, or at the very least that there was not one old person from every parish in the county there. If there had been I am sure that within a month there would be enough material forthcoming to keep the Folklore Commission working overtime.
Rhymes.
One point which Mr. Dulargey emphasised was the importance of recording facts, stories, rhymes etc. which seem to the ordinary person too trivial or too well known to be worth attention. He gave as an example the rhyme:-
"One moonlight night as I sat high,
Watching for one and two passed by,
The leaves did quiver and my heart did quake,
To see the cunning hole that the fox did make."
Probably every reader has heard that. Nevertheless it is of interest to know the exact version of it that is current in each district and what explanation is given of it.
How many know the very quaint prayer used to cure toothache, which embodies a dialogue between Our Lords and St. Peter.
"Oh, Peter, Peter, why do you quake?"
"Oh, my Lord and Saviour, my tooth does ache".
A collection of such rhymes would in itself make a most interesting entry.
Old Cures.
In one parish I know there is a traditional cure for almost every known disease from rheumatism to ringworm. Some are pure herb cures, others are charms like the mearing water (Uisce na dtrí-dteorann). A list of these from each parish would be most interesting, particularly if accompanied in each case by the name of the family who has the cure and how it has been transmitted as far as local memory goes. It seems that many of these cures are traceable to
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2019-09-26 00:10
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MIONNBHAR NA BOINNE
Folklore Competition.
I promised some time ago to say a word in this column on the Folklore Competition at Feis na Midhe. Since then the word has been said by an expert in the subject - a man to whom this work of saving the national tradition is indeed a labour of love. It is a thousand pities that every man, woman and child in the county had not the privilege of hearing Mr. Dulargey's lecture, or at the very least that there was not one old person from every parish in the county there. If there had been I am sure that within a month there would be enough material forthcoming to keep the Folklore Commission working overtime.
Rhymes.
One point which Mr. Dulargey emphasised was the importance of recording facts, stories, rhymes etc. which seem to the ordinary person too trivial or too well known to be worth attention. He gave as an example the rhyme:-
"One moonlight night as I sat high,
Watching for one and two passed by,
The leaves did quiver and my heart did quake,
To see the cunning hole that the fox did make."
Probably every reader has heard that. Nevertheless it is of interest to know the exact version of it that is current in each district and what explanation is given of it.
How many know the very quaint prayer used to cure toothache, which embodies a dialogue between Our Lords and St. Peter.
"Oh, Peter, Peter, why do you quake?"
"Oh, my Lord and Saviour, my tooth does ache".
A collection of such rhymes would in itself make a most interesting entry.
Old Cures.
In one parish I know there is a traditional cure for almost every known disease from rheumatism to ringworm. Some are pure herb cures, others are charms like the mearing water (Uisce na dtrí-dteorann). A list of these from each parish would be most interesting, particularly if accompanied in each case by the name of the family who has the cure and how it has been transmitted as far as local memory goes. It seems that many of these cures are traceable to
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2019-09-26 00:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
MIONNBHAR NA BOINNE
Folklore Competition.
I promised some time ago to say a word in this column on the Folklore Competition at Feis na Midhe. Since then the word has been said by an expert in the subject - a man to whom this work of saving the national tradition is indeed a labour of love. It is a thousand pities that every man, woman and child in the county had not the privilege of hearing Mr. Dulargey's lecture, or at the very least that there was not one old person from every parish in the county there. If there had been I am sure that within a month there would be enough material forthcoming to keep the Folklore Commission working overtime.
Rhymes.
One point which Mr. Dulargey emphasised was the importance of recording facts, stories, rhymes etc. which seem to the ordinary person too trivial or too well known to be worth attention. He gave as an example the rhyme:-
"One moonlight night as I sat high,
Watching for one and two passed by,
The leaves did quiver and my heart did quake,
To see the cunning hole that the fox did make."
Probably every reader has heard that. Nevertheless it is of interest to know the exact version of it that is current in each district and what explanation is given of it.
How many know the very quaint prayer used to cure toothache, which embodies a dialogue between Our Lords and St. Peter.
"Oh, Peter, Peter, why do you quake?"
"Oh, my Lord and Saviour, my tooth does ache".
A collection of such rhymes would in itself make a most interesting entry.
Old Cures.
In one parish I know there is a traditional cure for almost every known disease from rheumatism to ringworm. Some are pure herb cures, others are charms like the mearing water (Uisce na dtrí-dteorann). A list of these from each parish would be most interesting, particularly if accompanied in each case by the name of the family who has the cure and how it has been transmitted as far as local memory goes. It seems that many of these cures are traceable to
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2019-09-25 23:57
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MIONNBHAR NA BOINNE
Folklore Competition.
I promise some time ago to say a word in this column on the Folklore Competition at Feis na Midhe. Since then the word has been said by an expert in the subject - a man to whom this work of saving the national tradition is indeed a labour of love. It is a thousand pities that every man, woman and child in the county had not the privilege of hearing Mr. Dulargey's lecture, or at the very least that there was not one old person from every partish in the county there. If there had been I am sure that within a month there would be enough material forthcoming to keep the Folklore Commission working overtime.
Rhymes.
One point which Mr. Dulargey emphasised was the importance of recording facts, stories, rhymes etc. which seem to the ordinary person too trivial or too well known to be worth attention. He gave as an example the rhyme:-
"One moonlight night as I sat high,
Watching for one and two passed by,
The leaves did quiver and my heart did quake,
To see the cunning hole that the fox did make."
Probably every reader has heard that. Nevertheless it is of interest to know the exact version of it that is current in each district and what explanation is given of it.
How many know the very quaint prayer used to cure toothache, which embodies a dialogue between Our Lords and St. Peter.
"Oh, Peter, Peter, why do you quake?"
"Oh, my Lord and Saviour, my tooth does ache".
A collection of such rhymes would in itself make a most interesting entry.
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2019-09-25 23:53
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MIONNBHAR NA BOINNE
Folklore Competition.
I promise some time ago to say a word in this column on the Folklore Competition at Feis na Midhe. Since then the word has been said by an expert in the subject - a man to whom this work of saving the national tradition is indeed a labour of love. It is a thousand pities that every man, woman and child in the county had not the privilege of hearing Mr. Dulargey's lecture, or at the very least that there was not one old person from every partish in the county there. If there had been I am sure that within a month there would be enough material forthcoming to keep the Folklore Commission working overtime.
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2019-09-25 23:50
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MIONNBHAR NA BOINNE
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2019-09-25 23:49
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.
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2019-09-25 23:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
MIONNBHAR NA BOINNE
Folklore Competition.
I promised some time ago to say a word in this column on the Folklore Competition at Feis na Midhe. Since then the word has been said by an expert in the subject - a man to whom this work of saving the national tradition is indeed a labour of love. It is a thousand pities that every man, woman and child in the county had not the privilege of hearing Mr. Dulargey's lecture, or at the very least that there was not one old person from every parish in the county there. If there had been I am sure that within a month there would be enough material forthcoming to keep the Folklore Commission working overtime.
Rhymes.
One point which Mr. Dulargey emphasised was the importance of recording facts, stories, rhymes etc. which seem to the ordinary person too trivial or too well known to be worth attention. He gave as an example the rhyme:-
"One moonlight night as I sat high,
Waiting for one and two passed by,
The leaves did quiver and my heart did quake,
To see the cunning hole that the fox did make."
Probably every reader has heard that. Nevertheless it is of interest to know the exact version of it that is current in each district and what explanation is given of it.
How many know the very quaint prayer used to cure toothache, which embodies a dialogue between Our Lord and St. Peter.
"Oh, Peter, Peter, why do you quake?"
"Oh, my Lord and Saviour, my tooth does ache".
A collection of such rhymes would in itself make a most interesting entry.
Old Cures.
In one parish I know there is a traditional cure for almost every known disease from rheumatism to ringworm. Some are pure herb cures, others are charms like the mearing water (Uisce na diri-dteorann). A list of those from each parish would be most interesting, particularly if accompanied in each case by the name of the family who has the cure and how it has been transmitted as far as local memory goes. It seems that many of these cures are traceable t
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2019-09-22 21:24
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Certain Days
If you are building a house put a medal of St. Benedict in every corner to bring you good luck and don't go into a new house on a Tuesday or you will have no luck.
Generally all the old people used to sow their crops before the sixth of April and on that day they would go to the bog.
Turnips have to be sown before the 11th of June or they will be no good. The winter wheat has to be sown before the 1st of November and the Spring wheat before the 6th of April.
If you want to keep down weeds in your ground sow your oats on the 18th of April.
Lizzie Coyne, Kildangan, from my father Thomas Coyne, Farmer.
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2019-09-22 21:20
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Lore of certain days
If you marry in May you will rue the day
If you marry in the Harvest your children will be bracket.
Monday for wealth
Tuesday for health
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for crosses
Friday for losses
Saturday no good at all.
It is not right to pay out money on Hansel Monday because you would be paying out money the whole year. If you put out ashes on a Monday you will put out the luck of the week.
Lizzie Coyne, Kildangan. From my mother Mary M. Coyne 1938.
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2019-09-21 21:47
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died in hospital and her husband asked the priest to let him wake her in the chapel as he was very poor. The priest consented and so she was taken to the chapel and ever since every corpse is taken to the chapel after one night in the house.
Gur Flitche, Gur Flatche
A few people got together and formed a ring. Then one of them got a hay rope and hid it under his legs. They all sat down on their hunkers and one got in the middle and the person with the rope gave him a blow of it and then passed it on to the next. If the person in the ring caught the one with the rope he was to get in and the one that was in the ring first got the rope and gave him a blow of it and while he was hitting he would shout Gur Flitche, Gur Flatche huroor.
Lizzie Coyne,Kildangan. From my father THomas Coyne, Farmer 1938, Kildangan, Kinnegad, Co. Meath.
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2019-09-21 21:41
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Customs at wakes
When a person died the members of the house went to the town and bought a basket of clay pipes, a couple pounds of tobacco, and a box of snuff and sometimes a barrel of whiskey. At the wake everyman would get a clay pipe full of tobacco and the women used to get snuff.
The whiskey would be given around and after that the young people or boys would play games and the old persons looked on. They used play "Gur Fliche, Gur Flache" and Button and sometimes fling little pieces of turf at each other and an odd time it would hit the corpse so it was forbidden. The corpse would be waked for three days. Then it was put in a coffin and brought to the graveyard. It was carried four times round the grave yard and then put in the grave. The priest would say some prayers over it and then it was buried. About twenty years ago these customs stopped. A woman
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2019-09-21 21:15
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The Wakes in Ireland long ago.
The wakes in Ireland long ago were very different from what they are now. The corpse was kept in the house till it was buried. A great number of people would gather into the house at night and they would start to play games. One game was called the Hurragh. All the men but one sat round in a ring and he had to find out who had the hurragh. It was made out of a piece of cloth twisted into a hard ball at one end and they kept it going round the ring behind their backs.
Sometimes they gave the man that was looking for it a hard blow on the back then he would get vexed and they were all shouting hurragh, hurragh. They sang songs and psalms at some waked also.
Mary Mitchell, From Christophen Brennan, Ballinabrackey, Co. Meath. Age 70.
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2019-09-21 21:14
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The Wakes in Ireland long ago.
The wakes in Ireland long ago were very different fro what they are now. The corpse was kept in the house till it was buried. A great number of people would gather into the house at night and they would start to play games. One game was called the Hurragh. All the men but one sat round in a ring and he had to find out who had the hurragh. It was made out of a piece of cloth twisted into a hard ball at one end and they kept it going round the ring behind their backs.
Sometimes they gave the man that was looking for it a hard blow on th eback then he would get vexed and they were all shouting hurragh, hurragh. They sang songs and psalms at some waked also.
Mary Mitchell, From Christophen Brennan, Ballinabrackey, Co. Meath. Age 70.
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2019-09-21 21:11
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Thomas Hughes of Cappalboggan about 25 years ago. Before that a man the name of Tailor Monahan, he is about 42 years buried.
The old church of Templeary measures thirty-six and a half feet by fourteen and a half. It is in complete ruin now.
From Mr. Collins, Baltigeer, Co. Westmeath. Age 45. 1938.
Kathleen McCluskey, Castlejordan.
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2019-09-21 21:09
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Templeary
There's an old monastery or chapel at Baltigeer known as Templeary. About thirty years ago a man the name of Mr. Barden from Coralstown gave a short history of it in the Mullingar Press. He said it was connected with Fore in Westmeath. The monk used to be called the raven owing to his very black hair. There are several rocks about the building and one a flat stone about ten yards out with hole in centre, must have been for a cross. There is another stone about 50 years away seeming to be a Holy water font. There is also a grave yard around and inside the ruins. There is a number of plain head stones and only one with inscription and nicely carved with two angels with Trumpets in their mouths on each side of the top of the head stone. This headstone is erected by Silvester Maguire in memory of his father Laurence Maguire. Departed this life July 24th. 1798, aged 70 years, also his sister Eleanor Maguire Departed this life August the 20th 1796, aged 19 years R.I.P.
The last to be buried was an Infant of
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2019-09-21 21:03
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belonged to the monks of Ballyboggan in earlier times and was consecrated ground.
From James Coyne, Kildangan, Co. Meath. 1938.
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2019-09-21 21:02
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Near Ballyboggan monastery there was a public house belonging to people named Rourke. One day a stranger called - a copper coloured man. He asked for a nights lodging and the people told him that they had no room for him. He went out and lay in the turf house and they found him dead in the morning. The police barrack was not far from the place and when they were informed the sergeant came and as no one knew him and nothing could be found on him to say who he was, he said all they could do was to bury him. The people got together and provided a coffin. You could get a coffin for 25 shillings then. They buried him in Ballyboggan churchyard and next day the coffin was found overground. They told the Priest who lived in Ballyboggan at that time he said to bury him in a different spot. They moved outside the boundary of the graveyard and buried him again, and again the coffin was overground. Then they brought the coffin some distance off and buried him in a field and they had no more trouble. The ground where he was buried the first and second time
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2019-09-21 20:57
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the population of the place being so large that the labourers stood in a row from the site of the Monastery to Carrick Quarry which lies midway between Edenderry and Ballyboggan and handed the stones that built it from one to another and that was how the Material was carried to the building.
From Mrs Coffey Ballinbrackey June 1938
Lizzie Coyne, Kildangan, Co. Meath.
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2019-09-21 20:56
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The Ruins of Ballyboggan.
Ballyboggan in the Co. Meath is situated about 5 miles from Edenderry and about 4 from Kinnegad. In it are the remains of a Monastery which was the home of Monks hundreds of years ago. As it stands now nothing remains only the high walls covered over with ivy and carved out on a stone on the top of the walls are the faces of two maidens.
The Story is told that one morning when two maids were returning with their pails of milk they were met by one of the monks who asked them for a drink. One of the maids refused to give it and the other put down her pail and told him to drink his fill. He was a mason and when he went back he had the two maids faces cut out in the stone in such a way that the sun always shone on one and could never shine on the other. This was the maiden's face who refused to give him the drink. And it is also told that when this monastery was being built
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2019-09-21 20:55
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The Money Field
A field in Greenhill is called the money field. Many years ago a young man went to plough this field. The first day he ploughed up lumps of metal as he thought and the same thing happened for three or four days. He had almost done ploughing one evening when in one of the furrows he passed over a small pot and a number fo dried leaves whirled up out of it.
He went back and took up the pot. He knew then he had broken the charm as he did not treasure the pieces at first, as he had given them to the children around to play with. His master, Mr. Dames, heard the story and got him to collect the lost pieces and he brought them to a goldsmith and he valued them and sent him back seven pound with which he paid his passage to America and that is why it is still called the money field.
From Patrick Kavanagh, Killowen, 1938.
About 70 years.
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2019-08-26 22:22
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The present R.C. Church in Castlejordan was formerly a school house. The site of it was given by one of the Gifford Landlords who lived in the Castle of Castlejordan at the time. Holy Mass was celebrated in it on Sunday and it was used as a school on week days. Duke Gifford would not allow this and had the building closed.
Mass was offered then for some time in a neighbouring barn owned by people named "Noone". The trace of two chimneys may still be found one on each end of the present church.
From Miss Wyer, Clonmore, Edenderry.
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2019-08-26 22:16
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driven to a pond or drain and they washed themselves.
Then they were driven back again and put in the nests.
The holes were generally in a corner of the house and under the table.
Lizzie Coyne Kildangan, Kinnegad, Co. Meath.
From my father Thomas Coyne, Age 60.
December 16th 1938.
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2019-08-26 22:14
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Eggs.
Friday is considered a lucky day for putting down hatching eggs.
You should not put down an even number of eggs because there is luck in an odd number.
Sunday is the worst day of all for putting down eggs and if you put them down on Saturday you should shake holy water on them or they will not be birded.
Hatching eggs are marked when they are being put down because another might come in and lay in the nest. They are marked with a pencil or soot.
It is not lucky to put eggs of young geese with those of old ones and the young should be marked in order that you would know them.
Long ago there was a hens hole in the wall in every house and the hens and the geese were put to hatch in them.
Every morning the geese were driven out and fed and were
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2019-08-26 22:10
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St. Bridgets Well.
From Mrs Hughes Baltigeer Co. Meath.
St. Bridgets well is in the townland of Ballyheashill about two miles from Castlejordan. Long ago this well was in a field in Ballyheashill and the owner, not believing it to be a blessed well filled it in. THe next morning the well sprang up in the field next to where it was and flooded the field.
That evening the flood went down and the well became an ordinary size. One morning a woman filled her kettle with the water of this well and put it on the fire to boil and at twelve o'clock the water was still cold.
Another woman was boiling potatoes and she filled the pot with water out of this well and that evening the water was not even hot.
People that have any disease or illness go there for cures and they drop in pins or medals, or coppers and the rosary is recited at the well.
It is customary for any person who visit the well, to visit it first on May Eve and on three other occassions during May.
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2019-08-26 22:05
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Old Crafts.
Long ago the people were noted for their skill some men were great mowers and reapers.
There was one man who was named Patrick McNamee. He was able to reap all day, as fast as two men could tie the sheaves.
There was a certain man who was a great turf cutter, her was named Tom Mulligan.
He was able to cut the turf as fast as two men could catch the sods, and wheel them out five or six perch.
There was also another man who was good at cutting turf. One day they were competing, but Tom Mulligan was by far the best cutter.
Kathleen Foye, From Tom Mulligan Fahy, Rhode, Offaly, January 12th 1939.
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2019-08-26 22:01
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soap so the people could wash their clothes clean.
Lizie Coyne, Kildangan, Kinnegad, Co. Meath.
From Michael Flood, Kildangan, Kinnegad, Co. Meath. December 19th. 1938, Age 60.
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2019-08-26 22:00
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Houses in olden times
Long ago the houses were thatched and they had fairly big windows in them. Then the British came over and put a tax on every pane of glass in the windows.
So when the new house were being built the windows were sloped inside and made about one foot outside and two or three big iron bars were put in them and no glass at all and in the nights a bag of straw was stuffed in them to stop cats coming in.
Then they took all the good linen that was made in Dublin and brough it to Belfast and there was none made in Dublin and the British tried to put down Dublin but they could not succeed.
After a while the tax was taken off the windows and they began to put in the little windows and that is why the small windows are in some of the houses.
Then the tax was taken off the
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2019-08-26 21:58
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Houses in olden times
Long ago the houses were thatched and they had fairly big windows in them. Then the British came over and put a tax on every pane of glass in the windows.
So when the new house were being built the windows were sloped inside and made about one foot outside and two or three big iron bars were put in them and no glass at all and in t eh nights a bag of straw was stuffed in them to stop cats coming in.
Then they took all the good linen that was made in Dublin and brough it to Belfast and there was none made in Dublin and the British tried to put down Dublin but they could not succeed.
After a while the tax was taken off the windows and they began to put in the little windows and that is why the small windows are in some of the houses.
Then the tax was taken off the
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2019-08-25 22:33
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But there are more windows in it that the Lord Mayor's house.
A thimble.
What is in a riddle more than holes.
Corners.
What is it that I ran till I got it and when I got it I sat down to look for it?
A thorn.
What is on a house more than straw?
Knots.
As round as an apple as flat as a pan the whole of a woman and the half of a man.
A penny.
What is the quickest thing in the world.
Thought.
What is the difference betwee a telegram pole and a bottle of caster oil?
One is hard to get up and the other is hard to get down.
What is the first thing you do when you go to bed?
Toss it.
What is it hangs bears and never blossoms.
A pot hooks.
What is it that is brought to the table cut and never eaten?
A deck of cards.
Lizzie Coyne, Kildangan, From my father Thomas.
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2019-08-25 22:24
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she cant lick it.
What brings the jackdaw among the ravens?
His wings.
What is the dirtiest thing in the house?
A clock beause it has two hands and never washes its face.
Neither within nor without and it is all pains.
A window
What brings a hen across the road?
Her feet.
Where was Moses when the light went out?
In the dark.
Two dead men fighting, two blind men looking, two cripples running for the police, and two dummies telling them to hurry on.
A lie.
How many sprigs go to a crows nest.
None, only the one he carries.
Long legs, short thighs. Little head and no eyes.
A tongs.
Round and round the house and drags a harrow after it.
A hen and a clutch of chickens.
I have a little house. And it would not fit a mouse
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2019-08-25 22:23
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she cants link it.
What brings the jackdaw amond the ravens?
His wings.
What is the dirtiest thing in the house?
A clock beause it has two hands and never washes its face.
Neither within nor without and it is all pains.
A window
What brings a hen across the road?
Her feet.
Where was Moses when the light went out?
In the dark.
Two dead men fighting, two blind men looking, two cripples running for the police, and two dummies telling them to hurry on.
A lie.
How many sprigs go to a crows nest.
None, only the one he carries.
Long legs, short thighs. Little head and no eyes.
A tongs.
Round and round the house and drags a harrow after it.
A hen and a clutch of chickens.
I have a little house. And it would not fit a mouse
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2019-08-25 22:18
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Riddles
Why does a miller wear a white hat?
To cover his head.
What is full and holds more?
A pot of potatoes.
Headed like a thimble, tailed like a rat you may guess it forever but you won't guess that.
A pipe.
What is it that has a head and foot and four legs?
A bed.
Patch upon patch without any stiches riddle me that and I will buy you a briches.
A head of cabbage.
I have a little man above in the field when I pull his leg his nose will bleed.
A pump.
What side of the mug is the handle on?
On the outside.
What is it the more you take out of it the bigger it gets?
A grave.
Why did Adam eat the apple when Eve gave it to him?
Because he had no knife.
How many rungs in Jaob ladder?
Three - faith, hope and charity.
Why does a hen pick a pot?
Because
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2019-08-25 22:13
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them at your eye and say "You have a stye in your eye" and the person with the stye say "You lie". Then throw the thorns over your shoulder and the stye will be cured in a few days.
Lizzie Coyne, Kildangan, From my father Thomas Coyne, Farmer, 1938.
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2019-08-25 22:11
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wart and the one that is curing says "In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost, Amen" and rubs a stone to each wart.
Rub a snail to the wart and it will cure it.
If you have a sore lip get a bright spade and light a piece of paper and put it on it and the sweat that will come on it take it up and rub it on your lip and it will cure it.
Breadsoda and buttermilk will cure a toothache.
If you lick a salamander three times when a person gets a burn you will cure the burn by licking it three times.
If you have chilblains stick your feet into stable manure and they will be cured.
Honey will cure a sore throat.
If you have a stye in your eye get nine thorns of a gooseberry bush and let another person point
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2019-08-25 22:07
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Local Cures
A sting of a nettle can be cured by the juice of a dock leaf.
Blue will cure a sting of a wasp or a bee.
Wild Fire:-
If a man and woman of the same name get married and have an only son he has the cure of the wild fire but his fatehr must have died. He must draw a drop of blood from his finger and put it on the affected part.
Warts:-
If you have warts get a straw foreach wart and put a knot on it and a pin in each knot and bury it in the ground and when the knot begins to decay the wart begins to fade away. You have to bury a straw for nine mornings and the warts will go away.
Some old people have another way to cure warts. They get a bottle of holy water and the person with the warts gets a stone for each
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2019-08-25 22:03
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man is ploughing you will have to go back the same way or you will die that year.
It is not right to bum an elder stick because Judas hanged himself out of an elder tree.
If you hit with and elder you will not grow and inch bigger.
When you hear a bell ringing in your ear it is said to be a poor soul asking to pray for him.
If you marry in May you will rue the day.
When a cock crows in the night there is someone going to die.
Lizzie Coyne, From my father Thomas, farmer, Kildangan 1938.
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2019-08-25 22:02
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Weather Lore
Signs of rain:-
When the swallows fly low.
When a dog eats grass.
When frogs turn black.
When a crane flies over high land.
When he crows sit on the bank of a river.
When the sheep are up drazing early in the morning.
When the midges begin to bite very hard.
When the horse flies sting.
When the fog is coming down a hill.
When the Dublin red is up in the morning.
When the crickets sing very loudly.
Signs of Hard Weather:-
When blackbirds eat berries of an elder tree.
When a circle is far away from the moon.

Lizzie Coyne. From my father Thomas, farmer Kildangan 1938.
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2019-08-25 21:58
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Lore about May Day.
One time not very long ago a woman in this parish gave away milk to a little girl on May Day. The next day the woman was churning and no butter came on the milk so she churned the second day and no butter came. So the third day she sent for another woman to come and help her and they churned and still no butter came on the milk. Then she sent a message to the Priest to ask him to say a mass. The Priest said if the mass did not do she could ask for any favour she liked. The Priest said the mass and she churned the next day and butter came on the milk as usual.
People in this parish do not give away milk May Day because they say they would be giving away all the butter of the year.
Lillie McNamara, Castlejordan.
From Mrs Conlon, Castlejordan, Co. Meath.
April 28th 1988.
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2019-08-25 21:55
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An Old Custom
Long ago it was a custom here on twelfth night to get rushes that grow in the bog and to melt grease in a griset and draw the rushes through the grease - twelve of them.
Then a trench was made and the rushes were put in it and lighted and the Rosary was said while they would be burning. It was in honour of Twelfth night they were burned and they only lasted while the Rosary would be saying.
Lillie McNamara, Castlejordan.
From Mrs Pettit, Castlejordan, April 8th, 1938.
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2019-08-25 21:50
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Home Crafts
To make a candle:-
Get a piece of cotton thread and double it and twist it and have grease melted in a gringet and dip the twisted cotton into it and then let it cool. Then dip it into the grease again and keep dipping until it will get as thick as an ordinary candle. You could make it any length you like but it was generally made the length of the bought candle and it will last nearly a night. It is put in a flat candle stick.
Dyeing:-
Get Braemore herbs. They grow along the bank of a river and get alum. Boil the herbs in a pot until the juice comes out then throw out the herbs and put in the alum and let it dissolve. Then soak the article you will be dyeing in it and it will turn out yellow.
Lillie McNamara, Castlejordan.
From Mrs Pattit, April 9th 1938.
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2019-08-25 21:49
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Home Crafts
To make a candle:-
Get a piece of cotton thread and double it and twist it and have grease melted in a gringet ad dip the twisted cotton into it and then let it cool. Then dip it into the grease again and keep dipping until it will get as thick as an ordinary candle. You could make it any length you like but it was generally made the length of the bought candle and it will last nearly a night. It is put in a flat candle stick.
Dyeing:-
Get Braemore herbs. They grow along the bank of a river and get alum. Boil the herbs in a pot until the juice comes out then throw out the herbs and put in the alum and let it dissolve. Then soak the article you will be dyeing in it and it will turn out yellow.
Lillie McNamara, Castlejordan.
From Mrs Pattit, April 9th 1938.
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2019-08-25 21:40
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A Story and a Curse.
In Clonfad near Rattan there were seven Bishops buried. When the seventh Bishop was in the hearse to be buried a little woman ran out of an old castle that is near the graveyard and asked was that place going to be as holy as Rome and the horses stopped immediately and would not go on. So they had to bury him on the side of the road. Now when anyone has a disease he is told to get a bit of the clay of the grave and replace it with other clay. Then to boil the clay in milk and eat it and it is said it will cure the disease.
Lillie McNamara, Castlejordan.
From Mrs Pettit, Castlejordan, Co. Meath. over 70.
April 12th 1938.
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2019-08-25 21:37
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cream and table turning over on top of her.
The whole house and floors seemed shaking and she begged of them to help her get up but they only shouted at her and told her to have patrience till the house go steady. After some time she got to her feet frechched through ith cream and by this time some of the neighbours arrived.
She asked one of them to leave her at home til she would change her clothes but at the same time she had her mind fully made up not to come back any more. When she and her companion had gone out they passed through the haggard and the moment they entered it a large cock of hay started blowing in all directions although there was not a breeze of wind.
Next day there was hay found on hedges and trees two miles away but not a particle of the cock remained in the haggard. All the people in the locality remained silent as to the happenings of that night. Two years ago this house fell and is now in ruins. It is said that if a cock of hay is put there in the night it will be gone in the morning.
Kathleen Gorman, Harristown.
From Mrs Tyrrell age 85 years who lived in Harristown in this parish. She died 1936.
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2019-08-19 21:06
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The Lore of Certain Days
In this District cures for pains and people are cured on Sundays. Tuesday and Fridays are thought to be unlucky for making graves as ghosts and evil spirits are seen if the graves are made on these days. People generally change from one days ahouse to another on Friday. If a person is paying a bill he pays it on Wednesdays or Saturdays.
The "Cross day of the Year" occurs in May and it was a custom to put a scraw on a young foals head if it was born on that day or it was supposed to kill somebody. The potatoes are supposed to be planted around St. Patricks Day. People say that if
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2019-08-19 21:02
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Tuesday for wealth.
Wednesday is the best day of all.
Thursday for losses.
Friday for Crosses
And Saturday is no good at all.
John Pender.
Told by Mrs. Davis, Moyrath, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-19 21:01
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The Lore of Certain Days 22-6-38
Monday is the day that is thought lucky for people to get cured and Thursday is another day thought lucky for to get cured. Wednesday is the lucky day to get married on and Friday is the day thought lucky for people to change from one house to another. The correct day to sow crops on is Friday. The earliest and latest date for sowing potatoes is from the first of March to the Seventeenth of May. There is an old saying.
Monday for Health.
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2019-08-19 20:57
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Swithens day which his the fifteenth of July people say that if it rains on that day that it will rain for forty days. On Hansel Monday which is the first Monday in January. People say that it is unlucky to give away money before twelve o'clock and that it is lucky to get money before twelve o'clock.
James Corrigan.
Told by Peter Corrigan, Wood, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-19 20:51
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Friday is supposed to be the luckyiest day for anyone to put down a clutch of eggs. No one should cut their nails on any day only on a Friday. Saturday is an unlucky day for anyone to start work. People who are going to live in a new house always go on Friday because it is thought lucky day. If anyone built a new house beside an old one that is said to be very unlucky and that the eldest daughter is the family would die. On Saint
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2019-08-19 20:47
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The Lore of Certain days
The day thought lucky for sowing seeds and planting potatoes is Friday and the day that is thought lucky for getting married is Wednesday, Friday is thought lucky for flitting and Monday and Thursday are the days thought lucky for getting cured. The earliest day for planting potatoes is the first of Febrary and the latest day is the first of June.
John Bird.
Told by Michael Bird Carnisle, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-12 22:59
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unlucky day. Everyone would get married on Wednesday as they believe it is lucky. It was also unlucky to get married in May or August.
Long ago when a man was looking for a wife he would bring another man with him to ask the parents. They would bring a pint of whiskey and would have a good time. The parents sometimes would give a cow or money for a dowry.
The wedding would be held in the barn. The strawboys would visit the house with a strawbelt around their bodies and round their legs. The strawboys would wear a knee britches a pair of white stockings and a pair of black boots.
Thomas Corrigan.
Told by Mrs. Corrigan, Cloneylogan, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-12 22:43
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Local Marriage Customs 10-6-38
Long ago the marriage customs were very different to now. It was an old custom for people to marry on Shrove Tuesday night at about ten o'clock.
If the parents of a girl would not want her to marry she would go off to a neighbours house and get married in it.
It was an old custom for people not to get married on Friday because it an
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2019-08-12 22:41
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Local Marriage Customs 10:06:38
Local marriages take place on Shrove Tuesday. It is thought very lucky to get married on Shrove Tuesday. People make matches in this parish. It was an old custom long ago to get married in peoples houses and to give goods at the wedding and for straw boys to enter the house where the the married couple were and dance. They were dressed in a suit made of straw, and a straw hat. There is a story told about the straw boys. Once they visited a wedding in a house. The people were terrified and thought they
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2019-08-12 22:40
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were robbers. They went for the Police and when the Police came they found they were straw boys. The people long ago attending weddings on horseback used to race one another home and they thought it a great thing to pass their neighbour on the road. The way they used to go to the chapel to get married long ago was in a carried drawn by two horses. The custom was to hang an old boot on the back of the carriage and if they lost the boot they would die soon, and if not they would live a long time.
John Pender, 10 June, 1938.
Told by Mrs. Pender, Balatalion, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-12 22:37
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Local Marriage Customs 10:06:3_
Local marriages take place on Shrove Tuesday. It is thought very lucky to get married on Shrove Tuesday. People make matches in this parish. It was an old custom long ago to get married in peoples houses and to give goods at the wedding and for straw boys to enter the house where the the married couple were and dance. They were dressed in a suit made of straw, and a straw hat. There is a story told about the straw boys. Once they visited a wedding in a house. The people were terrified and thought they
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2019-08-12 22:34
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boy and girl would meet at a certain time every evening. They would go for a walk and they would tell stories to each other. When the bride and bridegroom was coming home from the wedding there would be two horses and two seats between them and the bride and bridegroom would sit on the seats. An old story is told that the strawboys would kill the bridegroom if they did not get to dance with the bride.
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2019-08-12 22:32
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Marriage Customs
Marriages take place from lent and in the summer. Some marriages take place in Shrove. The days which are thought unlucky for marriages are the week days of lent and advent. Matches take place very often in my district in the Summer. At marriage people always gave presents of one kind or another. Long ago people that were going to get married in the girls' house always. The customs that take place on a wedding day are. A lot of people come to the wedding house and start a dance. When the dance was over the people were given a party. Straw-boys visit the wedding-house. There is an old story told that once upon a time straw boys visited the houses and the people thought they were robbers and went for the police. The way the matches was made long ago, was, a
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2019-08-12 22:28
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would sit in the one car. They also tried which of them had the best horses.
Patrick Conneely
Told by Thomas Daly, Ballybrittas, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-12 22:27
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Marriage Customs
Long ago the custom people had for getting married was. The two who were getting married would go in the middle of the night to the Priests House and get married. They generally got married before or after Lent. Wednesday and Saturday are the two days thought unlucky for getting married on. The bridegroom would go to the Church first. Then the people would go back and bring the bride in the same car. The car they used would be generally drawn by two horses. The people tied ribbons on the horses head, and old shoes out of the cars, because it was thought lucky. The way the poor people got married was. They used to walk with shawls on their heads to the Church because they could not afford a car.
When the rich people would be going home the bride and bridegroom.
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2019-08-12 22:17
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custom that a brides mother breaks an oat meal cake over the brides head.
John Bird.
Told by Mrs. Bird, Carnisle, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-12 22:17
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Marriage Customs
People are married at every month of the year only May and August as those months are considered unlucky, it is also thought that Friday and Saturday are unlucky days. The local customs were long ago that a number of cars brought the bride and her friends to the church. When their married they return to the brides house and on their way they play musical instruments. When the reach the brides house they have great feasting and dancing. Sometimes money is given as doury but property is given at other times. There is a marriage
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2019-08-12 22:13
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a house and they played music. When the music was finished they asked for their money but the people would not give them any because they did not know who they were. They usually played music with a flute which gave a very sharp sound.
James Corrigan.
Told by Patrick Newman, Wood, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-12 22:12
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Marriage Customs
Years ago marriage customs were very much different from what they are now. When people were to be married they always went to the church on a coach drawn by two horses. When they came home they had their breakfast and then they went for a long drive on the carriage. Before going they tied an old boot to the carriage.
If the boot fell the couple would die soon and if it did not fall they would live a long life. May and June are the two months that is unlucky for people to get married in and also Shrove Tuesday. There is an old saying about the days which people should get married in.
Monday is for wealth,
Tuesday for health,
Wednesday is the best day of all,
Thursday for losses,
Friday for crosses,
and Saturday is no good at all.
The straw-boys were dressed very peculiar with straw-hats and ribbons in them. It is said that they visited
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2019-08-08 18:59
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years ago since it was in use. Some years ago the walls were standing about a foot high. There were three people killed in it. Two of them were burned to death by a fire which broke out. The other was killed by a gap who fired a shot through the window at him. There are no stories told about it. There is an old Church on Athboy side of Kildalkey. It is situated on a hill in the Priests field about a quarter of a mile from Kildalkey village.
There are the ruins of an Abbey in the old cemetery of Kildalkey. It was built in the fifth century. It was plundered and burned by the Danes and was built up again by the Parish. There is writing on the walls of it but it cannot be made out. It is said that ghosts are seen in it.
William Rispin
Told by Mrs. Rispin, Ballybrittas, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-08 18:55
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There are not many ruins of school castles in this district. There is an old school on the Clonfaine road between Trim and Athboy. It was called the Chatam school. There is a large dwelling house built on the site of it now. It is almost one hundred
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2019-08-08 18:53
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got it built. There is an old monastery in the grave yard in Kildalkey. It is now in ruins. St. Dympna lived in it for a while and she took water from the well near by, which was afterwards called after her. It was one of the first monasteries that was built after the penal times. It is situated about a half a mile from Kildalkey. It was plundered and burned by the Danes. There is a stone on the wall between the priests garden and the new school. There was an old church beside Trimblestown Castle. It was a different church beside the churches we have now.
Bernard Reilly.
Told by William Fulham, Ballybrittas, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-08 18:50
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There is an old castle in Trimblestown. It is situated about a mile from Kildalkey. It was fortified during the war of sixteen hundred and forty-one and some time after. A family named the Barnewell and a man named Lords Trimblestown lived there. It is now in ruins. There is some of Trimblestown castle used as sheds. There is another castle in Moyrath. It is still in use. It was owned by a man named Mr. Potterton, and it was he that
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2019-08-08 18:48
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are all covered with ivy. It was founded in the fifth century by St. Trena, a roman bishop. St. Dympna lived in the monastery. She was a catholic and her father was a protestant. It was burned by the Danes about the ninth century and there is a round tower beside the monastery which was also burned by the Danes. A priest that lived there got the tower built in the fifth century.
John Pender.
Told by Mrs. Pender, Balatalion, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-08 18:47
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Cromwell's army fought at the hill of Frayne they also fought at Moymet. Cromwell was in Trimblestown with an army and at that time Mr. Barnwall owned Trimblestown Castle. When Cromwell came he said to Mr. Barnwall "so you own this castle" and he answered "it was mine yesterday and it is yours to-day". When Cromwell heard that he did not take the castle. He was also in Moyrath and he put a widow and her children and gave the house to a soldier named Potterton. Kildalkey was the first place that Parnell was elected member for Parliament for Meath. He made a speech every Sunday in Kildalkey and he died in eighteen hundred and ninety one. From Kildalkey he went to Ballivor. The Priest and people thought a lot about him that time. Then he came to Kildalkey and the village was decorated with Laurel for him. He gave a great speech at the Parochial house also.
Thomas Corrigan.
Told by James Corrigan, Cloneylogan, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-08 18:41
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There are not many historical traditions in my district. There was a battle fought along the Pale ditch and the weapons are to be seen yet on the banks of it. There was another great battle fought in the field beside the grave-yard.
At the present time the remains of the soldiers are to be found in the field where the battle was fought.
Kildalkey was a large city long ago and it was burned three times by the Danes. It was supposed that Cromwell was burned alive in London and that his ashes were thrown into the Thames.
Cromwell and his army was supposed to pass through Kildalkey long ago on his way to Trimblestown Castle. There was another great battle at Portlester, between King James and the English. Portlester is situated about two miles from Ballivor.
Patrick Conneely.
Told by Mrs. Conneely, Ballybrittas, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-08 18:37
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taking their crops. The people eat grass and water-sedge and used to take turnips and eat them.
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2019-08-08 18:37
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It is supposed that Cromwell was in Kildalkey. He first marched to the castle, surrounded it with soldiers and ordered out the man who was living in it. The man came out and Cromwell asked him who owned the castle. The man answered "It was mine yesterday and it is yours today". This answered pleased Cromwell and he marched away and reached the hill of Ward. He got to the top of the hill and he saw Frane Castle. He pointed a chain gun to where it was and knocked it down. He marched to Trim and fought a battle on the banks of the Trimblestown river where the Irish were defeated. The time of the famine farmers had little huts in their tillage fields to keep the people from
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2019-08-08 18:33
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Nelsons fields is called after him. The name of the field is Neillstown.
John Pender.
Told by Thomas Davis, Balatalion, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-06 22:52
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There was a great battle fought in Kildalkey by the Danes. Kildalkey was a mud wall city and they burned it. There are no stories told about the famine in this parish. Cromwell fought a battle on the green of Kildalkey and he fought a battle at Earls Mill on the Stonyford river and it was called the Battle of Portlester. Cromwell visited Frayne and raided the country. From that he went
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2019-08-06 22:50
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the leader said "It is yours now and yours for ever" so they left him unharmed. When Cromwell soldiers were crossing North-East Meath between the towns of Carrickmacross and Slane, they planted their guns on a steep hill near Wood-town and from there shelled the town of Syddan, and there is only left a few old ruins.
This hill is called ever since Gun Hill.
John Bird.
Told by Mrs. Birds, Carnisle, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-06 22:47
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Historical Traditions
Kildalkey is a very historical place. Once it was a mud wall city and it was burned three times by the Danes. There was a great battle fought on Kenny's Hill and the trenches can be seen yet. It is said that the river Turry ran red with blood at one time. The Danes plundered and robbed the city and burned the houses and it was reduced to a small village. Later on in the
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2019-08-06 22:44
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of them got long poles and they tied a few sods on top of them and lit them. They went around the parish with them in their hands. Every Sunday Parnell gave a great speech outside the Parochial House and he was always welcomed by the late Father Reynolds. One Sunday while giving a speech he took out a green handkerchief and let it fly with the wind. He said that green was for grief and that Ireland was in grief also.
James Corrigan
Told by Peter Corrigan, Wood, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-06 22:42
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The greatest thunder storm I ever heard of was in June, Nineteen Thirty Four. It started at eleven o'clock and stopped at six o'clock. There was a great deal of damage done by the lightning. The lightning knocked trees, killed horses, sheep and cattle, and also knocked houses. Some people were killed too while they were saying the rosary. My father was thrown out of the bed by the lightning. My father says it was the worst thunder storm he ever seen. It was heard all over the country by everyone.
John Pender.
Told by Mrs. Pender, Balatalion, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-06 22:39
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There were also a great number of people found dead from the cold. A great number of horses, cows and sheep were got dead. Some were found dead under the trees where the trees had fallen upon them and killed them. Others were found dead in drains where the wind had blown them in and they could not get out. There are no accounts of the big wind in eighteen thirty eight.
John Pender.
Told by Mrs. Pender, Balataliom, Kildalkey
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2019-08-06 22:37
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Severe Weather
There was a very big storm twenty years ago. It was on the first of November, Nineteen Hundred and eighteen. There was no sign of the storm before it came. It lasted two days and two nights. There were a great number of trees and houses knocked
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2019-08-06 22:36
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until New Years Eve and on that night there was midnight Mass in Kildalkey and the people got to mass with great difficulty as the roads were so slippery. There is a story told of a man who was travelling on horse back, and as he was tired he got off his horse to rest, and tied it up he thought to the pier of a gate but he found later it was the spire of a Drogheda Church. This storm did great damage as it broke down hedges and many cattle and sheep were lost in the snow drifts. Telegraph wires were all broken down and this was very inconvenient. There was also a shortage of food in many places as a supply could not come for some time owing to the state of the roads.
John Bird.
Told by Michael Bird, Carnisle, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-06 22:30
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There was a very severe snow storm in the year nineteen hundred. It began on St. Stephen's day and continued till the next day. There were about three feet of snow on the ground and some places where it drifted it was the height of a man. It rained after this heavy snow and then a very hard frost set in, which made the roads impossible for any traffic. This continued
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2019-08-06 22:27
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It began on the fourteenth of August 10 p.m. and it continued until 2 a.m. on the following morning. People were terrified on this dreadful night and some of them were up all night saying the Rosary. Others were out taking photographs of it and others were watching it running down wires. So some were not as much frightened as others. It was raining very heavily during the night. The lightning killed cattle and burned houses and trees, and done a terrible lot of harm. It is said that a man was ploughing in a field in the district and a flash of lightning killed the two horses and the main escaped himself.
John Bird
Told by Mrs. Bird, Carnisle, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-06 22:15
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nineteen hundred and three. It began on the twenty seventh of February at ten p.m. and it continued until six a.m on the following morning. Many people saw lights in the sky at night before this great storm and other lights were seen in marshy places which old people called "Jack in the Lantern" or the travelling candle. People wondered what the strange lights meant until the great wind came. It was a very violent storm as it knocked houses, uprooted trees and scattered hay and straw about the country. It also took the roof of sheds and houses and some of this roofing was found miles away. The storm was on the fair day of Kildalkey and people could not go to the fair with the trees across the road.
John Bird.
Told by Mrs. Bird, Carnisle, Kildalkey.
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2019-08-05 20:53
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Ballyneill Field
Double Ditch
Púncan Field
Pen Field
Tul na Gaor Field
The Lime Valley
Stone Field
Barrack Field
Old Orchard
Wood Field
Pond Field
Road Field
Moat Field
Well Field
Three Corner Field
Castle Field
Herd's Field
Lukes Field
Mocks Sevenue Chair
Castle Meadow
Hugh Sands The Weaver
Sands Paddock
Páirc na Carraig
Pool Gowran - The Goats Hole
Cul na Tuaithe
Mullach na Cille
Tón na Gaoith
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2019-08-05 20:50
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Local Placenames
The High Boy Field
Tarry Field
Low Bush
Fairy Bush
Tennis Pasture
Clump Field
Brakens Field
Gravel Ditch
Middle Ditch
Well Field
Bottoms Field
Wildfollows Field
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2019-08-05 20:38
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in size. People say that in moonlights nights fairies are seen kicking football in it. The middle of the field is bare grass never grows on it. It is said that the fairies have tents on it. This field is called the Fairies Field. There is a field with a hollow in it. It is called the Borheen field because there was a road through the field. There is a bush in one field it is called the Black man's bush, because a black man was seen sitting under it.
Michael Gaffney.
Gaffney, Ballyboy, Athboys.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-05 20:35
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Local Place Names
The name of my townland is Ballyboy. There are many fields in it. Some of these fields have their names along time. There is one very big field, it is called the Coole Aless, there wass a cemetery in it. Another is called the Castle Field, so called because there stood a castle in it. There is another very small field it is surrounded by woods and is only about a rood.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-05 20:33
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Local Place Names
There are a great many different names of places about Carnisle especially fields. The names of the fields are Firnagh, Buabaile, Ardawalla, Tully, Boitaleen, Bean garden, Mornington, Brick field, Church yard field, Morans farm, Three cock field, The Pollocks, Middle field, Cox's Hill, Lodge field, Stake field, Mullens hornan, Cornagrana. Some of those names were put on by old people and no one knows the reason. There are only two small rivers about here namely the Black river and the Stony-ford river.
John Bird.
Told by Mrs. Bird, Carnisle, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-05 20:32
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Place Names
There are a great many different names of places about Carnisle especially fields. The names of the fields are Firnagh, Buabaile, Ardawalla, Tully, Boitaleen, Bean garden, Mornington, Brick field, Church yard field, Morans farm, Three cock field, The Pollocks, Middle field, Cox's Hill, Lodge field, Stake field, Mullens hornan, Cornagrana. Some of those names were put on by old people and no one knows the reason. There are only tow small rivers about here namesly the Black river and the Stony-ford river.
John Bird.
Told by Mrs. Bird, Carnisle, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-04 23:52
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ago - A certain man happened to pass through a neighbours field where his cows were at grass. He noticed a woman amongst the cattle - she had something like balls of yarn in her hand - She threw one and then another at the cows, saying one for you and one for me. The man said more by way of a joke "And one for me two".
In the space of a few days when his mother was making the churn in his home She marvelled at the amount of butter in the churn, twice or three times the usual compliment. She remarked to the son, and he then told her about the old woman and the balls of yarn. He having said one for me too - evidently took the produce of one cow also.
M. O'Farrell, NT.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-04 23:48
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Churning is done about once a week in Winter and twice a week in Summer. The old dash churn is still very common. It is customary for the stronger to lend a hand at the churn - otherwise it is thought they bring the butter with them. The old people of this district believed in witchcraft and that these beings were able to steal away the butter fat.
Story - In Rathcormac about sixty years
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-04 23:45
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Churning.
I have a churn at home. It is about a foot wide. It is about twelve years old. My mother does the churning. We churn twice a week in the summer and once a week in the winter. If strangers come in they help to churn. If not people say that they would take your profit. It is a barrel churn and turns on a little wheel. There is a lid with a glass in it when clear we know that the churning is done. When the butter is taken out of the churn it is washed and salted, and weighed into pounds. Water is put in and on cold days warm water is poured in to bring on butter quickly.
Michael Gaffney.
Told by Mrs. Gaffney, Ballyboy, Athboy
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-04 23:44
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Churning.
I have a churn at home. It is about a foot wide. It is about twelve years old. My mother does the churning. We churn twice a week in the summer and once a week in the winter. If strangers come in they help to churn. If not people say that they would take your profit. It is a barrel churn and turns on a little wheel. There is a lid with a glass in it when clear we know that the churning is done. When the butter is take out of the churn it is washed and salted, and weighed into pounds. Water is put in and on cold days war water is poured in to bring on butter quickly.
Michael Gaffney.
Told by Mrs. Gaffney, Ballyboy, Athboy
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-04 23:41
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a ventilator in the middle of it.
There is a balance on the bottom of it which keeps the churn upright, and on which the makers name is printed. In Winter we churn once a week and in Summer twice a week when the milk is plentiful.
My mother churns and I often help her and if at churning a strangers happens to come in they churn for a while.
The churning is done by twisting a handle which forms a rooling motion in the churn. When the butter forms like a shower of hail on top of the milk we know the butter is churned.
Then it is taken out with a butter shovel and washed until all the milk is gone out of it. Then it is salted and made into rolls with a butter patters and its then ready for use. The old proverb is if strangers come in they take a hand with the churn if not it is regarded unlucky.
John Bird.
Told by Michael Bird, Carnisle, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-04 23:31
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Churning
We have a barrell churn in our house for the last ten years. The various parts are the frame on which it stands, the axle on which it revolves, and the handle, and there is also a strong lid with
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-04 23:29
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Churning.
We have a churn at home. It consist of a dash and a lid. The height of it is about four feet, and the top is twenty seven inches, and the bottom is thirty inches.
When we are going to churn my mother puts in the milk and then she puts hot water on it and leaves it there for about five minutes. Then we churn it. At the end when the butter is near made she pours cold water on it. If anybody comes in while we are churning they generally churn a while because it is supposed to be lucky.
When it is churned my mother washes it with clean water, to take the buttermilk out of it. Then we the buttermilk to calves and pigs and make bread with the rest.
Told by Mrs. Kearney, Ballybrittas to Patrick Conneely, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-04 23:23
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Churning
We have a churn at home. It is three feet high. It is fifteen inches on the top and twenty inches on the bottom. We have it seven years. The sides are round. It is made up of a churn, a lid and a dash. There is no mark on it. The butter is made three times a week Summer and twice in the Winter. My mother and brothers do the churning. If strangers come in durning the churning they help for they say they will put luck on the churn. It takes about a half an hour to churn. It is done by hand. The churn dash is always moved upwards and downwards. When the dash is clean the churning is done. Water is poured in durning the churning. We lift the butter up with the butter cards into the butter dish. Then it is washed to take away the butter milk and then there is salt put on it. The butter milk is used for making bread and it is given to calves and pigs.
Bernard Reilly.
Told by Patrick Reilly, Ballybrittas, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-04 23:17
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Churning
We have a churn and it is a very old one. It is sixteen years old and the sides are round. There is no mark on the churn. We make butter twice a week in the summer and once a week in winter.
My mother always does the churning and if any stranger comes in they help because it is taught lucky. It takes an hour to churn and it is churned by hand. It is a dash churn and the dash is moved upwards and downwards when churning. My mother knows when butter is made when it comes on the dash. Hot water is poured in when churning to get the churning done quicker. The butter is taken out with a saucer and put on a butter board then it is shaped into pounds with butter spades. The buttermilk is used for baking bread. Here is a proverb about butter. Salt your butter in time and it wont go bad.
Told by John Pender,
Told by Mrs. Pender,
Balatalion, Kildakey. 19/2/38.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-04 23:16
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Churning
We have a churn and it is a very old one. It is sixteen years old and the sides are round. There is no mark on the churn. We make butter twice a week in the summer and once a week in winter.
My mother always does the churning and if any stranger comes in they help because it is taught lucky It takes an hour to churn and it is churned by hand. It is a dash churn and the dash is moved upwards and downwards when churning. My mother knows when butter is made when it comes on the dash. Hot water is poured in when churning to get the churning done quicker. The butter is taken out with a saucer and put on a butter board then it is shaped into pounds with butter spades. The buttermilk is used for baking bread. Here is a proverb about butter. Salt your butter in time and it wont go bad.
Told by John Pender,
Told by Mrs. Pender,
Balatalion, Kildakey. 19/2/38.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-08-04 23:12
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Churning
We have a churn and it is a very old one. It is sixteen years old and the sides are round. There is no mark on the churn. We make butter twice a week in the summer and once a week in winter.
My mother always does the churning and if any stranger comes in they help because it is taught lucky It takes an hour to churn and it is churned
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:48
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The lore of Certain Days.
There are certain days that are thought lucky to make a grave. People generally make it on Wednesday. People say that it is lucky to begin to plought on Mondays. If people are changing from one house to another or setting up a shop, They generally start on Tuesdays. The cross day is in the month of May. The people plant their potatoes around St. Patrick's Day. People say that it is lucky to put down a clutch of eggs on Fridays or to cut your nails. There is a rime about the day of the week. Monday for wealth, Tuesday for health, Wednesday the best day of all
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:44
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it rains on St. Swithen's day which is in July that it will rain for forty days and forty nights. People put down a clutch of eggs on Fridays as it was thought lucky. Housebuilding is generally started on Tuesdays.
William Rispin.
Told by Mrs. Rispin, Ballybrittas, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:44
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it rains on St. Swithen's day which is in July that it will rain for forty days and forty nights. People put down a clutch of eggs on Fridays as it was thought lucky. Housebuilding is generally started on Tuesdays.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:42
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Thursday for losses, Friday for crosses and Saturday no day at all.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:42
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Bernard Reilly.
Told by William Fullham, Ballybrittas, Kildalkey.
The Lore of Certain Days.
In my district Tuesday and Saturday are the two days thought unlucky for starting work on. Friday is the day people go out of one house into another. There is an old saying that "Saturdays flitting is a short sitting". The meaning of that is if you change on Saturday it won't be long until you will be changing again.
Wednesday is the day people get married on. The month of May is thought unlucky for getting married in. There is an old saying which related to that. "Marry in May and you will rue the day".
The earliest date potatoes are planted are about the middle of March and the latest date is about the end of May. Wednesday is supposed to be a lucky day for making a grave. There is a rime about the days of the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:38
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Thursday for losses, Friday for crosses and Saturday no day at all.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:37
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The Grisset.
The Grisset was got from Miss A. Byrne, Moyrath, Kildalkey by Kitty McKenna, Kildalkey.
It is an ancient vessel which is made of metal. It is about eight inches long and one and a half inches high with a handle on the side of it. In shape it is like a boat.
Long ago the grisset was used for melting tallow or beef fat to make rush candles. The rush were pared and a bunch of them were drawn through the grease on the grisset. Then it was left aside to cool and when cool it was ready for use.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:32
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A Noggin is a very ancient vessel and it is made of wood. It is about five inches high and the mouth of it is also about five inches wide. It is narrower at the bottom than it is at the top. At the top there is a piece of wood about two inches high with a hole in it. It was into this hole a person put his thumb when he would be holding his noggin. A Noggin was used to each porridge out of long ago. People used to eat porridge with a wooden spoon or "sluasóg" as it was called.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:31
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An old Vase
The vase is of a brown colour and it is not very large.
A girl named Betty Corrigan
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:30
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Old Crafts.
Long ago the people of this district made "Rush-candles". They got rushes and they dipped them in a sort of grease called Tallow. They then put them one by one into the long rush-candle stick and they lit them. It lasted for about an hour until they had finished their meal.
There was a man once living on the Athboy road named Bernard Reynolds who used to make baskets. There was also a man who could spin and weave also from the Athboy road and his name was Thomas Bligh. There were great thatchers in this district long ago. Some of them were
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:27
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An old thermometer.
There is an very old thermometer in our school. It is a long glass tube with greenish fluid in it and a small insect in it also. It was collected by Patty Kealey who got it from Mr. Jim Miggin, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:25
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114
An Old Story.
There is an old story my Grandmother told me while she was sitting by the fire with her knitting in her hands. As follows:
Many places are called after the cow and here is an old story about three cows. Long ago a lovely mermaid arose out of the western sea and she came ashore. All the people treated her as a queen. She told the people that a great spirit had sent her to announce the coming of three cows. They were Bó-fionn, Bó-Russ and Bó-Dubh and they should fill the land with the finest cattle and nobody ever would be in want again. When she had been for some time among the people she asked to be taken back to the sea.
On May Eve a great throng came with her to the strand. She told them to come to the same place on that day year to await the arrival of the three.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:25
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1.
I am lonely to night oh! my sad heart is aching,
To think I must part from my youths happy home.
And long are the green vales at morning are waking.
Far far from the loved ones in Trim I must roam.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:25
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1.
I often climbed the Hill of Ward,
Some thirty years ago.
And sat upon its grassy sward,
And viewed the vales below.
Tom Potterton, Kildalkey.
2.
One fine Sunday evening in the month of May,
To Rathcormac I did stray.
I met Tom Garry on my way,
There is a dance in Hesnans, Tom did say
The've Browne and McDonnell
for the night to play.
Whack fol the diddle o' the dye do day.
Told by Patrick Newman Wood, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:24
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My Home District
The name of my home district is Ballybrittas. There are about fifteen houses.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:20
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The bride keeps the silver and spends the gold. But if it is the ring instead of gold she keeps it.
Match-Making
The man that would be going to marry the girl would buy a bottle of whiskey and bring it to the girls house. The match-maker would go with him. They would give it to the people of the house to drink. It is done in some places yet.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-07-06 22:20
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Local Marriage Custom's
Eithne Conway got this from her mother Mrs. Conway.
Many people get married at Shrove, as they cannot marry during lent.
People don't get get married in May
Wednesday is a lucky day to get married: an old rhyme says:
Monday for health
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for crosses
and Saturday no luck at all.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 23:34
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John Bird.
Told by Mrs Bird, Carnisle, Kildalkey.
The only thunder storm I can get any account of is the one that was in the year nineteen hundred and thirteen.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 23:33
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nineteen hundred and three. It began on the twenty seventh of February at ten p.m. and it continued until six a.m on the following morning. Many people saw lights in the sky at night before this great storm and other lights were seen in marshy places which old people called "Jack in the Lantern" or the travelling candle. People wondered what the strange lights meant until the great wind came. It was a very violent storm as it knocked houses, uprooted trees and scattered hay and straw about the country. It also took the roof of sheds and houses and some of this roofing was found miles away. The storm was on the fair day of Kildalkey and people could not go to the fair with the trees across the road.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 23:28
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The only storm I can get any account of is the one that was in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 23:28
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Winds
There was a very severe wind wind storm in eighteen hundred and thirty five. People knew it was coming the night before. The sign was the sky around the horizon was red. It was very bad around my district. Three houses were blown down. Three stone walls were blown down. Trees were blown down and some fell on sheep and cattle. Hay was blown down and blown around the country. A man when trying to rescue a cow which fell into a dike a tree fell upon him and killed him.
Michael Gaffney.
Told by Mrs Gaffney, Ballyboy, Kildalkey
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 23:24
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53
A woman was sitting by the fire with her dog but lightning struck the dog and killed him but it did not kill the woman. It killed many people also. The people feared the lightning in the night more that the day.
James Corrigan
Told by Peter Corrigan Wood, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 23:22
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James Corrigan
There was a storm of thunder and lightning in the year nineteen hundred and thirty three. It lasted one day and one night. The lightning did a great deal of damage as it killed cattle, sheep and horses and it also burned a great deal of hay.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 23:21
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Severe Weather
There was a very severe wind in the year eighteen hundred and thirty nine. There was a great deal of damage caused. Houses were knocked and the people in them were killed and also people died from the cold.
Many trees were knocked by the wind and some of them fell on cattle and killed them. A woman was milking a cow under a big tree. When she had the cow milked she went home but when she was gone a few perches the tree fell from the roots and killed the cow.
There was another big wind in the year nineteen hundred and tree which is well remembered by the people of to-day.
Told by Patrick Newman Wood, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 23:13
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114
An Old Story.
There is an old story my Grandmother told me while she was sitting by the fire with her knitting in her hands. As follows:
Many places are called after the cow and here is an old story about three cows. Long ago a lovely mermaid arose out of the western sea and she came ashore. All the people treated her as a queen. She told the people that a great spirit had sent her to announce the coming of three cows. They were Bó-fionn, Bó-Russ and Bó-Dubh and they should fill the land with the finest cattle and nobody ever would be in want again. When she had been for some time among the people she asked to be taken back to the sea.
On May Eve a great throng came with her to the strand. She told them to come to the same place on that day year to await the arrival of the three
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 23:11
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Old Schools
Mr. Shiels was a teacher around this district over one hundred years ago. He went from house to house teaching the children and he did not teach all his subjects in Irish.
He lived in a room in a house near the graveyard which now belongs to a man called Corrigan.
In Kildalkey cemetery there is a little house and long ago it was called a watch house because when a person was buried doctors came to try and steal the body and it was in this watch house an armed man stayed to prevent anyone from stealing the body.
So one night Mr. Shiels was watching and he had his gun loaded and he shot his arm off accidentally but this did not stop him from teaching. He kept on teaching very strictly and he also taught reading and writing. He taught in the district before
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 22:02
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The priest put a penance on him to go round every scribe in the ploughed field and then the priest galloped home as quick as possible and when
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 22:01
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Folklore
There are a great many old stories told in this part of the district. A story is told about a man who lived in Moyrath farm. He was a herd and had one son. He was known by the name of Mocks Evenue and he had no religion. He used to roar and shout through the fields and he prevented the people from going to mass.
One Sunday morning in particular he lay across the path as if he were dead and told his son to pretend to the people that passed that he was really dead. When all were gone to mass the son told his father to get up but he found to his surprise that he was really dead.
When it came to his removal it took twelve herds to lift him and he is buried on Moyrath avenue. His ghost haunted the people afterwards because at that time there lived in Moyrath a priest called Father Rickard. He was coming home on horse-back after visiting the sick and in the middle of a ploughed field the ghost appeared to him in the form of a turkey-cock and would not let him pass
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 21:54
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114
An Old Story
There is an old story my Grandmother told me while she was sitting by the fire with her knitting in her hands. As follows:
Many places are called after the cow and here is an old story about three cows. Long ago a lovely mermaid arose out of the western sea and she came ashore. All the people treated her as a queen. She told the people that a great spirit had sent her to announce the coming of three cows. They were Bó-fionn, Bó-Russ and Bó-Dubh and they should fill the land with the finest cattle and nobody ever would be in want again. When she had been for some time among the people she asked to be taken back to the sea.
On May Eve a great throng came with her to the strand. She told them to come to the same place on that day year to await the arrival of the three
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 21:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
My Home District
The name of my home district is Ballybrittas. There are about fifteen houses
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 21:50
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
My Home District
The name of the townland I live in is Balatalion. It is in the parish of Kildalkey. There are four families in the townland, and about eighteen people. The names of the families are Miggins, Pottertons, Martins and ourselves Penders. All the houses except Miggins are slated. The most common name in the townland is Miggins. There are no people in the townland over seventy that can tell stories or talk Irish. There is one old house in the townland in ruins. It was a mud cabin long ago. There are no people from the townland in America. The land in the townland is of the best quality. There is one small wood in the townland but is very small. There are no rivers or lakes in the townland.
Told by John Pender
Balatalion
Kildalkey. 10/02/1938
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 21:32
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The Patron Saint
Saint Dympna is the patron of Kildalkey. There is a well in Kildalkey and it is called after Saint Dympna. This is also an Abbey in the church-yard that is called after her. She left her father and came to Kildalkey. Her father wanted her to marry a Protestant Prince but she would not. He said that he would kill her, so herself and another Saint fled to Europe. She went into a waiting room. Her father followed her and he went into the same waiting room and lodged in it that night.
When he was leaving he payed the man and the man said that there was a girl here who gave the same kind of money. He inquired where was she and he said that she was on such a mountain. He followed her and he asked her was she going to marry the prince and she said that she would not, so he killed her. The are a great number of people around Kildalkey called after Saint Dympna - Dympna Harte, Ballybrittas, Kildalkey, Dympna Corrigan, Moyrath, Kildalkey.
Collected by Bernard Reilly, Ballybrittas. 4/2/'38
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 21:12
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1.
I am lonely to night oh! my sad heart is aching,
To think I must part from my youths happy home.
And long are the green vales at morning are waking.
Far far from the loved ones in Trim I must roam.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 21:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1.
I often climbed the Hill of Ward,
Some thirty years ago.
And sat upon its grassy sward,
And viewed the vales below.
Tom Potterton, Kildalkey.
2.
One fine Sunday evening in the month of May,
To Rathcormac I did stray.
I met Tom Garry on my way,
There is a dance in Hesnans, Tom did say
The've Browne and McDonnell
for the night to play.
Whack fol the diddle o' the dye do day.
Told by Patrick Newman Wood, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 21:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The bride keeps the silver and spends the gold. But if it is the ring instead of gold she keeps it.
Match-Making
The man that would be going to marry the girl would buy a bottle of whiskey and bring it to the girls house. The match-maker would go with him. They would give it to the people of the house to drink. It is done in some places yet.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-24 21:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Marriage Custom's
Eithne Conway got this from her mother Mrs. Conway.
Many people get married at Shrove, as they cannot marry during lent.
People don't get get married in May
Wednesday is a lucky day to get married: an old rhyme says:
Monday for health
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for crosses
and Saturday no luck at all.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1.
I often climbed the Hill of Ward,
Some thirty years ago.
And sat upon its grassy sward,
And viewed the vales below.
Tom Potterton, Kildalkey.
2.
One fine Sunday evening in the month of May,
To Rathcormac I did stray.
I met Tom Garry on my way,
There is a dance in Hesnans, Tom did say
The've Browne and McDonnell
for the night to play.
Whack fol the diddle o' the dye do day.
Told by Patrick Newman Wood, Kildalkey.
1.
I am lonely to night oh! my sad heart is aching,
To think I must part from my youths happy home.
And long are the green vales at morning are waking.
Far far from the loved ones in Trim I must roam.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
And Home by Curraghmore.
2.
I went down to John Doran,
To thresh a stack of rye,
A bolt flew out of the engine,
And blinded Johnies eye.
The day I met with accident
The day I went to Pass
cursed, I sacked the man
from the town of Mullingar.
3.
As I was going up Owen Keogans hill,
The steam was going down,
The Engine would not move,
But the wheels was going round,
Up came the Winter Miggin,
In a suit of grey,
He swore he'd drive the engine
Until the month of May.
4.
So he drove it up and down,
Ballivor town.
Smoking a cigar,
And you would think her was the genius
from the town of Mullingar.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
My name is James Regan,
I am doing the best I can,
I bought a noble engine,
And it pleases every man.
I threshed the country over,
From Ballivor to Donore.
And back by sweet Kildalkey,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
and he three quarted jared.
I have four men with me he said.
The best of loyal sons, and we wont go to Clonmore to night till we capture Dolans guns.
I have four men with me,
When he came to the crossroads,
He shook the road, I hear,
And Farnan swore by the belt he wore,
He nearly died with fear.
When he came to the Captain Yorkes,
He shook the handle-bar,
Old Katie came out and began to shout,
May the devil come and sweep your motor car.
John Kelly stood in the yard that night,
For Kildalkey he was bound.
He was thunder stricken with Lightening,
When he heard the horn sound.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is one doctor Dolan,
A story, I will tell,
If you'd only listen,
To me just as I tell.
He has a little farm
His house is lake a Dun,
For to protect his bottles
Sure he keeps his uncle's funeral,
Himself and Old Cosmore.
They drank hand and fist,
In Mack's and Mary's,
Until they'd get no more,
They both went out upon the street,
Said Dolan I'll go home
He went up straight to Clonans,
Where he played up Garry Owen.
Then Old Cosmore turned in to Mat Mack's yard
Where he kept his motor car
There he met Cove Farrelly.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A most majestic pile.
Of ancient fame, o'er Dutch or Dane
Set foot upon out Isle
Told by James Simons.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:13
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
After the match would be made by the match maker the woman's people would go to visit the mans house to see it and see how much grass he had and how many cattle it would feed and how many cows he had and so on.
The Bride would pay some of her fortune at the wedding, and the rest maybe the next year.
When they would be married the brides chest (that was what the trunk was called) would come in a few days, full of bed linen which she made herself the year before the marriage. The woman would be said to be a bad housekeeper if she hadn't that chest full.
There would be no special presents
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:09
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
daughter married.
The bride and groom should not visit the brides parents home for a month after marriage. Then they have the months visit and generally invite their friends and have a party.
Rita Dargan got this account from her mother Mrs. Dargan, a native of Clare.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Marriage Custom's
Eithne Conway got this from her mother Mrs. Conway.
Many people get married at Shrove, as they cannot marry during lent.
People don't get get married in May
Wednesday is a lucky day to get married: an old rhyme says:
Monday for health
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for crosses
and Saturday no luck at all.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The bride keeps the silver and spends the gold. But if it is the ring instead of gold she keeps it.
Match-Making
The man that would be going to marry the girl would buy a bottle of whiskey and bring it to the girls house. The match-maker would go with him. They would give it to the people of the house to drink. It is done in some places yet.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-23 22:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Place Names
From Essie Keogh
Part of our land is in the townland of Coolronan and the rest of it is in the Townland of Carranstown. The names of some of our fields in Coolronan are:
1. The Barrack Field
2. The Raspberry Field
3. The Long Field
4. The Bog Field
The Barrack Field: It is called the Barrack Field because it was opposite the barrack long ago.
The Raspberry Field: IT is called the Raspberry Field because there are raspberries growing in it.
The Long Field: It is called the Long Field because it is very long and narrow.
The Bog Field: It is called the "Bog Field" because it is bog ground that is in it.
The clay in it is brown coloured.
The field in the townland of Carronstown are:
1. The Castle and
2. The Bottoms
The Castle: It is called the Castle because it is said that there was a Castle there long ago. There is a Little Hill in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
One evening for pleasure I once took a stroll
Along by the river that Maren's Mam
Its cohort were gleaming serenly and fine
As it ran in its course to the famed river Boyne.
Moyrath broad lands where yonder stand
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
2.
Each year I'd seen his stanzas among.
Those gifted bards, who did raise the standard of each verse and song.
Sweet soul inspiring lays.
For Meath was rich in classic lore.
Some names with love I'll breathe.
And now their loss We'll long deplore
With Geraghty bard of Meath.
3.
In classic Kells McDermotts strains
Were charming terse and true.
And Galligan nigh Cavans plains.
Shone like Martins of Lough Crew.
The essays from great Larkin's pen to cities.
They were a treat.
Yes, what a lot of gifted men lived here in Royal Meath.
Told by Patrick Newman,
Wood,
Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago when bicycles first came out, a country man went to the city
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Funny Story
There was a man who used to go rambling to this house at night. Teh peopel used to call him Thomas the fool.
This night a man hid in the hedge to frighten Tom and he had a white shawl over him. Tom was going to ramble when he saw the thing in the hedge. A white lady was seen there every night at twelve o'clock. When Tom saw the lad he said good man Jack you have company tonight and Jack looked around and saw the white lady beside him. He fainted and Tom had to carry him home on his back. Jack never recovered from it for a month after.
The is collected by John Pender 10-12-37 Balatalion, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About one hundred years ago a certain family near Trimblestown had a dream about a pot of gold and a life had to be lost in finding it.
They also had a dream that when tehy would see it, not to take their eyes off it until they would have it in their possession.
After a time they made up their minds to dig for it and they dug until they sighted it. At the same time a child
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
his name. This soldier was leaving the house and he was going to live in another house, and he did not want his sword as he was too old to fight any more so he hid it. No attempts have ever been made to find it as there is a cement door step over it.
Collected by John Bird, Carnisle, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
It is supposed that a sword was hidden, long ago at the back door of Carnisle house. It was hidden there by some soldier who lived there long ago. Nobody seems to know
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A Hidden Treasure
There was an old woman and she had a great deal of money. She lived aobut two miles from Kildlakey. She had a niece and a nephew. When she was dying she put all her money into an old stuffed animal.
She gave the animal to the nephew. The nephew was expecting to get a sum of money. After she died the nephew got poor. The animal used to be always looking at him.
This day the nephew got angry and he gave the animal a kick abd broke it. A bag of gold rolled out of it. Then he saw what his aunt gave him.
Told by my mother, Patricia Conneely, Ballybrittas, Kildalkey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Place
Name: Blane
Where: Murray's Land, Coolronan
Des: A field of course on one side. A river on the other side.
Name: Derralee
Where: Opposite Keoghs, Coolronan
Des: A dark wood with runs through it.
Name: Pollwee
Where: A wood behind Keogh's, Coolronan.
Des: Wood with deep cut turf. There is
Name: Gelltha Wood
WHere: Coolronan
Des: A little bog road
Name: Killoo
Where: Keogh's bog in Coolronan
Des: A big part of the where turf is cut.
Name: Moat
Where: A high mound behind Ludlow's in Rathkeenan.
Des: Also called a Rarchín - mounds. I don't see sy
Name: Scrúggán Hill
Where: In Grangemore Bog
Des: A steep hill in of trees and bushes. There are some there are stones
Name: Raheen
Where: In Rickard's field, Coolronan
Des: A small round large stones
Name: Dúnán
Where: In Rathkeenan
Des: A field about 8 in the middle
Name: Cul-yeen
Where: in Baskinagh, Kellet Estate
Des: A marshy field
Name: Aha moor or Ahar moore
Where: Rathkeenan, belongs to T.E. Potterton.
Des: A field about 20 a small stream.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Marriage Custom's
Eithne Conway got this from her mother Mrs. Conway.
Many people get married at Shrove, as they cannot marry during lent.
People don't get get married in May
Wednesday is a lucky day to get married: an old rhyme says:
Monday for health
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for crosses
and Saturday no luck at all.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:37
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The bride keeps the silver and spends the gold. But if it is the ring instead of gold she keeps it.
Match-Making
The man that would be going to marry the girl would buy a bottle of whiskey and bring it to the girls house. The match-maker would go with him. They would give it to the people of the house to drink. It is done in some places yet.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Place
Name: Blane
Where: Murray's Land, Coolronan
Des: A field of course on one side. A river on the other side.
Name: Derralee
Where: Opposite Keoghs, Coolronan
Des: A dark wood with runs through it.
Name: Pollwee
Where: A wood behind Keogh's, Coolronan.
Des: Wood with deep cut turf. There is
Name: Gelltha Wood
WHere: Coolronan
Des: A little bog road
Name: Killoo
Where: Keogh's bog in Coolronan
Des: A big part of the where turf is cut.
Name: Moat
Where: A high mound behind Ludlow's in Rathkeenan.
Des: Also called a Rarchín - mounds. I don't see sy
Name: Scrúggán Hill
Where: In Grangemore Bog
Des: A steep hill in of trees and bushes. There are some there are stones
Name: Raheen
Where: In Rickard's field, Coolronan
Des: A small round large stones
Name: Dúnán
Where: In Rathkeenan
Des: A field about 8 in the middle
Name: Cul-yeen
Where: in Baskinagh, Kellet Estate
Des: A marshy field
Name: Aha moor or Ahar moore
Where: Rathkeenan, belongs to T.E. Potterton.
Des: A field about 20 a small stream.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Marriage Customs
From Mrs. Keogh Coolronan
Marry in May you will rue the day.
Marry in blue you are sure to be true.
Something old
Something new
Something borrowed
Something blue.
Days for getting married
The poem says
Monday for health
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for Crosses
Saturday no day at all.
The Bridescake
I put this bridescake under my head.
To dream of the living and not of the dead.
To dream of those to whom I will wed.
To see them three nights at the head of my bed.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago when Catholics weren't allowed to go to school the learned people would teach the children in their own houses.
Mary Fox got this account from her father Eugene Fox, Rathcormick.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Rosie Smyth got this from her father Michael Smyth, Grangemore.
Her father told her that he doesn't remember the penal times but he hear his father saying that Catholics used to hear Mass behind the ditch. The altar would be on the grass. All the people would stand round and hear mass.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago people used to have potatoes three times a day. It was very seldom they had sweet like now it was nearly always oaten meal and Rye bread and the people were as strong as now.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
mix the stuff that would be left in the cloth with the boiled potatoes to make it into a dough. You would then cut it into diamond squares and put it on the griddle. When it would be done you would eat it hot with plenty of butter. It would be very nice and sweet but it would be very sticky. My mother is able to make it and often saw it here in Coolronon up to 20 or 30 yrs ago.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago people used to have porridge instead of tea.
For dinner they used to have boiled potatoes and dip them in oaten meal gruel.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago people used to make potato cakes and they would not put flour into them like us. They would make them with oaten meal mixed through them and they would call them oaten meal potato cakes.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
mix the stuff that would be left in the cloth with the boiled potatoes to make it into a dough. You would then cut it into diamond squares and put it on the griddle. When it would be done you would eat it hot with plenty of butter. It would be very nice and sweet but it would be very sticky. My mother is able to make it and often saw it here in Coolronon up to 20 or 30 yrs ago.
Long ago people used to have potatoes three times a day. It was very seldom they had sweet like now it was nearly always oaten meal and Rye bread and the people were as strong as now.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:29
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago people used to have porridge instead of tea.
For dinner they used to have boiled potatoes and dip them in oaten meal gruel.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-16 23:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago people used to have porridge instead of tea.
For dinner they used to have boiled potatoes and dip them in oaten meal gruel.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-15 20:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
8. Bird Lore
The wild birds which are found most commonly in this district are the thrush, the blackbird, the rook, robin, wren, sparrow, jackdaw, yellow-hammer, sparrow-hawk, and the gold-finch. Those birds do not migrate.
Some birds build their nests on tree-tops as the rook others build their nests in bushes as the blackbird, and thrush. Others build their nests in house-eaves and holes in walls and fences.
The blackbird a nest with with moss, and hay with mud inside. The rook builds a nest with small sticks and hay.
There are other birds also called migratory birds. Some of those birds come to us from northern Europe, namely the wild goose, the red-wing, the field-fare and the snipe, and different kinds of wild duck. Other come to us from southern Europe, namely the chiff-chaff and other. Other come to us from tropical Africa namely the cuckoo, and the nightingale.
The birds which come to us from Southern Africa are the swallow, swift, martin and the corncrake. Those birds come to us at the beginning of Summer, and the birds which come to us from the north, come to us in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-15 19:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Leipreachán
The Leipreachán in this locality is called a fairy a ghost or a banshee. He is about a foot high and he wears a red cap and a green jacket. The Leipreachán lives usually under a hill. His usual occupation is shoemaking and he found mending shoes on the top of a mushroom.
The Leipreacháns are looked upon as friendly beings if you do not interfere with them. The leipreacháns take away young children at night if you interfered with them. The leipreachán has in his possession, a hammer, a last, an awl and a purse of gold.
If you see a leipreachán keep your eye on him for if you take your eye off him he is gone and if you succeed in catching him, order him to give you the purse and you will take the money out of it shilling by shilling.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-13 21:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Buying and Selling
Shops were common in olden times, because there were no motor deliveries and they had to go to the nearest shop to buy and sell things. Money was given for goods in olden times. Goods were bartered in the district in olden times, such as a man gives a load of turf for a bag of potatoes. Labour was also given in exchange for goods, such as a man would work for a couple of days and he would get a bag of flour instead. In olden times there were words used in buying and selling such as boot, tick, change and luck. Markets were held in former times in one part of the town called the Market Square. In this district in former times pedlars and dealers used to go around buying rags, feathers and bottles. They still go around buying rabbits, skins, rags and feathers. The names the various coins were called in olden times were as follows: Pound was called a quid, a shilling was called a bob and a sixpence a penny.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-13 21:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bread.
There are no accounts from the grown up people with regard to the kind of bread made in the district in olden times. Bread was made from wheat and oats grown locally. There were different kinds of bread such as Potato Cake made from potatoes and baked in a pan, Flour Bread made from Flour and baked in an oven, Wheaten Bread made from Wheat and baked in an oven, and Oaten Bread made from Oat Meal and baked on a griddle. Bread was baked nearly every day because if it was baked every week it would be hard and stale. A cross was made on the top of the cake when made. An oven was given as a name to the vessel in which the bread was baked. Griddle bread was often made.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-13 21:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Grave, in the month of July.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-12 23:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Ruins
An ancient Augustinian Monastery - now roofless on banks of Boyne, near Ballyboggan bridge, and midway between Clonard and Edenderry. This was founded in the 12th Century by Jordan Cormin.
In the year 1538, a crucifix which was held in great veneration was publicly buried here, on the roadside near Ballyboggan bridge, and at the foot of Carrick hill. It is said that soon after, a well sprang up here. The well is still there, surrounded by a concrete wall and roof, and is called the well of the Holy Cross. There is no pattern at present, in connection with this well.
Donore Castle - Norman - roofless - on North bank of Boyne - near public road, between Hill of Down and Trim and 4 miles from Hill of Down. Those rains are in good preservation and have recently been repaired by the Board of Works.
Ardnamullen Castle - Norman - Built by De Lacy - on the road side at Ardnamullen Hill (Brian Casserly's Land) - 2 miles west of Clonard. Walls now only about 12 feet in height.
Church of St. Liadhan - at Killyon between Hill of Down and Trim, and 2 miles from Hill of Down. St. Liadhan was the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-12 10:55
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Local Monuments
There are no ancient crosses or standing stones in this parish. There are no ornamented stones in the churchyard either. About a half of a mile from the National School near the main road, there is a mound of clay raised up and it is said thas there was a chief buried under it in olden times. There is a cross about three miles from Clonard and about one hundred yards from Leinster Bridge in a field on the banks of the Boyne. This cross was raised up over sixteen soldiers who were killed returning from the fight in Wexford in the year 1798. All their names are written on the cross both in English and in Irish. There is a commemoration every year at the Croppies
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-12 10:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Fish and vegetables were also used at dinner by the people in olden times. Eggeating was a custon in Ireland on Easter Sunday. Mugs were used before cups became common.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-12 10:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Food in Olden Times
In days gone by, people ate three meals each day, namely, breakfast, dinner and supper. The meals were eaten in the morning, in the middle of the day, and in the evening.
The people used to eat porridge for their breakfast, potatoes and cabbage or other vegetables for their dinner, and porridge for their suppper.
Bread was made with flour, breadsoda, salt and buttermilk and then put into an oven, then they put a lid on the oven and they put fire on the lid and then it is left beside the fire to bake. The people used to eat meat twice a day morning and at dinner time. Bacon was the meat that was generally eaten in olden times
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-12 10:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The landlord exercised special powers over his tennants and they were punished for trivial acts.
Tithes were not collected in this district.
Teresa McCabe
Ballinbarney
Longwood.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-12 10:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Land Lord
The landlord of this locality was Magan. The family had been settled in the district for about one hundred and forty years. The Magans had a bad name.
Many evictions were carried out.
Some of the people who were evicted went to America and others lived in the bogs. It is said that one of the Magans was an informer during the rebellion of 1798 and that on account of this they got a lot of land and money. The land was divided into farms but it does not seem to have been divided among members of families at marriage.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-12 10:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
on the animals back.
When an animal is sold the rope or halter is not given to the buyer. The fairs in this locality are held once each month. Special fairs are not held for the sale of sheep, pigs or horses.
Teresa McCabe
Ballinabarney
Longwood.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-12 10:35
ceadaithe
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The Local Fairs
The fairs in the locality are held mostly on the streets of the towns. In some places fairs are held in special fields called the fair-green. Buyers sometimes go to farmers houses and buy cattle and these men are called jobbers. There was formerly a great fair held at Ballyboggan but it was discontinued about three years ago because very few people came to it. There are no local traditions of fairs held on hills, cemeteries, castles or forts.
Toll is not paid on cattle sold. When an animal is sold luck-money is given, it is called the luck penny. The buyer usually takes the luck-money which the seller gives him. When a bargain is made the parties show their agreement by the buyer striking the hand of the seller with this hand.
When an animal is sold it is marked by clipping the hair of the animal or by putting a mark of paint
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-12 10:31
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Teresa Casserly
Ardnamullen
Clonard
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-12 10:30
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The Clonard Monastic School
Saint Finian established a monastery between the protestant church and the main road in the year 520. The ruins of this monastery is not to be seen now, except the heights and hollows in the field. There is nothing left of this old monastery now except a bapismal font and a square trough. This baptismal font is in the Protestant church. It is made of grey limestones. It is three feet high and it stands on a square pedestal. The top of it is covered with decorations and figures cut out of stone. The principal figure is that of a bishop with a crozier, is supposed to be Saint Finian.
A square trough was also found. This is not decorated. It is two feet, two inches long by one foot seven inches, and it is fifteen inches deep.
It remained buried in the grave yard near the present churchs untill a couple of years ago.
There is a story told about it that if geese or fowl drank the water out of it, they would immediately die. It is said that this trough was full of water all the times.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-12 10:20
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Teresa Casserly
Ardnamullen
Clonard.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-12 10:20
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Stories of the Holy Family
There are not many stories tld about the Holy Family in this locality. One story is told about a long black beetle which walks along the ground and when anyone comes near him he raises he back part of his body. It is said that when the Holy Family was escaping from Herods soldiers, this beetle told hem that hey had gone along the road where he was.
On account of this when the children see him they kill him.
Teresa McCabe
Ballinabarney
Longwood
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-09 22:26
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Clothes made locally.
The tailors in this district are Joe Bracken - Kinnegad, John Rafferty - Carrick and John Hannon - Castlerickard.
These tailors do not travel from house to house but they make clothes in their own houses. Joe Bracken stocks cloth but the others do not. Cloth is not spun or woven in this district. There are no sayings or traditions connected with tailors or tailoring in this district. The implements which the tailors use are a measuring tape, scissors, needle, thread, thimble, smoothing iron and a smoothing board. Shirts are not made in the homes. There is no accounts of shirts being made from cloth made from flax as there was no flax grown in this district.
Socks and stockings are knitted in this district. There are no spinning-wheels in this locala locality. At the death of a relative black clothes are worn for a year. There are no special sorts of clothes worn at weddings.
Teresa McCabe
Ballinabarney
Longwood.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-09 22:21
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The care of the feet
I do not know what age people began to wear boots in former times, but I know that the poor people did not wear them until they are grown up. The children at the present time go barefoot in Summer. There are no beliefs connected with the water used for washing the feet. Boots are not made in this locality but they are repaired. There is only one cobbler in this district. There are not as any shoemakers now as there were in former times because there are factories to make them. Clogs were worn in former times. Leather was never made in this locality. Sheepskin was used as a foot covering in former times.
There are no sayings or proverbs in this locality connected with the covering of the feet.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-09 22:16
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Churning
We have a churn at home. It is standing on four legs and it is an end over end churn. It is about a foot and half wide at the top and bottom. The sides are round. It is about eight years old. The various parts of the churn are called the frame and the barrel. Butter is made twice in the week in Summer and once in Winter. My mother does the churning at home. Strangers do not come in to help at the churning. The churning lasts about half an hour. The churning is done by the hand. People know when the butter is done when they see little pieces of butter on the milk. They pour water in to warm the milk. When the butter is done it is taken out into a dish and salt is put on it and then it is fit for use. There are no stories connected with churning. Buttermilk is used for baking and for drinking.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-09 22:11
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Care of Our Farm Animals
The principal farm animals in this locality are horses, cows, donkeys, sheep and pigs. The domestic animals are the cat and the dog. The fowl are turkeys, geese, hens and ducks. The cows in this locality have names, such as Kitty, Nancy and so on. The people say How, How to the cows when they are driving them. They say Suck, Suck to the calves when they are calling them. The cowhouse is the house where the cows are kept. The cows are tied by the neck with an iron chain chained on to a stake driven into the ground. There is palm hung in the stable to bring luck to the stock. There are no stories connected with milking. They say Heup to the horses for to go on. They call the hens by saying Tuk, tuk. They call the ducks by saying Hish hish. They call the turkeys by saying Yib, yib. They put a mark with a purple pencil on hatching eggs when they are setting them.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-09 21:59
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ashes on their forehead to remind them that when they die they will return into ashes again.
We have no custom on Holy Thursday except the religious customs. Good Friday is a day of fasting and prayer in memory of the first Good Friday when Jesus Christ was crucified.
In some parts of the country the people believe that on Easter Sunday the sun dances.
The 15th of August is the feast of the Assumption and it is a Holy day of obligation.
Hallowe'en is on the thirty first day of October and the people eat a lot of nuts and apples on that night. There are a lot of other feast days during the year but there are no customs in relation to these feast days.
Teresa McCabe
Ballinabarney
Longwood.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-09 21:54
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Festival Customs
We have many customs in Ireland on the feast days during.
On the twenty sixth day of January which is called St. Stephens Day, Boys dress themselves in old clothes and cover their faces and go from house to house and they bring a wren with them and they sing, dance and play music and they expect to get money.
On St. Brigid's Day which is on the first day of February in some districts a number of people gather together they dress one person as a woman and call her Biddy and go from house to house making fun for the people but they do not do any harm.
On St. Patrick's Day we have great rejoicings and games.
Shrove is the period from Christmas to Lent and it is the custom for people who intend to get married to get married during Shrove.
Shrove Tuesday is the day before Ash Wednesday and on this day we have a great feast of pancakes.
Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent and it is a day of fasting and prayer the people go to Mass and get
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-09 21:46
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8. Bird Lore
The wild birds which are found most commonly in this district are the thrush, the blackbird, the rook, robin, wren, sparrow, jackdaw, yellow-hammer, sparrow-hawk, and the gold-finch. Those birds do not migrate.
Some birds build their nests on tree-tops as the rook others build their nests in bushes as the blackbird, and thrush. Others build their nests in house-eaves and holes in walls and fences.
The blackbird a nest with with moss, and hay with mud inside. The rook builds a nest with small sticks and hay.
There are other birds also called migratory birds. Some of those birds come to us from northern Europe, namely the wild goose, the red-wing, the field-fare and the snipe, and different kinds of wild duck. Other come to us from southern Europe, namely the chiff-chaff and other. Other come to us from tropical Africa namely the cuckoo, and the nightingale.
The birds which come to us from Southern Africa are the swallow, swift, martin and the corncrake. Those birds come to us at the beginning of Summer, and the birds which come to us from the north, come to us in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:25
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Local Marriage Customs
From Mrs. Keogh Coolronan
Marry in May you will rue the day.
Marry in blue you are sure to be true.
Something old
Something new
Something borrowed
Something blue.
Days for getting married
The poem says
Monday for health
Tuesday for wealth
Wednesday the best day of all
Thursday for losses
Friday for Crosses
Saturday no day at all.
The Bridescake
I put this bridescake under my head.
To dream of the living and not of the dead.
To dream of those to whom I will wed.
To see them three nights at the head of my bed.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:22
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Long ago the people could not go to Mass because the English were too hard on them. If the priest was caught he would be killed. They used to say Mass in a round hole in the middle. When Mass would be over they would make a hole in a wall or in the ground and hide the holy things.
Some of the people used to make fans and go to some quiet place when the priest would be saying Mass. All the people would stand around and listen to the Priest.
All the people out that time were Protestants. The Protestants were fighting against the Catholics. The Catholics would not be let have anything even a horse.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:16
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and he was jealous of the other mans lovely horses. One day when the Catholic was in Mullingar and he had his horses in front of a hotel and he was inside when in walked his protestant neighbours came in and showed two five pound notes and said "Price of the horses. They are mine". "Not just yet" said the Catholic. He then went out. After a short while, he came in and said "Take them now". The Landlord went out. The horses were lying dead on the roadside. Ever after until the day he died the Catholic could be seen with two snow white bulls drawing his carriage to Mullingar.
There is a field in Pottertons where Sir John Moore was buried. It is in a corner of it. There is a headstone over his grave and a lot of stones around it.
He was coming from the wood where he had being fighting and he was shot dead. He was carried over in a sheet and buried there. There is a small ash tree growing beside it and there is another headstone but nobody know who was buried
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:15
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Rosie Smyth got this from her father Michael Smyth, Grangemore.
Her father told her that he doesn't remember the penal times but he hear his father saying that Catholics used to hear Mass behind the ditch. The altar would be on the grass. All the people would stand round and hear mass.
Long ago when Catholics weren't allowed to go to school the learned people would teach the children in their own houses.
Mary Fox got this account from her father Eugene Fox, Rathcormick.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:13
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under it.
There is a place in Joyces wood. It is a big round hole and very deep.
People say Mass used to be said there. There was a lot of stones with drawing on them. Then a lot of men used to be cutting trees and they saw then and brought them off.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:11
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and he was jealous of the other mans lovely horses. One day when the Catholic was in Mullingar and he had his horses in front of a hotel and he was inside when in walked his protestant neighbours came in and showed two five pund notes and said "Price of the horses. They are mine". "Not just yet" said the Catholic. He then went out. After a short while, he came in and said "Take them now". The Landlord went out. The horses were lying dead on the roadside. Ever after until the day he died the Catholic could be seen with two snow white bulls drawing his carriage to Mullingar.
There is a field in Pottertons where Sir John Moore was buried. It is in a corner of it. There is a headstone over his grave and a lot of stones around it.
He was coming from the wood where he had being fighting and he was shot dead. He was carried over in a sheet and buried there. There is a small ash tree growing beside it and there is another headstone but nobody know who was buried
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:07
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Folklore about the Penal Times
Mary Kiernan got this from an old lady names Mary Anne MIggin. She is 77 years of age.
She told me that her father was out in the penal times (or the last of the penal times) in Ireland. She heard of a mass path which leads from a little style made of stone on the roadside beside Conroys of Coolronan.
It leads from that style to Smyth's Wood where (she thinks) there used to be a mass said.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:04
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From Peter Kiernan. He is 59 years of age.
My father heard this story from his father who was a boy when it happened.
There was a man living in Mullingar and he was very fond of horses. He used to drive in a lovely carriage to Mullingar. He was a well-to-do Catholic. There was a Protestant Landlord living there also
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:02
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They need to call it the "brawn".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:02
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Long ago people used to have porridge instead of tea.
For dinner they used to have boiled potatoes and dip them in oaten meal gruel.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:02
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mix the stuff that would be left in the cloth with the boiled potatoes to make it into a dough. You would then cut it into diamond squares and put it on the griddle. When it would be done you would eat it hot with plenty of butter. It would be very nice and sweet but it would be very sticky. My mother is able to make it and often saw it here in Coolronon up to 20 or 30 yrs ago.
Long ago people used to have potatoes three times a day. It was very seldom they had sweet like now it was nearly always oaten meal and Rye bread and the people were as strong as now.
Long ago people used to make potato cakes and they would not put flour into them like us. They would make them with oaten meal mixed through them and they would call them oaten meal potato cakes.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:01
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Boxty Bread
You would have to get potatoes and boil half of them and grate the other half raw. You would have to put the raw one's into a cloth and squeeze the water out of them. Then you would
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 21:00
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Tuesday "Siraft". Anyone that was going to get married around that time would get married before "Siraft".
Everyone makes pancakes on that night an it is sometimes called "Pancake night". People sometimes make colcannon on that night too.
This is the way the people used to make pancakes long ago:-
They used to get a big dish and put flour into it and get a little drop of buttermilk and mix them together till it would be very thick paste and then get an egg and cream of tartar and mix them together and throw the mixture into the dish. Then get the pan and grease it and put the mixture into it. When it would be done take it up and cut it in quarters.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 20:44
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Another name for Shrove is Siraft.
From Mrs. Kehoe, Coolronan. She heard it from her mother.
Long ago they used to call Shrove
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-06 20:43
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Shrove Tuesday
From Eithne Conway who got it from her mother.
Some people call Shrove Tuesday Pancake night because we make pancakes.
Most people make them very thick. Long ago people used to play a trick on someone. This is the way they uses to play it.
They used to say to anyone that would come in "Go to such a house for the pancake sieve. When he'd go to that house they'd tell him to go to another house and so on. They would make him go around until he would come to the house he was in first.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:58
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Got from Mick Stones, Rathkeenan, Ballivor. He is 60 years of age.
A priest from Ballivor had some cows and he noticed that they were only giving a small amount of milk. So he went to Conor Sheridan and told him his story. Conor said "Do you see a woman in your farmyard every morning?". The priest said he did see her. Then Conor said for the priest to go over to her the next morning and to break a piece of the wool and to say "That's nice wool you have Ma'am". The priest dud this and all the milk flowed out.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:55
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Conor Sheridan.
Conor Sheridan lived in Westmeath. He would be dead some fifty or sixty years ago. He was famous for his cures all over the country and he is still talked commonly about all over the country. If you were trying to do a thing that was very hard a person would say to you "It would take Conor Sheridan to do that".
He had a brother a priest and it is said that he wanted Conor to give up the curing. Conor said he would and he gave him a hundred pound's. It seems that it was worth that to him.
One time a man from Glack (Ballivor) went to him to cure a cow or something and Conor called him by his name and asked him something about Glack. The man said "How do you know Glack" and Conor said "Did you never see me in Glack". The man said "I did not".
"Well" said Conor, "I saw you from the top of the Mullagh. I spent fourteen years
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:50
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The resin candles were not in general use in her house at all events. Here is how she told me it was done.
You would put down the grisset (a little iron vessel) and put into it as much resin as you'd think you'd need and you'd put in the little water at the beginning of the melting but when it would be melted you'd pour off the water.
Then you'd get a piece of cloth and old sheet for example which must be quite dry and you'd then tear it into strips about an inch wide and of the length you wanted the candle. Then you'd twist it to form a wick and pull it slowly through the melted resin. It would take up a lot in an irregular sort of way. You would then put it on the candle board - a square smooth board used for the purpose - and roll it under your two hands to make the outside smooth. You would continue doing so till all your resin was used.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:46
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Resin Candles by Mrs. Conway.
I heard this from my mother who was born in 1854 at Bolga parish of Tallanstown, Ardee, Co. Louth.
Resin candles (or "rosin" as it is always pronounced in the country) were used long ago by the poor because they were cheap. Resin used to be sold in the towns at fairs and markets there would be people with standings selling it. My mother thinks it was only a penny or twopence a pound. It made a very smoking light - the plates on the dresser would be all soot and to save that a little the candle used to be lighted under the chimney brace so that most of the smoke would go up the chimney. My mother made the candles herself but she thinks it was only for fun or perhaps sometimes they had come short of candles - that
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:43
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Then he says either "let go" or "hold fast" and whoever makes a mistake gets a whack.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:42
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Another game: All hold round the edges and corners of a hankerchief except the one giving out the game. He says
This pocket hancerchief goes by rule of contrary.
When I say "Let go" you hold fast and when I say "hold fast let go".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:41
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Bees in the Hive
There used to be seats in the barn, one here and one there, for the hives. There would be one hive less than the number of people so that one man would be left without a seat. One would stand in the centre and give out:-
Ding Ding
Hush Ding
Cuit flickery (like cúir)
Cuit flackery
Cuit fór.
Cuit fór away.
At the word "away" all would run to the hives. One is left out and the others blackens all his face with soot from the chimney.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:38
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The Cobbler & the Tinker
(Tapping your foot sing)
Merry we are and merry we'll be
Said the Cobbler to the Tinker
Cobbler Tin take care
Said the Cobbler to the tinker
You'll sing Cobb and you'll sing leir
Youll sing tin and youll take care
Of the cobler and the tinker
You'll sing black and you'll sing blue
youll sing starch and you'll sing too
Said the cobbler and the tinker
(Start at Cobbleir again) Cob leir tin take care etc;
youd answer at "cob" or you go down and get a blow.
Etne Conway got this from Tom McKeon, Ballivor. He is about seventy.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:37
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crooked horse etc.
Heres the crooked woman that married the crooked man that rode the crooked horse etc.
that ate the crooked grass
that grew crooked around the
"Crooked Crab Tree
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:36
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Essie got this from her father Patrick Keogh. It is a wake game or rhyme.
The Crooked crab tree.
Heres the crooked crab tree
Heres the crooked grass that grew
around the crooked crab tree
Here's the crooked horse that ate the grass that
grew around the crooked crab tree.
Heres the crooked man that rode the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:36
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It was the custom that everyone would smell snuff and smoke clay pipes at the expense of the house at wakes.
My father told me that he never heard tell of a caoine. So it must be a long time since it was practised in Rathkeenan because my father's people are here for the past three generations.
They used to play games at wakes such as (1)"The Cobbler and the tinker
(2) The house that Jack built.
(3) The priest of the parish lost his considering cap.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:35
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It was a custom up to 14 years ago that people were waked on a big high table. My fathers father was waked on one.
We have the table at home yet.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:35
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When a person dies their hands are joined and it is said that when they are going to be put into the coffin if their hands are easy to loosen that someone in the same house is going to die soon after.
Long ago people used to bring out the corpse and put it on two stools and the priest would come and gather the offerings on a table.
These stools are always kicked over by someone. If this is not done it is believed that someone out of the house was going to die soon. This is believed still.
From Peter Kiernan, Rathkeenan, Ballivor.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:34
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People were waked long ago on boards but now it is not done so much.
About a year ago here in Coolronan a young man was waked on a settle bed. His name was John Connor. There were sheets tied out of the rafters of the house and hung down. It was like a house around him. There were sheet's around him on every side.
When people go into a wake they sprinkle holy water on the dead body. Long ago they used to give out snuff and cut up tobacco.
The last of this done was at Christopher Conroys wake about 6 years ago.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:34
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Funerals and Wakes
When a coffin would be brought out of a house and the dead person in it,
There would be two stools and the coffin would be laid on them while the offerings was being collected.
Then in taking up the coffin the stools should be knocked down the bearers would kick them down.
From Pat Keogh Coolronan, Ballivor Meath
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:34
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There is a bush in Duignans field Coolronan. About fifty years ago Kit Andersons grand father went out to cut down this bush; As he was cutting it a white woman came out from under the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:33
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So they would not build it there.
One evening when Mrs Clarke and her sisters were walking on a certain hill, Mrs Clarke was not walking as quick as them they looked back and she was gone out of sight. The fairies had taken her under the ground for three days. So one day she was left where she was got.
They asked her what did she see but she could tell nothing.
In Kellets hills there are fairies there. Stones are shaped like chains on this hill.
Got from Mrs Clarks, Ballyboy, Athboy, Co. Meath.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:33
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There is a Raheen in Richards field Coolronan and it is said that there are fairies there and that they be kicking football every night.
There were a lot of trees growing around it and there was one in the middle, once they were going to cut it but there was a lot of fairies came out and told them not to cut it nor neither did they.
It is said that the tree is there yet.
It is said that there are fairies in Cooney's field Coolronan named Shankhill.
There is a lone bush in it and if that bush was cut
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-05 19:33
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to be seated on the last horse.
If he would put up his hand she would be released; but he did not so his house was haunted by the fairies ever after.
From P. Keogh Coolronan
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-04 20:23
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The loud laugh bespeaks the vacant mind.
An empty bag cannot stand, nor a dead cat cannot walk.
One black beetle knows another.
An empty pot makes the most sound,
The darkest hour comes before dawn.
Cows over the sea have long horns.
Better the devil you know that the devil you do not know.
Going from the frying pan in to the fire.
Time and tide wait for no one.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-04 20:22
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Live horse and eat grass.
The more hurry the less speed.
Early to bed and early to rise makes a man happy healthy, wealthy and wise.
What is worth doing is worth doing well.
Happy is the bride that the sun shines on and happy is the corps that the rain rains on.
I have seen you already as the cat said to the hot milk.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-04 20:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Proverbs
Make hay while the sun shines.
Well begun is half done.
Better late than never.
Strike the iron while it is hot.
The early bird picks the worm.
Thinks twice before you speak one.
A stitch in time saves nine.
A half of a load is better than no bread.
A good run is better than a bad stand.
Look before you leap.
Rise with the lark and go to bed with the lamb.
Too many cooks spoils the broth.
One mans food is another mans poison.
The man on the helm steers the ship.
If you grasp at too much you will lose all.
The best hurler is on the fence.
Looking for wool in the goats house.
Don't put off until tomorrow that which you can go today.
One good turn deserves another.
Necessity is the mother of invention.
If you want a thing done do it yourself.
The long coming comes at last.
Birds of a feather flock together.
Have it of your own or be without it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-04 20:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
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The Potato Crop
We sow potatoes on our farm every year. We sow about three roods of potatoes on our farm. My father prepares the ground for the potatoes. The potatoes are sowed in drills in the fields and in ridges in the garden. The drills are made by two horses and a plough. Wooden ploughs are not used now. The spades are bought in the shops. We sow the potatoes in this locality like this. First, the ground is ploughed, then harrowed, then the drills are opened, then the potatoes are put into the drills, the manure is put in on the potatoes the drills are then split in two and it covers the potatoes, and then the potatoes are sowed. The potatoes are dug by a spade or by a machine called a potato digger. The potatoes are picked in bags and brought in to be put in pits to feed the fowl and pits for the Winter. The potatoes that grow best in this locality are the White Champions, the Irish Queens, the Spry Abundant and so on.
Sean Nevin
Towlaght
Hill of Down
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-04 20:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Blackshade road goes from the Bayleaf crossroads to Blackshade and there crosses the canal and railway. When it passes the canal a branch goes to Longwood and another branch goes to Killyon and there meets the Drogheda-Tullamore road.
There are no very old roads in the district. There are no local accounts of when the roads were made.
There are no mountain passes in the district. There are lanes going into bogs.
We do not know how the rivers were crossed in olden times as the bridges are there a very long time.
There is a monument at Leinster Bridge about tow miles east of this school, in memory of the sixteen men who were killed in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety eight.
There is a mound near the school and it is said that there was a chief buried there before Saint Patrick came to Ireland. There is a bush in McNevins field called the mass-bush in the townland of Towlaght.
Teresa McCabe
Ballinbarney
Longwood.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2019-06-04 19:56
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diúltaithe
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The Local Roads
The main road which goes through the village of Clonard is the Dublin-Galway road which goes from Dublin to Galway.
About three miles west of Clonard at the village of Kinnegad the Drogheda-Tullamore road crosses the Dublin-Galway road.
At Clonard a road goes south-east to Edenderry from this road at Ballyboggan Bridge another road goes to Castlejordan and Ballinabrackey and another road foes to Clochrincoe and Cadamstown.
A road goes from Trim and joins the Clonard-Edenderry road at Clonard and goes through the village of Longwood.