Líon iontrálacha sa taifead staire: 15692 (Taispeántar anseo na 500 ceann is deireanaí.)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-24 20:22
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
In unity his bride she'd be
She is the Weaver's daughter.
5
Your music fine with me combine
And read my declaration
There is not her equal to be found
In any rank or station
No foreign queen was ever seen
Or any other charmer
In beauty rare I could compare
To the Weaver's Handsome daughter.
6
And its now I must lay down my pen
Alas my time is over
Look to the end of these few lines
Tis then her name you'll discover
There is "M" and "T." as you may see
And "D" is the next that chosen
Like Luna hid behind a cloud
This then her name you'll discover
Her name was Margaret Donoghue.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-24 20:18
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
2
I stood amazed and on her I gazed
Till viewing of her features
And her beauty rare do far exceed
All other works of Nature
As she walked along she sweetly sang
The birds in rejoice did chorus
The verdant trees with bended knees
Bowed down in ranks before her
3
Her look serene to see her frame
It just like wax would turn
And her glancing eye to my great surprise
Which caused my poor heart to mourn
If she had been on the battlefield
She'd conquer the Great Alexander
Or that Hero brave that rules the waves
Or the European Commander.
4
And she is of a Catholic Race
My pen can scarcely praise her
She's of a charming beauty rare
There is no one to exceed her
Had Bonaparte but seen this maid
Hed forfeit all he fought for
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-24 20:13
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
I obtained the words of the following Song from
Mícheál Mac Chártaig
Drom-Fhosta
Drom - Dhá liag
Mí Na Samnna 1937 In aois a 85 bliana anois
He told me this song was composed when the railway line between Drimoleague and Skibbereen was making, and the first train ran on that line in May 1877.
The Song was made by a Steward on the line about one Margaret Donoghue who was going to a Sewing School in Skibbereen at the time.
She was a very handsome girl and every time on the passing she used be singing, so the Steward made the following song about her.
The Weaver's Handsome Daughter
1
By Newman's grove as I chanced to rove
Being on a Summer's morning
Its there I spied a comely maid
Whose beauty was most charming
I took her to be the Queen of May
That did the meadows adorn
Or Luna bright that ruled the night
Or the bright star of the Morning
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-24 20:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I obtained the words of the following Song from
Mícheál Mac Chártaig
Drom-Fhosta
Drom - Dhá liag
Mí Na Samnna 1937 In aois a 85 bliana anois
He told me this song was composed when the railway line between Drimoleague and Skibbereen was making, and the first train ran on that line in May 1877.
The Song was made by a Steward on the line about one Margaret Donoghue who was going to a Sewing School in Skibbereen at the time.
She was a very handsome girl and every time on the passing she used be singing, so the Steward made the following song about her.
The Weaver's Handsome Daughter
I
By Newman's grove as I chanced to rove
Being on a Summer's morning
Its there I spied a comely maid
Whose beauty was most charming
I took her to be the Queen of May
That did the meadows adorn
Or Luna bright that ruled the night
Or the bright star of the Morning
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-24 16:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A sore throat:-
A Foxglove.
Cure for Thrush:-
Three screeches of a gander down the person's throat.
Cure for toothache:-
To put a frog's hind leg into the tooth.
Cure for sty in the eye:-
To rub a gold ring to it.
Cure for sore head:-
A cap made of ivy.
Cures for Hiccoughs:-
(a) Raise your hands over your head until they would meet.
(b) To frighten a person with them.
Cure for a burn:-
To lick a lizzard.
Bleeding from nose:-
To place a door key on you back.
Cure for corns:-
Walk in the grass when the dew is on it.
Cure for swelling:-
Goose Grease.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-24 16:43
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
well and said "what do you want. The woman said "the child sent me. "Come down with me" said the wowan of the well and dont be afraid". She drew her down by the hand. When they reached the bottom they went into a room and there sat the King of the fairies and a nurse. "This is the nurse of your son" said the old woman. The woman sat down in a grand chair. Then the queen brought in a child in her arms and gave her to the woman and said. "Take him he is your own child that we carried from you for he was so beautiful and the child who you have is ours. Take your own lovely child now home with you and the man that you beat was not your own hushand at all but when you go home you will find your own true hushand at home before you.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-24 16:38
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
rolled and the lightening flashed and the door was opened with a bang and in came two strange women with red caps on their heads and stout in their hands. They rushed at the man and beat him till he was nearly dead. Now kneel down and ask her pardon and if you will beat her any more we will kill you. So the man went away and troubled his wife no more. Then the child sat up in the cradle. "Now mother" said he "Ill tell you what to do. There is a holy well near this place that you have never seen before but you will know it by the bunch of green rushes that grow near it." Go there and and stoop down and cry three times and an old woman will come up". So she went away and done what he bade her. The woman came up out of the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-24 16:32
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
5
Travellers often called to our home, such as tinsmiths, they sold cans, tin-lanterns, and strainers. They sometimes buy horse-hair. They make those things themselves. They sleep in tents of their own. They would be welcome sometimes. The female folk ask for food and alms. They travel on foot, and are knows an McDonagh's. Years ago they used to come men selling other things, such as pious pictures, brooches, collar-studs, laces. ect. I think they bought those things in small shops. They never delayed so long as to tell stories, or no local people gathered.
6
There were a lot of poor people going about the place long ago, and even at the present time, such as Rambling Dolan, he used to tell great stories, Paddy Villey used to go about the place. The people used to have great welcome for them, and they used to gather to hear them. Margaret Monson used to travel from place to place . and she used to ask lodging for a night.
Paddie Monackon and Mary used to go about the place. Bridget Lavin was a poor woman who went about from place to place, asking the people to keep her lodging for a night. Mary Villey went about the place, and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-24 16:24
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
"This will make me work,
And me work will make me warm
This will do me good
And anyone would do me harm"
This is an old saying always said by Peter Mc Guinness [?] who was a mason and always used to be going to be building for the neighbours if at all possible.
When he would go to do a piece of work for anyone, he would try
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-23 20:18
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
were fast asleep in the two little beds the old woman came and felt their thin cheeks. "too thin" she muttered. Now this old woman who was so kind to the children was really a witch. Next morning when John woke he found himself in a cage and wondered very much who had put him there. Along came the old witch. "Wake up child" said she to Margaret, "You must go to the well to draw water untill I cook something for your brothers dinner to fatten him to eat him for supper to night" At that moment John began to cry out and began to think of a plan. So she opened the oven door and peeped inside and Margaret gave her a sudden push that she fell head-over-heels into the oven over she ran and left off her brother. They began to search around the house and in the drawers they found heaps of gold and silver. They filled their pockets with it and set out for home. They wandered all day through the forest and towards sunset they saw the smoke rising out of their fathers hut. When they reached the hut there was their father standing at the door very sad looking for the old stepmother had died now. When he saw them coming he could hardly believe his eyes. So they lived
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-23 20:11
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to lose all hopes they heard a beautiful bird singing, they followed it and it brought them to a lovely little house. The walls were made of white bread and plum cake, the windows were made of toffee and the roof of gingerbread. "What a nice house" said Margaret "I am going to find out what does it taste like" said John. He stole over and broke off a piece of the roof and Margaret pulled a pane out of the window. They were eating away when suddenly the door opened and out came a very old woman with a pair of crutches. "Come here children" said she "My eyes are not good but you are welcome" She passed her hand over their faces once or twice and said to herself "They are thin" for she was a witch. "Come in my children" said she, "I am very fond of children". John and Margaret thought they had never met anyone so kind and they wished they had a stepmother like that. They followed her in and there in the middle of the floor was a table ready for supper and two little beds lovely looking. "Poor children," said the old woman, "I am sure you are hungry." When they had their supper eaten they went to sleep in the two little beds. When they
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-23 19:26
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
marbhócadh sé é. Do bhí ana áthas ar an athair mar geall air sin agus dubhairt sé leis an mac "Raghad-sa isteach má [?] agus ní marbhócidh sé mé."
Do connaic an fear ag teacht isteach é agus dubhairt sé bhíos ag dul i gcóir airgead agus an dtabarfaidh tú dom é. Ní tabharfhadh go deimhin. Tá alán airgead. "I have it and I won't give it, and I wont give it to YOU because you are an ould Divil."
D'imthig an fear uaidh agus do tháinig sé airís agus ní fheaca sé an mac ann in-aon-chor agus ní fhéadfhadh sé theacht suas leis.
Dubhairt sé Cá bhfuil mo mhac, Ní fheadar arsa an fear ní raibh sé annso in-aon-chor.
Do bhuail an athair an fear láidir le bata mór a bhí na laímh aige agus do shín sé ar an dtalamh é agus d'eirig sé airís agus bhí sé ar buille
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-23 19:18
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Do bhí fear ann fadó agus do bhí aon mac amháin aige agus do bhíodh an mac ag dul amach gach aon oidhche go dtí port agus do bhí mórán airgid sa port agus do bhíodh an aithir ag cnáimhseál gach lá mar go raibh an mach ag gabáil amach gach aon oidhche.
Oidhche amháin do cuaidh sé amach agus do bhí an aithir ag dul amac leis agus do bhí árd fhearg ar an mac agus dubhairt sé leis an aithir cad na thaobh go raibh sé ag dul amach leis Dubhairt an aithir leis go raibh sé ag dul go dtí an port cun airgid a thabhairt as dubhairt an mac leis "Tá an airgid go léir agam-sa agus ní thabharfhadh pioc duit".
Do bhí an mac ag liúrig agus dubhairt sé leis an aithir go raibh fear láidir sa port agus aoinne a raghadh ann go
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-23 19:12
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
doras. D'oscail an fear an doras agus do tháinig deich preachán isteach.
Ansan t'itheadar a breicfeast agus dubradar le na leanbaí an suipéar a ithe leis agus d'itheadar é agus isé an biadh a fuaireadar ná an biadh a fuair na preacháin.
Nuair a bhí sé ithte acu dubhairt an fear beag ba mhaith liom go mbeadh sibh na preacháin agam mar do bheadh sibh ana úmhal dom agus an neómat san d'iompuigheadar na preacain agus d'fanadar mar sin go deó agus do bhí an athair agus an máthair ana bhrónach[?] mar ní raibh fhios acu cá rabhadar.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-22 21:04
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
And a son of Granuaile.
I joined the Fenian brotherhood
In the year of sixty four
Bound to save our native land
Or perish on its shore.
III
Ah! My curse be on those traitors
Who did our cause betray,
I'd tie a rope around their neck
And drown them in the say(sea).
They were Sweeney, Massey, Dwyer.
And Talbot; that makes four
They are banned and exiled from our land
And cursed for evermore.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-22 21:02
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
John Browne of Crinaloo sings the following song:-
O'Donavan Rossa.
Farewell to friends of Dublin town
I bid you all adieu,
I cannot yet appoint a day
When I will return to you
I write you these few lines
From our ship as billows roar
May heaven bless our Fenian men
Till I return once more.
II
I've robbed no man or spilt no blood
Still they sent me off to jail
Because I was O'Donavan Rossa
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-22 20:58
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a man there long ago and he was looking for lodgings. He saw a light in a house and he went towards it. He knocked at the door but no body opened it. When no body opened it he opened it himself and went in He saw a very old man reading a newspaper. The old man asked him who left him in or what did he want and he told him. Another man came out of a room and he told him if he would skin the old man he would give him a week's lodging. He skinned the old man and buried him. The day after the old man came back again. The man told him bury him again. He went off again and the old man was jumping in the coffin. He buried him
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-22 20:57
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The bread was made from wheat in olden times. The wheat was ground in Millstreet. It is from that mill the town got its name. The different kinds of bread were wheaten bread, potato cake and ciste baise. The wheaten bread was made from wheaten flour soda and sour milk and it was baked in a bastable. The potato cake was made from flour, soda, milk, and mashed potatoes. The "císte baise" was made by rolling the dough in the palms of the hands and this was baked on a griddle.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-22 20:55
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago every house was covered and inside the thatch were scraws. The floors were made of mud and when a hole came in the floor the man of the house went out and brought in a green scraw and turned the green side of it into the hole and after a few days it would be like the rest of the floor flat and smooth. In the rooms they had "taster" beds. They were timber beds with a canopy. Those beds were papered inside. Some people had only one room in the house and they had the hens inside in a coop in the corner of the kitchen. They had only one small window and a door in the kitchen. Some of those houses are still in this district.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-22 20:53
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The local fairs and markets are held in Millstreet and Kanturk. The fairs are held in the fairfield in Millstreet but in Kanturk they are held in the town. There are no fairs now being held out in the country but about a hundred years ago there was a fair held in Dromagh fairfield three times a year. One year all the sheep were stifled with snow at the May fair. The place where these fairs were held was not convenient to a railway station and so they were discontinued after a time. It is on the 1st March the greatest local fair is held in Millstreet. When an animal is sold the seller gives luck money to the buyer. This is called toll money.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-22 20:48
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Éistíg a chuideachta grádmhar go ninnsead dhaoibh fáth inaghaidh an scéil.
Gur mhó fear éadrtom sásta tá curtha le trí rátha sa cré.
Nár ól riamh a scilling i dtig an tábhairne ach í chur ins an sparán len a thaobh
Nách mairg nár bhain an chéad lá as gan an t airgead d'fhágháilt thar éis
II.
Do casadh mé isteach i dtig an tábhairne
Mar a raibh cuideachta ghrádhmhar ag ól.
Do féachaidh am thimchell cé tháinig agus mise is gan sgáth ar mo dhóid
Do glaodhadh ar an landlady láithreach dubhairt nár [?] mo shórd
do caitheadh amach ar an sráid me is do ghabhadar dá sálaibh am thóin
III
Greada ar an gcmargairín[?] ngrádna níor thugas aon ghrádh dhos fós riamh
Mara dtugainn do leanbh ná páiste
do shiúbhalách an tSráid síos am dhiaidh
b'Fhearr liom é thómhas chúgham 'na chártaibh
S É chur ar an gclár go breágh fial.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-22 20:06
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wall around the forge is a bench on which pieces of iron, horse shoes, pinncers, sledges, hammers, pliers etc. are kept. Near the trough of water is a window.
The smith shoes horses, asses and mules but he never shoes cattle. He makes ploughs, harrow-pins, shovels, spades and fire-tonges. This work is done by putting bass of iron in the fire and when they are red taking them out with fire-tonges, putting them on the anvil and hammering them into the shape required. They are cooled in the trough of water and reveted to-gether with bolts.
When the smith is putting on shoeing on carts he goes out into the air as outside the door is a cement ring for that purpose.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-22 20:03
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numerous in olden time. Buying and selling were carried on after Mass. This custom is observed still in some places. There were many articles exchanged.
Money was not always given for goods, sometimes goods were exchanged for goods. Labour was another way in which people used make payment for goods.
A lot of words were connected with buying and selling such as "boot" "tick" "charge" and "cant". The place where the market was held was where Mr. Hegarty's house is now.
The names for the various coins were as follows:- A Shilling was called a "bob", a sixpence a "tanner", a pound a "quid", a penny a "wing" and a half penny a "make"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-22 19:59
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There were a few hedge schools in our district.
There was one situated in Doughmackeon. My great grandmother who is still living at [?] the age of 77 years learned her first lessons in Mr. Pat. O Tooles house Doughmackeon. This house now belongs to Mr. William Burke. The mastere who taught her was named Mr Austin O Malley. They had no pens nor pencils, but a nice flat flag on which they wrote with a stone. The next place she went to school in was in Ashlane[?] in Mr. John Mac Donogh's house, and also in Mr. John Hanlon's house. Mr. John Mac Donoghs house now belongs to Mr. John Kelly, and Mr. John Hanlon's house belongs to Mr. Owen Duffy. She spent some time learning in each of them.
Mr. James Prendergast her father and a few others in the village employed a man from Clare Island to teach the children of this village. He went to the different houses on their turn and all the children of the village attended at whatever house he was in. They also had a man named Joyce from Connemara teaching them. She was about seven years old when the first national school was built in Accony. When she was about three or four years she started going to school in the hedge schools. The name of the Clare Island teacher was Mr. Bradshaw.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 20:56
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was a modest inquiry for the health of the father and mother, a demand for more cash, as this thing and the other had to be got - things the poor parents never thought existed at all. The cash was always forthcoming by our over-generous benefactor.
At long last the crisis came. Seemingly the college Jack was in, was entirely different from our clerical colleges nowadays. After a specified time the students got the option of selecting any career they wished for. The list was read out, and each and every one could adopt his choice and according to the rules, he was then sent to a certain branch to receive his final training for his chosen career. That time had arrived at the College, and the list was called out by one of the professors, and included amongst others were lawyer, doctor, priest, teacher, accountant, thief etc etc. Jack listened attentively, and made his decision selecting to be a thief. He had others who made a like choice. Very Well!
He's now on for training for his chosen post. He was sent to the master rogue for instructions. This man had a staff at work under him. Their dwelling was a hut in a lonely mountain side, and their business was plundering from the honest people of the valley below. The first night he accompanied another apprentice to steal a sheep under the direction of a fully qualified hand. They proceeded in the broad-moonlight through glens and valleys till at last they reached a sheep-field. Little time was spent in capturing one, which was quickly driven along, and without any great difficulty safely secured in his master's premises. Good though Jack to himself
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 20:54
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to the baby but, on any account she was warned not to leave it touch her skin. Her eye got itchy, and she rubbed her hand to her eye but on doing so the oilment touched her eye. She could see all the fairies of the fort. When she came out of the fort she saw it was the beam of a plough the man for the horse. She was afraid to sit up behind him on the plough. He told her not be a bit afraid. When she sat up, the plough jumped the river and they went home like the wind. She went a fair in Millstreet about a week after and she saw the man who took her to the fort walking up and down the street.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 20:51
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Famine reached this country about the year 1846 and held out until the year 1847 The country was very thickly populated. Hundred of people, both young and old died of of hunger. Most of the boys and girls of this district emigrated to foreign countries. They had nothing to eat, but green leaves. They used boil weeds and eat them. The common food of this district was turnips. They had but very little money but they had to pay the rent of their land.
It was the first year the potatoe crop was known to fail. In June the stalks turned black and the potatoes rotted on the ground. They had oats and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 20:47
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in "Cullen" Graveyard. One of these tombs dates back to 1814.
There are very nice crosses and head-stones in "Cullen" Graveyard also. Some of the churchyards are level.
Ballydesmond Graveyard slopes to the south.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 20:47
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There are four old Graveyards around the district "Clonfert" Graveyard." "Nohoval." "Cullen." "Kilmeen." They are the oldest Graveyards I know around my district. The townland's of the Graveyards are "Nohoval Daly." Clonfert churchyard," "Clonfert townland." "Kilmeen churchyard." "Kilmeen townland," "Cullen churchyard." "Cullen Mullach Ruadh" They are all still in use.
There was a churchyard in Báile na h-Olla called "the Crag." There were a number of young children buried there. People say that it was removed down to "Nohoval" during the night.
Nohoval is one of the oldest and the biggest Graveyards now a-days. There are a lot of ancient trees in the four of them. There are five tombs
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 20:42
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
In olden times there were only a very few shops around here. There would a woman go around with a bag selling. These women were called "huxters". Buying and selling were carried on after mass and they are carried on still. The goods that were bought after mass were generally for the house.
In olden times some of the people used give money and more used give eggs. Goods were exchanged for labour and people sold butter and eggs in the shops and would get money or "value" instead. People got their goods on "tick" to pay weekly monthly or yearly according as they had the money. Poor people who had not any money often gave work to the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 20:10
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There were many old schools in my district long ago. There was one in Doon in Michael McAuliffe's land. It was inside they were taught, and the ruins were standing up to lately. There was another school in Ruhill. The schoolmaster was John McAuliffe. He had the school in his house. It was English that was taught there. When the scholars came to a hard word in their lesson he used to say "Skip that, that is Latin.
My grandfather was taught there. He learned his Catechism in Irish there. The teachers lived in the farmers' houses and used to go around the district teaching for weeks.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 20:05
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
If a person sneezes, the person listening says "God bless us". If a person tells another one of some fearful happening he says "God bless the hearers" When a few people have finished any work they say "May we be all alive this time twelve months." When some people are working and a person passes by he says, "God bless the work and the workers".
In the morning "O my God, my only good, the author of my being and my last end. I give thee my heart. Praise, honour and glory be to thee for ever and ever, Amen"
Getting up out of bed "I will raise myself up from this bed of sleep to adore my God and to labour for thee of my soul. O may I rise on the last day to live everlastingly."
When a person takes a pinch of snuff he says, "Lord have mercy on the dead." When one person does some job for another, he says "The Lord spare you the health." When a person is going on a journey we say "God speed you" When we enter a house we say "God Bles all here." If you give alms to a person,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 20:01
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Twenty sheep went out a gap.
Twenty more followed that.
A man and a dog came after that
Two feet.
What turns without moving? a Road.
A little white and round house, and it is full of meat, but is has no door or window, to let me in to eat? An Egg
It opens like a barn door, It shuts like a trap. You would think of twenty things before you would thing of that? An Umbrella.
When is a pony like a mouse? When he is under a trap.
As I went up a slippery gap, I met my uncle Davie, He had timber toes and iron nose and 'pon my word he frightened the crows? A Gun.
As I went up a slippery gap, I met my uncle Davie, I cut off his head and drank his blood and left his body standing easy? A bottle of porter.
Riddle me, Riddle me, Randie ó, My father gave me some seeds to sow, The seeds were black and the ground was white, Riddle me, Riddle me, Randie ó? Pen and Paper
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 19:57
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of the car?
281.
I have a little Kerry cow standing by the wall she eats all she gets and drinks nothing at all?
A fire.
I ran and I got it. I searched for it and I could not find it and I carried it home with me because I could not find it.
A thorn in my leg.
How many sticks goes to build a crow's nest?
No one goes but the crow has to take them
What goes up the ladder with its head turned down?
A stud in my boot
I have a little sister she lives in the ditch and if you went near her she would smear you with itch:
A nettle.
Nine horses nine times nine loads in the day at fourpence a load what did the turf come to?
Ashes.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 19:54
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How many wells would make a river?
One if it was big enough.
It is black, it is white and it is read all over?
A news paper.
Two black men and a white man went into a motor car; the two black men ate the white man what was the number
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 19:53
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Two Germans went into a house in Cork one of the Germans was a father to the other German's son what were the two Germans to each other? Husband and wife.
Two Ns two Os one L and one D put them together and spell them for me? London.
Spell black water in three letters? Ink.
Spell broken down ditch in three letters? Gap. Spell red rogue in three letters? Fox.
Cork and Kerry Londonderry spell me that without a K? That
Why does a cow look over the ditch? Because she can not look under it.
What part of a cow goes out the gap first? Her breath.
A fiddler in Cork has a brother in New York, but the fiddler in New York has no brother in Cork? The fiddler in Cork is a girl
What is lighter than a feather?
The dust on the road on a summer day blown by the weather.
As black as ink as white as milk it hops on the road like hail snow.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 19:49
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The penal Days forbid Catholic to practice their religion. An old story is related about how soldiers were searching a district and they met a little girl with a basket. They searched the basket and found a leaflet in it. It was from the priest thanking the little girl's mother for the food. They wanted to make her tell them where the priest was, but she would not. She suffered the most cruel torments and still she would not betray the priest and in the end they shot her. "Carraig an Aifrinn" near Millstreet is named so because Mass was said there in the Penal Days. There were secret little holes behind shutters of windows, where priests were hid, when the priest-hunters were looking for them to cut off their heads and get a five pound note for each head.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 15:38
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With McClure he stayed for a short time in Pollardstown and it was always a tradition in the family that he too was with McClure and ONeill Crowley but that he evaded arrest.
Brother Kennedy, who taught the Secondary classes of the CB.S. Mitchelstown in the middle nineties often spoke to his boys of the Fenian days - for, thirty years earlier he had been teaching also in Mitchelstown. He used to say that the people of Mitchelstown in those days were aware the OMeagher Condon was at Kilclooney.
After the Spring of 1867 OMeagher-Condon went to England and there he was second in command to Captain Kelly, being G. O.C. in the Lancashire area. When his leader was captured he determined on his rescue and planned the attack on the prison van in Manchester. Had everything worked according to plan it would have been a complete success. But one man failed to bring tools as ordered
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 15:32
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of the Condon chief still stands on the Funcheon bank in a very fair state of preservation on the Moore Park lands beside Kilworth. Through the troubled years that closed the sixteenth century the "Noble Patrick Condon" of Cloghleigh remained faithful to his religion and to his sworn pledges to his overlord, The Earl of Desmond. In Cromwellian Times the Condons were deprived of their possessions; their family was dissipated and their descendants were all reduced to poverty.
While still in infancy the family of OMeagher-Condon migrated to America. This migration was the result of the cruel years the followed Black Forty Seven.
Edward entered the American Army and fought with distinction on the Federal Side during the Civil War, obtaining the rank of Captain.
The war over, he with others, crossed to Ireland, to help the Fenian Cause. His great friend was Captain Mac Clure who was taken prisoner at Kilclooney
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 15:31
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of the Condon chief still stands on the Funcheon bank in a very fair state of preservation on the Moore Park lands beside Kilworth. Through the troubled years that closed the sixteenth century the "Noble Patrick Condon" of Cloghleigh remained faithful to his religion and to his sworn pledges to his overlord, The Earl of Desmond. In Cromwellian Times the Condons were deprived of their possessions; their family was dissipated and their descendants were all reduced to poverty.
While still in infancy the family of OMeagher-Condon migrated to America. This migration was the result of the cruel years the followed Black Forty Seven.
Edward entered the American Army and fought with distinction on the Federal Side during the Civil War, obtaining the rank of Captain.
The war over, he with others, crossed to Ireland, to help the Fenian Cause. His great friend Captain Mac Clure who was taken prisoner at Kilclooney
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 15:25
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Captain O'Meagher Condon _ the officer in charge of the attack on the prison van in Manchester in 1867 was born at Brigown near Mitchelestown. His father was one of the Brigown Condons, a family now extinct. His mother was a sister of James Meagher of Pollardstown and of Mrs Casey, mother of Will Casey who was father of the present Thomas Casey of Dronngath (Dronn gChath)
The ancestral territory of the Norman family of Condon lay to the south of the lands of the Mac Gibbon, the White Knight, of Mitchelstown both areas forming the Barony of Condons and Clan Gibbon. The Condon country which contained 30,000 acres included the towns of Kilworth and Fermoy. Cloghleigh, the home
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-21 15:20
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"My uncle has a churn which is really a barrel like an oil barrel - with two handles on the two ends of it. There is a four-legged stand made or iron _ about three feet in height and on this the barrel rests. It is about a year old at present. It was made by a local carpenter _ Denis Nolan He got the barrel from my uncle and also the old barrel
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 21:13
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and furze bushes are gathered and made into a huge pile.
At dusk they light the fire and pile on more and more furze.
Then the children and passers-by gather around to dance and sing and tell tales.
The fire-makers bring home a coal from St. John's fire, for kindling for the coming twelve months.
5
In the old days water was never thrown into the air, after use, after seven o'clock at night. It should be thrown downwards towards the ground, or it would be splashed on the faces of the 'good people' - this belief still prevails.
6
Each member of the family should take a drink of cold water every night before going to bed.
7
In this parish the woman of the house 'settles the chairs' - each in its own place; sweeps the floor; quenches the fire, (but leaves kindling at hand); and sees that everything is clean and tidy for anyone who might care to come. i.e. for departed relatives who might care to revisit.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 21:08
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A great snow-storm occurred in this district in the end of February, and, as far as I can make out, it was in the year 1893.
Prior to the storm the weather was intensely cold, with a strong wind blowing from the east. The sky was dark and gloomy and birds and animals sought shelter wherever they could find it before the approach of the storm.
It began about three o'clock in the afternoon. The flakes were very small and hard and blown with great force. Nobody could go out into the open for fear of getting smothered.
The flakes were so small that they entered the house through key-holes, between doors and frames of doors, even in between the window frames. I need hardly say that the houses were not as air-tight then as they are now. Most of the houses were in poor repair. The doors were often broken and the windows without panes.
At all events the snow was blown into the houses and was lying in heaps inside the doors and windows.
Both people and animals had to remain where they were when the storm began. It raged
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 21:04
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Beside my house there is a field called the Long Field. It is very long and narrow.
Another is called the Hill Field. It is near the bank of the River Araglen. Between the river and it there is a flat inch. Then a cliff rises steeply up, and on top a hilly, uneven field.
I know another field called Jack Shea's meadow, though who Jack Shea was I could never find it.
Another was called Móinfhéar na [?] - why it is so called I could not find out; but it is sticking out sideways from the farm to which it belongs and this may be the reason of the name.
Another is called the Portach a' Ghárnóra (I am giving it phonetically). Who this individual was I could never find out, but some gentry owned the place at one time, and they possibly gave him turbary in the place that has since converted into a field.
Another field was called "The Brake". I discovered that is was so called because the place was a real brake at one time, covered over with briars, bushes and undergrowth.
Another was called "The Fine Meadow". The
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 20:58
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(This story is true)
In some cases the young couple were entirely unacquainted till the match was made.
Well, a man called Jerry Moynihan of Banard, Gneeveguilla, Co. Kerry made a match about 40 years ago with a girl by the name of Buckley living near Millstreet. This girl had two sisters and Moynihan had never met any of them. The three sisters had lovely golden hair. Two of them were really good-looking while the third was all pock-marked. When the match was made he went to see his future bride and was introduced to one of the good-looking ones as the girl that was to be his. The morning of the wedding came and the three sisters dressed alike. But it wasn't the good-looking girl who stood before the altar with the bridegroom. The pock-marked one unknown to him took her place. He thought then and until the wedding festivities were over that one of the good-looking girls was his wife; but when the hour of departure came the good-looking girls went away, leaving the pock-marked sister behind. The surprise of the bridegroom can well be imagined. However he made the best of the matter, as he was ashamed to let on how he had been fooled.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 20:54
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Formerly in this district marriages were celebrated in Shrovetide only. This was the case in my young days. Shrove Tuesday was a day on which a large number took place; but they might be celebrated on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, and (very rarely) on Sundays.
Monday, Wednesday and Friday were considered unlucky days; and even still no wedding is celebrated on Monday and Friday.
Marriages now take place in all months of the year except in May. Of course they are not celebrated during Lent or Advent.
May is considered very unlucky for marriages Marriages are more frequent in Shrove than in at other times.
Marriage, except among the poor, is becoming rare in the district. In my young days there were few old bachelors or old maids. This happy state of affairs no longer exists. Among the farming population marriages are now almost unknown.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 20:50
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and, in some cases, quarrelled before the wedding was over.
The guests started to take their departure about nine o'clock. The sober people took charge of those who were not able to take charge of themselves.
The bride usually conveyed her friends a short distance and there was more leave-talking and wailing by her intimate friends.
Thus ended the wedding.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 20:49
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to the teetotallers of the party. The men partook of large quantities of the salt meat in order to have a good thirst for the drink. This went on for several hours until all the guests were fully satisfied.
Dancing was again indulged in. Those who were well up in step-dancing gave special exhibitions of their skills. Tea was made several times during the night for the women folk, while the men sat round the barrel of porter, each man having a basin in his hand, and helping himself to a plentiful supply of the liquor.
Very often two or three barrels were finished and very often, if it were not yet day, another supply of drink was sent for. Nobody left the party before eight or nine o'clock in the morning. By this time the men were usually in high spirits and didn't know whether they were drinking soup or porter. Very often large bands of "travelling people" or tinkers visited the house. In some cases the number was so great that the cow-house had to be cleared of cows, and the uninvited guests were entertained there.
They also got supper and plenty of drink. The danced and enjoyed themselves
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 20:46
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About 60 or 70 years ago there were no side-cars or traps. Saddle-horses only were used to take the people to the church. A man sat in front on the saddle and the woman behind him (cabhlóg) having her hand around the man's waist to keep her steady.
The bride sat on the same horse with her father or brother.
When the marriage ceremony was over the bride sat behind the bridegroom usually on a frisky horse. They returned to the bridegroom's home. The friends of both parties vied with one another in getting first to the house. They galloped as fast as they could and the first arrival was usually cheered and proclaimed to have the best horse in the whole district.
When all had arrived a barrel of porter was tapped and large basins of it distributed to the men, while the women got glasses of punch; and all drank the health of the happy hair and wished them the best of luck.
About nightfall the wedding-feast was held. It consisted of boiled bacon with cabbage and turnips and several geese which usually boiled. The soup was handed round
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 20:43
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These were carried on on a large scale in former times. They usually lasted a day and a night.
At one time the priest came to the wedding-house early in the day and remained for a part of the day and performed the wedding ceremony in the house before he left.
This practice no longer exists as it is now against the laws of the church.
All the friends and neighbours were invited, both the bride and bridegroom having an equal number of guests which often numbered eighty or ninety on each side. On the wedding morning, as early as nine o'clock the guests made their way to the home of the bride, each person getting a glass of whiskey on his or her arrival. Those who would not drink whiskey got wine. Then breakfast was served which consisted of fried bacon and eggs. Dancing was then indulged in for several hours. Even elderly people were supposed to dance on such occasions.
About 1 o'clock all got ready to go to the church. On leaving the bride's mother and the women friends had to kiss the bride and cry after, and praise her, and wish her good luck. This took about half an hour.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 17:08
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The main road from Dunmanway to Clonakilty is called The Clonakilty road and a branch from it to Drinagh is called "The Lake road" and is one of the important roads of West Cork for traffic. It was made about 100 years ago. The only old road in this district is the road leading from "The Clubhouse" to Drinagh graveyard. It can be traced from Bandon at the south side of the Bandon river along to Ballineen and Ballinacarriga and breaking in to the main road at the western end of Drinagh lake.
There are a few roads in this locality called "The Board of Work Roads". One is convenient to the school going to Lisbealad West and the other is connecting the Inchafune road with the old road to Ballinacarriga. They were made during the years of the Famine for relief work. The rate of pay was about five a week.
According to history the river between Knockane and Lisbealad was crossed by a ford before the bridge was made.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 17:01
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Long ago, the principal food the people had was potatoes. So then when the potatoes failed the people were in a very hard plight.
In the year '47, and '48 the potatoes failed, and many people died of hunger, and starvation. The people of whom I enquired, knew but very few people who died during the famine around this locality. Several charitable people did their best to keep the people alive. The most noted of these was old Mrs Cronin.
There is an old story connected with her. She used always give all the milk to the starving poor. When the husband found it out, he was enraged. Then he locked the diary. What-ever way she got in, she still gave away the milk. She drained every drop of the milk out of the keelers. When the husband came back the keelers were again full.
After the famine a desperate fever swept the country, and many people died. Then many other people emigrated.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 16:55
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Long ago a robber lived about five miles from Killarney at a place called the Robber's Den. His name was Séan Ruadh. He was a very cruel man and had a gun and used kill a great deal of people, and rob them. He had a great crock of gold. One day he was riding on a horse going home to his den. He saw a beautiful lady and caught her and put her before him on the saddle. He brought her home
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-20 16:51
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It is recorded that the spring moved; it is now in the place where O'Brien's body was found.
John O' Brien a brother of William O' Brien was another landlord in this locality. He owned the townlands of Tulcon and Drumrahan. His residence was Drumrahan House, Eslin:- a stately old mansion, now demolished by the Land Commission. His tenants enjoyed more freedom than under most men of his type.
While they continued to pay him the exorbitant rent of £1 per acre of their holdings, he did not evict them. Many of them having small holdings who would be utterly unable to pay this amount were compelled to send two of their sons to work for O'Brien at the rate of 6d. per diem: and grub at home. Their combined work for the year just paid their father's rent and left them clear with O'Brien.
O'Briens servants, particularly the woman brought about his downfall. The women used to play into his hands and take his money while the men were robbing outside. It was his custom to kill his own bacon but before it had time to cure it was stolen. His cows were robbed of their
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 19:39
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II.
Do labhair an gabhair críonna leis an mhínsig
"Faire airiú" a bhuidhin mo náire é
Ná bfuil aon luibh sa righeacht tríd a dtalamh iníos
Do b'fearr le na mhnaoí ná an cabáiste
I dtosach na h-oidhche nuair a thosnuig an bruigheann
Ní raibh aoinne gan luighe ach é féinig
Ach bean aosta an tighe a bhí ag rádh paidrín
Agus ba bheannuighthe é luigthe bréine
Do tháinig sí go dtí sin id' iarraidh comairce agus dian dúinn
Agus do bhí anaithe a chroidhe uirthe féinig.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 19:33
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I
Batairseach cruaidh arsa Nannie go dúirc,
Nár fanamair thuaid a mháthair,
San áit go mbeadh biolar agus geabhair,
Agus fear tige gan feall, ná brisead ár dhream mar athá sé,
Má chuadmhair i gcúinne i gáirdín gan dhúnad,
Is nar dheanamar ach siubhal de [?] ann,
An talamh go siud an cuid eile de siud,
Agus go bfuairir se ar drúct,
Nú ar bháistig, an seana, seana cabáiste,
D'ob é sin a dubhairt an minsig.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 19:25
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Do chuadar isteach ingairdín cabáiste agus nuair a bhí fear an tighe ag dul a chodhladh do ghaibh sé amach agus do chonnaic sé na gabhair sa gháirdín do chaith sé isteach sa chistin iad agus do ghaibh sé ortha agus mar seo dubhairt an seana bhean[?] a dubhairt an dhá ghabhair le na chéile.
Do bhí sí ábaltha ar filideacht a dhéanamh agus do rith sí cuighe agus do thosnuig sí ag cosaint na gabhair. Do bhí sé á rádh leí go ndéanfhadh sé a lán rudaí leí.
D'airig an bhean an fothramh. D'eirig sí agus do rith sí cúcha agus do chosain an bheirt mhnaoí na gabhair bochta. Do dhein an seana-bhean dar ab'ainm de Peig an bhéarsa seo mar a dheadh na dhá ghabhair ag labhairt le na chéile.
Is sé seo an bhéarsa a dubhairt sí.:-.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 18:51
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on Lateeran Sunday and visit Tullylease on the eighteenth of February. 'Rounds' are performed and prayers are said at the holy Wells. The 'rounds' consist of a Rosary said when walking round the Well. St. Lateeran is the saint connected with the Dromtarriffe Well.
People are cured at these Wells. Invalids drink the Well water and rub it to the effected part of the body, but they are not allowed bathe in the Well.
A man owned the land where the Dromtarriffe Well was situated sent two servants to drain the Well. The
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 18:48
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horses etc when the time is getting late for anyone who may not have help.
During the Summer the potatoes are earthed or the ground raised to the growing stalks. Later the stalks are sprayed. When the potatoes are finished growing they are ploughed out and picked by farm servants and placed in pits for storage until their removal to the farm or potatoe house in beginning of Winter. The best type of potato grown in this district is the champion, or British Queen.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 18:46
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In Autumn the potatoes are dug with a machine called a 'digger'. This machine puts the potatoes in a row so then it is easy to pick them. The owners of the potatoes pick them accompanied by neighbours. The potatoes are stored in pits. The pit consists of a trench about three feet wide. In this the potatoes are clamped up and covered with straw and earth. The local types of potatoes are Kerr Pinks, Golden Wonders, Champions, Kidneys and Arran Banners.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 18:43
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"But if you fill it of the small". It will not agree with wrenboys at all.
When the Wrenboys gathered the money. It was spent on preparing a big feast where they sang and danced all night.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 17:44
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The famine long ago affected this district very much. This district was three or four times more thickly populated than it is now.
The blight came in the potatoes and the potatoes decayed in the ground, and afterwards in the pit. Then people had to set the decayed potatoes the second year and many people died of the hungar. The people got Indian meal and as they did not know how to cook it they died from bad food. A great sickness called the Plague followed the famine. People died in great numbers; they even died on the roadside going to the "sickhouses". There was a sickhouse in Newmarket just at the Charleville line cross; there was another "sickhouse" in Bourkes mill Kanturk, and another in Freemount.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 17:41
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Almost every place in Ireland has its "fort" In the district of Duarrigle there are three "forts." They are in view of one another. All these "forts" have a circular earth ditch around them and rows of trees growing upon the ditch.
Long ago a story was told about one of these "forts," which is in Charles OFlynn's land. It is supposed that a hare was in the "fort" and if anyone went coursing him out of his place the hare would run a field and would then disappear. The hounds would lose the trail and the hare would not be seen anymore until they would go into the "fort" again. Then the hare would rise again and do the same thing as he did at first.
In another "fort," in Joe Noonan's land a light is seen and then all the pigeons would fly out of it. The galloping of horses and blowing of horns were heard often and after awhile the noise ceased and got quiet again.
One night a man had to go searching for
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 17:37
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of streams are joining it. there is a field in Curraheen and it is called "the field of the dead" because the dead were buried there long ago.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 17:36
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My townland of Curraheen is situated in the parish of Kanturk and in the barony of Duhallow. There are seventeen families living in Curraheen, and seventy people altogether.
The family name most common is "Ahern." There are thirteen houses thatched and four slated. Curraheen got its name from the bogs that were there long ago. There are four old people in the district.
Mr Connell and Mrs Histon are over seventy two years of age, and they can tell famous stories in English but they cannot speak much Irish.
There were nearly twice the houses in Currraheen long ago. Most of them are in ruins now. A lot of people sold their houses and land and went to Australia and America and other foreign countries.
The land is nearly all good, and some field are boggy. A great number
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 17:33
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Seán Mór Ó Luasa lived about a century ago. He was one of the Ballyvourney Luceys, but lived at Bolomor, Millstreet. He was a man of giant build and giant strength. He was six feet eleven inches in height and stoutly built in proportion.
Man or beast had no terror for him. The strongest bulls were conquered by him. Often, when crossing the mountains between Millstreet and his native Ballyvourney, if attacked by a bull he would catch one of the animal's horns, bring him to earth and twist his neck. Then he would call someone to his aid, to draw the conquered bull's blood
In Sean's time butter used to be made at home, packed into firkins ans sent to the Butter Market in Cork One farmer used to take his own butter and that of several other neighbours in a horse and cart to Cork.
One day, Seán after his visit to the Butter Market was returning home
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 17:28
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It's of a damsel both fare and handsome.
These lines are true as I have been told.
On the banks of Shannon in a lofty mansion.
Her parents claimed great stores of gold. Her hair was as black as the ravens feather.
Her form and features describe who can.
But there is a folly that belongs to nature.
She fell in love with her servant man.
II
As Mary Ann and her love was walking.
'Twas close to them her father drew.
And as those lovers were fondly talking.
'Twas home in anger her father flew.
To build a dungeon was his intention
To part those true lovers he contrived a plan
He swore an oath too wild to mention.
He'd part this fare one from her servant man.
III
He built the dungeon of brick and mortar.
A flight of steps 'twas under ground.
The food he gave her was bread and water.
The only cheer for her was found.
Three times a day he did cruelly beat her.
Until to her father she thus began,
She said, "I have transgressed dear father,
I'll live and die for my servant man.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-19 17:21
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are several birds in my district namely, the thrush, blackbird, robin, wren, goldfinch, chaffinch, sparrow, crow, cuckoo, swallow, snipe, and the willie wack tail. Some of these birds migrate such as the cuckoo, and the swallow. The cuckoo comes in May and migrates again in June. If you see the cuckoo you will notice a little following him. The cuckoo never makes a nest and furthermore he lays only one egg.
He lays in a titlark's nest. When the young cuckoo is big she shuffles the other young birds out of the nest and kills them. The titlark thinks the cuckoo is her own so she follows him where ever he goes
The thrush is a handsome little bird and is a beautiful singer. She builds her nest on hedges and bushes. She shapes it outside with mud. She lays 4 or 5 eggs with brown spots on them.
The wren is the smallest of all the birds
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-18 21:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Some years ago when people made their own butter anybody who came into the dairy while the cream was being churned should take a few turns at the work for fear of taking away the luck and that the butter could not be made.
On Christmas night a candle is lit in every window and one candle is left lighting until morning. The door is never locked on that night, to show that the Holy Infant is welcome to the house.
On May morning green branches are brought in to welcome the summer. It is considered lucky to bring water from a stream near a bounds ditch on May morning. Evil minded people go and milk their neighbours
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-18 21:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A cat with his back to the fire is a sure sign of rain. When sea-gulls are seen inland and heard screaming it is a sign of bad weather.
It is lucky to be licked by a cow. People never like you to talk of animals - cows or horses without saying - God bless them. It is thought that is that was not said that the devil would have power over them. It is unlucky to find a dead pig in one's garden.
Sometimes when fowl die they are taken and thrown over the bounds ditch this is to take the death away and put it on the neighbours fowl. When a farmer is killing an animal for his own use - as a cow or a pig he never kills one of his own rearing. He buys one
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-18 21:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
If sparks fly from the fire towards a person it is a sign that money is coming to him. If the palm of the right hand is itchy it is a sign that you are to get a shake hands. If the palm of the left hand is itchy it is a sign that you are going to get money. If the sole of your foot is itchy it is a sign that you are going to walk on strange ground.
It is not right to dip a milky vessel into water especially into a well. Milky water should not be thrown into a stream but on dry ground. Never lament if you spill milk It is said that one of the Holy Souls is in need of it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-18 16:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
éigin tagaithe ar Diarmuid agus go raibh ag teip ortha é leigheas.
Do bhí bachach ag gabháilt tímpeall an uair sin agus d'airig sé go raibh Diarmuid breóite. Oidhche amháin do tháinig sé isteach chúcha agus d'fhiafhruig sé díobh a raibh aoinne breóite sa tig agus dúbhradar go raibh.
Ansan dubhairt sé gur dochtúir é féin agus go leighisfheadh sé Diarmuid ach go gcaithfhidís céad púnt do thabhairt do ar dtúis.
Ní raibh ach céad púnt acu ar fad agus do thug sé an chéad phúnt san do. Do tháinig ana áthas an an bhfear bocht mar cheap sé go leighisfí Diarmuid. Chuaidh an bachach go dtí Diarmuid agus thug sé luibh éigin do agus d'imthig sé leis agus nuair a tháinig an mhaidean do bhí Diarmuid tar-éis bháis.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-18 16:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Do bhí fear ann uair agus bhí sé pósta agus bhíodar ana bhocht. Do bhí aon mhac amháin acu agus isé an ainm a bhí air ná Diarmuid.
Do bhí ana chion acu ar Dhiarmuid mar buachaill ana mhaith do b'eadh é chun oibre. Lá amháin do thug an fear bocht fé ndeara go raibh rud éigin tagaithe ar Diarmuid mar ná raibh aon chaint aige
D'fhiafhruig an fear bocht de'n mhach a raibh sé breóite agus dubhairt an mac go raibh. Do chuaidh sé a chodhladh an oidhche sin agus níor chuaidh sé ag sgoruidheacht in-aon-chor mar ní raibh sé ábaltha.
Nuair a tháinig an mhaidean do bhí sé ana bhreóite agus níor eirig sé in-aon-chor an lá san. Ansan do chuaidh ráfla amach go raibh breóiteacht
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-18 16:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
de ar ghoid sé airgead ó aoinne agus dubhairt sé nár ghoid. Ansan do dheineadar an tig do chuardach ach do theip ortha é d'fagháil.
D'imthig na píléirí leó abhaile ansan agus do tháinig eagla ar Sheán agus dubhairt sé leis féin do dtabharfhadh sé an t-airgead thar-nais airís nó go ndéanfadh sé é stracadh as a chéile nó rud éigin [?] ná choimeádfadh sé in-aon-chor é pé rud a dhéanfhadh sé leis.
Nuair a tháinig an oidhche do fuair Seán an t-airgead agus do strach sé as a chéíle é. Ansan do chaith sé ar an mbóthar é. Nuair a chonnaic Dómhnall é do tháinig sé chuige agus fuair sé sgian ana mór agus do mhairbh sé agus do mharbuidheadh Dómhnall féin trí mí na dhiaidh san.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 20:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This was a day that was looked forward to years ago, as the people then hadn't such chance for amusements as now.
After mass on Saint Patricks day, the local band came out and its members paraded the village, and played national airs for a couple of hours.
At 3 oclock the young people went to the cross-roads, where platforms were usually laid, and there they danced and enjoyed themselves until cow-time 7 oclock. The older people generally went for a drink and some came away nice and merry. It was hard to blame them, as the drink that time was so cheap, porter 2 1/2 d a pint and whiskey 2d a glass.
Very often the young people were so anxious for the dancing, that they neglected to go to mass on that day. A story is told of a blind fiddler, who was a bit "tough" about attending mass, when anybody was round, who was anxious to dance to his music. On Saint Patrick's day, the curate, who had heard of the dance starting very early at Guiney's bridge, surprised the dancers, who ran in all directions. The blind fiddler, all unconscious of what had happened, continued on with his playing. The went up to him in a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 20:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This was a boy's game but girls played them too. A ring was made in the ground and a glassy marble put in the middle of it. A line was drawn on the ground, about 5 feet away and each one had to stand behind that line. Buttons were the stakes put down and they had to be good buttons too. Any defective one was called a
When you played, you aimed at pinking the marble out of the ring. If you were successful, you got another shot at it. If your marble did not strike the glassy, and remained in the ring, you were "fat" and told "to go home and cook the cat" If you wished to remain in the game, you could have another try, but you would have to put down another stake.
Very often if a player was second or third to play and other marbles in the way, he could hit them, if he liked. If he hit them, they were out and he could take up their stakes. This went on until all but one was knocked out. The last one own the game.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 19:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Muintir Uí Fhloinn a dhein an caisleán so ar dtúis.
Ba leo Muscraidhe go léir fadó ach do bhain na Cárthaig díobh é ach d'fhan Cuan na Dromann agus caisleán Dún Dá Radharc aca go 15.78. Bain Eibhlís díobh an áit an san agus thug dos na Cárthaig é. Cormac Mac Cárthaig. Do bhain ó Súillabháin Béara des na Sasanaig é sa bhlian 1601 agus thug do Cormac Mac Cárthaig é cun é thógaint ach do ghéill sé siúd é ar closaint do gur cailleadh Aodh Ruadh sa Spainne. Tháinig an caisleán thar nais i seilbh na gCártach aris ach do baineadh do Diarmuid Mac Cáthraig é tareis an cogad 1641. Do thuit an caisleán sa bhlian 1820. Deineadh teampall galldha des na clocaibh ach do leagadh an teampall ó shoin.
Tá cúinne de'n chaisleán na sheasamh fós.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 17:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Mrs O’Connor of Clashroe, Meelin, Newmarket, Co Cork owns the following fields :- The Loch Meadow, The Bog, Páirc na bPoll, Páirc na bhFíonán, The Cúinín. Páircín na gCaorai, The Roggy, The Kiln Field (There was a blasting kiln here formerly, a Blasting Kiln differs from the ordinary kiln.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 17:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Timothy Twomey, Clashroe, Meelin, Newmarket, Co Cork owns the following fields :- The Leaca. The Cuainín. The Four-Acre Field. The Kiln Field, The Rushy Field. Páirc na h-Inse, and Páirc an Réidh bhuail (?). The Narrow Field, The Big Meadow. The Cúinín.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 17:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Cornelius O’Sullivan Mínroe, Meelin, Newmarket, Co Cork owns :-
The Leaca, The Long Meadow, The Wheaten Field, The Coarse Meadow, The Páirc Mór, The Double Meadow. The three-corner field.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 17:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Patrick Roche Meenishal owns the following fields:-
The Kenny Philpott, The Páirc Bhán? (wán) The Cluain, Páirc na Loch, The Long Field, The New Meadow, The Lúb, The Roggy The Kiln Field, The Middle Hill, The Leacha, The Over Meadow The Middle Meadow The Sand pit Field, The Paddock, The Hayseed.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 17:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
John O'Doherty, Meenishal, Meelin, Co Cork owns the following:-
The Hedge Field, The Cuindy, The Coarse Meadow, O'Donnell's Field, The Kiln Field, The Step Field, The Field Below the Kiln Field, The Inch, The Black Field, The Barley Stubbles, The Round Acre, The Field near the Road, The Roggy, The Wán (Bhán), The Lawn.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 17:13
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Benjamin O'Doherty Meenishal owns the following fields:-
The Front Field, The Small Field, The Fine Meadow, The High Meadow, The Sand-Pit-Field, The Cuindy[?], The Coarse Meadow, The Garaidhe Buidhe, Páirc na Cuise, Páirc an Tuair, The Pig Réidh, The Well Field, The High Field, The Field Behind the House.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 17:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Patrick Curtin Meenishal owns the following fields:- The High Field, The Gate Field, The Middle Field, The Pound, The Field near the Road, The Field at the Back of the House, The Black Field.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 17:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Patrick Curtain Meenishal owns the following fields:- The High Field, The Gate Field, The Middle Field, The Pound, The Field near the Road, The Field at the Back of the House, The Black Field.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 17:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A poet by the name of Thomas M Kearney lived in this district. He lived in the townland of Lettergorman. He didn't live to be very old. He was buried in Ballymoney. He was a farmer but well educated and very clever. He could think and say anything and verses came to him at will. He often made verses about his neighbour and these verses were called skelliglists. There called skelliglists. There was another poet named James Collins. He lived in Drinagh East. He was a farmer and was educated in the model School Dunmanway. He was gifted and made many verses. He often attacked Kearney and answered his songs. He died in America at a young age. The local people were afraid of them as it was said poets were not very lucky.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 17:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Fairs were held formerly in Tullylease and Newtownshandrum.
The fair of Tullylease was held on the 11th of February and was called the fair of the wells.
The reason the fairs were not continued in those small villages was the population is two small to transact business and the villages are two far from the railway line.
In the six old fairs of the year the toll is paid to Mr O Sullivan as he pays a licence for these fairs.
The toll is 6d for Cattle and a 1s for a rail of pigs.
When cattle is sold it is always the custom of the sellar to give tuck penny.
When a cow is sold for about ten pounds 6 shillings is given as luck penny.
When a bargain has been made the parties concerned show their agreement by striking each others hands.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-17 16:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
"I'll go down first and if I get cowardly I'll shake the rope and ye be sure to pull me up." He was not two yards below surface when he shook the rope to pull him up. The second fellow was the same "Well now" said the youngest. "Ill reach the under ground world if I can." Dont ye dare attempt to pull the rope until ye find that ye have only a hold of the bare end." "I will be then at the bottom and when the rope is spent you can pull then." "If ye are living be at the mouth of this cave a year and a day from now and if I am living I'll be here then." They hauled up the rope and basket and took them home. The king felt very lonely after his youngest son and there was no fun or enjoyment in the palace since the day they left. We leave them there and follow the young Prince that succeeded in the tunnel. The nicest road was where he landed below, and, the greenest fields, and beautiful hedges, and flowers of every description.
He travelled on the straight road until he came to a Lis. He noticed fourteen open gaps in the wall round the Lis, and fourteen hares inside in the Lis and a man with one leg minding the fourteen hares. His other leg was bound up with leather belts. The Prince asked him what was his name and he said it "Cos fe crois" "How long are you there" he said to Cos "I am there all my life" said Cos "and will until the end of time if an Irish Prince dont[?] come the way "Leave off" said the prince "I think
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-16 20:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
for making bread. In this case often a kind of leaven called "The Plan", was passed from one woman to her neighbour. This leaven was not much different from yeast but was not so vigorous in action.
In most of the country houses in those days there was no table as we know them today. What served for table was a large box rectangular in shape and about the size of an ordinary kitchen table. This was called "cómhra". It was not only a table, it served also as a dresser and table requisites were stowed away in it until required. When potatoes were being eaten they were either piled in the centre of the table or left in the basket in which they were strained after being boiled and placed in the centre of the table. When porridge was being eaten it was generally put into a large wooden dish which was placed in the middle of the table and the family sat around. The same method was used when "cally" was being eaten only that a lump of butter or butter and milk
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-16 20:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once there was a widow woman and she has a son called Jack a very lazy fellow. When he grew up to be a young man his mother sent him one day for a needle, When Jack went to the town he went into a shop and bought a needle. He saw passing by a load of hay which was going as far as his own house. He stuck the needle in the hay. When he reached home his mother asked him for the needle and he told her it was in the load of hay. His mother gave him a scolding and a good thrashing and told him he was a fool. "Oh mother" said he "how should I carry it". "You should put it in your pocket" "I'll know better the next time" said Jack. Next day his mother
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-16 20:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Luighim leis na h-aingilibh, ainglí órdha
Is sia agus is sinne tá i gcathair na glóire
Tar a Mhichíl gabh mo lámh, dein mo síothcháin le Mac Dé,
Is má tá aon ní ar thí mo dhíobhgála cuir Críost idir mé agus é.
Luíghim ins an leabaig seo mar a luighfinn san uaidh
Faoistin go cruaith leat a Dhia
A Mhuire Mheidhraach sa Maighdean ró glórmhar
Tabhair domhsa radharc ar do theaghlach mhór chómachta
Solas na soillse agus radharc na Triónóide
agus grásta na faoidhne i naghaidh na heagórtha.
Dia ár saoradh agus Dia ár naomhadh
Dia ár gcosaint de dhíon ár bpobal
Aon Mic Mhuire le na féide
Cosain olc is earc is éiginn orainn
Teachtaire Íosa le olla Críost
Go raibh agam in am
A chuireas siola ar m-anam dhílis
In ainm Críoist a ceasadh ar an gcrann
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-16 19:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Do bhí bean bocht ann uair agus do bhí sí pósta agus do bhí beirt inghean aice.
Do fuair an t-Athair bás nuair a bhí sé ana óg agus d'imthigh an Máthair ar buille ansan agus ní raibh puinn chiall aice ó shoin agus ní raibh puinn chiall ag an t-inghean leis.
Lá amháin do chuaidh an Máthair amach ag bailiúghadh cipíní i gcóir na teine agus d'fág sí a h-inghean Cáit[?] istig ag tabhairt aire do'n tig agus do bhí an t-ingean eile ag obair do feirmeóir.
Nuair a bhí an Máthair ag theacht abhaile do chasadh fear ana mhór uirthe agus do bhí féasóg mór air agus is amhlaidh a chuir sé eagla ar an bhean agus do rith sí leí abhaile
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-16 19:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
agus dubhairt sí leí féin dá mbeadh sí ag bailiúghadh cipíní gach aon lá ná bfanfhadh sí amuigh chómh déanach aon lá eile.
An oidhce sin do tháinig Siobhán abhaile agus d'fhan an triúr acu in-aice na teine ag caint an oidhche sin ar fad.
Tímpeall a dó dheug a chlog nó mar sin do tháinig fothram éigin go dtí an doras agus do bhí eagla ortha an doras d'osgailt.
Fé dheire d'eirig an Máthair agus d'osgail sí an doras agus ché bhí ann ach an fear mór a chuir an t-eagla uirthe an tráthnóna san. Do shiúbhal sé isteach sa tig chúcha agus dubhairt sé le Cáit a bpósadh sí buachaill tímpeall fiche bliadhain d'aois agus dubhairt Cáit ná raibh a fhios aice chad a dhéanfhadh sí ach fiafruighe dá Mháthair agus pé rud a déarfhadh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-16 19:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Do bhí bean bocht ann uair agus do bhí sí pósta agus do bhí beirt inghean aice.
Do fuair an t-Athair bás nuair a bhí sé ana óg agus d'imthigh an Máthair ar buille ansan agus ní raibh puinn chiall aice ó shoin agus ní raibh puinn chiall ag an t-inghean leis.
Lá amháin do chuaidh an Máthair amach ag bailiúghadh cipíní i gcóir na teine agus d'fág sí a h-inghean [?] istig ag tabhairt aire do'n tig agus do bhí an t-ingean eile ag obair do feirmeóir.
Nuair a bhí an Máthair ag theacht abhaile do chasadh fear ana mhór uirthe agus do bhí féasóg mór air agus is amhlaidh a chuir sé eagla ar an bhean agus do rith sí leí abhaile
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-16 19:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Dubhairt an chailín leis nuair a bhíodar ag fágaint an bhaile ná dubhairt sé leó teacht thar-nais, agus ansan gur dhein a Mháighistir chleamhnas di le Seán mór.
Tháinig ana fhearg ar an t-Athair agus dubhairt sé go gcaithfheadh sí dul abhaile leis féin.
Do chuaidh an chailín abhaile agus tar-éis trí mbliadhna do phós sí fear eile ó Ciarraighe agus tar-éis trí mhí do phós sé fear eile agus do fuair sé bás.
Do dhein an chailín cleamhnas eile agus ní raibh a fhios ag an t-Athair gur dhein sí in-aon-chor é. Nuair a chuadar go dtí an t-séipéil chun pósadh ní túisge a bhíodar istig sa t-seípeal ná gur thuit an chailín marbh ar an t-urlár.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-16 13:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The following are verses from "Mo Craoibin Cno," referred to by Mitchell. They are said to have been written while Walsh was teaching in Waterford, though they would indicate that he was in Dublin at the time of the writing :-
My heart is far from Liffey's side
And Dublin town;
It strays beyond the southern side
Of Knockmealdown,
Where Cappoquin had woodlands green,
Where Avon Mor's waters flow;
Where dwells unsung, unsought, unseen,
Mo Craoibhin Cno.
Low clustering in her leafy screen,
Mo Craoibhin Cno.
The high bred dames of Dublin town,
Are rich and fair,
With wavy plumes and silken gown
And stately air
Can plumes compare thy dark brown hair?
Can silks thy neck of snow?
Or measured pace thine endless grace,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-16 13:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
you are the one man in Ireland most to be envied.' I answered that I thought there might be room for difference of opinion about that; and then after another kind word or two, being warned by the turnkey, bade him farewell and retreated into my own den. Poor Walsh! he has a family of young children he seems broken in health and spirit. Ruin has been on his traces for years, and I think him in the wind at last. There are more contented gally slaves moiling at Spike Island than the schoolmaster. Perhaps, this man really does envy me and most assuredly I do not envy him."
A little over a year after this interview, Michell's estimate of the condition of Walsh's health was justified in the fact that the unhappy man died.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-16 13:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
passed through; and immediately a tall gentleman-like person in black, but rather overworn clothes, came up to me and grasped both my hands with every demonstration of reverence. He was Edward Walsh, author of 'Mo Craoibhin Cno,' and other sweet songs, and of some very musical translations from old Irish ballads. Tears stood in his eyes as he told me he had contrived to get an opportunity of seeing and shaking hands with me before I should leave Ireland. I asked him what he was doing at Spike Island, and he told me he had accepted the post of teacher to a school they keep here for small convicts - a very wretched office indeed and to a shy, sensitive creature like Walsh it must be daily torture.
He stooped down and kissed my hands. "Ah," he said,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-16 13:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
passed through; and immediately a tall gentleman-like person in black, but rather overworn clothes, came up to me and grasped both my hands with every demonstration of reverence. He was Edward Walsh, author of 'Mo Craoibhin Cno,' and other sweet songs, and of some very musical translations from old Irish ballads. Tears stood in his eyes as he told me he had contrived to get an opportunity of seeing and shaking hands with me before I should leave Ireland. I asked him what he was doing at Spike Island, and he told me he had accepted the post of teacher to a school they keep here for small convicts - a very wretched office indeed and to a shy, sensitive creature like Walsh it must be daily torture.
He stooped down and kissed my hands. "Ah," she said,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-16 13:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The torrents that the mountain sends
Past storied cave and dew.
Through dale and vale, those streams that flow
Throughout its entire length ,
Add beauty to the vale below
And to the river strength.
But choosing neither hill nor dale,
Nor Suir's strong rapid stream;
But in the heart of Golden Vale,
Purchased the lands at an army sale,
And there worked out his scheme.
The mansion I will not describe,
The refuge of the feathered tribe;
Except that in the lofty court,
Through which the winds & Jackdaws sport;
Tradition says that there was here,
A window for every day in the year,
Twixt [?] and Shronell on [?] road
Was the site selected for his abode
The [?] Ava glides below,
Like a silver thread in the sunlight's glow;
Where sloping fields and meadows green,
Fresh charms lend to the rustic scene.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-15 21:22
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so the chief called all the clansmen to a meeting and made them swear that they would never pay the tribute as long as they lived.
When the king heard of their refusal to pay the tribute he was very angry. He called his warriors together and he told them to be ready to march next day against the rebellious tribe. Now the queen was once a member of that tribe. She had some time previously been given as a hostage to the king but she was so beautiful that he married her. She still loved the members of the sept. She went and implored the king to spare them, because she knew that her husband's huge army would overwhelm her clansmen, but her pleading was of no avail and she was very sad. After some time she hit upon a plan to save her clansmen. That night the king and his generals held a council of war. The king thought that his wife was gone to bed. She had pretended to him that she intended to retire for the night but instead of doing so she came and listened at the door of the council room and so learned of all their plans.
In the middle of the night when all was quiet in the king's palace the queen rose
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-15 21:14
ceadaithe
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Bhí bean ann fadó agus gach oidhche bhiodh sí ag sníomh. Oidhche amháin bhí sí ag sníomh ar fead na h-oidhche agus bhí an chlann go léir imighthe a chodla agus tháinig bean mhór isteach. Dubhairt sí "Cioram is cártham, snátham is níghfam is bréag scroid árnáin bean a tighe cúgam."
Dubhairt bean a tighe annsan, "Tá sliabh na mban bhfionn tre theinne", agus do rith an bean mhór amach agus dubhairt sí "mo bhotháinín-sé mo bhotháinín-sé" Annsan do dhún bean a tighe an doras agus chuaidh sí a chodhla.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-15 21:09
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Feach bun leathanach a 119
maireann daoine meadhan-aosta (Bill Richard &c) a chualaidh glórtha agus gáire agus gol nár bhain leis an saoghal so sa bhaile fearain so ist oidhche. Innseadar dom é.
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Bhí crann ann, agus aoinne a chuir tuagh i bfeidhm uirthe riamh cailleadh é. Thuit an crann sa deire ach má thuit fagadh ann é gan dodhadh gur fhéoch an aimsear é. Ní fheadar na go bhfuil cuid de fós ann . Tá lios comhgarach do áit.
Muircheartach
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-15 21:01
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Bhí banaltra (bean chabharda MOS) ina cómhnuidhe i gCeann Seana Bhó fadó. Oidhche amháin tháinig fear ag marchuigheacht ar chapall ag glaodhach uirthe. Chuaidh sí ag marguigheacht, ní tuisce bhí sí anáirde ar an gcapall ná bhí fhios aice gur fear marbh a bhí ann. D'imthig an bheirt aca go dtí go dtánadar go dtí tig. Chuaidh sí isteach agus bhí mórán ban i naice na teine. Bhí aithne aice ar chuid aca agus bhíodar marbh leis na blíadhanta.
Nuair a bhí sí ag dul síos san t-seómra 'na raibh an bhean bhreóidte do bheir bean ar a cóta agus dubhairt sí "Ná tóg deoch ná bíadh ná airgead ó's na daoine seo" Do bhí leanbh beirthe san tig agus nuair a tháinig an banaltra suas, bhí bórd leaghta amach agus gach sórd bídh ann. Bhíodar san ag ithe agus do iarradar uirthe rud éigin do ithe. "Ní iosaim" ar san bhanaltra, "Ach tá cailín sa bhaile agam agus tá cos tinn aice agus do bheinn ana bhuidheadh díbh dá mbeadh leigheas éigin agam ar.
Do thug bean aca an leigheas di agus dubhairt sí gan aoine aca teacht síos san chistin san oidhche gan a gcuid eadaig do chuir ortha, mar do tháinig an cailín seo síos gan a eadach ceart uirthe agus go raibh cuid aca seo ag ithe agus gur cathadar cupán léi. Thug an fear an capall amach agus thug sé í abhaile. Fuaireas é seo óm athair atá anois 51[?] de bliadhnaibh.
[-]
"Con Mick" a athair.
Is é do chualaidh coisidheacht nár saogalta taobh leis ag casadh na Caillighe MOL
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-15 19:54
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an seana bhean leis an duine what do you want agus níor fhreagair an duine é in-aonchor, ansan do bhris ar a bfoidhne an bean bocht agus do léim sí amach as an leabaidh agus síos an staighre léi agus ní raibh aoinne in-aonchor ann.
Do chuaidh sí anonn go dtí an áit na raibh an cniotáil agus bhí gach pioch di deánta ansan. Do tháinig bean isteach, agus do leighis sí í, agus níor tháinig aon breoidhteacht uirthi ón oidhche sin amach agus do mhair sí go socair cómpórdach na diaidh san.
Siné mo sceal sa agus má tá breag ann bíodh ní mise a chúm ná a cheap é ach brógai páipéir agus gártacri bainne reamhair agus do caitheas amach san aoileach iad.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-15 19:47
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Do bhí seana-bhean na chómhnuidhe i mBeal-Átha-an-Gaorthaid tímpeall cead blian ó shoin agus do bhí sí na chómhnuidhe istig i gcoill mór agus do bhí sí na aonar ann, lá amháin do bhí sí go h-ana bhreoidhte.
Níor ól sí aon nídh in-aonchor a dheanfhadh maitheas di. Tháinig an oidhche agus do bhí sí ag cniotáil, agus níor dhein sí aon t-súim in-aonchor don bhreoidhteacht a bhí uirthi, d'fhan sí suas go dtí a h-aon a clog ar maidin agus do bhí sí ag cniotáil ar feadh na h-oidhche go léir agus ansan do bhí an breoidhtheach ag dul ró dhian uirthi ar fad agus b'éigin di stop don cniotáil.
Do chuaidh sí suas an staighre agus do cuaidh sí a chodhladh do bhí sí go h-ana breoidthe ar fead an uair seo agus ní fheádfhadh sí dul a codhladh an oidhche sin go léir in-aonchor ach páisín beage di, ansan d'oscail an dorus agus do tháinig duine éigin isteach agus dubhairt
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 20:17
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coitchianta a bhí ann, seacht gcapall ag dul thart agus fear lé bean ar a chúl ar gach uile capall dhíobh abhí ann, do labhair Phádhraic lé gach beirt do réir mar abhíodar ag dul thairis acht fáir ná freagra ní bhfuair sé nó go dtáinic an bheirt dheiridh.
D'árduigh an fear a ghlór agus dubhairt go cáirdeamhail, cineálta "A Phádhraic tionntuigh do chóta ort". Do ghlac Pádhraic lé'n a chómhairle, do bhain sé de achóta agus do chuir air arís é leis an dtaobh istigh amuigh aige, agus sar a raibh deich nóiméid caithte bhí sé slán, sábháilte ag abhaile.
Ní fhéadair an fíor go bhfaca sé an seactmhar adubhairt sé, b'fhéidir gur ar a shúilibh a bhí an galar acht deir sé féin go fíor go raibh siad ann, agus creideann sé go daingean cinnte gurb' iad na "daoine maithe" a chur amúdha
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 20:09
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The following are the Local Place Names in Waterloo School district.
The Game Bridge.- so called because all the people used to partake of open air dancing every night. This place is near Garrycloyne.
Horgan's Bridge - so called because it was Father "Mat" Horgan laid the foundation stone of it. This bridge is on the main road from Cork to Blarney.
Putland's Bridge - so called because Putland the Landlord around Waterloo built it. It is in Waterloo.
Carraig na Saor. The rock of the wise man. It is in Mr Meany's land in Garrycloyne.
The Fairy Queen's Grave or rock. This is a big rock with a lot of small ones around it. It is in Mr Bolsters land, in Balligbbion.
The Cill Field - so called because there was a Chapel there before. It is in Mr Brown's land, in Knocknasuff.
The Kiln Field - so called because there was a lime Kiln here before. It is in Mr Meany's land in Garrycloyne. The 4 acre field. This is in Mr Moore's land in Balligbbion.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 20:00
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1. A rainbow in the morning,
A shepard's warning.
A rainbow in the night,
A shepard's delight.
2. When the cricket sings it is a sign of bad weather.
3. If the swallows fly low it is a sign of bad weather. Because when the flies come down low in bad weather the swallows fly low to eat them.
4. If the sky is red at the setting of the sun, the next day will be fine.
5. If the train is heard very clearly at night it will freeze.
6. Fog on the mountain and the river clear is the worst sign of the weather.
7. When the day lengthens,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 19:58
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caught up to them and took a piece of the tail of the herdsmans coat, but it was noticed after that the herdsman was very slow to sit down. So I think the bloodhound must have taken more than the tail of the coat.
One day Mac Carthy was jumping over the ditch of the field which the cow was in when his horse fell and Mac Carthy gave a swear.
The cow cocked her ears when she heard the swear and away with her to the bottom of the lake, and ever since the six cows come up and graze on the meadow.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 19:56
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not let go the cow's tail.
He said he would not let go unless they would give him a golden ball which one of the children was playing. They said he could have it, to come and get it but he said he had a touch of rheumathism in his knee and that it was inconvient to move the limb, but to bring the ball to him. He got it and said it was not half enough. Just then he heard the people of the lake talking about bringing out a bloodhound so he thought it was time he was going back to Blarney. The cow back-up through the lake and was half way up before she was missed. As she was going up she told the herdsman that no one was ever to swear in her presence or the spell would be broken and the six cows would come up again every night and eat all the grass off the field. The cow and the herdsman were just stepping out on dry land again when one of the bloodhounds who had been set loose
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 19:52
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which we have been talking about was owned by a man called Mac Carthy. Not wishing to have it like a lawn in front of a gentleman's house he told his herdsman one night to hide himself in the field and see if anything would happen that would give him a clue to the meaning of the fields bareness. The herdsman did as he was bid and just as the moon was at its full six cows came up through the lake and started grazing on the field and when they had gone there was not one blade of grass remaining. Next morning the herdsman related to his master all that had taken place. He also said that if Mac Carthy wished he would go to the field again that night and try to go down with the cows to the bottom of the lake and demand satisfaction for
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 19:50
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This is a story as told to a visitor to Blarney Castle in the year 1880 by Tim Cronin a hedge school-master and a native of Blarney. The visitor says he was rambling around the grounds of the castle when he came to a bare meadow near Blarney Lake.
He was examining this meadow when a man tapped him on the shoulder and said "I suppose you are wondering why this field is so bare while all the other fields around are covered with rich green grass. The visitor said he was just thinking something like that. "Well" said the man no one can tell the story better than Tim Cronin and I happen to be that same man and no better a man ever taught school under a hedge, in Munster or in any part of Ireland. "Well" this is the story. Long ago this meadow
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 19:47
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Two men were coming down from a farmers house in Garrycloyne with a load of hay.
They saw fairy men playing Hurley ball in one of Mr Murphys fields. It happened the ball went out into the road when the men were passing.
One of the fairy men jumped up on the wall of the field and said
"First man give me the ball".
The first man did not give it to the fairy. So he asked again. The first man gave it to him. The fairy said "If you did not give the ball. I would have killed you.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 16:30
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Many strangely shaped stones and gigantic boulders are strewn over the mountains, glens, and bogs of County Cork.
Cork people will tell you that the "Gobaun Saor", the wonderful builder or smith, who is the "Wayland Smith" of Irish Folklore, and his wife, had their home at Rath Goban, near Watergrasshill, where legends are told of certain great boulders and stones. Many other parts of Ireland also claim to have been the home of the great architect, who is popularly supposed to have built most of the Round Towers, stone circles, and cromlechs in the land, and some say, even the Giant's Causeway, though others attribute it to Fionn Mac Cumhal or Finn Mac Cool.
"Giants' Graves" and "Hags' Bens" are numerous. At Murragh, Co. Cork, there are some ancient graves marked by pillar-stones, which the old country-folks used to
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 16:24
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Tá an diabhal ró-gnóthach is is dócha gur fíor é,
Mar do stúir sé mé chun bóthair gan cómhnaidhe le'm muinntir,
B'atuirseach cráidhteach, mo cás dealbh deórach,
Mar a sgarus le'm máthair geal grádhmar na glóire.
Mar isé a chonnaic é go cráidhte cinn deórach
Mar a mbeadh rígh amadáin ag an ngárda dá ndhaoradh
Iompuig o'n scamaill cruaidh daingean na n-diabhal,
Agus do mairfidh an t-anam comhfada le Dia.
Níl ins an t-saogail seo ach tréimh-se mí-ádhmharach
Níl cúnntas ag aoinne ann ó indé go dtí amáireach.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 16:17
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Fear saidhbhir ag mnaoi boirb cuir mac De na luath ar a gcodladh
Dernadh Muire agus a Mac leis an greim
In ainm an athair agus an mhic agus an sprid naoimh Ámen.
Shuid Peadar ar lic Eóin
Thainig Críost ó's a gcionn
Eirig id' shuidhe a Pheadar
Go dhaor sin ort.
An té adéarfadh an paidir sin gach maidin Luan geóbhaidh sé fhathas Dé mar dualgas agus ní fheicidh sé ifreann mór go bráth.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 14:57
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Is bluire ní raibh ann dí
Is feuch ar sin mar clampar a bhí gealltha do Shéan.
5
Do siúbhaileagas cnoc is sléibhte
Gleannta cúmhanga caola
Abhfad amach óm gaóltha
Is gan aon túairisg fhághail.
6.
Sé deiridís le chéile ní aithinimhíd tú in aon-cor
Ce-cu fear atá le céird tú no stráire bocht an fán
Dinnseas pairt dem sgeul dóibh
Go rabhas ag dul go Beare is gur binn a bhí mo station
Gur fear a bhí le céird mé agus saor glan gan cáimh.
7.
Níor crádhaidh ríamh an croidhe agam
Cun gur gabhas trí Ínse an Géimlidh
Bhí cailíní an Mhoill úd am chíopadh is am crádhadh
Do strachadar mo bhríste
Is mo gheallaisí do scaoillead
Mar a fúair síad siúd an sgíllead
Ná creid pioc ó Shéan.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 14:35
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(feich leath. c 18.)
1.
Do ghabhas go Drochad Banndan aonac ceart na Samhna
Mise a bhí san am san gan anngar gan gádh
Do cheannúigheas blúire gamhnaig o fhear taobh theas den ceanntar
Is ní bhfúaras riamh ar ceann i ar cheabhraig ná ar chnáib.
2.
Tógamar linn anall í go dtagánamar thar Banndan
Do chuireamar í i gcablach ná raibh ceann uirthe ná sgáth
Bhí ceól is rínnce is damhas ann is súidheamar seal na deannta
Is ba ghairid dúinn go rabhamar gan meabhar seal gan cách.
3.
Núair a bhí sé in am againn cun glúaiseacht
Ní raibh sí rómhainn ná a tuairisg
Dúbhairt sa féin lem búachaill glúaiseacht is í fháighil
Blagáirdí na túatha á rad gur bfúid í suas í
Sé deinidir le thruagh dom nú an bhfuairis í a Séain.
4.
Suibhluigheas cnoc is gleannta cablach agus stéal
Ar lorg seal dom gamhnaig
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 14:22
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Colmáin agus aon líntighe de mhuinntir Duinnín agus aon líntighe de mhuinntir Carthaig na gcómhnuidhe ann.
Do bhí móin ann fadó ach tá sí gearrtha amach leis na bliadhanta. Deirtí nuair a bhí tighearna talmhan ar an áit gur chuir an tighearna geall le tigearna talmhan a bhí thall i Sasana go raibh móin aige féin ar an gCeanndroma níos fearr ná ag gual a bhí ag an tighearna eile i Sasana. Do fuair an beirt cead meadhchaint de'n gual agus cead meadhchaint de'n mhóin agus do thugadar go Corcaig iad. Ach mo léir do bhí an mhóin abhfhad níos fearr agus níos teó agus do lean sí abhfhad níos sia. Ach do bhí feall deanta ag fear na móna mar do bhí poill beaga deanta aige ins gach fód móna agus geir curtha isteach ionta. Ach mar sin féin do bhuaidh sé an geall.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-14 14:14
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CATAPULT:- This is made for throwing stones. It is made by getting a small gabhlóg [drawing (Y) here]. Then a strip of rubber is tied to the end of each spike [drawing]. A bit of soft leather is then got and tied to the ends of the rubbers [drawing]. When throwing, a stone is placed in the leather the gabhlóg is caught with one hand and the stone and leather together are caught with the other. The leather and gabhlóg are then parted as far as the rubber will stretch. The leather is suddenly released and the stone flies with great force.
CAT: This is also a game
The cat is made by getting a bit of a hazel stick and pointing it at both ends. It is then placed in the middle of a ring and one of the ends is hit with a longer stick which is also hazel. It then pops and is driven a certain distance with the larger stick. If one of the opposing players reaches it
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 20:58
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live in the district. 'Derrirneach' apparently saluted Mullane, but did not so much as look at Fr. O'Callaghan.
Fr. O'Callaghan was apparently annoyed at the way 'Derrirneach' dashed past him, and he is supposed to have said "Ha! isn't stiff he is, may be stiff as he is, his face may not be where his poll is when he is returning".
When returning that night 'Derrirneach' was thrown from his horse at Tower Bridge in Tower, Inniscarra, and was killed.
The priest said afterwards that he didn't mean any evil to him, but passed a casual remark about the independence of Derrirneach.
Many of the descendants of Micheál Derrirneach live in the Berrings district and when any trouble or misfortune comes on any of these the remark is quietly passed, "The curse of Micheál Derrirneach" or "Micheál Derrirneach's curse".
This story is pretty well known locally, and told by E. Lane, Berrings.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 20:55
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Some hundreds of years ago there lived in the Berrings district a man, nicknamed 'Micheál Derrirneach'. He lived in the townland of Berrings and had about 200 acres of land, being agent to the Colthursts of Ardrum, Inniscarra. He did not like priests apparently because he was aware that Colthursts did not like them but Derrirneach was supposed to be a catholic; it was even said of him that he attended at Berrings Cross to take note of those who attended Mass.
It was said and is still believed that he and his descendants were cursed for seven generations and that thirteen priests were seen in one of his fields one morning. This field some people call An Malacht to this day, while others say Mullach is the name of the field, because of the fact that the field is situated on high ground.
This 'Micheál Derrirneach' was one day going on horseback along the Ardrum Road, Inniscarra and on the road were chatting, Fr. O'Callaghan, one time parish priest of Inniscarra, and a man named Mullane, whose descendants still
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 20:51
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days that they do at present due to the fact that they were more dependent on the horse then, and because of that it was a proud boast of a farmer to have a horse that would take 30 or 35 cwts up certain hills. This often gave rise to a challenge at a fair or market or on the way home, due perhaps through having 'a little drop taken', to see who had the best horse, and it was pitiable to see 'herself' seated on a sack of hay or straw in the common cart while it rattled and jolted over stones and pot-holes for the roads at that time were in a wretched condition, so that such 'stepping matches' were quite common in those days.
It was usual too to see 30 or 40 'common cars' at a funeral, as there was no other vehicle at the time, and it was usual also to see many horsemen at the end of the funeral but pillion riding, the common cart and the 'saddle horse' are never seen at funerals or weddings now in this district.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 20:47
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At Berrings Cross there was many years ago an old forge and the site of the old forge is still called 'The Forge Yard'. The smith that worked there was known, and is to-day spoken of, as 'Con Gabha'.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 20:46
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The correct name of the 'Tobar Beannuighthe' which I described in a preceding page as being situated by the side of a bye road called 'The Stoney New Line' is 'Tobar na Mná Finne'. The water of this well was supposed to have special healing properties for sore eyes, and 'rounds' were paid there for that purpose, but no rounds are paid there now, and the well is scarcely visible being overgrown with briars, weeds.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 20:43
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in, yet it was often done by the poor labouring man after, or before his day's work for the farmer, and many remember instances where this work or the working of collecting manure, or drawing earth to the garden, was done by night with the aid of some artificial light.
When the ground was 'graffed' ridges were made, and the potatoes planted. When the ridges were to be 'first earthed' and 'second earthed', the earth was in many cases drawn to those barren plots by the labourer, on his back with panniers.
In this district were at least five 'Board of Work' houses - one in the farm of Daniel Healy, Knocknamorrive, Inniscarra, one in the farm of Con Cronin, of Ballyshonin, one in the farm of Thomas Buttimer, Ballyanly, one in the farm of William Regan of Kilclough, and one in the farm of John Desmond of Ballyanly.
These houses, consisting of a room, a kitchen with one room overhead, were built for farm labourers. The tenants were compelled more or less by the landlords to build these houses, but a grant was made after their erection by
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 20:39
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a field into the 'labouring-man's' yard where it was left during the winter and where the labouring-man mixed manure with it, 'turned it' a few times during the winter when it was ready to be 'drawn out' by the farmer the following spring for garden!
Labouring men then invariably kept a few pigs constantly which they fattened and sold, and also so as to have manure to mix with the earth for the 'garden'.
The wives of these poor people used gather the dandelion and feed it to the pigs.
In many places in the district can be seen traces of ridges amongst the most barren land. In these same places can be seen traces of houses, and apparently these ridges are the traces of what once were potatoe plots.
To prepare this ground for garden, the poor labouring man of that period had to take the rough sod off the ground with a 'graff', a hand grubber, and burn it when dry. This 'graffing' was supposed to be the hardest work a man could be engaged
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 20:34
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are remains of many little houses of many years ago to be seen in the Berrings area. There was a cluster of such houses at Lisnashandrum, Berrings, and many detached houses along by the Sheep River by the side of the road from Cork to Kanturk via Cloghroe. There was a cluster of such houses on this road, at a place called Vicarstown. This cluster was known as "The Village". In some of these houses were little shops.
In a field of Denis O'Callaghan's of Callas, Inniscarra was a very large house occupied by a man named Kirby, looked upon as a wealthy man at that period.
These smaller houses were usually occupied by farm labouring men, and near many of them, though sometimes built in very bad land is a little plot which apparently was tilled.
These labourers were generally given ground for garden in their employer's farm, and the farmer had to 'put in the manure' and 'put out the manure' for the labourer, which meant that he drew earth from
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 20:02
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
is an cailín aimsire suas ag tórramh an leinbh.
Tréis tamaill bhuail chúcha isteach beirt fhear is shuideadar síos. D'fhiafruig sí do dhuine acu an fada uatha an lá Dúbhairt sé sin leis an nduine eile "A síogh an domhain cad é an t-am é." "Eirig" ar seisean "a bhean foidhneach is beir leat a chodhladh do leanbh." Níor chuir sí aon t-shúim ann. Dhúbhairt sé arís is arís é. Mheas an bhean gur ag magadh fúithe bhí sé ach lean sé air á rádh. Fé dheire chuaidh an bhean anonn chun an bhúird is ann a chonnaic sí an leanbh slán folláin is é 'na sámh codhladh D'imtig an bhean léi ina codhladh agus rug sí léi an leanbh agus is sí bhí go sásta.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 19:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bean a bhí ann is bhí aon leanbh amháin aici. Tháinig a deirbhsúir chúiche lá is nuair bhí sí ag imteacht abhaile chuaidh an bhean amach á tionnlacan is d'fhág sí an leanb fé chúnamh an cailín aimsire na diaidh. Bhí an cailín aimsire ag deunamh seóláil[?] agus i gcionn tamaill bhuail chúiche isteach fear mór dubh a gheall sparán airgid don cailín ach an leanbh a seoláil. Scóláil an cailín aimsire an leanbh is chuir sí an sparán óir fé bhéul báisín.
Nuair a bhí an fear imtighthe is an leanbh scóláithe chuaidh an cailín aimsire ag áireamh an airgid sa sparán ach ní raibh ann ach licíní slinne. Nuair tháinig an bhean isteach d'innis an cailín di cad a bhí deunta aici D'imthig an bhean is thug sí léi cnámha an leanbh is d'fhíll sí suas in éadach bán iad is chuir sí i gcoiméad iad. Nuair a tháinig an fear isteach d'fhiafhruig an cailín cá raibh an leanbh agus dúbhairt sí gur rug a deirbhshuir léi é. Ní raibh an leanbh ag teacht in aonchor is fé deire dúbhairt an fear leis an mnaoí imtheacht is an páiste a thabhairt léi. Nuair bhí an fear imtighthe a chodladh d'imthigh an bhean is thug léi cnámha an leinbh is d'fhíll sí suas in éadach bán iad is chuir ar an mbórd iad. D'fhan sí féin
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 15:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
a nirt. Deirtear go bhfheadfadh sé tarbh do theactadh fé cheann dhá neómat act greim d'fagháil ar scórnaig air le na órdóg agus a mhéar thosuig. Mac baintraighe dobh eadh é. San am úd bhíodh taoisig ag tógaint crieche ó chéile agus nuair bhí Dómhnall sé bliadhna deug d'aois do tháinig fear de mhuinntir Dhonnabháin go Gleann Garbh ag tógaint chreice ós na daoine bhocta do mhair an uair úd idir an Ghleann-Garbh agus "Eadaragóil".
Lá bóg ceóch dobh eadh é agus bhí Dómhnall sínte dho féin istig cois teine nuair do rith a mháthair isteach. "Greadadh chúghat a bhligeáird" ar sise "annsún ataoi agus chuid do chómharsan scuabhtha chum siubhal ag an mbeitheamhnach ó Chairbre. Deirig Dómhnall agus bhain sé searradh as féin. Ghaibh sé an doras amach agus sgian aige. Gheárr sé slatracha agus do dhein gad díobh. Nuair shrois sé an Gleann Garbh do thóg Ó Donnabháin a chuallact leis agus níor fhág sé ac aon fhear amháin chum na beithig do thiomáint. Nuair bhí an gad déanta ag Dómhnall, seo chum siubhal leis agus thóg sé gach cómhgar. Tháinig sé suas leis an gcreac ag áit ar a nglaodhtar Doire Creiche. áit atá tímceall a's leath-slighe idir Droicead an t-Snámha agus an Ghleann Garbh. Rug sé ar
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 15:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
fhios agamsa cad is ciall le miorbhail." Do chuir an sagart paróisde gaire as agus dubhairt. "Tá suil agam an chead uair eile go bhfeicfir-se miorbhail de'n t-saghas san go mbeidh do bhrísde féin ort.
Sé brísde an t-sagairt-paróisde do bhí ag an sagart óg air an maidean san.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 15:15
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
XV
Sé Diarmuid a Craith d'airigheas ag innsint an sgéil seo a leanas i dtaobh Dómhnaill Cam.
Ar an gcéad dul síos caithfear a rádh nach ag tagairt do Dómhnaill Uí Shúilleabháin Bheara atáim - an taoiseach úd do throid i gcoinnibh na Sasannaig i gCath Cínn-t-Sáile agus d'imthig ó thuaidh na dhiaidh san go Caisleán Uí Ruairc.
Fear eile do beadh Dómhnall Cam cé gur minic a glaodhtar Dómhnall Cam ar Dhómhnall Ó Súilleabháin Bhéara leis. D'aon treibh amháin do mhuinntir Shúilleabháin dob eadh an dá Dómhnall agus Cam an leas ainm do bhí ar an dtreibh sin.
Do rugadh an Dómhnall Cam go bhfuilim-se ag tagairt do sa sgéal so tímceall a's leath slighe idir an Ghleann-Gharbh agus "Eadaragóil". Nuair do bhí sé na bhuachaill tímcheall seact mbliadhna deug no oct mbliadhna deug d'aois bhí a ainm ináirde le méid
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-13 15:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
leabhaidh go dithneasach (dithnsreach) agus tháirig air á chuid eadaig. D'imthig sé go dtí an t-seípéal agus leíg sé an t-Aifreann. Ag fileadh abhaile dho tar éis Aifrinn do rádh do bhuail bean bhocht uime agus d'iarr sí déirc air. "A bhean mhácanta" arsa an sagart léi "níl leath phinginn ruadh agam agus dá mbeadh thabharfainn duit é." Chuaidh sí ar a dá glúin ar an mbóthar agus d'iarr sí ar son Dé air aon leath phinginn amháin do thabhairt di.
"Ná deirim leat" arsa an sagart léi na fuil oireadh agus leath phinginn ruadh agam ach níor b'aon chabhair do bheith ag cainnt.
D'fan sí annsan ar a dá glúin ar an mbóthar ag impídhe air rud éigin do thabhairt di.
Chum a thaisbeaint di go raibh sé ag innsint na firinne do chuir sé a lámh clé na phóca agus thairig sé amach an líneáil. Chuir sé a lámh dheas sa phóca eile agus tháirig sé amach an lineáil ach céad glóíre le Dia do thuit spalla leath-choróineach amach ar an mbóthar. Thug sé an leath-choróin di agus ní fios ciacu ar an mnaoi nó ar an sagart ba mhó do bhí iongnadh. Thabharfadh an sagart an leabhar ná raibh pinginn aige.
Ba gheall le miorbhail é. Tháinig sé abhaile agus d'innis sé don sagart paróisde cad do thuit amach agus "mara miorbhail é sin" ar seisean "níl
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-12 20:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Very many travelling people visit this district, especially during the Summer months. They nearly always visit the same houses. Nowadays they do not sleep in the houses, as they travel in bands and had caravans of their own.
Some of them are very poor. and they only ask for food or money. and when they get any help. they always pray for the person. Others sell tins, and holy pictures, and laces, and studs and nearly everybody buys something from them. They usually stay in the district for a week or longer.
They never have food with them, but they ask for it in the houses.
The Driscoll's and the Sheridans are the best known of them.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-12 20:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The birds that are most seen in our district are:-
The crows, and pigons, the robin, swallow, starling, plover, sand martin, trush, and the cuckoo, the black bird, the crane, the carrion crow, lady wack-tale, hawk, the mag-pie and their king the wren.
The following migratory birds are:-
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-12 20:14
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Potatoes are grown at home. Each farmer grows about one acre of potatoes. The ground is prepared by the farmer, and it is manured before the potatoes are sat. They are grown in drills, and a plough is used in making them.
Long ago wooden ploughs were used there are none left now. The spades were bought in the shops.
The potatoes are cut in two each half having one eye. People help one another in sowing the potatoes. There is earth put up on the drills
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-12 20:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
mixture of lime stone and washing soda put into a spraying can and used in each drill.
The time for the digging of potatoes is October when dug out they are stored away into pits and left in the field for some time. Then they are brought into an out house or left and used each day for use.
The kind of potatoes grown are. Arran Banners, Arran Chiefs, Ker-pinks, British Queens, and Champions which are known to be the best for table-use.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-12 20:08
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Farmers grow their own potatoes in this district. They often come together and help each other by putting in some of the potatoes for each other or by lending horses or ploughs.
First the farm manure is put in, and then the artificial manure. The potatoes are then cut and put in and the drills closed. When the stalks are up the are "risen to", this consists of putting the earth up around the drills, with a plough. They are also sprayed two or three times
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-12 20:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
We have potatoes grown at home.
The ground each year varies one year about an acre and the next year not quite as much.
The ground is prepared by the farmer. The time for to menure for the potato crop is February or March. Potatoes are grown in ridges and in drills and a plough or spade is used in the time of digging. Wooden ploughs were used in years gone by and none of these are left at the present day. The spades are got at any country shop around. The preparation for the sowing of the potato crop is First the potatoes are selected for seed then cut in to what is called sciolans and left over for a few days until the ground is ready. If its in drills they are to be planted, the ground is first ploughed the drills are opened the menure is spread along the drills and the the potatoes are put down one after the other about nine inches apart.
People help one another in sowing the potatoes either in horse work or planting the potatoes.
The treatment given to the potato crop during the Summer months is a while after being set when the stalks appear the earth will have to be raised round the stalks. When the stalks get stronger the same is done again. Next they will have to be cleaned. Next they are sprayed and very often sprayed twice with a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-12 13:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
was dead in the stable.
The hunt used be heard regularly in Cnoc Firinne. Galloping of horses and the hounds giving tongue, but they used see nothing.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-12 13:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A wretched old building - now used as a cow-house was once a school in Knockfierna. It was also used as a Chapel.
A school-master named David Burns taught School there about the year 1826.
His pay was £6 per year or thereabouts. About 76 Catholic pupil's attended. It was the free of rent, and no donation from any Source was given.
The house is now owned by a family named Curtin
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-12 13:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
meisge gach aon lá ar feadh seachthmaine nú mar sin.
Ansan d'innis Máire do'n ríg cad a bhí ag Pádruig a dheanamh agus nuair a airig sé é bhí an ríg ar buile agus nídh nár b'ionghnadh leis.
Dúbhairt an rígh le Padruig gan bheith ag leogaint air go raibh sé ar meisge in aon-chor mar go mbeadh na daoine go léir ag maghadh is ag caint ortha.
Ansan nuair a bhí Pádruig tímpeall caoghadh bliain nú mar sin ana gearánach ar fad agus triobalóideach leis.
Ní raibh sé ró fhada mar sin ansan nuair a fuair sé bás sa deire.
Ansan bhí brón ar na daoine agus go mór mór ar Mháire mar ní raibh a fhios aice cad a déanfhadh sí leis.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-12 13:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Nuair a bhí bliadhain eile chaithte do dhein an Rí féin chleamhnas do Phádraig agus dubhairt an Rígh dá mbrisfí an cleamhnas so na pósfí in-aon-chor é. Do socaruigheadh lá an phósadh agus do pósadh iad agus isí an ainm a bhí ar an gcailín ná Máire.
Bligeárd mór do b'eadh Pádraig agus ní raibh a fhios aige chad a dhéanfhadh sé chun fearg do chur ar Mháire. Aon lá amháin do bhuaidh sé amach ag obair agus nuair a tháinig aimsir dínnéir do chuaidh sé abhaile agus do leig sé air go raibh sé ar meisge agus do thosnuig sé ag amhránaidheacht agus ag chaint ana ghreannmhar.
Do tháinig ana fhearg ar Mháire agus dubhairt sí leis muna n-éistfheadh sé a bhéal go gcuirfheadh sí amach an doras é ach níor leig sé air gur airig sé in-aon-chor í.
Do leig sé air go raibh sé ar
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-12 13:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
buachaill abhaile gach aon bliain agus do thabharfhadh an ríg próca óir do.
Nuair a bhí na ceithre bliain caitte dúbhairt Conchúbhar leó go ndeánfhadh sé cleamhnas do Pádruig agus do dhein leis deirim-se leat é.
Nuair a bhí an cleamhnas deanta níor thaithn sé leis an ríg in aon chor agus do briseadh é leis.
Ansan d'imtig bliain eile agus do deinead cleamhnas eile airís do Pádruig ach má dhein féin níor thaithn sé le Pádruig, agus ansan ní raibh san ceart in-aon-chor airís.
Ní raibh Pádruig sásta in-aon-chor ansan. Ansan bhí gach rud tré na chéile agus ní raibh a fios acu cad a [?] as.
Bhí gach duine ag cuineamh is ag cuineamh ar cad a dheanaidís ac ní raibh aon maith aon mhaith dóibh ann in-aon-chor.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-11 20:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
(b) Ardglass:
There was a great storm in the year 1921 and the storm felled many trees, in the woods and it damaged almost every house in the district and felled one, which was near our house.
A great amount of snow fell in the year 1903 and many sheep afterwards were found dead under it. Also, a woman was found dead under it. It was said she was coming from town and lost her way and was suffocated with the snow. This snow remained on the ground for about five weeks and when it melted away many small animals and birds were found dead under it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-11 20:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is hidden treasure in Ardrath. It is hidden there for the last century. There was a servant girl working at Carroll's long ago; she had two hundred pounds she hid it in the centre of Carrolls field called "Pairc na gCapall". The hidden treasure is supposed to be found at 12 o'clock in the night. Many attempts have been made to find it by Rodger O'Sullivan and John Hennessy but they never found it. There is another hidden treasure in Scanlons of Ardrath inside in a glen. There is gold hidden there. There is a big stone covering it. It is supposed to be found by three men at 10 o'clock in the night. Micheal Collins, Jeremiah Sheehan and Richard Scanlon went looking for it one night at 10 o'clock. Micheal Collins had a spade, Jeremiah Sheehan had a shovel, and Richard Scanlon had a pick-Axe. They had a light with them, the light was quenched and a white man appeared to them. Again, and again they lit it but it was quenched each time.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-11 19:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
was so heavy, because it is over three tons, that he brought it a few yards and then had to drop it, and it is there ever since. People come from long distances to try to dig it up. It was dug all round it by some men and when they had it almost overthrown a ghost appeared and they ran away, and never since did anyone come to dig it. It is very high and there are four little steps for your feet, and when you get to the top you would see all round you. The treasure consists of gold and perhaps silver.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-11 19:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
4. Pellick:
The treasure is supposed to be hidden at "Spaniards Cross", Ballynela. Attempts were made to unearth it, but there is supposed to be huge black dog guarding the place. The treasure consists of gold. Treasures were never found in the district.
Lights were once seen in the place where the treasure is supposed to be hidden. It is said that if a person ate of some kind of food they would be able to find the treasure but nobody ever knew what kind of food should be eaten to find the treasure. No one ever knew the particular spot where the gold is hidden. Micheal Fouhey saw lights in one of his own fields under an ash tree when going to the fair one morning. Next evening he went to the place where he saw the lights but he could not go near it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-11 19:15
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
are floating all about
And from far heights to the smiling morn
A lark's clear notes ring out
The walks that guard that temple are
The mountains all around
And joys for pure and simple
In that hallowed spot are found
VI
For from each homestead well I know,
Ascends the morning prayer,
All hearts are raised and heads bent low
To beg a father's care.
VII
And over all a peace divine,
The very peace of God,
I wonder if in Palestine
Such scenes the savour trod.
The man God was a toiler too
And earned his Daily bread.
"And oft He had not sad but true
A place to lay His Head"
Oh may the hardy sons of Beare.
His Sacred footsteps follow
And with Him heavenly pleasures share.
For those of earth are hollow.
God's peace be to you Castletown
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-11 19:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
And modest wild flowers pure and shy.
Are clustered round my feet
II
The tranquil waters of the Bay.
Are gleaming in the light
There seagulls, circle, poise, or sway
Or gracefully alight
Bere Island's towers across the wave
Still rear their heads on high
The wear and tear[?] of time they bare.
Its tragedies defy.
III
The hills around the headlands bold
Are clothed with bright heather.
And in due season gorse with gold.
Will crown them all-together
IV
The valley seems a temple fair
The dome the blue, blue sky.
The curling smoke like incense rare,
Floats up to God on high
The booming of the mighty deep.
Upon the rockbound strand
With the song of birds seems time to Keep
Like strains of an organ grand.
V
Silvery mists of angel form
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-11 19:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
My Town Land is called Finaha. There are not any families in my Town Land. The place near me is called Cnocán na mBád that means the Height of the boat. It got its name from a boat builder that lived there.
None of these people know Irish but can relate many strange stories in English. Harrington is the most common name in my Town Land. All the houses are slated and have a second storey in them. These people heard a lot of stories from their fathers and can relate them. Long ago houses were far more numerous. There were about eight or ten and the ruins of some still stand. Two of them are now used as cow houses. There were many more houses there that are scarcely remembered now. It is supposed that some emigrated and numbers died during the famine I do not know of this place being mentioned in any poem or song only a poem written by my Aunt a (Sister of Charity) who after an absence of fifty years paid a short visit and wrote a poem Entitled
"Summer Morning In Finaha"
I stand outside my hillside home.
That looks out over Beare.
The scene if far as-eye can roam.
It's calm and peaceful there
The sun shines from a cloudless sky.
The balmy air is sweet.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-11 18:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
76
If you saw a red-haired person the first thing in the morning it would be a sign of bad luck.
77
On May morning a farmer's wife would not allow a person light his pipe in her house fearing he might take away her butter.
78
If you entered a farmer's house while a churn is making, before you leave you are supposed to beat the churn for fear you might bring away her butter.
78
You are supposed to have bad luck if you put on your left shoe before your right.
79
If you brush the dust out the door, you are supposed to be brushing the luck out the door.
80
If you went to bed without having clean water in the house you are supposed to have bad luck for ten years.
81
If two persons are saying the same.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-10 20:09
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
scoil i gcionn ocht lá mar go mbheadh sí ós chionn aoise.
Ní raibh aon éadaighe aiche ach na giobail. Do bhí dhá caoire achu. Dubhairt an máthair le na fhear lá na caoire a bhearadh di indiu.
Do dhein agus do nig sí an t-olann an lá san agus do dhein sí é chárdáil agus é sníomh.
Nuair a bhí sé sníomhte aiche do dhein sí é dheilbh agus é chiaradh agus é a shnámhad.
Nuair a bhí san déanta aice do dhein sí gúna deas di, nuair a bhí san déanta aice do fuair sí bláth a bhí ag fás air a nglaodhtar samh chun é dhathúghad.
Do chimil sí saghas coinne sméarad leis ansan. Do dhearnáil sí é ansan agus do bhí sé chómh deas le n-aon ghúna a cheannóchfá. Do chuir sí cnaipí deasa air leis. Do bhí saghas
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-10 20:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
ag dul?" airsa'n firín beag leis.
"Táim ag dul go dtí an t-aonach" air seisean "ag díol thrí ghamhain "an mór athán tú ag fiafhruighe orhta?" arsa'n firín beag leis.
"Deich bpúint an ceann" air seisean "deich bpúint an ceann air na trí rudaí slacadh san ní thabhairfainn pioch duit ortha."
"Tá go maith" arsa'n dritháir agus d'imthigh sé leis go dtí an t-Aonach, ní thabharfhadh aoinne pioch do ortha.
D'imthigh sé leis abhaile agus ní go ró-shásta a bhí sé. Nuair a chuaidh sé abhaile dh'fhiafruig a bhean do air dhíol sé iad.
Dubhairt sé nár dhíol d'innis sé a scéal go léir di do bhíodar níos measa ná riamh ansan.
Ní raibh ach aon inghín amháin ag an ndritháir bocht agus dubhairt An Sagart go [?] sí bheith air
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-10 19:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
liom bó bainne a ceannach leis an t-airgead.
Do bhí árd áthas air an dritháir bocht ansan agus d'innis sé dá mhnaoí an scéal go léir nuair a chuaidh sé abhaile.
D'innis an dritháir saidbhir an scéal dá mhnaoí féin leis. Dubhairt a bhean leis go rabih trí gamhain ansan agus iad a thabhairt leis chun iad a dhíol an céad aonach eile.
Nuair a tháinig lae an aonaig d'eirig sé go luath chun dul go dtí an t-Aonach.
Do chuaidh sé go dtí an t-aonach leis na trí gamhain agus air a shlíghe dho, do chasadh an firín beag air sa bóthairín.
D'fhiafhruig an dritháir do an mbíonn sé ansan i gcómhnaidhe, "ní bhím" airsa'n firín beag "ach lae aontaighe 's margaidh, cá bfuilleann tú
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-10 17:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
uair sin.
Ní raibh sé i na chodhladh in-aon-chor ach is amlaidh a bhí sé ag éisteacht leis na daoine eile a bhí san cistin.
Ní raibh a fhios san ag na daoine a bhí ins an chistin in-aon-chor ach do cheapadar go raibh sé i na sámh codhladh. D'airigheadar ansan mar a bheadh sé ag teacht amach as an leabhaidh ach deirim-se leat nár dhein sé puinn fotharaim in-aon-chor agus do chuir san ionghnadh a chroidhe ar na daoine eile a bhí ins an chistin.
Ansan dubhairt a mhach leis ó'n gcistin, "an amhlaidh nár chuadhais a chodhladh in-aon-chor fós nú cadh tá ort.
Ní h-eadh ar seisean ach an amhlaidh a chuaidh sibh-se amach ag cuardach mo casóige nú cadh tá a dhéanamh agaibh in-aon-chor.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-10 17:40
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Níor ith sé aon rud ag dul a chodhladh dho an oidhche sin agus bhí sé ar buile.
Nuair a bhí an fear san tar éis dul a chodhladh do chuaidh a mhach amach feuchaint an bhficfheadh sé aon páirt nú aon [?] de'n casóg ach mo léir ní fheaca sé aon cuid de agus mar sin do tháinig sé abhaile airís.
Dubhairt sé leó ná bhfeacha sé aon cuid de agus dubhairt sé leó leis gurb' amhlaidh b'féidir nár cheannuig sé aon casóg in-aon-chor an lá san.
Is cuma cad mar gheall air anois mar tá sé ag duine éigin eile um an dtaca so.
Ceapadar san go raibh an seana fear i na chodhladh um un dtaca so mar bhi sé imthighthe a codhladh a bhfadh roimis san an
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-10 17:34
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
sé aon chasóg ba dhóbar ná gur bhuail sé íad.
Do cheap sé gan amhras go raibh an chasóg ar agus gurb' amhlaidh a bhíodar ag maghadh fé ansan.
D'fhiarrghuigh sé díobh ansan ar theastuig aon troidh uatha nú ó aoinne in-aon-chor agus níor thugadadh fhreagra air an bhfear mbocht
Ansan dubhairt sé gurb' amhlaidh a thóg duine éigin é agus nár a bh'fios é caithin a thóg sé é.
Níor cuimhnig sé in-aon-chor ar chonus a chuaidh sé ar an dtaobh istig de'n claidhe mar bhí an fear bocht beagáinín ar meisge. Bí sé ag cur de cómh tiugh agus d'fhéadhfhadh sé é do rádh.
Nuair a tháinig an oidhche do chuaidh sé a chodhladh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-10 12:17
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water stone". Scouts watched near these stones while mass was being celebrated.
The scholars kept the Irish language alive. They also helped the Catholic religion.
Once when a scholar was passing a ministers house he wrote a verse on a freshly plastered cement step. The minister said he would give seven hundred pounds if he could find out who wrote the verse.
The reason why there are so many turns in the roads is because the roadmakers should make the roads in such a way as not to waste the Protestants' land.
If you were seen with your hands in your pockets you would be shot instantly.
Everybody should close their
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-10 12:16
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field to hide. When the hunt was continued the minister cried "Mercy! mercy!. When the man that was digging the potatoes heard this he said:- "I'll give you mercy". The man hit the minister with a spade and he killed the minister.
Once When a priest was being hunted he went into a dike. A cavalcade of horses passed searching for the priest. Only one man who was riding a horse knew the priest. This man who recognised the priest was a Catholic.
Mass was celebrated in "The holy water stone". There is a big hole in the middle of the rock. This hole was used as the tabernacle.
The is a local field called "The priests' field".
Priests hid themselves in six big stones near the "Holy
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-10 12:08
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Butter was made in my district long ago. Now nearly all the milk is sent to the local creamery. The people had churns to make the butter. Some people had separators to separate the cream from the milk, but others skimmed the milk.
We have one churn at home. It is twenty years old. The names of some of the parts are the handles, the beaters, a rubber ring etc. The only mark that is on the churn is the makers name. We make no butter now. When we were churning, butter was made twice a week in the summer and once a week in the winter.
If strangers came in during the churning they might help in making the butter especially if it was very heavy. The churning is done in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-10 12:04
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The farm animals on our farm are cows, horses, pigs, calves, cats, dogs. Some of the cows have names such as, Blackie, Bawny Mor, White legs, Half Moon.
When we drive the cows we say "How! How". The in which the cows are milked and fed is called a stall. The stall is cemented. The way the cows are tied is : two bits of timber in the ground and when a cow puts in her head there is an iron on the top and when we close up the timber the iron is put on and the cow is stalled up. Cows are sometimes tied by the neck with the chain, to a stake. The tyings we have are made of timber. They are home-made.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-10 12:00
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The name of my town-land is 'Curraduff' which means the black boggy land, there are four families in it and the approximate number of people is about twenty-eight. The family name most common is Harrington because three of the families are called by that name.
The type of houses in this town-land are high cement ones, all being two storeys and two of them have porches. There are no old people over eighty in it. There is one old house which is in ruins and in olden times two families dwelt in it.
Several people emigrated from it to America in olden days but very few left it in recent years. Some of the land is low and fertile but more of it is barren and coarse and rocky being near the mountain. There are only two lakes of very little importance in it but the old people say that a child was lost in one of those lakes long ago. There is only only one river in it which flows peacefully to the sea and divides the town land.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 20:10
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that his right hand should make thee
A bed cold and hollow
Where in cold sleep it laid there
Young Máighréad Ní Ceallaigh
III
And while to this lone cave,
My deep grief I'm venting.
The saxon's kean [?] handog
My foot-steps is scenting,
But true man should await me
Afar in Duhallow
Farewell, cave of slaughter
And Máighréad Ní Ceallaigh
The scene of this terrible deed is supposed to be at Gortmore, near Banteer, but local tradition more usually places it at Dromscarra Faill Dómhnall Cásga is still pointed out. It is difficult to say how much reliable history is behind this local legend.
The chieftains of Pobal OKeeffe when turned out by the stranger from their lordly castles and broad acres led a wild and wandering life in Western Duhallow, where the people showed them that hospitality and protection which they have never refused to the fallen chieftains of their ancient race.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 20:02
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to.
the outlaw's cave (from Mallow). she accidentally let fall a letter which Donald found and read. To his horror he found that it contained all the details of a plan for his betrayal
He was so enraged that he then and there plunged his dagger in her heart and threw her dead body out of the cave.
In the following poem the outlaw addresses the corpse of his betrayer.
With strings of rich pearls,
Thy white neck was laden.
and thy fingers with spoils,
of the Sassenach maiden,
Such silks enrobed not
The proud dames of Mallow
Such pure gold they wore not
As Maighread Ní Ceallaigh
II
Alas, that thy loved one
Her outlaw should injure.
Alas! that he e'er proved
Her treason's avenger!
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 19:56
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It is remarkable that of the many great chieftains of the O'Keeffes of Duhallow almost the only one whose memory survives in local legend is the outlaw Donald Casga.
He is said by some to have been the last chieftain of the clan but others say that he was merely a retainer of the OKeeffes of Dromagh.
Whether chieftain or retainer he led a wild career among the woods and glens along the Blackwater and was ever read to rak fierce vengeance on the adventurers who now held the lordly castle and broad acres of Dromagh.
The legend states that his fortunes were shared by one Mary Kelly, who was eventually induced to betray him, and thus secure the price which head been placed on his head by British soldiers who pursued him. Returning one day to
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 19:27
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forming ballads about them.
On Easter Sunday morning it is an old custom that the people rise at daybreak to see the sun dancing. This is a token of joy and rejoicing at the resurrection of Our Lord. The custom in connection with May-day is the gathering of the "druicthin" the night before. It is the snail and its box that is gathered and placed within two plates covered with flour so as it will not escape and the "druicthin" is supposed by its constant creeping to write the name of the future partner of the person on the flour. The custom associated with Saint John's night which falls on the 23rd June is the lighting of bonfires in honour of Saint John who was a marytr.
The feast of Michaelmus occurs in September, on this day a turkey or a goose is usually killed and eaten for the dinner. The next feast to occur is all Saints Day which falls on the 1st of November. On November's Eve the custom that still prevails is the eating of the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 19:23
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supposed to cause them to decay after that date.
Christmas eve the people decorate their houses with holy and ivy and light the Christmas candle that night. It is a custom in this district to keep it lighting all night and to put a lighted candle on each window to welcome the baby Jesus. It is also a custom to have an abundance of food to last for the holidays. No house is without a turkey or goose for dinner and a plum-pudding is provided for dinner also. An old custom is still is still kept up on St Stephens day - groups of boys disguise themselves in old clothes and wear masks on their faces. They carry a bush of holly decorated with ribbons and coloured papers. Sometimes they have a wren and other times they pretend to have one. They call to every house and chant or sing the song -
The wran, the wran, the king of all birds,
St Stephens day he was caught in the furzes,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 19:20
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the most eggs.
On May morning the girls used to get up and wash their faces in the dew, and dry themselves in the sun. They then went looking for snails, if they came across a black snail, they were supposed to be married to a dark haired man. If they saw a fair snail it denoted they would be married to a fair man. If the snail carried his house with him they would marry a tinker. The people used not give away any milk or butter "May day" as it was supposed to to take the luck from the stock.
There were several customs connected with Hallowe'en. At the tea the people have barm brack which contains a ring, stick, pea, bean and rag. The ring denotes marriage for the finder. The finder of the stick will beat his partner. The pea denotes poverty for the finder and the finder of the bean denotes richness. The rag also denotes poverty. Nuts and apples should be gathered before november day as the fairies as the fairies are
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 19:18
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a custom in olden days to have the "black fast" in lent and the people would not allowed anything except bread baked with water and tea without milk or sugar. It was and is a custom to have hot-cross-buns on "Ash-Wednesday" and "Good-Friday". These are buns which have a cross of pastry on top of them. My grandmother is still alive, "thank' God" and she never remembers a Sunday by the name of "Chalk Sunday".
Any plant or tree that is planted on "Good-Friday" is supposed to grow. If eggs are put to be hatched all birds are supposed to come out.
An old custom connected with Easter Sunday is to fast so as to be able to eat a pot of boiled eggs on Easter Sunday morning. The people used to count the number of eggs they would be able to eat. My father remembers a man to eat thirty eggs and they put a sugán round his waist so as to prevent them from causing pain. People used to bet each other who would eat
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 19:12
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"A closed mouth catches no flies"
"The darkest hour is that before the dawn"
"He who goes a - borrowing goes a- sorrowing"
"After a storm there comes a calm"
"It is hard for an empty bag to stand upright"
"Strike the iron while 'tis hot"
"Tis better late than never"
"Avoid danger or you'll perish there ' in"
"Wide will wear but tight will tear"
"Where there's a will there's a way"
"The masters eye does more work than both his hands"
"Small leaks sink great ships"
"It is to late to spare when all is spent"
"Idleness is the parent of want and shame"
"Necessity is the mother of invention"
"Plough deep while sluggards
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 13:31
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a certain man who was one night returning from home from rambling. As he was passing by a nook in the side of the road leading from Muckanagh to Ballygar a voice cried out - Muna mbeidh go raibh salainn i d'phóca agat mharbhóchad mé thú. The man at once recognised him as being a friend of his own who had died some time previously.
From that time people say that if you have salt in your pocket when you meet a ghost, you are safe.
===========
A certain man who was getting poor and only having but one cow went to the fair this day to sell her. On his way he had to climb a hill.
As he was walking up the hill a little fairy came out from a field in the side of the hill. The fairy asked the man where he was going and the man told him that he was going to the fair.
The fairy asked the man if he would sell him the cow for a bottle. At first the man was confused and did not understand the fairie's request. After a while he consented and the fairy told him what to do with the bottle and to tell the bottle to do its duty.
The man did so and when he went home his wife asked him what did he get for the cow and he
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 13:25
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'The longest stand and the toughest hide,
Will bear away from Shercock'."
The yeomen then fired without orders
and fourteen corpses were laid out on the square next morning. It is said some of the Ribbonmen were fired on as they were crossing Leix Rocks and wounded or killed. The Catholics had no guns and informant things no Protestants were killed.
Several yeomen were put on trial for firing on the Catholics and FATHER BLAKE'S evidence saved the yeomen form conviction. This is also referred to in some versions of the Protestant ballad on the fight. Father Blake was the local priest and was endeavouring to settle the riot when he was pulled into a house occupied by some of the yeomen.
Owing to the Rector's condemnation of the yeomen's conduct on this occasion, one of the leading yeomen in the district left the parish church and went to the local Presbyterian Church which his descendants still attend.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 13:17
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are many signs observed in the sky by the sun, moon, stars, rainbow, and clouds. If the sun is blood red @ sunset it is the sign of frost. When there is a ring around the moon it is the sign of rain. When the stars dont appear in the sky it is the sign of bad weather. If the sun is clouded at sunset it is the sign of bad weather.
A rainbow in the night is a shepherds delight
A rainbow in the morning is a shepherds warning. If the robin is on top of a high bush singing in the morning it is the sign of a fine day, and if he is in the middle of the bush it is the sign of a bad day. If you see the crows perching on
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 13:12
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once there was man who got married and lived happy in the country. After some time he died and his wife went to live with her parents One evening she was cleaning the kitchen when a knock came to the window. She looked and saw it was her husband. He said to her "Will' you be ready to morrow night if I come"? The woman said she would. Next night the knock came to the window again. She went out without making any noise. She handed the man the bundle of clothes she had and got up on the horse behind him. The man told her to put her arms around his waist. When she caugh hold of the man she taught he was only bones. The woman said nothing till they came to a stream. When they were crossing the stream the woman looked down. She saw the man's shadow in the river. He had a skeleton's head and had cloth around it. When they got to the far side of the stream. She heard a black smith hammering in his forge. When they came to the forge the woman jumped off the horse and ran in to the forge. She shouted to the black smith to help. The black smith had a red iron in his hand. He stuck the red iron in the side of the door and the man could not cross the red
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-09 13:02
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the boat and through out my grand father R.I.P. and his companion. The other two men were knocked down in the boat. Three of the four oars were taken away and there was only one left. The boat was pitched away with the wind and sees.
My grand father was swimming with his clothes and shoes on. He swam after the boat for about two miles. He had to dive under the boat. It happened that another oar came under the boat. When they got the oar they pulled up to where the men were knocked out.
They pulled my grand father in to the boat unconscious. The other man
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 21:07
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The wild birds commonly found in this district are, the robin, the blackbird, the thrush, the goldfinch, the bullfinch, the swallow, the linnet, the lady-wagtail, the wren and the yellow hammer.
The most of these stay with us during the Winter, the swallows of course migrate and before their migration their movements are noticed by everybody. In our district it is common for them to come together on the electricity wires and then after a few days they leave and go to countries that have warmer climates than ours.
The wild birds build their nests and hatch their young ones during the summer months, they build their nests in bushes, in house-eaves, in holes in walls and in fences. Swallows build in house eaves and in the farmers' out houses, the wagtails build in slaty fences; all the others build in stone made and clay fences, and in bushes. The mean habit of young boys stealing birds' eggs is now very rare, it is said that those who steal birds' eggs will get sore eyes as a result. In Winter when the plovers come up close to a village it is said that a very heavy fall of snow is likely.
The wren boys hunt and kill the wrens and put them on their holly bushes for St Stephen's day celebrations. We are told that the wren is persecuted so much because he informed the Jews where our Saviour gone to, He was then pursued and captured. The tradition explaining the red breast of the robin is that the blood of our Saviour dropped on his breast when he was crucified on Calvary. The KINGFISHER, a very rare bird, visits infrequently, he is generally seen near the small river known as the "Athán" and it is said that much rain is likely to fall when he appears. A nest
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 20:55
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Horse Customs;-
When a mare foals and when the "CLEANING" ( that's what it is called here) comes, it is thrown up on one of the rafters of the stable and left there. Several of these - they're now like big cobwebs - can be seen in many stables. When calling the horse from the field the farmer uses some word sounded like "WHEG" "WHEG"
The Pig:-
The expression "Hí Muc" when driving her out of harm, is very common, as is also "Bain bain" when calling her. The expression "Hurrick" or "Hurrish" is also used, and as well "Cutcha" or "hutcha".
Fowl:-
"Feen" "Feen" for the duck; "tuck" "tuck" for the hen; "tee" "tee" for the turkey are commonly used when calling the fowl. The people use them as their ancestors did but dont know what the explanations are.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 20:49
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Locally there are the usual farm animals horse, cow, sheep, goat, donkey, pig. But the donkey as a beast of burden is only rarely called on now; he is gradually dying out and it being replaced by the pony. (Its just as cheap to keep a pony as a donkey.)
Cows get various names, e.s. Daisy, Polly, Bluebell, Dolly, White leg, and white Face. When being milked they are "stalled in"; This means that the head goes between two poles; one upright and stationary the other which swings to one side is then closed in and an iron clasp closes over both on the top. In this way the cow is held and cannot release herself. At times though, we see cows being milked in the open; they grow accustomed to this and remain very quiet.
Cow Customs:-
The old CUSTOM of the Blessed candle prevails in some places, when a cow has calved.
Ere being milked for the first time, the hairs on the udder are burned off with the "BLESSED CANDLE" and some holy water is poured on her or sprinkled about the stall. Then she is given to drink the first milk that is milked from her. the "BEESTINGS". When calling the calved people use the expression suk, suk.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 19:56
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he would travel on.
When he drew near he was sure it was a Goat, so he moved near it and as soon as he did it disappeared.
He did not stay out so late any other night.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 19:55
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The oldest school that I know is Berrings School.
It is situated a mile and a half from my house.
It is situated between a chapel and a public house.
The public house belongs to Mrs Reen.
The school was built in the year 1822.
One night when a man was passing down by the side of the school he saw a Ghost standing by the wall of the school.
The man's name is Timothy Healy of Rea
It was about ten o Clock when he was passing.
When he saw the Ghost he did know what to do so he said
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 19:52
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once when a man going from Blarney to Cork with a load of potatoes.
He left Blarney at eleven o Clock, he had two lanterns one one each side of the car.
So he just arrived at Mathey at twelve o Clock, and with the light of the lanterns he saw a priest at the right hand side him who stopped and told him to come in to Mass.
He tied the horse to the gate and he followed the priest in to mass.
When he went inside the door of the chapel he saw a number of people who had beed dead for several years. He also saw the priest saying Mass on the altar.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 19:46
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The only well Im aware of is in the parish of Ross and is known as "Teámpallín Factna".
People visit this holy well on August 15th, and make nine rounds each year for three years in succession in order to obtain the benefit.
I have heard of many invalids being cured at this well, even before they had fulfilled their full rounds.
Many people bring some earth from the surroundings of the well and rub it to the affected part as they believe in its early relief.
From what information I can gather I believe fish were never seen in this well. But I believe this water is not used for household purposes.
The water in this well springs up from the ground and is almost completely covered over with bushes, and which are never disturbed.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 19:40
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a holy well near the town of Ross which is called St Fachtna's well. It is in a field. People still visit this on a certain day which is the 15th of August. Rounds are performed there and prayers are said there.
There is no story told about this well. The Saint that is mentioned in connection with this well is Saint Fachtna.
People were cured there. This well is specially recommended for the cure of special diseases.
Invalids and people generally drink the well-water and rub it to the affected part.
There are no relics left behind at this well. There is no fish in this well.
There is no fish in this well. People tried to mock this well, and it failed them, and people tried to use the water for household work and if they had it on the fire for-ever they could not warm it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 16:33
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The following notes are taken from a Scrap Book of a prisoner named M. Fitzgerald No. 12452. Hut 15, Tintown, Curragh and also Section 1 Wing 2. Female Prison, Cork.
In Memory of Liam Lynch C/S. I.R.A. Killed in action April 10th 1923.
Light of martyrs lead to heaven,
Ireland’s pure souled warrior brave,
All his thoughts were always riven, Motherland's sacred cause to save.
Loved liberty had claimed his heart,
Yea; life he gave slavebonds to break
No greater hero e’er did take,
Calvary’s Cross for Ireland’s sake,
He soldiered well the soldier’s part.
The Yarn of The Flea in Cork Female Jail.
Did I ever tell you the story of The Fleas in Cork Jail?
How we “raided” our beds to nail them
And slaughtered the divils wholesale.
Yet one of the pests had escaped us,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 16:29
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Can bowlplay or goal with Young bold Thady Quill.
At the All-Ireland match between Cork and Tipperary,
That was played in The Park at the banks of the Lee,
Our Gaelic young men were afraid of being beaten,
So they sent for bold Thady to Ballinagree.
He hurled the ball left and right in their faces,
Showing the Tipperary men training and skill.
If they touched on his lines he would certainly brain them,
So they placed on the papers the praise of Thade Quill.
Bold Thady was famous in many more places.
At the athletic races held down at Cloghroe.
He won the long jump without throwing off his waistcoat.
Going twenty-four feet from the heel to the toe.
At the throwing of the weights there was a Dublin chap foremost,
But Thady, our sportsman, exceeded him still.
And around the whole field went the wild ringing chorus.
"Long life to you and glory, young bold Thady Quill."
At the Cork Exhibition there was a young lady,
Whose fortune exceeded a million or more,
A bad constitution had ruined her completely.
And medical treatment had failed o'er and o'er.
"Oh mamma," says she, "I know what will heal me.
And cure the disease that would certainly kill.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 16:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Air - "The Dingle Puck Goat".
Bold Thady Quill.
Ye maids of Duhallow thats anxious for courting
A word of advice I'll give unto you.
Proceed to Banteer to the athletic sports there.
And give in your name to the Club Committee.
But do not commence any sketch of the programme
Till a carriage you'll notice going over the hill.
And flying through the valleys and glens of Kilcorney
With our Muskerry sportsman.
Young bold Thady Quill.
Chorus
For rambling and sporting.
For gambling and courting.
For emptying a pint just as fast as you'd fill.
In all your day's roving.
You'd find none so jovial.
As our Muskerry sportsman.
Young bold Thady Quill.
Bold Thady was famous all over the nation.
At the sports and the races he was very well known.
There is no other young lad can court all the ladies.
From Bantry Bay to the Co. Tyrone.
There's not a young damsel.
From Kerry to Coachford.
But is wild to elope with him right with their will
There is no man in Duhallow, Kanturk or Kilcorney,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 16:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Ye maids of Duhallow thats anxious for courting
A word of advice I'll give unto you.
Proceed to Banteer to the athletic sports there.
And give in your name to the Club Committee.
But do not commence any sketch of the programme
Till a carriage you'll notice going over the hill.
And flying through the valleys and glens of Kilcorney
With our Muskerry sportsman.
Young bold Thady Quill.
Chorus
For rambling and sporting.
For gambling and courting.
For emptying a pint just as fast as you'd fill.
In all your day's roving.
You'd find none so jovial.
As our Muskerry sportsman.
Young bold Thady Quill.
Bold Thady was famous all over the nation.
At the sports and the races he was very well known.
There is no other young lad can court all the ladies.
From Bantry Bay to the Co. Tyrone.
There's not a young damsel.
From Kerry to Coachford.
But is wild to elope with him right with their will
There is no man in Duhallow, Kanturk or Kilcorney,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 16:21
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
machine, a needle, scissors, a thimble, chalk and a measuring tape.
In most homes shirts are made with flannel, flannelette, and linen.
Socks and stockings are knitted locally, but the thread is not spun in the homes; it is bought in the shops.
There are no spinning wheels in the district.
Some people wear black clothes at the death of a relative, others have a band of black crepe around their left arm, and more wear a black diamond on their sleeve.
"A tinker's wife and a tailor's wife never agree".
"The long thread of the lazy tailor".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-08 16:15
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
And carried all before it their lives and property.
Their homes were swept all were plunged into eternity.
III
Next morning what an awful sight
the neighbours did behold,
A country side of misery was covered
with turf and mold
They organised the party for miles to
search around
For the bodies of the victims they tried every inch of ground
IV
Before it reached Headford some
bridge was thrown down
And people cried loudly "Tis making for the town.
It was the will of Providence that broke this bog away
And emptied in Killarney lakes
Thank God I'm glad to say.
Supposed to be composed by 'Joe' Dineen (poet?) who was a brother to An tÁthair Pádruig (of Dictionary fame) - Joe died 23/6/1928.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-07 20:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I have a little heifer she lies near the wall and if I gave her water she would die and if I gave her herrings she would eat them all. (a fire.)
Headed like a thimble tailed like a rat. You may guess for ever but you could not guess that. (a pipe)
Long legs crooked thighs small head and no eyes. (a
Two apples on a tree one fell off and there was no apples on. (There was only one apple left.)
As I went over Westminster bridge, I met a Westminster scholar. He took off his hat and drew off his gloves and what was the name of the scholar. (Andrew.)
Riddle me riddle me what is that over the head and under the hat. (the hair on your head
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-07 20:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Ding de'n liobhán a sgoileadh í féin.
Ná glac duine coidhche ar a mhairg féin.
Ní n-aitheantas go h-aontigheas.
Feileann an feall ar an bhfeallaire.
Sroiseann each, mall muilleann.
Is treise tuagh ná tíghearna.
Is binn guth éin 'na choill bhig féin.
Is trom an tualach an t-ainbhfios.
Níl aoinne sa charraig gan a aindeise féin air.
An té a bhuailfeadh mo mhadra,
buailfeadh sé mé féin.
Marbh ag té agus marbh gan é.
Dritheár do'n bás an codladh.
Mara bhfuil agat acht ghabhair,
bhí i lár an aonaigh leis.
Tabhair rud don páiste is tiocfaidh sé amárach
An té bhíonn tinn ní binn leis aon rud.
Bíonn an-rath ar an srimileáil.
Bíonn cabhair Dé ar bóthair .
Ní sia gob an ghé ná gob an gandal.
Borradh ar aon ghé
Beidh rud ag faoilean fós
is faoilean éile gan seóid.
Más gréigeach an péacóg
ní pioctar a cnámh - mar a céile é do'n gé - an t-earball.
Teachtaire an Fhiagh ó'n Áire.
Cont'd at page 73.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-07 20:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Is ard fuaim na n-uiscí neadtrom.
Deire fir a shuan
Is bean á fáire féin suas"
"Bíonn múineadh ar fhear ó b'aois go bás
A's ní bíonn múineadh ar bhean go lá an bhráith"
"Is fearr lán duirn d'fhear
Ná lán gaid do mhnaoi."

Bean dhubh ar thosach an uilc,
Bean bhán ar thosach an ngrást
Bean ruadh ar thosach an tsluaigh
Bean gheal dubh an bhean is breághtha amuich.
Comhairle mná gan iarraidh ní raibh sé riamh ach sonaidhe.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-07 20:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Cómhairle a thug máthair Thomáis Ruadh dhó nuair a bhí sé ag pósadh:-
"Fan fada is bí foidhneach, a Thomáis
Ná tabhair-se léim caorach i nduibheagán,
Toigh-se bean éigin
Dod' chine bhreágh féinidh
A ghlanfadh an taonach a ghábhaid"
Is mairg nách comharlaidhe dhó bean.
Is mairg ná deineann comhairle deagh-mhná.
Ní bheadh sé na codladh is an líon ar an bochta.
Is fearr bean bheag dheas ná bean mhór ghránda.
Cara mná tighe.
Togaibh an bhean do réir a dúthchais
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-07 20:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
if you give it a fair death." Death said to him; "You can cure people now but you cannot cure them if you see me at the top of the bed." This man heard that there was a princess sick and the man went to the house where the princess was sick and looked at the top of the bed. He saw death and got four people to turn her head down to the bottom of the bed. That night when he was coming home he met death and death got angry with him and said he would kill him. The man said, "I know you are very powerful," and he took a little bottle out his pocket and said "I bet you would not go in to that." Death took one jump into the bottle. The man put the cork on it and kept him in it for seven years after that and no person died for those seven years. After that the man got tired of keeping the bottle in his pocket and one day he stood up on a high cliff and threw it
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-07 20:09
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The name of my townland is Kyle. It is in the parish of Killeagh and it is the barony of Imokilly. There are six houses in Kyle now and four houses have thatched roofs. Two houses have slate roofs. There were eight houses in Kyle long ago. The ruins of the extra houses are to beseen[?] to this day. The reason why my townland is named Kyle is because there was an old church and and old graveyard in it long ago. The field where they were is not far from my house. It is also called Purcín na Réilige. The owner of it is Mr. Thomas Meade. It is less than half an acre. I think it was never tilled. It is said that the work people did there by day was knocked down and carried to the graveyard in Clonpriest by night. A man saw a light in Paircín na Réilige one night about twelve o clock. Anoth
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-07 20:02
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
garr, páirc luachra, páirc fil, pairc na capall rásanna, The Ivy house field, The Tramway, The Lime field. The crucín, Cull na turan, The [?] field, Powers field, Carey's field and the Pump field. There were three tradesmen in Knockmonlea long ago but one went to America and there are two there now one is a shoemaker and the other is a carpenter. Thh people come from Ballykilty and Ballyglavin to get their work done by the tradesmen.
There are several old ruins in my townland including two forges, five on Mr Cotters land, Kidneys house, Hankards house, Linehans, Careys and Máire Faors and tig [?] Above boreen Cláire there is a cross locally known as Cros na Rinnce and also a boreen known as Máire faors boreen where the funerals went when they were going to the graveyard in Kyle.
There are several ghost stories attached to Knockmonlea. One is that a field in which was a fairy lios was ploughed and next morning the horses were found dead and the sods were turned over as if it was never ploughed. Also that a man was coming home late and as he was passing the quarry he heard Connors gate rattling and a tall man with a black hard hat followed him home. When the man went home he fainted.
Another is that Protestants were living at the quarry and when they died a big dog with chains hanging to him was seen walking along the road. Another is that a man was shot off his horse at boreen cléire and it is said that you could hear the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-07 19:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The most common weeds that harm the land are:- Thistles, Dogroots, Pishoe Buide, Swich grass, Spunk, Briars, Furzes, Rushes and Ferns. Swich grass, Briars, Furzes and Spunk impoverish the land. Pishoe Buide chokes other plants. Thistles and Dogroots grow only in good land. Rushes grow only in bad land. Swich grass chokes other plants.
Ferns Briars and Furzes destroy land and it is very hard to banish them. Nettles are a cure of Rheumatism and Rheumatics. Nettles are used for eating by the people and water-cress is also used for eating by the people. Nettles are used for curing by rubbing. Garlic is a weed that grows in a field and it is used for curing black-quarter in Cattle.
Long ago furzes were given to the horses to eat. The furzes were cut with a furze's-cutter. There is a weed know as Buacallan and it would cure a sore leg in a horse. There is a poisonous weed grown near the river known as Maca do haba. If you eat nettles three times in the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-06 22:09
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
duine úd - Cormac Mac Thaidhg, athair an duine úd - Cormac Mach Thaidhg Muscraighe - do dhein Cambden agus úghdair eile tráit air mar duine tábhachtach in aimsir na Bainrioghan Eibhlis. D'éag Tadhg Mach Cárthaigh san gCaisleán sa bhliadhan 1565.
Ba san seachtmhad aois deag a thosaigh beatha an chaisleáin i gceart. Sa bhlian 1602 bhí Diarmuid Mac Cárthaigh 'na chómhnuidhe san áit. I Meadhon Fóghmhair de'n bhliain sin, do thóg an Tíghearna Searlas Wilmot an caisleán tar éis léigear an-fhada san t-slíghe seo. B'é "Smith" an t-úghdar ("Stair Corchaighe") Thugann an cur síos dúinn (leath 159-160).
"D'éaluigh Cormac Mac Diarmuid Cárthaig, an Tíghearearna Múscraidhe a bhí 'na chómhnuidhe ann, ó'n Tíghearna Uachtarán. Ag an am gcéadna, bhí an Tíghearna, Seárlas Wilmot agus a arm in Mághchromta agus iad mór thimcheall ar an gCaisleán ag iarraidh é do chur fé 'na smacht. Ní raibh sé ag éirighe ró mhaith leo mar bhí na daoine a bhí istigh ró-laidir, ró-chliste, ró-chalma dóibh. Bhí eagla ar an dTÍghearna Uachtrán go dtiocfadh Cormac Mac Dhiarmada Cárthaigh ar ais le h-arm agus annsan nach mbéadh seans ag Séarlas Wilmot, ridire, imtheacht saor ó'n áit. Dá bhrígh sin, d'órduigh sé go bhfillfeadh an t-arm ar ais go Cathair Chorchaighe. Ba leasc le Séarlas, Ridire, filleadh.
An oidhche roimh theacht ar ais dó, thosnuig teine istig 'san gcaisleán. Is mar seo do thárla é do bheith ann - do mhairbhuigh na saighdúirí a bhí istig, muc. Do bhí easba uisce ann agus dá bhrígh sin, ní raibh aon uisge aca chun an muc do sgóladh. In ionad é sin do dhéanamh annsan, chuireadar an mhuc ós chionn teine a lasadh le duilleóga, chun na guairí do dhógadh dhe. Ach mo mhairg; trí thonoisch do chuireadar bothán a bhí san mbán ar lasadh. Do leathnuigh ar an dteine agus chuaidh lasair ó dhíon tuighe an bhotháin, isteach tré fhuinneóig sa chaislean. Do thárla go raibh roinnte geire san áit sin agus ní raibh níobh' fhada go raibh an caisleán
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-06 21:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Níor chuireamair suim uainn suas é amach i gCuimín.
Do chasadar anuas é is do marbuigheadar ar a stuaic é.
Is dá calma an tuairise ar buachaill i moill,
Do rugadar i bárr leó agus buachaillí Cill-Áirne,
Gleann-Fleisg a bhí go laídir agus lán acu sa choill,
Sé dubhairt Abby Dómhnall ná ragainn a gaol fóghnumh,
Is ná fuair sé leath a dhóithin de liath bhuidhe.
IV
Ach go deimhin geóbhaid sibh go léir é agus Betty Dick Leary,
Sweet heart of tumeréire is ná dearmhad Maggie Uí-Chuill
Ar maidin go moch Dé Máirt,
D'eirigheas as mo chodhladh go ró sásta,
Ní mothuighim sráide go dtí go rabhas i Sráid Neidín,
An té a bhí mála ag lár ghabhann a Mhágistir púnt a bhí dá bhárr is nár b'alluinne ár spree.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-06 20:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Another tale about Moll's destitution was given to me by Ned Buckley Knocknagree who heard it from his mother: Nell was so badly off that she went to a neighbour's outhouse one night to 'steal' even a turnip if she could find it. The dogs made so much noise that the owner came out and when he heard the movements in the outhouse he judged what was amiss. He slipped quietly to the door of the outhouse - closed it and hasped it and left Moll a prisoner until morning. Moll's poor husband spent all that night with his finger in the baby's mouth trying to ease the pangs of hunger for it.
Times were so bad, Ned Buckley and John C O'Herlihy told me that farmers had to watch their potato gardens when they were setting the sgioláns lest they (sgioláns) would be stolen. Many a farmer had his gun ready for such and eventuality.
On the other hand, a farmer in Stake Hill (one of the Leaders) had a pit of turnips which he gave to anybody who wanted some but his rule was. "Take one, or take two but take three and I'll take you'
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-06 20:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
madhbhán fíor ghlan ó Fhaoide, an doileasg o cúanta Cléire, an t-iasg ó leamhan adthúaidh, as an cneamh ó "Ballach Béimis". Innstear an sgeal seo mar geall uirthi.
Lá amháin cúaidh beirt bhúachaill ag baint easgrach in gleann ar a dtugtar "Cúm Naoisil". Deirig troid eatorra mar gheall an an easair agus d'árduigheadar a spela ós cionn a chéile in aoinfheacht agus thuit an bheirt. Tosnuig sé ag cur sneachtaidh agus thuit sé cómh trom gur, gur clúduigheadh gach áit ar feadh coighthíse 'na dhiaidh sin. Núair nár braith a múintear an bheirt bhúachaill ag filleadh abhaile do chúadar á lorg. Chúarduigheadar gac ghleann agus chnoch agus lá amháin do sheas an "Chailleach Bhéarra" ar bhárr Mhioscais agus dúbhairt sí in árd a cinn is a gotha
Cím ón áit na bhfuilim Cnoc Úaire agus Daod,
Cnocán deiridh a' Mhuire agus Cúalach réidh.
Mioscais na gCunnar mar a luighfhidh sneachta agus gaoth,
agus Cum Moisil a' trupaill mar ar cuireadh an da Philip cun súain aréir.
In dheireadh a laethe bhí sí ag teacht o Fhaoide go Cúalach núair a fuáir sí bás. Bhí a ciseán ar a drom aici agus é lán de thrupán agus de bháirneachaibh agus le linn di beith ag tógaint coiscéime o Cnoc Úaire go dtí Cúlach do leagadh í in aice na trágha agus bhúail sí a ceann i gcoinnibh cloiche agus d'fhan sí ann marbh i bfuirim carraige. Tá an cairrig le feiscint ann anois - crot mná agus ciseán ar a drom, ar an gcarrig
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-06 20:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Sometimes we know what kind of weather is coming by signs of the animals, or by the appearance of the sky.
Storm:- We know that a storm is approaching if ducks flap their wings and fly up. It is also a sign of a storm if a cat when she is washing her face, washes round behind her ear. If there is a blue flame in the fire we may be quite sure that a storm is at hand. When there is a dim circle round the moon, it is also a sign of a storm.
Frost:- It is a sign of frost if the fire burns very brightly, and if there is a great heat from it. It is also a sign of frost if there is a redness in the sky towards the west when the sun is setting. If the night is clear and a lot of bright stars in the sky and the air very cold it is a sign that it is freezing.
Snow:- It is a sign of snow when the air becomes bitter cold and the clouds overheed become leden and heavy. Soon the clouds burst and the snow falls. It is also a sign of snow when the north wind blows.
"Let the north wind blow,
And we shall have snow."
Rain:- When the clouds become dark and [?] and roll rapidly through the sky, it is a sign of rain. We also know that rain is approaching when we see a rainbow in the sky. It is a sign of rain too, when we see the smoke coming out of the chimney and instead of going up straight, blowing across from the chimney.
Good weather:- It is a sign of good weather if we see the smoke coming out straight from the chimney. In the summer-time it is a sign of good weather. In the summer evenings if the dew falls, we may expect good weather.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-05 20:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Fadó bhí fear agus a dhriotháir ina gcómhnuidhe i gCúmar Cáin. An saghas bórd a bhí aige, ní raibh aon chos fé, agus lá amháin bhí sé ag ithe a dhínnéir inaonacht leis a dhriotháir agus bhí an bórd shúas ar a dhá ghlúin acu i lár an urláir. Tháinig muc isteach agus bhí sí ag [?] gach aon rud a bhí sa tig. Sa deire d'eirig an fear chúiche agus níor chuimhnig sé go ar an mbórd inaonchor agus thuit an bórd chun úrláir agus na h-áristhighe go léir a bhí ináirde air do briseadh iad ar an úrlár. Bhí an fear ar buile annsan agus deirimse leat gur dhíol an mhuc as leis an fuip.
Na cístí a bhíodh acu fadó thugaidís cabhra ortha agus núair
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-05 20:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
bataí. Do leigidis annsan é go dtí go mbíodh sé cuibhseach fuar. Annsan do thosnuighidis chun na cístí a dhéanamh.
Ar dtúis do gheibhidis dornán mine agus cúpla dornán min coirce agus do chaithidis isteach sa leite iad agus gráin sóid agus salann. Do fhuinnidís é go maith go dtí go mbíodh sé bacálta. San uair sin do bhíodh saghas búird aca cun na béilí d'ithe. Do bhíodh aon chos amháin fé 'na sheasamh ar an úrláír agus clár adhmaidh leatheann anuas air ar nós dorus beag. Nuair a bhíodh síad ag ithe do bhíodh sé tairringhe suas treasna an teine agus nuair a bhíodh síad criochnuighte do crochaidis suas leis an raca aris é. Do bhíodh na h-eisc níos flúirseac ná an fheoil aca. An colnóir na h-eisc is mo a bhíodh aca
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-05 20:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
San am fadó do bhíodh sé ana chruaidh ar na daoine. Do bhíodh síad ag obair ó mhaidin go h-oidhche gan aon stad. Nuair a thagadh am na prátaí. D'eirighidis roimh eirighe gréine agus do dhéanadh síad an teine agus do chrochaidis corcán prataí air. Do téighidis amach annsan ag baint na prátaí agus nuair a bheadh smuit aca bainte do thiocaidis isteach arís. Do leigidís na prátaí beirithe amach ar an mbórd agus d'itheadh síad iad. Uaireanta eile do bhíodh cístí mine aca agus do glaodis ortha cístí buidhe. Is é seo saghas cístí eile a dheinisis. Ar dtuis do líonaidis corcán uisce agus do crochaidis ar an dteine é, do leigidis annsan é go dtí go mbiodh sé teasaidhe Annsan do geibhidis min mín agus min garbh. Do chaíthidis isteach san uisce iad agus meascaidis trí na céile iad le
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-05 19:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
stable and began to sprinkle the whiskey on the dunghill. The men watching in the stable saw the old woman on the dunghill and smelled the whiskey. One of them went over and got one of the quarts of whiskey from her. When the quart was drank they said that she might have another, so one of them went over to her and got the second quart of whiskey from her and they drank it, and they all got drunk and the man in the saddle fell off and they all fell down drunk and they didn't know anything. Then the boy went into the stable, got up on the horse and rode him home.
The rich man said that that was very good, but that he'd give him another task to do, and that was to rob a mag's nest without putting the mag off it. So the boy got a hat and stole up the tree where the mag was sitting on her nest. He put his fingurs through the bottom of the hat, and then put the same fingurs up through the bottom of the nest and made a hole
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-05 19:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Cherry field, The pond field, The high field, The lower field, The haggart field, The Narrow field The big field, The fieldeen, and The cross field belong to my father.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-05 19:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are several fields in this locality with Irish names but there are some with English names and they are as follows:-
Paircín Árd, Cnocán Géar, Cúinne Thaidhgín Lane, belonging to Mr., Barry of Carrigane.
Sean-bhaile is also a field in Carrigane owned by Mr., Cotter, it is so called because there was a little village there many years ago. It is said that people would go astray there in the night time.
Páirc na Mainistir is also a field in Carrigane where there was a Monastry some years ago
Páirc na muc and glean na muc, Móin na nGleann and Gleann Ruadh, Straithin belongs to Mr., Gleeson of Curragh.
Páircín na Spout, Páircín na mbó, Páirc na leath thama, and lothrach belong to Mr., Cotter of Carrigane
Páircín na gcapall, Móin tá an gáirbh, Móinfhéir mór Cnocáin na tadhac, gleann na púca, belong to my father.
Lábán, bán na gréine, an sliabh mór, claise clé, Gleann na Geit, leabaidh na bó bána, I do not know who owns them.
The pipers field, The kiln field, The barrack field, The half moon belong to Mr., Gleeson.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-05 19:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
a long slab of iron called the table. This table was fitted with wires the width of a brick apart.
When the clay was out far enough usually the width of about twelve bricks it was forced through the wires on to a sanded board, the reason the board was sanded was, because the wet newly made bricks would not cling to the board.
Two men one at each end would catch hold of the board of bricks and place it on a barrow specially made for this purpose. This barrow would hold three boards and it was then rolled away to a long open shed called a shack. The man then unloaded the barrow with an implement called a fork. This fork has a small wooden handle with two prongs about four inches apart and one inch in length which he stuck in the brick to take it off the board as the bricks being wet and soft cannot be handled by the hand. After a period of drying in the shack it usually depends on the weather the bricks are then put into another different shaped barrow and rolled into the kiln and burned red. The average out-put every day was six thousand five hundred to seven thousand. This pottery is closed since 1915.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-05 19:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
At one time there was a pottery in Belvelly for making red brick which were made as follows:- First the clay was dug up and brought to the mill in small waggons usually shoved on rails by two men. The clay was then put down between two immense iron rollers to crush any small stones etc.
From the rollers the clay dropped down into a mill called the pug Mill. The clay was then sprayed with water and forced out in the bottom through a shape called a die, out on to
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-04 21:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
choda on bfear láidir agus tá fhuighleach bhídh anocht againn."
'Nuair tháinig an oidhche do cuadar go léir chun suain agus do bhí Seacrán d'a bhfaire. 'Nuair shaoil sé go rabhadar go léir 'na gcodladh. d'éirig agus do sháithídh sé biorán suain is gach aon neach go dtáinig sé go dtí Conán, an fear dhéidhneach. Do preab Conán 'na suidhe agus d'fiafruigh do bhitheamnach cad do cheap sé do déanamh nú ar meas sé an Fhiann go léir do chuir chun bháis Dubhairt Seachrán nar cheap agus luighe sios agus codhladh. Do shuidh Seacrán ag an dteine agus tháinig an cnag ar an doras agus dubairt oschailt Dubhairt Seachrán nach osglóchadh sé agus d'iarr sí arís osgailt go raibh teachdaireact aici chuighe D'freagair Seachráin má, bhí teacht annso in-áirde ins an tsimné agus go dtóghfadh sé uaithi é. Níor tuisge sin na do bhí sé inairdé agus do shínn sé a lámh annuas agus litir innte. Rug sé ar a lámh agus do geárr í ó'n gualainn di. Do thóg an litir agus do chaith an lámh i dtaobh thiar na teineadh. Nuair rud an teine ar
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-04 21:29
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
do. Dubhairt sí nár aithin sí é agus nach leigfeadh isteach é cum go dtigead Fionn. Thus sé a gual do'n doras agus bhuail sé siar an an gcliathán eile de'n réidh theaghlach é. Do phreabh sean-Ghráinne Barróid 'na seasamh, agus do rinne sí sios air agus do bhuail sí le leangaire bhaisé é do chuir an rialáil síos go tóin an réidh teigleach é. Tháin[?] aníos agus ní dhearnáidh aon tsuim de. Do rinn ar an mbhiadh agus do crom ar é ullmhughadh; do leag amach an bhórd agus do chuir a chuid féin [?] i láthair gach aon fir. Tháinig Fionn agus an Fhiann agus do shuidheadar síos chun bídh. Nuair do bhíodar go léir sásta do bhí fuighleach indiad gach[?] aon fhir. D'fhiafruigh Fionn "cad é a chúis é seo Do thugann sé níos mó bhídh 'ná shoin dom fheraibh agus ní fhaca riamh a bhfuighleach". "Inneosad-se dhuit" dubhairt Seachrán caidé an chuis é seo. Do caithtea-sa i [?] chuacha é; acht ní mar sin do rinneas-sa é, acht do chuireas a cuid féin i láthair gach aon fir agus ní raibh an fear láidir a breith a choda ón bfear lag ná an fear lag ag bhreith a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-04 21:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1.
If the sky is dark and the clouds grey and low we know rain is near.
2.
When the sun rises red or if shines it out very brightly early in the morning we expect rain before night-fall.
3.
The new moon coming on its back or as we say turned up side down this is supposed to bring bad weather.
4.
When there is a hailo around the moon at night it is a sign of rain.
5.
When the stars are dull and cannot be seen very plainly rainy weather is approaching.
6.
When the starlings and crows are in flocks or when the swallows fly near to the ground then surely rain is near.
7.
Ducks quackling loudly is a sign of rain.
8.
When a pig snors loudly we may expect rain.
9.
When the sheep come lowland and when the heifers cluster under bushes there is a storm approaching.
10.
When the cat sits near the fire and cannot be kept away from it we may expect rain.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-04 18:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Do bhí ana fhearg air ach níor leog sé air pioc.
Ansan nuair a bhí na prataí go léir bainte aige do chuir sé íad go léir isteach i dtigín beag
Nuair a tháinig an oidhche d'fhan sé sa tig feuchaint a dtiochfhadh aoinne chun na prátaí do goid.
I láir na h-oidhche tháinig an tínncéir agus níor connaic sé an fear in-aon-chor agus do thóg sé mála mór prátaí
Ní dubhairt an fear saidhbhir pioc ach ar maidin chuaidh sé go dtí na gárdaí.
D'innis sé an sgéul go léir do mar gheall ar an tínncéir
Do tánadar cuige agus d'fiafruigheadar don tínncéir cad na thaobh gur goid sé na prátaí on bhfear san.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-04 18:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Do bhí fear ann úair agus tá sé tímpeall céad bliain ó shoin.
Do bhí sé ana saidhbhir ar fadh agus do bhí sé pósta le bean saidhbhir leis.
Pádruig ab' ainm don b'fhear pé ainm a bhí ar an bhean agus lá amháin do tháinigh tínncéir cúcha agus d'fhiarr sé biadh ach ní bhfuair sé é agus d'imthig sé agus guidh sé prátaí ón bhfear saidhbhir.
Ar maidin d'eirigh sé agus chuaidh sé go dtí an pháirc agus d'feuch sé mór tímpeall an gáirdín.
Connaich sé go raibh mór cuid des na prátaí breághtha imtigthe
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-04 18:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhí árd áthas ar an rígh agus thug sé a inghean do lé pósadh agus do bhí bainnise maith aca ar feadh seachtmhaine agus do bhí fleath agus féasta acha ar feadh na h aimsire sin go léir agus mhaireadar go compórdach as san amac.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-03 19:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
t-aonach ad' iarraidh an crioceann a dhíol ach ní cheannóchadh aoinne uaim é ar aon-chuma" ar seisean. "Agus cad a dheinis leis" ar sise "b'éigin dom a dhíol fé dheire ar cúig sgillinge" ar seisean "airiú" ar sise "Ní h-aon duine thusa i gcóir aontaig ná margaidh" ar sise "Cad na thaobh ná bíonn tú mar do dhrithár agus na margaidh a dheineann sé.
"Á" ar seisean "bíonn an t-ádh leis sin i gcómhnaidhe agus tá sé ana cháirdeamhail leis an bhfirín mbeag agus ó's rud é go bhfuilimíd saidhbhir ní bhíonn aon truagh aige dhúinn agus óir tá an fear eile chómh bocht go mbíonn truagh aige do agus siné an cúis go ndíolann sé go maith é as gach aon rud a dheineann sé."
Do chasadh an fear bocht ar an bhfear saidhbhir cúpla lá 'na dhiaidh san "Ar mharbhuighís an bó dubh san?" arsa'n drithár bocht leis an ndrithár saidhbhir. "Do mharbhuigheas mhaise" ar seisean "agus do bhaineas an croiceann de. " "Agus cad a dheinis leis?"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-03 18:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
7.
Paidir.
Na seacht n-Aingil is sine
Na seacht n-Aingil is órtha
Na seacht n-Aingil is mó chómhacht
i gCathair na Glóire
Ár ngárdáil ár sabháil is ár seoladh
Is ag breith ár n-anam go Cathair na Glóire.
8.
An taidhbhreamh a deineadh do Pól
Is é ag dul go Róimh na Reamh
D'innis Pól do Chríost é
Agus dubhairt Críost gur mhaith,
Breith Muire agus a Mic ar árd-aidhreamh
Nimh ár n-aisling ar ár naimhde
Sinn féin agus ár ndaoine go maith.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-03 18:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Tá mo chosa ró-thinn
Is a leigheas ag an aon-mhac
Is mé gan costas gan oidhreacht
Gan saidhbhreas gan séada
Mar bheaca nuair a cailltear
Idir cadhain mil agus créithre
'Na gcaithfid a dteaghlach
Le doibhreas a shéanadh.
6.
Molaimíd thu a Thíghearna Dia
Thugais saor ó'n oidhche sinn
Agus do thugais radharch arís dúinn
Ar sholas an lae.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-02 19:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
was in the hut, and rolled it down the pathway in front of the hut in the direction of the military who were so amazed that they kept looking at the wheel long enough for Sean to escape. He made his exit in another direction through one of the paths that were so well known to him.
He was a wonderful shot. When Hedges White the owner of Macroom Castle and some of his friends were dining in the Castle one night about midnight an discharged a shot from his gun which quenched the candle which was on one of the dining tables. This terrorised the company.
Soon afterwards an officer who was also a famous shot was brought to Macroom to engage in the pursuit of Seán. This man boasted that if caught sight of Seán he would have him dead or alive. This resulted in two days pardon being given to Seán in order to meet his opponent in the square of Macroom to have a trial test as to which of them would be the better shot.
Hundreds came to see the contest, and about two o'clock Sean Ruadh came fully equipped. A crown piece was placed on the Castle Wall and both succeeded in hitting it. Then a penknife was placed on the wall with the same result. Seán then took a penknife from his pocket and placed it
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-02 19:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
first sports meeting under the new rules, was held. It was at that meeting Pat Warren ran his first race, and a competitor against him was another runner who afterwards became famous, namely O'Mahony from Rosscarbery. The latter was called "Steam Engine" because he beat the train in a half-mile race.
After this Warren won at sports after sports until he became one of the best one-mile runners in Ireland.
Seán Ruadh an Ghaorthaig.
Many stories are told of a famous rapparee who, we are told, lived near the Lee, between Macroom and Kilmichael, about two hundred years ago. He was called "Seán Ruadh an Ghaorthaig". He generally befriended the poor, and robbed the rich to help them. At that time the country was ruled by tyrannical landlords. The British soldiers made several attempts to arrest him, but he escaped each time.
One night as he was seated in his hut in the "Gearagh" he narrowly escaped being captured as an armed band of British military suddenly approached the hut. Seán quickly thought of a plan. He seized a wheel that
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-02 19:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
i nÉirinn agus chuaidh sé go dtí Americea. Bhuaidh sé rás mór ann, an "Cross Country Race". B'feidir go bhfuil se beo fós i-n Amearicea

Murphy "Rahy"
Another famous runner who lived near Kilmichael was Murphy Rahy grandfather to the present William Murphy "Rahy" owner of a threshing engine. He got his nickname from the word "reatha". He was such a noted runner in his time that some English gentlemen who were visiting his neighbourhood took him to England to compete there. At first he had a series of successes, but was not able to keep these up, partly on account of the change of food. He came home and died at home.

Another runner we hear much about is Pat Warren son of Dannie Warren the well-known Gaelic singer (Domhnal Ó Murnáin)
When the G.A.A was established in 1884 by Michael Cusack and Dr. Croke, it was in Kilmichael, in Mr Maurice Dromey's lawn, the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-02 19:02
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
in some parts of the country "strawboys" visited the house where the wedding was held and demanded money and food from the people of the house; the latter usually gave them what they demanded as they were afraid they might harm them. Those boys were so called because they dressed in rags and straw and disguised themselves in every way they possibly could.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-02 18:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
fed like dogs, housed like cattle the inmates were huddled together naked and unashamed screaming, cursing, howling, with pain whining for food, having acquired the instincts of the lower animals and lost the higher attributes of man.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-02 18:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
hinged coffins were used one body after another being brought to the grave in the coffin. The unburied corpses: the unattended funerals: the pitiful pleadings of the hungry: the torture of the fever-stricken ceased to arouse pity in this part of the country as overpowering calamity had dried up the fountains of compassion. On the streets and roads women and children once modest and self-respecting cried whined and lied with the shameless audacity of the professional beggar.
Those who faced the local workhouses fared none better than those who remained at home for
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-02 18:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
been separated from the sound ones and the latter deposited in the pits and the pits after a time opened it was seen that the blight had entered and laying it awful hands on the sound ones rendered them unfit for human food. The peasant with blanched face saw his food thus disappear and as he looked at his children shivering with fear at what they saw and as he thought of the many months before him during which the potato was his and their only resource he was filled with terror and dismay. The doomed people realized but too well what was before them. The year 1846 thus closed in darkness and gloom but in the new year
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-02 18:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In this part of the country the disease on the potato crop called the blight was first seen about the middle of September 1846. The stalks till then green and healthy and loaded with blossoms crumbled and withered beneath its touch: the leaves looked as if acid had been sprinkled upon them: the burned spots grew larger until leaves and stalks were decayed and the fields lately vigorous with vegetable life became a putrid mass of vegetable matter. When the potatoes were dug up it was found that the fatal disease had penetrated beneath the soil and that a large part of the crop was rotten. Worse than all when the unsound having
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-02 15:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
"Cráin muice, no láir siorraig, no bean marbh ar thaobh an tíghe - ní raibh trí nídh ag fear abh'fheárr ná iad."
"Mar a bhíonn an gas, iseadh bhíonn an phráta."
"Olann gach cat bainne, ach an cat ná faigheann é."
"Aoine an Chéasta, is mór an cheasadh bainne d'ól,
Domhnach Cásca, is mór an náire bheith gan feóil."
"Bíonn da ínnsint ar gach scéal, fé mar a bhíonn dá thaobh san mbilleóg."
"Bíonn an fear deireannach, díobhálach"
"Nuair a bhíonn an cat ar an margadh, bíonn na luchaig ag rínnce."
"An té a bhíonn síos luightear cos air, agus an té a bhíonn suas óltar deoch air."
"Smachtuigheann gach fear bean malluighthe ach an fear go mbíonn sí aige."
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-02 15:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
"Ní scéal púin é más fios do thriúr é"
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"Ar mhaithe leis féin a dheineann gach cat crónan"
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"Is measa an tath-iompáil ná an cead fiabhras"
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"Is feárr ciall ceannuighthe ná dá chiall múinte."
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"Ní faisce do mhnaoí leat, sgéal ná praiscín"
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"Is maith an t-annlan an tocras"
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"Bíonn gach aoinne go láhmach, go dtéidheann bó 'na gharrdha"
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"Is olc an rud bheith ag dul ó thig an diabhail go tigh an deamhain."
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-02 15:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
"Bíonn beal iadhta ar cheann chríodhna"
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"An rud is goire don chroidhe, 'sé is goire don beal"
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"Cion i gcanfhios do mhnaoí no leanbh"
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"Ceileann serc ainimh is locht"
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"In am na prádhanna aithnígheatar cara"
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"Ní ceileann meisce rún"
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"Téigheann ag an bfonn ar an bhfaithcíos"
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"Ní féidir feaduigheal agus min a chogaint"
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"Is feárr an sláinte na na táinte"
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"Níl luibh na leigheas in aghaidh an bháis"
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"Fear do chómhairle, fear bhfuatha"
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"Is leagh gach othar tar éis a leighis"
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"Do gnó féin, dein a dhuine. Ná bac mo gnó-sa ná mise"
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"Ní liagh tír ná ciós "
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"Fileann an feall ar an bhfeallaire"
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ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-01 20:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Beirt drithár a bhí na gcóhnaidhe ar an mBarrlinn i dtuaisceart Paróiste Bheanntraighe. Bhí duine acu pósta ’na thig féin agus chuaidh an drithair singil ag sgoruideacht chuige oidhche áirithe. Do thárla go raibh an t-athair sa tsráid an lá san agus go raibh sé gan teacht nuair a ghaibh an buachaill singil amach. Thugadar tamall beag ag seanchaidheacht agus dubhairt an dritháir óg gur mithid do féin bheith ag dul abhaile. “Cad é fáth do do dhithnis,” arsan fear eile. “Tá m’athair sa tsráid,” adubhairt sé agus dhein sé saghas rann mar seo.
"Mar a mbeinn-se sa bhaile nuair a thiocfadh sé siúd isteach,
Do gheobhadh chugham an bata agus bhuailfeadh mé sa chúl le cnap.
Déarfadh "imthigh uaim a ghaige agus ná fill orm féin thar nais,
Mar is fíor nár dheinis le fada mo chomhairle i gceart’.”
Dhein an dritháir críonna rann na choinnibh.
"Ba mhinic le t-athair bheith deidheanach sa tsráid gan teacht,
Go nglaoidhfeadh na coiligh agus go gcuirtí na daoine amach,
Ach a chárt bhreágh leanna na stól na sudhe le n-ais,
Agus gan cuímhneamh aige ar chapall ar chlainn ná ar bhean.”
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-01 20:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
na mBocht agus amhlaidh a bhí bean agus cúpla clainne annsan marbh. Tháinig scannradh ’na chroidhe agus d’imthigh an tsráid anonn. Do cheannaigh an bhulóg aráin agus níor bhé sin an sgéal ba mheasa ach ná fhéadfadh sé greim a dh’ithe le h-eagla. Do léim sé isteach thar claidhe chomh luath agus a fuair sé seans air agus chuir sé timcheall ar féin ag teacht abhaile ag ghabháil bun os cionn le na daoine go dtí go dtáinig sé thar n-ais airís go Tuath na Dromann. Dá bhfeiceadh na daoine bocht ocracha an bhulóg aige do bhaileochaidís timcheall air agus do stracfaidís ó chéile é mar a dtabharfadh sé dóibh é.
Ar a ghabháil tríd an tsráid mar a raibh seo bothán ar bhruach na h-abhann i n-aice an droichid chonaic sé seó daoine sínte taobh amuigh des na dóirse go lag leis an ocras agus tuille aca ’na suidhe i n-aice na dtinteán. Deir sé gurb é toil Dé go dtáinig tuile uathbhásach agus gur sgiob sé na botháin agus na daoine bochta leointe a bhí ionnta chun siubhal agus ná raibh luaith ná láthair tighe ann i gcionn cúpla lá.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-01 20:37
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
gurb ainm do Seán Ó Suibhne agus cailleadh seisear cloinne air i mbotháinín leis an ocras. Cuireadh i reilig an Ghúagáin iad gan chómhrainn. Chuaid Pádraig Ó Liatháin ón dTúirín le h-Árd agus é ’na gharsún isteach i gcabhlaichín a bhí ar an mbaile sin. Bhí bean bhocht shuarach ’na suí cois na tine. “Nách cruaidh an saol é,” ar sise leis leis an ngarsún, “sin é mo mhac marbh annsan le trí lá agus ná faghainn éinne a chuirfeadh é.” Cailleadh draoidheacht daoine ar Dhrom an Ailtigh le hocras. Fuaradh fear agus bean marbh i mbotháinín ar Céim Corach Buaile.
Bhí fear gurb ainm do Dónall Ó Liatháin ’na chómhnadhe ar Ghoirtín na Coille timcheall míle ó Sráid Bhéal átha-’n- Ghaorthaidh agus d’inis sé an scéal seo leanas ar an méid a chonaic sé féin den Ghorta.
I dtosach a shaoil bhí sé i n-aimsir sa taobh thoir de Pharóiste Thuath na Dromann. Bhí sé lá agus ocras mór air agus gan aon fhághail aige ar aon ghreim bídh d’aon tsaghas. Bhí roinnt éigin pinginí airgid aige i bpoll chlaidhe agus nuair a chruaidh air dob’ éigin do dul go dtí an claidhe agus na pinginí a thógaint agus aghaidh a thabhairt ar Mhaghcromtha chun bulóige aráin do cheannach. Thóg sé gach cómhgar a fhéad sé agus ar a ghabháil síos go barra Bhóthar na Sop bhuail bean uime go raibh aithne aca ar a chéile. Labhradar le chéile suim focal. “Tar i leith,” ar sise, “go dtaispeáinfidh me radharc duit.” Ghluaiseadar le chéile go dtí geata Tighe
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-01 20:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
35) To tie on a boot to the car - a lucky marriage
36) A horseshoe on the cow-house for good luck
37) If you get a horse shoe and spit on it - good luck
38) It is not right to build a new house on an old yard.
39) Not to build the new house on the old foundation
40) Not to build a new house on a path.
41) Not right to cut a branch off in a lios.
42) Never till a "páirc a leasa"
43) Never remove a single bush that's in a field.
44) If a swallow took your hair, after being cut you'd get a pain in your head for 3 months.
45) To rob a bird's nest - wants in hands
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-01 19:59
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might stick in it. Dont forget the Grace of God says the Gentleman.
I've a Laural there growing outside there in the bawn, and every one passing the way to a fair or market breaks a switch off it. That the next fellow that will put his hand on it may stick to it.
The man went away. A short time after a man came to Jackie the Lantern & told him to come along with him, that his master had sent for him.
And who is your master says Jackie.
The Devil says he.
Hand me over that fine awl in the box says Jackie, I want to draw my shoes together for the road.
He put his hand in the box, and if he did he 'stuck' there. The devil such a walloping anyone ever got as Jackie gave him, but he had compassion on him, and he left him home in the finish.
T'was'nt long till another fellow came, Come with me to my master says he to Jackie.
who is your master say Jack
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-01 19:50
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Jackie The Lantern was a shoe-maker & a stiff surly old boy he was. He never gave charity nor a bit to anyone. He was out this night & he met a poor dejected little man. He brought him home, and he put him up for the night. This was the first person he ever did a good turn to. When he awoke in the morning he went into the room where he put the poor man in, and the room was shining & sparkling. There was a grand well dressed gentleman in the room.
Now says the gentleman since you were so good I'll give you three wishes, but dont forget the grace of God.
I've a little box there say's Jack with awls & wax ends in it & everyone that comes in [?] puts his hand in it fiddling with me awls & wax ends.
That the next hand that will be put into it may stick in it.
You have two more wishes says the Gentleman - don't forget the grace of God.
I've a chair there says he & everyone that comes in side the door sits on it & often breaks it. That the next fellow
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-01 19:42
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[-]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-09-01 19:42
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arrived at Gansey[?], they went into a little shop full of tobacco, and there was a little dog minding the tobacco in the shop.
The Crookhavener caught the little dog & put him inside his coat. They filled up the boat of tobacco and sailed away for Cruagh. When they landed there, they were dividing out the tobacco between [?]. They were making no share for the Crookhavener.
He asked his own share. He opened his coat & left out the little dog & if he did away they cleared and he had the boat of tobacco to himself.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 23:15
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were special hereditary officers to guard these documents. A principal requisite in the lawyer and judge was a full knowledge of tribal genealogies, since the clan laws centered about blood kinship.
At the Aeneachs or Fairs there was an officer, the Suide, whose duty it was to recite the pedigrees of the chiefs; and another, the Filid, who made the eulogies of the clan and rehearsed their history. The O'Malley's had such an Aenach or fair yearly at Aghagower[?], called the Aenach Derg (Acallamh na Senorach. Irische Texte, 4th Series, 1st heft[?].)
The provincial king had [?] own Aenach, and a checking records of the genealogies in his kingdom. The King of Connaught held the Aenach Cruachan, at his residence at Cruachan in Roscommon. Then all these records were checked again in the Roll of Tara by the federal king, and reviewed at the Feis Teamhrach. After the Feis Teamhrach ceased the Aenachs continued.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 23:06
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He was an outlaw and had two caves one in Gurtmore near Mallow and the other in Dromocarra near Kiskeam on the left bank of the Araglin. He spent most of his time in the latter. He had a sweetheart named Maighread Ní Cheallaidh whom he dearly loved. She visited him often and she very often supplied him with food. The soldiers often hunted him. One day he was hunted by them from Meelin and he ran towards his cave in Dromacarra a distance of about eight or nine miles. There was a woman washing clothes on the banks of the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 23:04
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The Duggans were living at Knocknaseed House (see Chart) Cottage. They had all the land around them. They were there for a hundred years but in the end they had only Knocknaseed. Poor scholars called at a cottage near it and a Duggan used to call to the cottage and talk with them. He used be late for his dinner and his daughters were tormented. One day he was early for dinner and his daughter said "Have the poor scholars gone." "No," said Duggan, "The scholars are gone." They joined up with the Cronins and them Godfries. They had two ponies and hey used to put the two under the car and they had two stables with their names over the doors.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 22:59
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happened three times. When she was gone the third time the woman looked at her churn and found there was no butter in it. The tailor said to go up in the room and to look into the bucket and the three coals had changed into three lumps of butter.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 22:58
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sons remained up on May night to mind the cows. About the middle of the night they saw a man coming into the middle of the herd and chanting a kind of magic called "Black Art." He and his sons bound him and brought him before a magistrate. The magistrate gave him two years' hard labour and said "Now my boy you will not be here next May Day to carry on your 'Black Art'."
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 22:56
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There were once three men who used to go roving every night. They used to come and go along a path that was leading into the house. One of the boys' mother died, and a few months after, as they were going one after another and this boy last and his mother appeared to him and told him never to go last in the line when he was going roving. She then disappeared and from that on he never went last.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 22:54
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save her. That Sunday he said he would carry her up there on his back and she went up on his back and he carried her as far as the gate of the church and she came off his back there.
The second woman said to her husband that he was dead and he said he was not but he lay on the table and the people came to the wake. The next day they got a coffin and were carrying him to be buried when the third man saw them pass his house. He said to his wife that he should be at the funeral and went to put on his clean clothes but his wife said he had his clothes on him and he went out naked. The man in the coffin began to hit it. The people opened the coffin and the man came out and the people were surprised and said he was only "codding".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 22:51
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hump." The queen said "Go out and put on another hump and let him go home with two humps."
N.B. I have allowed this to be recorded as so not to discourage the collector or giver.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 22:46
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went off and sat near a well. A robin flew past them for a crumb of bread to feed its young and they told her to clear. The third son came and sat near the well to eat and the robin came and asked him for a bit of bread to feed her young ones and he said he would give her enough for a week. The first two went away and came to an uninhabited house. It was full of cats. One small cat was asked by its companions to tell a story. He said he would not because he was afraid that someone might be listening so they searched the house and found the two first sons and tore them to pieces but they could not find the third son. The small cat began his story. He said there was a princess sick and that whoever would cure her could marry her and that the cure was
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 22:40
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the cock and at that instant a big dresser of ware that was in the kitchen was thrown down on the floor. They then heard the sound of galloping horses coming into the yard, the door was thrown open and they could hear the sound of tramping in the kitchen and all the time the cock was crowing in the room. The following morning when they got up all the vessels were thrown around on the floor but not one of them was broken and the cock was outside in the yard dead. They told no one what happened but the following morning a man from Meentifuck came and told them the whole incident. He told them to leave the cock alone that he would be alright and he told them that the man was lucky that he did not strike the cock or he would be dead now.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 22:38
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an attempt made to carry away her mother's husband too but that he would be saved by the cock. Sometime after that the husband was coming home late at night and he went into a field where he saw a number of people playing foot-ball. They kicked the ball before him on the path. He stooped down to catch the ball but what was it but a human skull. He threw it from him and ran home. His wife was in bed before him. When he went to bed he was telling his wife the story and she said she always told him not to be out late at night. Before he had the story finished the cock flew down into the room and he jumped into the bed and began crowing. His wife caught the man as he caught a stick to strike
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 22:35
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that the sons would pursue him and kill him. They did so but he saw them coming and he guessed who they were. There was a bótharrín near and the pig went into the briars to cool himself He lid on the ditch on the flat of his back. The brothers came up and asked him if he had seen a man passing with a pig. I did he's just gone into that cloud". "Tis true for my mother he was was a man from God. By that he proved that he could live by his wits
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 21:48
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that the sons would pursue him and kill him. They did so but he saw them coming and he guessed who they were. There was a bótharrín near and the pig went into the briars to cool himself He lid on the ditch on the flat of his back. The brothers came up and asked him if he had seen a man passing with a pig. I did he's just gone into that cloud". "Tis true for my mother he was was a man from God. By that he proved that he could live by his wits
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 21:44
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time he called into a house for a drink of water she gave it to him and she asked him "what kind of a man are you" and he said "I am a man from God" Tell me did you see "Sean-na-stocaí" (her husband) She asked him how was he and he said "he was fine" and she asked him how was the white horse and he said "he was never so strong" she said "would it be two much trouble for you to cary a few cakes to him (Seán). He said he would do more than that for him, because he was his best friend So she parcelled up the cakes
Lazy Bones was preparing to go and she asked him would it be two much trouble for him to carry a fat pig. he took the pig and went off in a hurry for he was afraid
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 21:40
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years old it was said that person was taken by the fairies. Seán went one day across a ford selling the stockings and was drowned and he was taken home and waked. His wife said that she often told him to keep away from Áth na Marbh. There was a man living near Seán and he was very lazy who said he could live by his wits. He said he could make as much money in one day by his wits as Seán could ever make. One day he went out to find out if he could live by his wits. In his travels he passed a house in which two women were crying. He went in to see what was the matter with them. The old woman said that when she came in her daughter was crying because there was a stone loose in the chimney and when her baby would
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 21:37
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There was a man long ago named Seán na Stocaí so called because he made his living by selling stockings He had a car and a white pony. He had four sons and they and his wife used to stay at home in his little farm. There was a superstition then that if anyone died before he was a hundred
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 21:32
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Daniel J Mahoney, who was Secretary, was not a highly educated man and his reports of meetings were written by Thady Herlihy an Assistant in the Boys' School (see page 143). Later Timothy Carrol was deprived of the Chairmanship and it happened in this way:- It was the duty of the Landlord's Agent to report evictions to the Relieving Officer so that he could issue tickets to the Union for the evicted. John Reardon was Archdeacon Bland's agent and (which is important to note) also agent for Shine Lawlor of Nohovaldaly. The Land League reported the failure to notify the Relieving Officer, to the Board of Guardians and the Board proceeded against the Landlord. It was shown in court that the prosecutions should have been against Reardon and not against Bland so that, it looked as if Reardon would be decreed for £40 per family of the six families evicted, when the case was again brought to court. Reardon got to work and got Shine Lawlor on his side. Shine Lawlor went to Tim OCarrol his tenant
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 21:21
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The following fair day Johnson and two others named Renihan and Tanner came to Knocknagree. They brought a Brass band with them and that was the first time a band was heard in Knocknagree The people were scared and ran in all directions shouting - Cogadh! - Cogadh!! However, they soon learned what it was all about and the meeting was held. Tadhg Stail Cronin (Hedge teacher) was made Secretary of the meeting and when it was over the three visitors found it hard enough to get twelve men to form a Committee. They succeeded at last and Timothy Carrol Nohoval Daly was appointed Chairman, Bob Howard Knockeenagullane was appointed Vice-Chairman, Daniel J. Mahoney, Secretary and Denis Breen Treasurer. Daniel Sheehan, Umeraboy: Timothy Nolan Farrankeal, Tim Guiney & Pad Guiney Scrahan, Daniel Murphy Tureenclassagh, Robin and Timothy Howard, Laughtsigh, Jeremiah Herlihy Knocknagree Denis Dennehy Nohoval were members of the Committe. The meetings at first were held in Patsy Nolan's (now Mike Walsh's) and the Committee met after Mass each Sunday.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-31 21:11
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There is a man going around this place for many years called Jerry Collins or sometimes "Private" Collins. He was at one time a soldier. He carries a bag on his back in which he has ballads and other artickles. He is very welcome at almost every house because he travels a lot and has many stories to tell of his travels
There is another beggar localy called "Daly the fiddle". He is is very old now but travels a lot. He carries a fiddle. He carries a fiddle with him and plays it at every house he goes to. For this he always gets a penny or two.
There is another traveler called Tom Malone who thinks himself a very clever man and is always discussing politics. He spends most of his time in a few houses where the people agree wih him.
There were other beggars long ago. One of these was John Kellaghan or locally called "Smoke Sir" because every man he meet he used offer him his empty pipe saying to him "smoke sir". One day this beggar sold some potatoes in a bag to a woman. When she had them bought she threw them out into something only to find that some of them were boiled. She said to John that he was a rogue. John answered her saying, "never again buy a pig in a bag mam"
There was another beggar called "Jerry
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-30 20:51
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhí Seán Máighistir Ó Conaill na mháighistir scoile scailpe i d-Tuaith na Droman ó 1780 go dtí 1810. Do chúm sé amhrán breágh ag moladh an Ghaorthaidh nuair a thárlaidh dó san oidhche ar bhruach na Laoi. Seo an t-amhrán:-
"Bhí géana ar linn ann míolta is garra phuic
Éisc ag tigheacht de dhruim gach caise acu
Naoscaigh, faoilinn, scéimheal de lachannaibh
A tigheacht gan eagla tracht ó'n spéir.
II
Tá mórán Éireann éan ná feadarsa
Ag déanamh neaduighthe ar bhárr na gcraobh
An fiolar 's cuach agus mór cuid eadtarra
Go suanmhar seasgair faoi scáth na gcraobh
An druid as an creabhar ar chrann eile na h-aice sin.
An Ciarsach sleamhain is an seabhac breagh beathuighthe
Cáig agus colúir ina dtrúpaibh a' taisteal ann
A's smólaigh breacha 'na n-árus féin.
III
B'ionghantas riamh liom triall no h-aicme-seo
Ag Cliaraidheacht sealad le h-áilneacht scéimh.
Foithin a's biadh go greanmar taisgithe
Fial gan easneamh le fághail a's réim
Bhí measradh na slaod ar ghéagaibh daraighthe
Ubhla caora, sméar agus abhairne
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-30 20:45
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mar gurb í a mháthair a bhí ar a dhrom aige. Nuair a bhí Seán faid urchair uatha do scaoil sé uaidh í agus chuaidh sé saor.
Uair bhí fleadh ar siubhal i gCaisleán Maghchromtha phreab Seán anuas Bóthar an t-Sléibhín agus scaoil sé urchar isteach tríd an bhfuinneóig chúcha agus bhain sé an smól de choinnil a bhí i lár an bhúird.
"Seán Ruadh a dhein é sin" arsa Hedges "agus is féidir leis mise do mharbhuighadh chomh fuiriste agus é sin do dhéanamh. Ocras atá ar an bhfear mbocht". Annsan chuaidh sé tímcheall le pláta agus chuir gach aoinne síntúis air. Fuair Seán an pláta lán de airgead annsan.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-30 20:43
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i ndiaidh Connradh briste Luimnighe. Istigh i lár crainn téagartha an Ghaorthaidh a bhí poll folachais aige.
Bhí anam Sheáin anáirde imeasc carad agus namhad toisc é bheith chómh clisteacht ar an gunna agus chómh h-oilteach sa saighdúireachta. Bhí fear darb anam Hedges, an caiptín a bhí ar airm Chaisleáin Mhaghchromtha an uair úd. Is minic a fuair Seán faill ar Hedges agus níor bhac sé leis. Bhí cailín muinteardha do Sheán ag obair i gcistin an chaisleáin agus is minic a thug sí focal dó nuair bhítí ag d'iarraidh teacht air agus is í a sholáthruigheadh na piléir agus an púdar dó.
Uair nuair a bhí fleadh ag siubhal sa chaisleán thug Seán cuairt do'n chistin. D'aithin duine dos na cailíní Gallda é agus d'innis sí an scéal do'n airm. Thug an cailín eile fé ndeara é sin agus níor dhein sí acht deoch de bhainne géar do thabhairt do Sheán. "Ní maith liom é fuar" arsa Seán "Más maith leat bheith buan chaith fuar agus teich" ar sise.
Amach an doras leis tríd an mbláth-ghort ach cé a bhí ag siubhal ann acht máthair Hedges. Do dhein sé uirthi agus do chaith sí aniar ar a shlinneáin í agus suas Bóthar an t-Sléibhín leis. Dírígheadh na gunna íair. Dubhairt Hedges leó stad
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-30 19:20
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About mid-day one of them unearthed a flag and so it seemed a big one they kept on digging until they had the whole flag unearthed. It corresponded in size to the flags over the Graves in the local Graveyard. They called the owner of the field and he gave them permission to lift the flag but they refused to do so. They tried to persuade him to do so, but he too refused. Finally the flag was re-covered and was never disturbed since. The person who told this story, also named the workmen - one was Hourihane and the other Donovan [?]. they told him the position of the grave, and he believes he could locate it to-day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-30 19:16
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that somebody was about to hang him. The boy to tease him said he had a dream and he thought he actually saw him hanging. He wondered if hanging was painful and his anxiety to know became so great that he decided to try it himself. He was too cowardly to put his own head in the noose so he forced the boy to put his. He swung him up in mid air. The boy suffered the pain without twitching and when he was lowered he laughed and mocked at the thought of Hanging causing pain. The G. dubh now prepared to find out for himself. He put his head into the noose and ask the boy to swing him up. At the same time he warned him to let him down when he made a sign with his leg. Very soon the sign was given, but the boy refused to let him down. As he was dying he muttered that his money was hidden between two hills and two streams in Carraig i n-air-Cool na Clehy Bog.
His Burial
Tradition has it that he was buried in a field now in the possession of the Crowley Family. Two local labourers were one day earthing potatoes in that field They both knew well the story of the G. Dubh etc and one of them jokingly remarked in the morning that he hoped to find the grave of the G. Dubh that day
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-30 19:09
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Next to Kilmacabea is the townland of Cnocan na Croiche. So called because the Gallows was at work there many years ago. Close to Mr Timothy ODonovan's house is a small garden, and in this garden is a mound of rock & earth. On this mound the Gallows was supposed to be erected.
Somewhere here lived the Gaduidh dubh. He was a robber who never purdoned anyone. He always kept a servant boy and he preferred a fool of a boy to a sensible one. He had no confidence in anyone, and when he thought he was getting too wise, he hanged him and immediately got another instead.
His own Fear.
He feared the pain of hanging, though he never scupled to hang the helpless and innocent. One morning he arose from his bed. He had sadness in his countenance. He told the boy the he had a dream during the night
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-30 18:21
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castle keep. His wife begged of him to surrender lest he should bring ruin on the whole family. Food jowever failed them after fifteen days of the siege he resolved to fly away with the ornaments of the Church. At nightfall he with his shield in his left hand and his sword in his right hand and the altar furniture under his arm followed by his three retainers glided noiselessly through a broken spike hold and suddenly sallied out unseen by the watchful soldiers on guard, but when they reached the further bank of the streamlet.They were pursued with loud shouts by the soldiers through the trees. Sir John Bourke escaped after hiding precious burden in the bushes, but one of his brave followers was slain and the other was wounded. Father Clancy had fled from the castle in disguise bearing safely with him sacred vessels. Sir John then ran off through the country till he came to a southern town, hoping soon to set sail
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-30 18:17
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Dubhairt an t-athair gur ag cainnt le Dia a bhí sí fan 'na h-oidhche agus nár bh'fada uaid anois. An tarna oidhche d'fhan Séan suas agus bhí an t-athair ag cainnt agus ag leimhrig sa leabhaid fan na h-oidhche.
D'fhiarfhuigh an t-athair do ar maidin conus a bhí sí fan na h-oidhche agus dubhairt Séan go raibh sé ag cainnt agus ag léimrig sa leabhaid fan na h-oidhche go léir.
D'fhiarfhuigh an t-athair do cad a bhí aige a rád. Dubhairt Séan narb' feadar sé ach gur airig sé á rád neosfhadh doibh é.
Dubhairt an t-athair leis gur ag cainnt le Dia a bhí sé fan na h-oidhche.
Dubhairt Diarmuid leis go raibh sé ag cainnt agus ag léimrig fan na h-oidhche go léir.
An triomhadh oidhche d'fhan
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-30 18:11
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agus capall igcóir an bainne gach maidin agus do bhí na fir ag dheanamh bluirín[?] oibre, agus oidhche mar seo do bhuail an t-athair breoidhte agus do glaoidh an t-athair na trúir mac le chéile go dtí an leabaidh cuige.
Dubhairt sé leo go raibh sé ag fághail bháis. Dubhairt sé le duine achu fanamhaint suas leis gach oidhche. Dubhradar go bfanaidís D'fhan Diarmuid suas an cead oidhche agus bhí an t-athair ag caint agus ag léimrig as leabhaidh fan na h-oidhche.
D'fhiafhruig an t-athair do air maidin conus a bhí sé fan na h-oidhche agus dubhairt Diarmuid go raibh sé ag caint agus ag léimrig sa leabaidh fan na h-oidhche d'fhiafhruig an t-athair do cad a bí aige á rádh.
'S Dubhairt Diarmuid ná raibh fhios aige cad a bhí sé ag caint mar dheall air ach gur airig sé á rádh "neosfhadh dóíb é."
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-30 18:02
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Is amhlaidh a dhíolaidís an bainne an uair sin mar ní raibh fhios achu conus ím a deánamh leis ná aon nídh.
Do bhí glaodhach mór ag an Tíghearna talmhan air. Dubhairt an t-athair go raghadh sé féin go dtí an t-Sráid leis an bainne an lá san cun é dhíol agus indóthain a ól iad féin go dhéanfhadh sé go breágh láidir iad.
D'imhthig sé leis go dtí an tSráid agus bhí dá bhean ann ag ceannach an bainne do dhein sé margadh le bean achu do dtabharfhadh sé an bainne di igcóir deich pingine an galún agus bhí sé sgulling an galún ach fhios a chuir air do dtí an tig cuige gach lá mar bhí sé in'iomad trioblóide bheith ag teacht leis an bainne air maidin mar do bhead leath don lá imighthe, agus do raibh tómhaiseana aige féin sa bhaile chun an bainne a thómhais.
Tá go maith arsan bean an bainne agus dubhairt an fear léi go bfeadfhadh an duine a thiochfhad igcóír an bainne an bainne a thómais é féin. Do thaghad fear
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-29 22:12
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Nuair a bhí an bhean féin cúpla [?] ansan do fuair sí bás in-aon-fheacht [?] an gcuid eile aca.
Tigín ana-bheag a bhí acu i Gort an Imil agus fear ana-shaidbhir ab'eadh fear a tháinig ann agus do dhein sé tigh bhreágh mhór nuadh agus d'fág sí an tigín eile ann do's na cearca nó rud éigin mar sin.
Do thagadh na buachaillí óga [?] ag eirighe suas i Gort an Imil an uair[?] sin le na chéile istig san tseana-bhothan agus do deinfhidís suas teine beag éigin agus do bhíodh spórt mhaith nuair a bíodh na h-oidhcheannta fada[?] ann as ní bheidís ann gach aon [?] in-aon-chor. Do bhíodh triúir nó ceathrar [?] mhuintir Criodáin ann agus buachaillí[?] eile leis. Oidhche éigin nuair a bhí do's na buachaillí amuigh do chonnaic sé
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-29 21:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Lá amháin do bhí sí ag dul amach i gcóir bacla móna nó rud éigin mar sin agus do bí sí ag gabháil amach an dorus ag do rug duine éigin uirthe agus dubhairt sí leí go raibh droch sgéal eile ag teacht ach níor éist an bhean leí in-aon-chor mar do cheap sí go raibh sí imthighthe as a mheabhara nó rud éigin agus gura 'bámhlaid' a bhí tairinge sa dorus agus do rug sé uirthe agus d'imtig sí leí agus an tuirim sin aice agus níor chuimhnig sí a thuille air an méid sin go ceann tamaill mhaith.
Cúpla seachtmhain n-a dhiaidh sin do buaileadh breoidte a fear agus do fuair sé bás ansan agus ní raibh aon fear acu na h-oibre a dhéanamh agus do bhíodar i gcruadhcás.
Do dhíoladar an feirm le mhuinntir Chriodáin agus d'imthig Máire agus a mháthair go dtí Seamuisín agus d'fanadar ann.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-29 21:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
sara b'fada a bhean macánta agus d'imthig[?] sé leis abhaile aíris.
Cupla lá na indiaid sin do fuair[?] sí leitir ó na mac i America sé sin [?] Domhnall go raibh Conchubhar marbh.
Do bhí ana bhron air an bhean [?] agus is amalaid a chaith sí dul go duine dos na comharsain chun é léigh dí mar ná fhéadfhad sí féin ná a [?] é leighead agus do chaitfhead na sean-duine go léir é sin do dhéanamh.
Níor codail an máthair aon oidhche[?] ar feadh sé nó seacht sechtmhaine ach cuimhneamh air a mhac agus ag gol uaireannta. Do bhí sí ag obair ar fuaid [?] agus ag déanamh gach aon rud.
Ach is san oidhche a goilfhead si ar fad uirthe nuair ná raibh aon rud le déanamh ach bheith ag cuimhneamh air an oidhche fada go leír agus gol uaireannta.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-29 19:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Nuair a tháinig an fear ar maidin amháireach do bhí ionghnadh ar agus ní raibh a fhios aige cad a dheanfadh sé agus do bhí píosa den dorus ite aige.
Dubhairt sé leis féin ansan go dtabharfhadh sé féar nú tuighe nú rud éigin do chun go mbeadh sé alright airís amáireach agus do thug sé rud éigin do ansan agus do chuir sé an t-asal amach ansan airís ins an bpáirc.
Ansan do chuaidh an fear amach airís ins an páirc agus do connaic sé an t-asal amuic agus do bhí sé i na luighe amach agus do bhí sé lán amach mar do thug sé rud len n-itthe do agus do phós an fear agus do mhaireadar go suaineasach as san amach.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-29 19:37
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Do bhí asal amháin aige leis agus nuair ná bíodh sé ag obair do théigheadh sé ar mhuin an asail leis chun marcuigheacht d'fághail. Ní raibh puinn len n-iththe ag an t-asailín bocht agus do bhíodh an caoire aon-fheacht leis i gcómhnuidhe ins an páirc[?] céadna.
Do thabharfhadh fear a bhí in-aice truchail tuighe dho i gcóir an t-asailín bocht.
Do bhí tigín beag aige leis i gcóir an t-asal agus do chuireadh se an t-asal isteach ins an tigín sin gach aon oidhche[?] sa geimhridh.
Oidhche amháin do chuir sé an t-asal isteach ins an tigín sin agus níor thug[?] pioc len ithe dho agus a lár na h-oidhche[?] do bhí ocras diaghail ar an t-asaillín bocht agus tuith sé na luighe i lár na tigín mar ní raibh pioch aige le nithe agus bhí ocras air mar ní raibh poich le tabhairt do.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-29 19:29
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
a mark on his arm?" said the stranger, at the same time exposing his arm with a mark on it "You are not my brother, but you resemble him very much" said the Priest "but if you are my brother you will come inside the holy water circle and sprinkle yourself with the water in the bowl." "I will do so", said the stranger, but the Priest noticed that he trembled violently while so doing. "So now, amn't I your brother"? said the stranger" No! said the Priest, if you are my brother, you will take this from me extracting from his bosom, the pyx in which he kept the Blessed Sacrament. I will take that too, said the stranger reaching out his hand for it at the same time.
Lo! behold! e're his hand could touch it, he disappeared in a flash of lightning through the roof and was never seen since.
The young Priest awakened the old Priest and told him that he had a severe fight for him during the night. He then wrote a letter to the owner of the house, telling him his trouble with that room.
But from that day to this, the track of the carriage wheel in which he was banished can be seen after each tide on the strand.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-28 20:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Name / Residence / Trade or Occupation
Maurice Scollard / North main street / Publican
Stephen Sullivan / Warner's lane / Mason
Daniel Sullivan / Shannon street / Baker
John Sullivan / Castle road / Shoemaker
Michael Shaw / South main street / Carpenter
James Wren / Ford's street / Farmer
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-28 20:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Name / Residence / Trade or Occupation
Andrew Moore / North main street / Miller
Edward McSweeney / Do. / Mason
Thomas Murray / South main street / Leather cutter
Denis Murray / Do. / Whitesmith
Jerh. Mahony / Do. / Publican
John Murphy / Shannon street / Harness maker
John Murphy / Do. / Carpenter
John Murphy / Do. / Cart maker
Jeremiah McCarthy / Castle street / Publican
Wm. Moore / North main street / Baker and Publican
Timothy Murphy / North main street / Publican
John Magrath / Do / Medical Doctor
John Murray / Watergate / Gardener
Timpthy Mahony / Do. / Labourer
Timothy McCarthy / Shannon street / Publican
Richard Mahony / Gallows hill / Fustian cutter
Denis Murphy / Watergate / Publican
John O'Neill / Castle street / Shopkeeper
Edward O'Brien / North main street / Gentleman
Jer. O'Brien / South main street / Schoolmaster
Eugene O'Sullivan / Do. / Shopkeeper
John O'Brien / Do. / Do.
Denis Quinlan / Do. / Do.
Humphrey Quinlan / Kilbrogan / Farmer
John Staunton / South main street / Grocer and Spt. Dealer
Rev. A Sealy / Do / Clerk
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-28 19:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
say and the entrance of the cave. The brother travelled along and when he came to the cave he said open "Siseam". The cave opened and he went it. He was overjoyed with all the gold. He loaded his asses and when he was about to go home he could not remember the word to open the cave. He said open oats and open barley and he said every thing he could think of. But all was in vain the cave did not open and he had to remain there until the robers found him and slew the man.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-28 19:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
[continued from p. 387]
He brought with him three asses and some bags. When he reached the cliff, he said open "siseam". The cliff opened and he saw a great big room full of Jewels and silver and gold in plenty.
He filled the bags of gold and again said open "Siseam" the cliff opened and closed behind him again. He went home to his wife & told his story.
She at once ran to her husband's brother & brought with her a Jug. When the woman gave [?] the vessel she put soot on to the bottom of the Jug, So that the contince of whatever was in it would stick to it. The woman went home and counted her gold and then buried it in the garden. Then she went to return the jug and when the woman saw the gold stuck to the jug she told her to tell her the story.
The woman told her story and when she had it finished the other woman ran to her husband and told him of his brothers great fortune. He also got his asses and bags and went to his brother to get further information. He told him the words to
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-28 19:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There lived two brothers for some time together. Then after some time they got married. One brother got a very good wife, she had a great fortune.
So one brother was poor all his life and the other brother was rich.
One day the poor man was walking through a wood and when he turned round he saw a band of robbers riding on horse back coming after him.
There was a big cliff opposite him, he went up on the cliff. The robbers were coming nearer by digrease. When they were opposite the cliff the men dismounted their horses and went up to the cliff.
When they reached the cliff they took bags with them and said open "siseam". The cliff opened and shut behind them again.
When they had the bags full of gold.
they said the same words again and the cliff opened and closed behind them again. They mounted their horses. and rode away. The man came down from the cliff and went home in great haste.
(Continued on 2nd next page)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-27 22:41
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
agus ar maidin lár na mháireach d'eirigh an t-amadán agus do chuir sé an bóthar de go mear fé[?] dhéin an rígh agus bhí sé ag [?] an rígh le h-eiríghe na gréine[?]
Ní raibh an rígh na shuidhe[?] fós ach dhubhairt an t-amadán go raibh teachtaireacht aige dho agus go gcaithfheadh sé é fheiscint an neomat[?] san.
Do leigeadh isteach go seómra an rígh é agus dubhairt an rígh leis suidhe síos agus d'fhiafhruig an rígh de'n t-amadán chad é an saghas maidne a bh'eadh ácu.
"Maidin breágh aoibhinn", arsan t-amadán tá céad míorbhail dé dhá thaisbeáint.
Ó seadh tuigim arsa'n Rígh tá an ghrian ag eiríghe.
Do bhíodar mar sin ag chainnt ar feadh abhfad.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-27 22:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
dúthaig go raibh inghean Máthair an Rígh ag tairisgint míle púnt d'aoine d'innseadh do'n Rígh go raibh a Mháthair marbh agus i gcíonn cúpla lá do tháinig fear chúiche agus dubhairt sé leí go neósadh sé dho é.
Sórt leath amadáin do b'eadh an duine seo. Do bhíodh sé ag cúmadh amhráin ar daoine uaireannta agus ag gabháil tímpeall go dtí na tighthe ag lorg déírce.
Do bhí ana chion ag an Rígh air agus do bhíodh sé i gcómhnuidhe ag chur cheisteanna chuige agus ag déanamh spórt do.
Do bhí áthas ar an inghean agus thaisbeáin sí an t-ór go léir do agus dubharit sí leis go bfaigheadh sé é nuair thiocfhadh sé thar-nais ach aire thabhairt do féin ná bainfí an cheann de.
Tráthnóna do b'eadh é sin
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-27 22:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
bliadhanta fada na dhiaidh sin ach [?] dheire do tháinig breóidhteacht uirthe agus do fuair sí bás.
Bhí eagla ar gach aoinne [?] sgéal do thabhairt chun an rígh ní nach[?] iongnadh agus san am gcéadhna níor mhaith leó í do chur i gan fhios do [?] ar an rígh.
Bhí driofúr den rígh na chómhnaidhe[?] sa tig céadna na raibh a mháthair marbh agus do thabharfhadh sí sparán óir d'aoinne a neósadh den rígh go raibh mháthair marbh ach ní fhéadfhadh sí [?] d'fhághail chun é ínnsint mar do bhí [?] acu ná beadh aon mhaith dhóibh san airgead agus na cínn bainte dhíobh.
Pé scéal é do chuaidh an ráfla amach ar fúid na tíre raibh an driofúr ag tairiscint na mílte púnt d'aoinne a neósfadh an sgéal den rígh ac ní fhéadfhadh sí aoinne d'fhághail agus bhí [?] ag [?]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-27 14:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Near Belleville, Athenry there lived a man who had a good cow. He noticed that on one May morning she had no milk
On the 2nd May he awoke very early, and got his gun, and went towards the cow.
When he came near her he saw a hare milking the cow with her paws. The man fired a shot at the hare and wounded her. Although she was wounded, she was able to run, and the man saw her going into a stable near an old house. He went there and found that the hare had now turned into an old woman.
He said "Is it you who milked my cow?" and the woman replied "It was, but if you go home without killing me you will have plenty of milk and butter in future"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-27 14:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the summit of a gentle eminence. It consists principally of a square, and four small streets containing 282 houses mostly of indifferent appearance, and it retains but few vestiges of its ancient importance.
The manufacture of coarse linen was formerly carried on to a very considerable extent, but has latterly greatly diminished, and the inhabitants are mainly employed in agriculture and fishing.
Near the town are the extensive flour-mills of Mr. Lloyd, in which more than 5,000 barrels of fine flour are annually made. A new line of road has been carried across the Bay, by a raised Causeway 400 yds long and is connected with the mainland by a bridge at its western extremity.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-27 14:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The parish comprises 12,535 statute acres, of which 1288 are thithe-free: about three-fourths of the land are arable, and the remainder with the exception of a portion of bog and waste, is in pasture. The surface is very uneven rising in some parts into hills of considerable elevation. The soil though light is fertile. Several slate-quarries have been opened of which some produce slate of very superior quality and copper ore and manganese abound in almost every part; but no efficient means are employed to work them to advantage.
The town which is wholly within the Western Division of East Carbery, is situated on the Southern Coast at the head of an extensive creek called Ross Harbour, and occupies
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-27 14:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The townland in which I live is called Knockrour. (Cnoc Reamhar) It is hilly but the land is rich & fertile & good fattening land for Cattle, hence its name
The townland is in the Parish of Scartaglen and in the barony of Trughanacmy.
There are twenty one houses in the townland fourteen of those are farmers' houses, two are cottages, one a Dispensary, one a Road Stewart's house. There is a carpenter's house and a shop.
Some of the houses are slated, others are thatched, while others are roofed with corrugated iron. There are eight thatched houses, eight slated houses and five covered with zinc. There are 89 people altogether living in the townland. The oldest person is 91 years old. She is living withe her daughter & grand children. Her name is Mrs. Walsh commonly known as Norrie Leary. For some time this old woman was blind, but her sight was restored to her again quite suddenly.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-27 13:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1
Diusuadh na daoine fado trí beile sa lá.
2
An breicfasta an deinner agus an supear
3
Ar Maidin Meain lea agus sa treathnona.
4
Sa theach nuair mach bheidh na daoine ag gobhair ach nuair a bhoinn na daoine ag obair sa gharradh a iteann siad a bheile
5
Obironn siad cupla uair a chluig ribhe an breicfasta
6
Iscgh. Marbhochadh siad goleor iscg agus diolfadh sead e le naslig beata a saorú agus an t-airgidh [?] ceanonta sead go im agus bain agus bhróg agus
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-27 13:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Near Beleville, Athenry there lived a man who had a good cow. He noticed that on one May morning she had no milk
On the "2nd May he awoke very early, and got his gun, and went towards the cow.
When he came near her he saw a hare milking the cow with her paws. The man fired a shot at the hare and wounded her. Although she was wounded, she was able to run, and the man saw her going into a stable near an old house. He went there and found that the hare had now turned into an old woman.
He said "Is it you who milked my cow?" and the woman replied "It was, but if you go home without killing me you will have plenty of milk and butter in future"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-26 20:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
t-airgead.
Nuair a tháinig na píléirí abhaile ó Shasana chuadar isteach sa tig bhreágh féachaint an raibh an t-airgead ann agus ní raibh agus bhíodar ar buille.
Do cheap na píléirí agus na daoine uaisle gur na púcaí a thóg an t-airgead agus chuadar go dtí na púcaí.
Aon oidhche amháin chuadar isteach i lios agus tháinig na púcaí amach chúca agus do thógadar isteach iad.
Dubhairt na píléirí agus na daoine uaisle gur na púcáí a thóg an t-airgead agus chuireadar isteach i bpríosún iad. Do chuaidh na púcaí cun cómhnuighthe san tig nuadh agus bhí na píléiri istig i bpríosún i gcaitheamh a shaoghail.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-26 20:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
mhairbh sé é agus do rith sé amach an doras ansan.
Do chuaidh sé abhaile agus d'innis sé dóibh chad a thuit amach agus do bhí ana áthas ortha go léir. Ansan nuair a chuaidh na daoine uaisle isteach agus nuair a chonnaiceadar go raibh sé marbh chuadar go dtí na píléirí.
Do bhí ana iongnadh ar na píléirí nuair a airigheadar go raibh sé marbh agus bhí ana iongnadh ar na daoine leis.
Do bhí na daoine bochta ag briseadh a gcroidhe ag gáiríde agus chuaidh na píléirí go Sasana féachaint a bfaghuidís an fear a mharbh an Rígh.
Nuair a fuair na daoine bochta amach go raibh na píléirí go léir imthighthe go Sasana chuadar isteach sa tig bhreágh agus do thógadar an
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-26 19:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
leis an t-Athair táim ag imtheacht uait anois agus b'féidir ná feicfheadh thú go brách airís.
Ansan do chuaidh sé isteach san uisge in-aon-fheacht leis an bfear agus bhí ana brón ar an t-Athair ansan.
Do chuaidh an t-Athair thar-nais abhaile agus d'innis sé dá mhnaoí chad a thuit amach. Dubhairt an t-Athair ansan ná raghadh sé go dtí an abha a thuille mar nuair a fhéachfhadh sé isteach san abha go gcuimhneóchadh sé ar an mac agus go dtagadh brón air.
Do cheap an t-Athair is an Máthair go raibh na bliadhna ana fhada ag imtheacht.
Nuair a bhí an deich mbliadhna caithte do chuaidh an t-Athair go dtí an abha agus do bhí sé ann tamall ana mhór ag feitheamh leis an
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-26 19:29
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
go raibh rud éigin ag déanamh buadhartha dho.
Do chonnaic an mac go raibh an t-Athair ana bhrónach agus dubhairt sé leis a "Athair chad tá ort" agus dubhairt an t-Athair leis nár mhaith leis é ínnsint do.
Dubhairt an mac leis é ínnsint pé rud é agus d'innis an t-Athair an sgéal go léir do. Ansan dubhairt an mac leis gan aon brón do bheith air mar go ndéanfhadh sé an méid sin do go breágh.
Nuair a bhí an mac triocha mbliadhain d'aois do chuaidh sé féin agus a Athair go dtí an abha agus d'eirig fear aníos as an t-usige chúcha agus dubhairt sé leis an t-Athair do sheaduighis le'd fhocal.
Ansan dubhairt an mac
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-26 19:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
sé a thuille éisg do ach dá dtabharfhadh sé a mhach do féin ar feadh deich mbliadhna nuair a bheadh sé triocha mbliadhain d'aois go dtabharfhadh sé a ndhóithin éisg dho ansan is a choimeádfhadh ar siúbhal é i gcaitheamh a shaoghail.
Dubhairt an fear bocht go tabharfhadh sé dho é nuair a bheadh sé triocha mbliadhain d'aois.
Do chuaidh an fear bocht go dtí an abha gach aon lá as san amach agus fuair sé mórán éisg.
Do mhair an triúr acu le na chéile go cómpórdach go dtí go raibh an mac triocha mbliadhain. Lá amháin do chuaidh an t-Athair go dtí an abha féachaint a ngeóbadh sé a thuille éisg agus nuair a tháinig sé abhaile do bhí sé ana bhrónach ar fad agus do bheadh a fhios ag aoinne
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-26 15:53
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Sé an fáth go raibh na daoine fadó chómh folláin agus chómh sláinteamhail mar ní raibh aon té ná siúcre ná aon núacht eile acu ach leite mine bhuidhe igcóir a mbreacfast agus prátaí agus colmóirí[?] i gcóir a ndínnéir agus sin é an fáth go rabhadar chómh láidre agus gur mhaireadar níos sia. Nuair abhíodh lánmhan pósadh ann fadó do théigheadh an lánmhan pósadh go dtí an tSéipéil ar capall, an beirt acu ag marcuidheacht ar aon chapall amháin. "Cúlog" a thugaidís ar sin.
Gach aoinne abhíodh in aonacht leo théighidís ar chapall leis nuair abhíodh an beirt pósta
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-26 15:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A top the eastern wall, the hawk his habitat hed made,
And from his cryptic eerie, the surrounding land surveyed.
With eye alert and ready wing, from out his mansion high,
He noted every move upon the land and in the sky.

And when below, some little bird, he saw in merry play,
He swooped with vicious force upon the unsuspecting prey.
Then, towards the pinnacle he soared with shrill (?) triumphant calls,
Like conqueror who drags his captives to the Monarch's (?) walls.

And day by day, this bird of prey continued there (?) to kill;
I've often wondered how he relished such a fiendish thrill.
Concealed behind the creeping vine - from daylight well obscured,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-26 15:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
fúareadar an té ní raibh fhios acu conus é dhéanamh. Bhí fear ann agus nuair a chuailaidh sé go raibh té ann cheannuig sé dá unsa de agus núair a tháinig sé abhaile cuir sé an dá únsa isteach ins an corcán té agus cuir sé an méid uisge dhéanfadh é féin isteach ann annsan nuair a bhí sé ólta aige líon sé an corcán suas de uisge arís agus cuir sé é i gcoiméad i gcóir an céad uair eile mar cheap sé gur bfheárr é bheith' a bogadh agus go ndéanfadh sé é ar feadh na seachtmhaine.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-26 15:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Ins an t sean aimsear ní itheadh na daoine acht dá béile sa ló mar an breicfeast agus an dínnéir. Itheadh siad an breicfeast ar a h-aondhéag a chlog ar maidin agus an dínnéir ar a cúig a chlog um thráthnóna. Bórd crochta a bhíodh acu, bhíodh sé ináirde ar an suidheacháin agus ní bhíodh acht aon chos fé. Árduigheadh síad suas é nuair a bhíodh an béile críochnuigthe acu. Leite mine buidhe a bhíodh acu go minic agus sé an feóil a bhíodh acu ná feóil gamhna. Bhíodh iasc ana flúairseach acu go mór mhór an colmóir agus biadh ana mhaith do b'eadh é leis. Fadó sar a raibh aon té ann is é rud a ólfaidís ná bainne. An céadh uair a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-26 15:21
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
na sean daoine mar gheall ortha.
"Cíos nó gan cíos don tíghearna mar bíadh so leanbh."
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-26 15:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
nuair nách féidir leis í chur ibhfolach is é rud a dhein sé ná í marbhúghadh láithreach. San am sin do théigeadh an cuid is mó de thoradh talmhan don tigherana.
Téigheadh an tríomhadh stúca coirce ó gach pháirc agus an tríomhadh iomaire prátaí. San am sin do bhíodh stoc ag na tigearnaí[?] go glaodhtar fiadh ortha agus ní fágaidís garraidhe nó coirce ag na daoine bochta gan iththe. Dá gcloisfadh an tighearna go marbóchaidís ceann acu cíos nó gan cíos do cuirfí as thalamh tú agus do dhúnaidís an dorus ort. I gcionn tamaill bhí tuitim amach idir na tighearnaí agus sé an dlígh a tháinig amach ná éinne a bhéarfadh ar fiadh ina thalamh féin gur b'féidir leis é marbhúghadh. Seo sean fhocal a bhíodh ag
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-25 22:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
sé thar nais go dtí Coill Carraig a' Phúca agus bhí an capall annsan roimis agus d'imthig sé air go Corcaigh. Tamall na dhiaidh san bhí sé ag imteacht airís agus nuair do shrois sé coill Carraig a'-Phuca do tháinig an púca ar an dtaobh istig de'n chlaidhe agus ar seisean, "A Mhathúin bhfuil na grearráin sin fós ort. Tar annso", arsa Mathúin. agus beidh fhios agat," ach ambasa níor tháinig an Púca ach i gcionn beaga aimsire. Do théith sé o'n áit ar fad mar bhí gach aoinne ag cur spior ar a bhróga nuair d'airigheadar cad do dhein Mathúin.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-25 22:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Do bhí sprid thoir i gCarraig a' Phúca fadó agus ins an am san ní raibh traen ag rith Ó Mághcromtha go Corcaig agus do caitheadh na daoine ím do thabhairt go Corcaig cun é dhíol.
Capall agus srathar fhada a bhíodh ag na daoine an uair úd.
Uaireannta ní bhíodh ualach trom aca agus d'feadfadh an fear suidhe istig ar thaobh an tsrathar fhada ach núair do bheadh ualach trom aca do caithfeadh sé sé siubhal. Do thagadh an púca rómpa annsan agus do sáthadh sé a ceann isteach idir dhá cois an duine agus dárduigheadh sé leis ar a dhrom é agus ní stadadh sé go dtí go sroisidis sráid a Mhuillinn.
Bhí fear ó mbaile Mhúirne darb ainm do Mathúin Ó Tuama ag dul soir oidhche. Nuair a bhí sé ag siubhal trí coill Carraig a Phúca níor airigh sé pioc go dtí go raibh ceann sáidhte idir a dhá cois agus as go brách leo. Níor stad sé go dtí gur chaith sé Mathúin bocht isteach i Loc Cum-a-trúis inaice Sráid a Mhuillinn agus d'fág sé annsan é. Do tharraing Mathúin e féin amach agus siar síos leis treasna na cnuic go dtí gur shrois sé Baile Mhúirne.
Do bhí an capall taréis teacht abhaile agus an t-ualach ar a dhrom.
Ar maidin lár na bháireach do chuaidh Mathúin go dtí an ceardhcán agus do chuir sé spuir ar a bhróga. Do ghluias sé go Corcaigh airís an oidhche san agus na spuir air. Soir tré coill Carraig a' Phúca airis do tháinig an Puca ar an dtaobh thiar do agus cuir sé a ceann isteach idir a dhá cois agus d'árduigh sé leis air a dhrom é ach má dhein do thug Mathúin na spiorraí do ar clíathánaibh agus suas leo mar an sidhe gaoithe gur thuit an Púca ar mullach a cínn thuas ar Crois an Teampall agus d'fág Mathúin annsan é agus tháinig
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-25 22:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I have already mentioned Carraig an Aifreann and Cúm a' tSagairt as it is very likely that a priest was in hiding in these parts. It is said that once the hunters were on his track and that he ran into a hut and pulled himself up the chimney. He was seen entering the hut by the hunters however and was followed by them. They searched about the house and could find no trace of the priest. One of them looked up the chimney, saw the priest and tried to inform the others but was unable to utter a word, as the whole party went off unable to find a trace of the hunted priest.
Some days later this man south out the priest and begged forgiveness, and he never again took part in priest-hunting because he was convinced that the hand of God had saved the priest on that day.
It is believed however that the priest was in the end tracked down and slain on the Coomleigh mountains and that his headless body was buried there. They say that a plot about a square perch in area is fenced in and that it was here the priest was buried.
As far as can be made out mass was always celebrated in the open air
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-25 15:35
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
would not leave his son go and he sent one of his men. The Gúban put down on the paper "Crooked against Crooked" and "Straight against Straight". When the boy's wife saw this she knew what was wrong and she told the King's man to stoop into a big chest and that he would get the instrument there. He fell into the chest and she locked him inside in it. She wrote to the King and she said that she would not leave the man back until her husband and his father would come home. So they came.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-25 15:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Gúbán Saor was a great mason and a king sent for him to build a house as he could not get any other mason. When they were going the boy's wife told them to be very nice to the girls of the house.
When they were going along the road the Gúbán told his son to shorten the road. The boy said that he didnt know how to shorten the road and the Gúbán sent him home. He told his wife and she told him to be telling stories as he went along. He caught up to his father again and he began telling stories. They reached the place and they started to build a house.
They were very nice to the girls and when they had the house nearly finished they told the Gúbán that the king was going to kill them. When the house was finished. The Gúbán told the King that he could not finish the house without one thing and that and that he would send his son home for it. The King
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-25 15:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There once lived a man named the Gúbán Saór. He was a very clever man and he had a son who was not clever. He wanted to get a clever girl to marry his son. One day he gave a sheep skin to his son and he told him sell it and bring back the money and the skin. The son told him that he could not do so so he went to the fair.
He was in the fair all day but he could not sell it. When he was coming home in the evening he met a girl and he told her his story. The girl told him to come to the house with her. When they went into the house the girl got a sheers and shore the wool off the skin and gave the boy the money for the wool. When they went home he told his father all that had happened. The Gúbán said that he would make a match between the girl and his son. He made the match and they married. The
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-24 20:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There can be little doubt that the Duhallow is the oldest hunt now existing in Ireland, indeed at the time when Charles Edward Louis, Philip Casimer, commonly called the "Young Pretender" was raising the Standard in Scotland, Mr. Henry Wrixon of Ballygiblin kept a pack of hounds.
The is documentary evidence to prove this in the hands of the great-grandson of Mr Henry Wrixon, Mr William Nicholas Wrixon Beecher of Castlehyde Fermoy Co Cork. This is the receipt for thirteen Guineas paid by Mr Henry Wrixon as rent for the fox covert at Reyans Brake which adjoined the present covert of Rartmakea.
When many years ago the Kildare Hunt claimed to be the oldest pack in Ireland on the evidence of this document, the honour was eventually accorded to the Duhallow. Mr Wrixon resigned the Mastership of the pack to his son Col. William Wrixon during whose term of office in 1800 the Duhallow Hunt Club was founded. Mr Langley Brazier Chreagh of
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-24 20:07
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Charleville, an incorporated market and post-town is situated in the Parliamentary borough of North Cork and in the parish of Rathgogans. It derived its name from King Charles II, and was founded by Roger Boyle Lord President of Munster in the year 1661. The founder erected Charleville House. Charleville was ruled by a Mayor and Corporation.
The ancient Church has long been in ruins. The present Protestant Church was erected by the first Earl, and the Roman Catholic Church was founded in 1812. The Primary and Secondary schools were founded early in the 19th century. The Secondary school was endowned by Lord Orrery, who continues to do so at the present time.
Charleville has a historic passed. It was unknown during the early Irish wars until late in the 17th century. A Charter for a Corporation and markets dates back to its foundation. It was a very prosperous town, and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-24 20:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Passing by Old Two-Pot House we notice a road said to have been one time the main coach road from Limerick to Cork. A man named Michal Michael Hickey also told me that there were stables here at the crossroads in the present farmyard of Mr O Brien a few yards from the Cross and here they used to change horses for their journey. It is also said too that one Sunday long ago Daniel O'Connell stopped here while on his journey to Cork and talked with the old men of the neighbourhood. He showed great intrest in the locality and asked many questions about the landowners and the tenants. One must remember that the local people were mentioned in the Doneraile Conspiracy and were it not for O'Connells defence would have ungone the extreme penalty even though proved innocent-
O'Neill and O'Donnell with their
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-24 19:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Infant Jesus meek and mild
Look on me a little child
Make me humble as thou art
Make me love thy Sacred Heart.
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My Jesus, mercy, Mary help
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My Jesus be not to me a judge but a Saviour
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O Mary conceived without sin make my Body pure and my soul gentle.
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[-]
I lay my body down to sleep,
I pray to God my soul to keep.
If I die before I wake,
I pray to God my soul to take
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Creator Spirit by whose aid, the world's foundation first was laid. Come visit every pios mind. Come pour thy joys on human kind, from sin and sorrow set us free, and make us temples worthy of thee
Amen.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-24 19:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are four statues at present. lent to the National Museum Dublin which local tradition says were got in a tree close by the monastery of Kilcorban where they were hidden for security in the penal times. Some say that only two of these statues were found in the tree some say three were found. The tree was called Crann Deilbh. It is told in the locality that when the tree was being a voice was heard to say "na gearr". One of the images was without a hand which was supposed to be cut off by the hewer of the tree. There is no trace at present of where the tree grew but its position is pointed out as midway between the old ruins and the river near-by. These statues after being found were for many years laid on the stone Altar in the little church at Kilcorban before they were brought to Tynagh parish church. Local tradition has it that people went there to swear on these statues and some times
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-24 19:13
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Badgers - the most dangerous of our tamed wild animals, are a grey colour, they will attack human beings when roused to anger.
The squirrel is one of the animals that teach us a lesson in thrift, when he gets a nut which he doesn't need, he will store it up for his Winter sleep, he being one of the animals that hibernate. Whenever he feels hungry, he wakes up and eats a few of his store of nuts. But more often than not, he forgets all about his store of nuts, which are left in their hiding place to grow into trees, and so the tiny squirrel is instrumental in planting giant forests.
A strange bird has come to Timoleague recently. He is not a native of this country. He is very beautiful. When seen at a distance, he looks to be shell pink, but when near him he is white, and his wings are pink underneath them with black borders. Everyone says something different about him, the people have three names for him - Ostrich, flamingo and Penguin. All agree that there's only a dozen of his species in the world. Some say he came from South Africa; others say he is from some zoo, and others said he came off some ship. Personally, I think he didn't come from any warm country
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-24 19:06
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
couldn't even make a grab for him, so he got away safely.
Otters live in rivers, and if they caught you, they would never let you go, until they broke some bone in your body. Otters were plentiful under Spittle bridge about a mile from Timoleague. My Grandmother said that one of these otters caught a man by the leg. His brothers thought of a plan; they brought out a bucket of ashes and they made a crunching noise, and the otter left the man go, thinking he had broken some bone in him. This story sounds improbable.
The stoat or what we call weasel is plentiful in stony ditches. Though small, he is very fierce and will attack and kill bigger animals than himself [rabbit hare hedgehog].
Rabbits are not so plentiful now, because they fetch a good price, and many people hunt them.
The hare has no home, but wherever he rests, he leaves a mark which is called "his seat".
Eascú Luachair [a kind of lizard] is the only type of snake existing in Ireland. They are common in places where furze grows, when their bodies are cut in two, each part can wriggle away by itself, unless they are hit on the head they won't die. what about cure in an eascú luachair
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-24 18:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The animals which are common in this part of the country are fox rabbit hare stoat otter and eascúluachair. Rats and foxes are very clever. Mr Sullivan's assistant - Mr Wally told my Aunt that in Mr Sullivan's egg storage house in Clonakilty there were eggs lying in boxes one day. Two rats came out of their nest in the wall. Not knowing they were being watched, they went towards a stale egg which was lying on the floor. Not being able to roll it into their nest, they adopted a very clever plan to take the egg with them. One of the rats laid down on the floor with his paws around the egg, while the other dragged him by his tail back to their nest in the wall.
My Grandmother said that her people had a thatched geese house. Her Mother had a clutch of goslings in the house, and during the night, the fox came and made a hole in the thatch which was old. When her mother came in the morning to let out the goslings, they were all dead, and the fox in their midst seemingly dead as well. She ran yelling for her husband, leaving the door open. Scarcely was her back turned, when the fox came to life, and like a flash, he ran past her. She was so amazed she
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-23 20:14
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
down in 1922 by the Republicans They made great progress in learning the music.
There were lots of local men in the band namely Patrick Barry, Michael Moore, Maurice Moore, Patrick Moore, Garret Moore, Richard Gorman, William Bowdren, Patrick Woods, David Barry and Thomas Barry. They all had brass instruments some of them had Coronets, Saxaphones, Flutes, and lots of other brass instruments.
Every Christmas Eve, they used to bring out the band, and play from the Mill down to Dr Barry's Bridge and back up to the 'Corner House'. They used to play lots of old traditional airs.
They used always bring out the band on New Years Eve, playing the old year out, and the New year in. They used also play at the sports meeting that used be held that time
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-23 20:08
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhí sagart ag tabhairt seanamóna uaidh Domhnach áirighthe. Ghlaoidh sé amach on althóir, "Bhfuil Eóghain Ruadh an féirín annsan" "Níl" arsa Eóghan "ach Eóghain Ruadh an bhéil bhinn" Bhfuil na h-aiteannta agat chómh maith arsan sagart.
Fhreagair Eoghain is dubhairt.
" An ceud aithne dhíobh is fior go n-oireann don cléir,
Chun an bhúird nuair a súidheadh ar chíos na h-Eaglaise glaodhad,
Ar bhainnis an bídh is ag ól fíonta is leana go craos,
Is ní bhíonn acu suim ar daoine ainghise an t-shaoghail".
"Stop stop" arsan sagart "déanfhaidh san"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-23 20:03
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Chuaidh Eoghain Ruadh isteach go gréasaidhe lá cun peidhre bróg do chur á dhéunamh is seo mar a dubhairt Eoghain.
"Cuir mo shál ins an áit is ramhaire don stéig
Is cuir dá mhála breághtha mine réidh,
Bíodh do shnáithín bán, lag buidhe le céir,
Is bíodh sí beárrtha, bláthmhar díonmhar saor".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-23 19:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Chuaidh Fínghín O Scanaill ar chuaird fé dhéin Diarmuideach Seumais uair. Bhí Diarmuid 'na chómhnuidhe i gCúil Larraidh is nuair a tháinig Fínghin isteach bhí Diarmuid 'na shuidhe cois na teine is é ag ól píopa. Labhair Fínghín is dúbhairt sé
"A Fearaise shéim dob' féile is d'ob fheárr gníomhartha
Fé mhaithinn na nGaedheal nár staon riam i gcath ná a gcúimheasgar.
Faid ar do shaoghal fé réim is rachmar choidhche
Is tabhair dom féin go héasga gal don phíopa"
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"O ariú a dhuine arsa Diarmuid na thuigeann tú cúrsa an t-shaoghail
Do dhuine mar mise ná bhfuil sgilling 'na láimh ná néul.
Ó ná tuigeann tú nách miste leat méid mo féin
Cuireadh gach duine againn teine ar a phípín féin".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-23 18:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Do bhí tighearna talmhan ann fada is minic a bhí is beidh airís leis. Do phós sé bean a bhí go flaitheamhail don na bochtaibh.
Ní choimeadadh sí pioc di féin ach á roinnt ar na bochtaibh. I gcionn tamaill do bhí clann acu, triúr inghean a bhí acu agus ní fhéadfá leanbhaí níos deise ná iad fhághail.
Do bhí gach aoinne go mór léi nídh nách iongnadh. I gcionn roinnt blianta do fuair an bhean bhocht bás. Do bhí brón is buadhairt ar gach aoinne na diaidh agus níor b'iongnadh san.
Nuair a fuair an bhean bás níorbh' fhéidir leis an dtighearna talmhan aire a thabairt don na leanbhaí agus do thóg a dhriofúr léi iad.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-23 18:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
an choilig ach is fada ón áit seo Conndae Cill Choinnigh dubhairt an fear ná raibh sé thar a dó a chlog an uair sin. D'imthig sé leis go dtí Corcaig agus an oidhche san nuair a bhí sé a' teacht abhaile an oidhche san tháinig an bháisteach is na tóirtneacha i dtreo's gur chaith sé dul isteach go tig cómharsa.
Tímpeall a dódhéag a chlog do thriomuig sé is chuaidh sé abhaile. Do chuaidh sé a chodladh dho féin is tímpeall a dó a chlog d'airig sé cnag ag an ndoras le na linn sin do ghlaoidh an coileach is do stad an cnag.
An oidhche na dhiaidh san do thuit an rud céadna amach, do ghlaoidh an coileach is do stop an fothrom.
An tríomhadh oidhche do thuit an rud céadna amach is do cheapfá an oidhche san go mbrisfí an doras agus nuair
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-23 18:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Béarla ag rith trí n'aigne. Tar éis do siubhal ceathramhadh uaire chloig eile a chuir de d'airig sé fothrom éigin ar an dtaobh istig de'n claidhe. D'fhéach sé isteach agus is amhlaidh a bhí fear a' treabhadh istig i bpáirc agus bhí ceann de'n na capaill imthighthe síos air.
Bhí truagh ag an bhfear ó Bheanntraighe dho agus do chuaidh sé suas chuige is dubhairt "I wish you joy".
Nuair airig an treabhadóir é sin tháinig árd fhearg air agus siúd chun siubhail tímpeall na páirce é i ndiaidh an fear ó Bheanntraighe.
I gcionn tamaill d'fhan an fear ó Bheanntraighe leis an dtreabhadóir go dtí go dtáinig sé suas leis.
D'iarr sé maitheamhnachas air mar
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-23 15:01
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
"dubhairt Domhnall mór leis an mnaoí rud eigin a thabhairt le n-ithe dhóibh ar son Dé". Dubhairt an bhean go dtabharfadh[?] sí an dínnéir dóibh go deimin nuair a bheadh sé [?] aice." Bhíodar istig tamall ana mhór ag feitheamh leis an dínnéir ach ní raibh sé ag ollamhúghadh dhoibh ná aon trácht air.
Fé dheire dubhairt Dómhnall mór leí a raibh sí cun aon dínnéir a thabhairt dóibh agus dubhairt sí gur dearmhad sí é. Chuaidh Domhnall mór amach an dorus agus d'fhan sé amuich tamall[?] ana mhór. Tar-éis tamaill tháinig sé isteach agus bata mór na láim aige. Rug sé ar an mhnaoí agus thug sé aon buille amháin di ar a thóin agus thosnuig sí ag sgreadaig.
Ansan do rug na fir ar Dómhnall mór agus dúbhradar leis gan í bhualadh a thuille mar go marbhóchadh sé í. Tháinig ana fhearg ar Dhómhnall agus dubhairt sé le na mhnaoí an dínnéir a thabhairt dóibh nó go dtabharfhadh sé an rud céadhna dí nó rud éigin níos measa.
Do dhein sí an dínnéir d'ollamhúghadh dhóibh agus ní raibh sí ró mhall leis. Nuair a bhí an
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-23 14:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhí fear ann uair agus Dómhnall mór a ghlaodhfaidis air. Bhí fear eile ann agus Seán a b'ainm do. Bhí Dómhnall mór pósta is bhí ferim breágh aige in-aice Maghchromtha. Lá amháin bhíodar ag baint móna agus chuireadar fios ar Sheán cun cabhrú leó. Thosnuigheadar ar a seacht a chlog ar maidin agus nuair a tháinig cúig a chlog um thrathnóna ní raibh aon dínnéir ithte acu ná ní raibh aon trácht air.
Bhí Seán ar buille le h-ocras agus bhí sé le rádh le Domhnall mór rud eígin a thabhairt le n-ithe do ach tháinig eagla air agus dubhairt sé leis féín b'féidir go mbuailfheadh Dómhnall mór é.
Tímpeall a sé a chlog um thráthnóna dubhairt Dómhnaill mór le na fir a bhí ag obair do go raibh ana ocras tagaithe air féin agus gur dócha go raibh ocras ortha leis. Dúbhradar go raibh ocras ortha mar ná raibh pioc le n-ithe acu ó seacht a chlog ar maidin. " Fé dheire chuadar isteach abhaile agus
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-23 14:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
chuadar abhaile agus dubhradar leis na fir glic go rabhadar ag fághail bháis ach níor chreideadar iad in-aon-chor.
Dho chuireadar amach ag treabhadh ar an bpáirc iad agus nuair a tháinig aimsir dínnéir do chuaidh an bheirt ghlic amach ag glaodhach ortha ac bhíodar tar-éis bháis ar an bpáirc.
Ní raibh a fhios ag na fir ghlic cad a dhéanfhaidís agus do ritheadr trí míle ó'n áit agus chuadar isteach i lios agus chuadar ag obair.
Nuair a chonnaic na púcaí iad tháinig ana fhearg ortha agus do thógadar amach as an lios iad agus do mharbhuigheadar iad. D'fágadar istig sa lios iad agus táid siad ann ó shoin i leith.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:39
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
4
What is it you must take in your palm before it will let you in. A key
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:37
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1.
It's red and it's blue and it's valuable green the king can't come at it then either the queen. Answer The rainbow.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:36
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2.
White bird feathery flew from paradise down to the walls of paris - Snow.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:34
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
3.
What part of the cow goes over the ditch first - Her breath.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
4
What is it you must lathe in your palm before it will let you in. A key
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
5
Little red jenny she sits on a stall, if you gave her butter she would eat it all. If you gave her herrings she would cry, and if you gave her water she would die.
A fire.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:31
ceadaithe
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6.
Betty inside the ditch Betty outside the ditch and if you touch Bettty she would bite you.
A nettle.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:29
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time there was a man named O'Regan and he was very exact about time, he had a servant employed and one morning when they were at breakfast. The man used to eat a quarter loaf of bread at the time, and the master said it was as well to have the dinner and breakfast together so that they need not be coming in during the day to the meals. "Oh said the man "tis as well to have the supper also and go to bed".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a man one time and he stole a pair of boots from the priest he was working with. He went to confession to the same priest and the priest asked him what was his sins and he said he stole a pair of boots and he didn't know what to do. The priest told him give them back to the owner but he said "A father I cannot very well do that, but I'll give them to you". The priest said he didn't want
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:27
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is treasure hidden in "the Castle" according to local tradition. It is said to have been placed there by Lord Barrymore for fear of raids by the Irish.
According to Bridie Gubbins Farran no attempts have been made to unearth the treasure, according to May Casey Castlelyons, a local man attempted to recover the treasure but he was unsuccessful. He looked for the treasure in the daytime and instead of finding gold he found cinders. The local people say that if he had looked for it by night he would have found gold - as the gold was supposed to turn into cinders in the daytime.
The buried treasure is said to consist of gold vessels, and Gold Coins.
The treasure in the Castle is said to be guarded by a bull.
The treasure is said to be buried to the north of the Castlelyons Castle - up on the height facing the school.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:22
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So now I am tired of foreign lands &
I'll cross oe'r the sea.
To join the group of friendship's hands
[?] the slopes of gallantry.
& as I pass by Leary's cross. the
boys will welcome me
Likewise the men of rebel Cork
down. E's. L. L.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:19
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5
He also asked me did I know
where W. Tone's body lay.
Or what about Young Emmet who
sleeps in the secret clay
Or could I tell of bold Dwyer
the Wicklow mts. pride,
Or where the brave Manchester 3
are sleeping side by side
6
As I was leaving I. I came round
by sweet Kildare
And if I don't make a great mistake -
W. Tone lay sleeping there.
In coming down from Dub. town I
passed Glasnevin too
It's there Young R. E. sleeps that
patriot loyal & true
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:14
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Wren builds in old houses, bushes - holes in walls, trees, holes in trees. She lays 21 eggs.
The Pheasant builds in bogs, brakes, ditches big trees, furze and sometimes in a meadow or by a deep dyke covered with briars.
The Bullfinch builds in trees.
The Starling builds in holes in walls & [?]
The "Béní" (smaller than the wren - they'd spit at you if you went near em") builds in holes in walls and in hollow trees.
The Waterhen builds in rushes and in switch grass. "If you got her out in the middle of the field you could catch her' - she couldnt run at all in the grass." "There's waterhen outside in the river behind the garden near the school."
The Corncrake nests in meadows & corn. The eggs are bluey green with green spots on them.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 20:07
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Gulls flying inland denote bad weather.
Starlings & [?] in flocks on the ground foretell hardweather.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 19:40
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
ach spreallairín meathlóra nárbh fhiú é é a chothughadh, ach gur mhór an truagh agus an sgrupall bheith ag cailleamhaint bhídh ná beathadh leis.
Do bhíodh Muinntir Laoghaire sa[?] chath chómh maith le cách eile, [?] má bhídís, is fíor annamh a buaidhtí ortha, agus ní h-ag maoidheamh as a dtréine ná as[?] a laochas dom é, ach nuair a ghabhadh an dá lín tíghe le chéile igcómhnuidhe ní bhídís choidhche gan[?] a neart slógh féin, igcás ná mhór do ghearra - mhiothall teacht tíomchall ortha chun iad a chur i gcúl aon - chinn.
Oidhche aonaig áirithe, d'á rabhadar[?] ag teacht abhaile ó Mhágh Chromtha do casadh namhaid éigin ortha annsúd shíos ar Chill Gobnatan in áit éigin in aice an leasa; agus cuireadar cath ar a chéile. Bhí
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 19:35
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
chéadna a bhí sa lín-tíghe eile, igcás gur chuma no dritháracha agus deirbshiúracha iad uile go léir.) is andóich ná go rabhadar go léir oilte, eólghaithe[?] go maith ar a raibh de dhraoideacht[?] agus de dhiabalaidheacht, agus de chalaois ag gluaiseacht
Bhí fir lúthmhara, luatha, láidir ortha ná tabharfhadh a gcúl haoinne, in aon tsaghas gníomh[?] no gaisge, agus is dócha go raibh a chomhthrom de mheathlóiribh [?] mhaith ortha. Bhí filí leis ortha[?] ach cad é an chabhair dom tharrach orm mar is ró bheag dá gcuid filidheachta a thugas liom cé gur airigheas gearra chuid dí nuair a bhíos im' leanbh. Níor dhein aoinne de chrích i sgríobhadh in aon leabhar agus fágann san 'n-a[?] h-éaghmais indhiu sinn.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 19:30
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Mínigheann an tAthair Peadar ar leathanach a h-ocht, "Mo Sgéal Féin", go raibh beirt dritheár de Mhuinntir Laoghaire pósta le beirt deirbhshéar[?] de Mhuinntir Thuathaig. Bhí Peadar Ua Laoghaire pósta le Máire Ní Thuathaig agus bhí Diarmuid Ua Laoghaire pósta le Siobhán Ní Thuathaig. Mac mic do Pheadar Ua Laoghaire agus do Mháire Ní Thuathaig i beadh an t-Athair Peadar agus mac mic do Dhiarmuid Ua Laoghaire agus do Shiobhán Ní Thuathaig [?] mise. ( Nóta:- Tá sé seo ghá innsint ag Diarmuid Ua Laoghaire, as Lios Caragáin, mar a bhfuil cómhnaidhe air idteannta len a dhearbhrathair Barnaibí agus a dhrifiúr. Siad san an t-aon líon tíghe amháin de Mhuinntir Laoghaire atá fágtha i Lios Caragáin anois. Caith Diarmuid treimhse, is dóigh liom, mar
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 19:25
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Fuair sé bás bhreagacha, cun dhul ó fhiachaibh agus, i gcionn cúig mbhlian, nuair a bhí na fhiaca a dhata, dho dhein sé aiseirige agus bhuail sé an bhotar cóm togail le h-aoinne. Tug sé cursa go h-America an faidh a bhí sé suan. Is é a dhein an tigh údh sios í Maghchromtha go bhfuil Searghán Ua Seagdha féar dhiolta an eadhaigh, n-a chomnuidhe ann. Tá an tig chéadhna story nios aoirdhe na aon tig eile sa t-sraid: Fear ana-laidhir abheadh é.
Do sghriobhas féin a thréithe, í mbhearla agus í nGaodhluinn, agus ní chuirfheadh aon phaipear nuadhachta í gchló dhom é. Is dhocha gurbh amlaidh a bhí sé ró fada
(d)
"Páirch na Croiche". An pháirc dhronnach le h-ais dhroichead Carraig an Ime an pháirc is siadh ó tuaidh, ar imeall an bhóthair, dhe talamh Na mBhreatmhach. Dho crochadh triúr fear ann bhlian na mbhuachaillí mbhana
(e)
"Insin Carraig an Ime,"
"Nar mairidh sí a h-ainmh na a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 19:12
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
were never since touched. The weight is thrown in a more scientific way now and therefore the figures are extended. Well, Con Welshe is no longer in his hey-day and not able to advance with the times, but let the scientific Athletes turn back to Cons primitive method and test their muscles.
The next Athlete to appear on the horizon was Jerry Creedon of Barathanacnuck, who figured very prominently in the Mile Race track for a few years. Although he had no oppertunity for training or resting before a race he held his own among the best of them. The Alderman Walshe presented a Silver Cup to the Tuar na Dhroman Sports Commitee, to be won three times in succession or five times altogether. Jerry Creedon had no great difficulty in annexing it. He won several other
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 13:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Do bhíodar ag rith in diaidh na leannbaí agus na leannbaí ag sgreadaig is ag gol agus do chuadar ins gach aon bhall suas an staighre agus an sluag na dhiaidh.
Nuair a chuadar abhaile do dhéineadhar an bearsa seo:-
A fhear gan chiall a fhear gan ciall
bíonn tú igchómhnaidhe ag chodlad in aice na téine
Do páiste ag gol is ag sgreadaig
A fhear gan ciall a fhear gan ciall
Nuair a airig Seán maol an méid sin do tháinig feárg ar agus níor raibh sé ar méisge a tuille agus do tug sé áire maith dá phaiste agus géarr na dhiaidh sin gúr fuair a bhean bás.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 13:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhí ana eagla air fadh air na páisti ansan agus ní raibh sé abhfad na codhlaid nuair a buailead cnag ar an doras agus tháinig ana eagla ortha agus do thosnuigeadar ag gol agus má dhein níor dhúisig an athair in-aon-cor.
Do bhiodhar ag rith anso agus ansúd ag gáiridhe agus ag léimrig ó chathaoir go cathaoir agus do bhíodar ag gol agus ní raibh fhios acu cad a deanfaidís agus bhíodar ag rith ansó agus ansúd agus mórán eagla ortha.
Do bhuail cucha isteach sluig mór agus ní raibh fhios acu cad a deinaidís agus do bhí an atháir na codhlaid agus ana éagla ar fad ortha agus níor duisig an atháir in-aon-chor.
Do bhí an fear gheall leis isthigh sa teine agus na leanbaí ag sgreadaig agus ag gol ach níor duisig an atháir.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 13:37
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
agus do bhíodh sé ag buaileadh an cuid eile acú.
Oidhche amháin do bhíodar go léir ag suidh cóis na téine agus d'airigeadar an glór amuich agus do chuaidh an t-athair amuich go pé duine a bhí amuich agus do bhí sé ar méisge.
Cupla duine de's na chómharsain a bhí amuich agus iad ag éisteacht leo istig d'imthig sé amach agus dubairt sé leo stop go tapaid agus dubhairt sé leo dtuig a diabhal in [?] agus do bí éagla ortha agus do chuadhar amach in dhiaidh agus do tháinig éagla ar.
Do tháinig éagla ar na daoine amuich agus d'imthigeadar abhaile agus do chuaidh an fear abhaile agus ar a shlige abaile dho do connaich solus agus do chuaidh sé fé na déin ach nuair a tháinig sé cúige ní raibh sé ann.
D'imthig sé abhaile agus do shuidh sé cóis na téine agus do thuit a codladh ar.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 13:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once upon a time there was an old woman who lived alone. One night a traveller came to her door, and asked for lodging. She gave him lodging. The next morning was Sunday. The old woman got up early to go to Mass. She told the traveller to stay in the house till she returned from Mass. She told him to mind the baby, and to look after the cow.
When the woman went to Mass the traveller went for a walk. When he returned he saw the cow eating the child. He struck the cow with a black-thorn stick. The cow began to roar. When the people heard the cow, and the child roaring they came to the old woman's house. When the traveller saw the people coming he ran off through the fields, and was never seen again.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-22 13:24
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
the steward when she was not acquainted with Johnny's people. Before Johnny went in home she told him he must not let anyone kiss him or he would immediately forget her. Great was the welcome for Johnny when he entered his own house He told them of his experiences and of the girl who helped him.
He did not let anyone kiss but next morning when he was lacing his shoes the dog kissed him. Then he remembered what the girl told him. He ran out to the steward's house and sure enough the girl had vanished. She was an expert with the needle and her fame spread throughout Ireland. Johnny forgot all about her and years afterwards when he was getting married to another lady he sent an order to this famous dressmaker to make the wedding dress. The dressmaker told the servant that Johnny would have to come for the dress himself. Johnny went for the dress. He did not recognise her. He asked her what was his charge. She said an invitation to the wedding breakfast. Johnny said the dress could not cost less and gave her the invitation. Now in these times the wedding breakfast was held before the wedding ceremony. At the wedding breakfast everyone had to tell a story. When it came to the dressmaker's time she put her hand under her cloak and threw out a "Gold Cock" on the table. Then she put her hand under her cloak a second time and threw out a "silver hen". She then threw out a grain of wheat on the table and the hen picked it up but the cock pecked her. As soon as the cock pecked the hen, the hen said "You should not as that. Do you remember the day I helped you to empty the well and to find the ring." She then threw our another grain of wheat
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 22:17
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Ba cheart gabhar a dhéanamh de féin ar dtúis agus do dhearmhad sí e sin agus dhein an mac an bhéarsa seo.:-
A leas-máthair, a leas-máthair
Tá agat draoideachta
Agus tá agam-sa filideachta
A leas-máthair, a leas-máthair
Tá agam-sa amhránuidheacta.
Ní dubhairt sé pioc mar gheall ar an ngabhar mar bhí eagla air. Nuair a airig an leas-máthair sin, dhein sí bhéarsa eile.:-
A Mhic, a Mhic
Tá agam draoidheachta
A mhic, a Mhic
Ní'l agat filidheachta
A mhic, a Mhic,
Ní'l agat amranuideachta
Nuair a airig an buachaill sin dubhairt sé gur mór an bhligeárd
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 22:10
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Bairri in perpetuity.
C. 2. After that the little son did not speak until the proper time. Then Aimirgin and the maiden and the little son came away to Aachadh Durbcon. It was there the child was baptized. Bishop Mc Carp, who foretold that he should go to Cork to head a community baptized him. The first name given to him was Loan, and Fin was nursed for seven years at Achadh Burbeon. There were three clerics Munstermen, who were pilgrims in Leinster at that time. They came on a visit to their own country and arrived on their journey at the house of Aimirgin, and at seeing the beautiful little child within, the eldest of them said - This youth is comely the prosperity of the Holy Ghost has developed in his countenance, and we would wish to read for him (to instruct him). If so said Aimirgin, take him with ye, and let it be done for him. The senior said - we will not take him now until we come again, when going to Leinster. They came afterwards, the same three, to the house of Aimirgin
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 22:02
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
We know of many harmful weeds that grow in the soil which destroy the crops, unless they are kept under early control. I believe the most harmful weeds of all are "the thistle" and "dock root". The latter of these besides injuring the crop draw all nature out of the soil. On the other hand the thistle which is also distructive weed is never seen to grow but in rich soil.
In former days when people suffered from ailments
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 21:58
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before he himself left for the wake or funeral. Then perhaps when the work was under way or completed was it learnt that the rumour was false. Such occurrences were looked upon as a very good omen. "A person whose grave was dug before his death was sure to recover", just as the rumour of a person's death before his actual demise was considered to be a sure sign that he was to recover. Jamesy Peter Looney of Bawnnamucklach, Gneeveguilla Rathmore was seriously ill in a Cork Hospital almost 30 years ago. An account came to his relatives in Gneeveguilla that he was dead. There was no question of where he would be buried - with the family. Friends went to dig his grave and horses and carts went to the station to meet the funeral (the remains were brought by train from Cork in those pre-motor days) The train duly steamed in but it bore no coffin. The people learned from a friend who came off the train that Jamsey was not dead. They returned home and of course in their hurry they appeared to be like a funeral - car after car - all heading home to Gneeveguilla. The priest were waiting at the church and when the rumble of cars was heard the sexton tolled the bell. However, Jamsey didn't die then and he is hale and hearty today. He improve we are told "every minute from that day out."
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 21:48
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and in the long run he was shot one night. It was then the "raic"[?] started. Lord Tom was like a devil. Everyone was being held up and questioned and in the finish they cast their suspicion on poor Foxy Thady Hurley and arrested him.
He was tried and sentenced to be hanged but the good Parish Priest of Drimoleague Father Murray set him free.
IT WAS ABOUT THAT CON MAHONY [?] COMPOSED THE SONG AND Ill GIVE YOU THE WORDS OF IT
----------
1/
Loud sounds the horn in each brake and glen
Along each valley and by each rill
From Céim an Fhiaidh to sweet Glandore
There was loud "Huzzaying" and cheers galore.
----------
2/
Great Illumination in West Cork to-day
From around Dunmanway to
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 21:39
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhí ana-áthas ar fear na pluaise.
Dubhairt sé leó dul isteach. Do thug sé rud le n-ithe agus le n-ól dióbh. Do shleamhnuig sé uatha agus ní fheacadar a thuille é.
Do thuit a gcodhlad ortha nuair a dhúiseadar ar maidin bhíodar in-aice cloch agus an grian ag taithneamh ortha go breágh. agus níor dhúiseadar go dtí an maidin.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 21:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
"Táim-se im mhuinntir Shúilleabháin arsa fear. D'airigeas" ar seisean "nuair a bhíos óg. D'airigeas mo mhuinntir gá rád gur dhein fear éigin díobháil do gaol cómgaireach dár' ab ainm do Tadg Ó Suilleabháin.
"An maithfá so dhom" ar seisean más duine d'es na daoine sin thú. Do bhíodar ag cainnt ar fead abfad agus pé cainnt a bhí aca do dheineadar amach gur b'iad na Suilleabháin ceadna iad no Suilleabháin a tháinig ó Cionn-tSáile.
Do maith an fear do agus d'innis sé do gur b-é an ainm a bhí air ná Seán Ó rud éigin nár thuig an fear.
Táinig sé cúca ansan agus do thug sé deoc uisge do gac duine aca mar dubaradar leis go rabadar ana tuirseach agus go ragad deoc uisge síos go maith leó.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 21:26
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Caithead fanamhaint annso go dtiochfhad duine muinntir éigin de'n duine sin cúgamh agus mé a maitheamh ó'n rud a dheineas.
Ach ní mór an diobháil a dheineas ar seisean ach ba mhaith liom é bheith maithte.
Táim i bpurgudóireacht agus ní féidir liom dul go Flaitheas Dé gan an rud seo bheith maiththe "Cad é an ainm a bhí ar na daoine gur dheinis an diobháil do. arsa duine de's na fir leis.
Do mhuinntir Ó Shuilleabháin ar seisean ach ní dhéanfhainn é in-aon-chor ach do dheineas rud ar an Spáinneach i gCionn tSháile.
Tá cathú orm anois tar-éis an gníomh so a dhéanamh agus is dócha go bfuil Ó Suilleabháin ar neamh anois agus mise i bpurgudóireacht anois.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 20:55
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Nuair a shroiseadar é is amhlaidh a bhí fear na sheasam i mbeal pluaise.
"Cé hé tusa nú cad tá agat a dhéanamh anso" arsa duine leis na fir leis. "Sead begor innis dúinn" arsa[?] fear eile.
"Suid sios anso" ar seisean "do shuideadar síos a gcloc agus do thosnuig sé ag innsint a sgeal dhóibh agus d'ob e seo an sgeal.
"Táim anso ag déanamh mo phurgadóíreacht le trí céad bliain" ar seisean.
"Do dheineas diobháil mór do dhuine éígin nuair a bhíos beo. Do las sé solus sa pluais.
Do chuir sé cipíní ar an teine agus do chuir sé [?] crainn isteach ann. Do las sé suas go breágh agus ansan do lean an fear boct ar a sgéal ansan.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 17:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
looked after by a town improvements committee appointed by the Clonmel Corporation.
There is a splendid view of the valley of the Suir from it with Sliabh na mBan directly opposite it and strangers who visit this spot say that the scenery there can compare with anything in the world.
The Rag Well rises at the back of the Comeragh monuntains and flows into the river Suir at Newton Anner. The people put medals and small statues in the well. It is an ancient and historical spot in the Summer and many people visit it. The Rag Well one time was inhabited by two fishes. Everyone was forbidden to touch these fish. One evening a woman coming to the well for water dipped the bucket into it and took one of the fishes out with the water by mistake. The same evening another woman came to the well found it dry and was asked did she know anything about it. She said I took a fish out of it to-day and that may be the cause of it and she replaced the fish in the well and from that day to this a fish was never seen in the Rag Well and the water is still to be seen.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 17:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
imthighthe.
Do chuaidh sé abhaile agus bhí ana iongnadh air agus do chuaidh sé a chodhladh an oidhche sin agus d'innis sé dá mhnaoí mar gheall ar nuair a fhéach sé na thímpeal d'imthig an mac as a radharc ar fad.
Do bhí ana bhrón ar an Máthair bocht ag dul a chodhladh agus bhí ana bhrón ar an t-Athair leis.
Nuair a eirig an t-Athair ar maidin do chonnaic sé a mhac istig sa leabaidh chéadna ina raibh sé féin agus níor aithin sé in-aon-chor é.
Tháinig ana áthas otha nuair a chonnacadar é agus do mhaireadar go cómpórdach as san amach.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 17:18
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
chaithe do chuaidh an t-Athair go dtí an abha agus do bhí sé ag feitheamh leis an mac ar feadh ceithre lá sar ar tháinig aoinne chuige.
Fé dheire do tháinig sé amach as an t-uisge agus an fear in-aon-fheacht leis. Nuair a chonnaic an t-Athair é tháinig ana áthas air.
Dubhairt an fear leis an t-Athair gur buachaill ana mhaith agus go gcaithfheadh sé rud éigin a thabhairt do mar ghealll ar an mac a thabhairt do féin agus thug sé dhá chéad punt do'n t-Athair
Do bhí ana áthas ar an t-Athair nuair a fuair sé an t-airgead agus d'féach sé na thímpeal agus nuair a fhéach sé thar-nais airís san áit ina raibh an mac ina sheasamh do bhí sé imthighte agus ní raibh a fhios aige chá rabhadar
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 17:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
an mac go raghadh sé in-aon-fheacht leis an bfear airís.
Do chuaidh sé isteach san uisge leis airís agus do chuaidh an t-Athair abhaile go brónach agus d'innis sé dá mhnaoí cad a thuit amach agus tháinig ana fhearg uirthe mar gheall ar an mac do leigint leis airís.
Dubhairt sí leis dul go dtí an abha an lá na dhiaidh san agus glaodhach ar an mac féachaint a dtagadh sé chuige.
Do chuaidh sé go dtí an abha agus do ghlaoidh sé ar an mac ach ní raibh aon mhach dho ann. Do chuaidh sé abhaile agus é go brúighte brónach agus do bhí an Máthair ana bhrónach leis.
Do cheapadar go raibh na bliadna ana fhada ag imtheacht agus fé dheire nuair a bhí na deich mbliadhna
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-21 17:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
mhac.
Fé dheire do tháinig sé amach agus an bhuachail in-aon-fheacht leis. Dubhairt an fear leis an t-Athair "buachaill ana mhaith iseadh do mhac agus b'féidir go dtabharfá dhom é ar feadh tamaillín eile ach dubhairt an t-Athair ná dhéanfhadh go dteastuigheann sé uaidh féin.
Ansan dubhairt an fear leis go dtabharfhadh sé mórán airgead do ach an mac do thabhairt do ar feadh deich mbliadhna eile ach níor thug an t-Athair aon fhreagra air. Ansan dubhairt an mach leis an t-Athair ná bíodh aon bhrón ort mar déanfhadh an méid sin duit ach má déarfhair liom gan é dhéanamh ní dhéanfhadh é.
Dubhairt an t-Athair leis an mac go bféadfhadh sé pé rud is maith leis féin a dhéanamh agus dubhairt
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 19:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Trí fear fiadh, trí fiadh fiolar, trí fiolar umaire criadh, trí umaire criadh críoch a' t-saoghail.
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Seo mar cómhairuightí na gabhair fadó.
Trí fichid gabhar rabhta,
Trí fichid rabhta radlach,
Trí fichid radlach ailbhín,
Trí fichid ailbhín colpa.
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Bhí ceathrar fear ag dul amach go luath maidean Lae Bealtaine ag cur suas cré. Do bhí rán ar a ghualainn ag gach fear aca agus é ullamh chun oibre. Nuair a bhíodar ag gabháil trís na páirceanna buail bean sa chómharsanacht na gcoinnibh. Nuair a bhí sí i n-aice leó thóg fear aca anuas a rán agus do geárr se bróbh luachra a bhí aice a' tarrac na diaidh. Nuair a gheárr sé é do thosnuig an bainne ag rith as.
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Bhí feirmeoir ana mhór ann agus bhí fear aige ag feachaint i ndiaidh na mbeithideach. Lá amháin tháinig bean chun an fhir agus d'fhiafruig sí dhe an 'neosfadh sé dhi cathain a bheadh laogh ag an mboin sin, agus dubhairt sé leí go 'neósfadh. D'innis sé do'n mháighistir cad dubhairt an bhean. "Innis dómh-sa ar dtúis é" ar seisean. Nuair a bhí an laogh ag an mboin do chaith an máighistir píosa aoiligh isteach i mbeal an laoigh agus d'innis an fear eile go raibh an bhó tar éis breith. Do chuaidh an beirt aca go dtí tigh na mná
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 19:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Some years ago there lived in Cullen a family who were very haughty and tyrannical. They did not like to see anybody also well off in the world. The priest should wait until they were present to begin Mass in the church. One day the priest had celebrated Mass before they arrived, they chased him with dogs and the priest had to run to save his life. He jumped from a very high cliff on the bank of a river across to the other side, a feat which nobody could accomplish except by a miracle. Some people say the priest cursed them from the other side of the river. From that day on they were getting poorer, and all the family died out one after another. The last one died a pauper in the Millstreet Union. People knew when one of the family was dead as there were dogs heard barking in the air when each one died. There are several people still living who heard them when the last one died.
[-]
The family mentioned above were O'Keeffes, gentry who lived at Ahane, near Cullen. As gentry they had seats inside the railing (altar rail) of the Church, near the altar. One day they had a dog with them. The priest ordered them to put out the dog. They refused and insulted the priest, who laid a curse on them:
"Leagadh na raithnighe i gcoille ar a bhfuil beo d'bhur gcine, agus ná raghaidh m'athchuinghe nbhur ngoire mara ndeineabhair é thuilleamh!"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 19:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This local character was the hero of An t-Athair Peadair's little comedy Tadhg Saor which was founded on fact. His name was Tadhg Ó Ríordáin with a farm in Cac an Fhóid (Cackanode townland, 4 miles north of Macroom) and a drapery in North Square, now O'Shea's drapery, Macroom. He lived about 100 years ago. He erected in Cackanode a building (a "kiln") from which he thought he could obtain a fine view of Macroom and his own establishment there. Little trace of this "folly" now exists. Tadhg fell heavily in debt. At that time there were soldiers stationed in Macroom. Tadhg knew that he was liable to be arrested for debt, so he decided on an extraordinary plan. His death was announced to the surrounding countryside.
A coffin was taken to the house at Cackanode. It was filled with stones. It was taken to Clondrohid churchyard and buried there. When a number of years had passed and the debt could no longer be claimed Tadhg again appeared in public.
After his real death the farm passed to his brother Cal (Ceallachán) who had been a soldier on foreign service. To everybody who brought Cal a porcupine he paid a shilling. Cal cooked and ate the porcupines.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 19:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Seán Mór Ó Luasaigh was a native of Clondrohid, and was the strongest man in Munster (He was the biggest and strongest man ever known in this part of the country. Like Paudrig Crohoore, "his arm was as thick as another man's thigh.") He could cut three acres of hay or corn in a day with a scythe. He could knock a horse with one pull, or knock a bull by catching him by the horns. Once he went into a field where there was a terrible cross bull, and he had a scythe. The bull came towards him, but he struck him with the scythe and killed him. Another day he was travelling along a road, and he saw two men with cars (carts) waiting outside a locked gate. They wanted to get into the field, but the man in charge would not let them in. So Seán Mór Ó Luasaigh caught the pier and gate and lifted them away and let the men in.
(About 36 years ago while visiting Cape Clear Island I heard there exactly similar accounts of THEIR gigantic man Conchubhar Mór Ó Ciardubháin (d is silent). As I was born in Macroom I was of course previously acquainted with the tradition of Seán Mór Ó Luasaigh, who was a real personage and not fiction)
Diarmuid Ó Deasmhumhna.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 19:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Seán Ó Súilleabháin better known as Shawn the Bard, was a very brave and daring man who lived in or around this district some years ago. One of the many of his daring deeds was the destruction of William Twohig's house, the Square, Macroom, by placing a stick of dynamite underneath the shop window on a fair-day night around fifty years ago. For this crime he was sentenced to 25 years imprisonment. He was, as was called in those days, a famous moonlighter, and had a certain number of men under his command who helped him in such deeds. If there were any evictions about to take place within a certain radius of his own district Seán and his men went about warning certain people who were supposed to be interested in such lands not to interfere under penalty of death. Seán himself and his wife and 9 children were evicted at one time during these penal days. He was a short thick-set man, and very daring.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 19:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This is the man mentioned in Mo Scéal Féin who led the band that went to rob Colonel Hutchinson's house at Codrum. Duggan, after forcing one of the number to shoot Col. Hutchinson ("Shoot him, or I'll shoot you") afterwards turned informer and got many poor young men hunted down and executed. (1799)
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Malachy Duggan lived at Carrigthomas. He used to be robbing sheep and cattle and money and anything he could find. He had a hole in the floor and barrels for putting the stolen stuff into them, so that if anyone were looking for it they would not find it. If any poor person slept at night there he would be outside in the fields in the morning before them when leaving, and he would ask them where they slept last night. "In that house above," they would say. "What were they doing all night?" and they would say they saw them doing nothing, and he would praise them every way.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 19:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About 60 years ago (two accounts say 60, and one says 100 years) there lived a man in Carrigthomas, near Coppeleenbawn Bridge named Cornelius Ahern.
One evening he was fishing along the river Laney (Láine) He was watching a salmon, and sat down on an island in the river. After some time he fell asleep, and was there for a long time. When he awoke he found himself suddenly ill. After a long illness he recovered, and was then able to compose songs. He never stopped composing songs till his death, which occurred at an early age. His songs were in English and were about local people and places.
Two Examples:
3rd verse of seven entitled "Carrigagulla"
It is down by the Laney my darling goes herding her kine;
I wish you were near to hear her singing so fine.
Her notes were like music and surely her voice was the same,
And for tons of bright gold of course I'll not tell her name
One verse of "The Can of Spring Water."
One evening in June, near the town of Macroom,
As I roved out for sweet recreation
I met with a lass on the way as I passed
And gazed on her with much admiration.
Her aspect was bland and her figure was grand,
Her step in the least did not falter;
She sang a sweet song as she tripped it along,
And she going for her can of spring water.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 19:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhí triúr filí ann fadó. Is iad na h-ainmneacha a bhí orthu ná Seán na Buille, Seán na Tuille agus Seán na Raithíní. Thánadar go Drochad Mhaghchromtha lá. Ní raibh aon drochad an uair sin. Thosnuigh Seán na Buile ar chaint
"Is minic d'airigheas," ar seisean, "go n-imtheochadh fear buile trí thuile 'n-a tháin-rith."
Labhair Seán na Tuille annsan agus dubhairt sé:
"Ach do thógfadh an tuile fear buile le fánaidh."
Annsan do labhair an fear eile, an tríomhadh fear:
"Pé aca fear buile nó fear tuile a raghadh trí thuile n-a tháin-rith
Ní bheadh pioc díobh uile ná beadh fliuchta ná báidhte."
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 15:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Roinnt blíanta, ó shín is amhlaidh a théigheadh na táiliúirí ó thig go tog chun eadach a dheanamh de'n líon tíghe. D'fhaghaidís comhnúidhe agus lóisdín agus roinnt páig an fhaid a [?] gach tig. Ní bhíodh puinn éadaighe siopa ag feirmeóirí an uair sin. Do chaitheadh bean a tige óidhceannta fada an gheimhridh a sníomh na hola agus thagad an amhras ón bhfigheadóir go luath san Earrach. Idir bréid agus Plainín do bhíodh idir triocha agus da-fhichead bonnla eadaigh. As san dheineadh an tailiúir balcais do gach aoinne a bhí i ngádh leis.
Uaireannta do cheannuighdís píosa dheadach dhubh ná ghorm cun casóíge dheanamh d'os na daoinibh áosta agus is maiséamhail a bhíodh an bríste bréide len a'gcasóig dorcha. Cluith bréide ó bhárr go talamh a deineadh se de garsúnaibh. Plainíní a bhíodh lastig ar fearaibh. Ní dhéanfhadh na tailiuirí ach íad so a gearradh agus cuireadh bean a' tíghe le céile íad le snathaid.
Ba mhór an búadh ag mná tíghe sa comarsanacht an duine aca go bheadh na bailcaisí plainíní ba gile nidhte ar an dtor le teacht an tsamraidh. Níor ceannuigheadh aon leinteaca deanta d'fhearaibh an úair úd. Ba mhór an t-úabas bean tíghe na féadhfad leine maith a dhéanamh an úair
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 14:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
V
Those hounds have never since been seen
But are often heard in air
Chasing the spiteful maidrín
In the shape of a wounded hare
And when those hounds are in air
Well may his sept men cry
Vain Leeche's care vain churchman's prayer
For then O'Keeffe must die"
Note - Leech was the local doctor
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 14:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Though his utmost he did try
Nine times the hare did screaming run
Around that fatal tree
The mother who bewailed her son
In happless misery.
IV
The hounds all day as swift as light
That hare did still pursue
And that cruel knight and huntsman base
The chase did sorely rue
At e've' they saw an open door
Pass by the wounded hare
With joy they rushed upon the floor
But game they found not there
But seated by the old fire place
Astonished they saw a ween
Not mortal game or wounded hare
But the scowling face of the old witch maidrín
Such a sight said the knight I never have seen
I'm delighted that the hunt is done
"Oh come along cried maidrín
The chase is scarce begun
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 14:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
My son is my chiefest hope and pride
And to labour and toil he's strong
How cheerful his voice in the steep hill side
As he drives his team along"
"Had thy son stayed at home thou old maidrín
And driven the labouring steer
He would not have been hanged on yestere'en
For chasing my fallow deer"
III
"Had my boy who never did thee wrong
Been hanged by thee thou cruel knight
Thy self and thy huntsmen before 'tis long
Shall be in a wretched plight"
The chief then cried "flog maidrín
As she dare to threaten me
She would have been hanged on yestere'en
With her son on yonder tree"
The huntsman flogged old maidrín
Until she was steeped in gore
And then he followed across the green
The chief had ridden before -
Just then ran past a wounded hare
The hounds rushed madly by
O'Keeffe could not rein his steeds of air
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 14:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
We sing the crime of the fierce O'Keeffe,
Who lived long, long ago;
And how he came to his doleful grief
Before very long you'll know
O'Keeffe was famed at the festive board
But no carpet knight was he,
For a braver never drew a sword
Or a braver ne'er shall be;
A wide domain did to him belong
And to battle brave
And his castles strong
And he feared not any foe.
II
O'Keeffe set out at mornings dawn
To chase the hare and roe
And there he passed his castles bawn
He met the cause of woe
An aged croan he there did meet
"O grant to a widow's prayer
Give to my son his freedom sweet
And then go and chase the hare
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 11:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
An Irishman went over to America. He got a job as stable man. Minding horses and saddles. He never noticed his companion stealing one of the saddles.
One night he noticed that one of the saddles were missing. He was very troubled all night. The day after was Sunday. He fell asleep at Mass. He awoke at the "per omina saecula saeculorum"
"Oh said he Jackeen I knew you stole my saddle."
"Did you hear the Priest say saddle saddleoram.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 11:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are three holy wells in Mushera Mountain. One of them is St. Johns, Carrigeen Brown, and Tubberavauneen
People pay rounds at St Johns well on the 24th of June. There is a wall around it and a timber cross on it. People leave money and rosarybeads and other things
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 11:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
James D Sullivan Tubrid owns a holy well about 500 yards from Millstreet on the Killarney road. The well is round about 40 feet diameter. Its water flows about 100 yards to the Fionn Abha rive. Owner heard the old people call it, Tobar na bo Finne, which means, well of the wild cow. There is a story told about this well.
One Summers day in May a mad cow came along the Killarney road bellowing. When she came to the cross she faced down the bog. After a while she rooted with her legs and horns. She left again in the evening and went west. It was said she had come from Castlemaine. When people went down they found a stream of water where she spent the day rooting. The first one who went to the well was a blind man from Tipperary. He had a dream on three nights that he would be cured if he visited this well. Which was by another name, Tubber na mo Mingnon mon Clar na Claogh, which means, Tubber of the bogs beneath the fogs of Clare. He went with his friend O Leary of Coomlegane. They went on horse back to the well. On the first night after paying the round the blind man asked is that gravel. On the second night he asked is that a horse.
On the night he was cured. The water are especially good for sight.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 11:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a Hedge school in the townland of Baunreigh.
A man named Jerry Sullivan taught there. He was a native of Bantry. The scholars paid him 1s-6d per three mts. There were about forty pupils attending the school.
The scholars did their writing with goose quills. There was no blackboards in the school.
The scholars used to sit on stools around the house and when the days were fine the master used to arrange the boys in lines. One line used to be on the bank of the river near my own yard, and the other line on the other bank.
The Hedge school was about 12 yards away from where my house situated.
He had a house of his own and he used to teach in it during the bad weather.
The stones that it was built with are there yet
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 11:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There were two Landlords in this district. Collins was the landlord in Glenleigh, and Clancy was the landlord in North Horsemount and South Horsemount. Drin was the head landlord over them. Clancy and Collins gathered the tighs. It was in money they gathered them. The people did not like them. The rents were three times as much that time than what they are now. Collins evicted David Leader in Glenleigh. After a short time David Leader
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 11:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Summers morning awaiting the lime burners to get his load of lime. He sung the Praises of Drishane.
The song so charmed the lime burners that the first oppurtunity they got they conveyed the song to the owner of the Estate Mr Wallis. He instructed them to immediately let him know the next time he would come to the kiln. And the next morning when he arrived at the kiln word was sent to Mr Wallis who immediately arrived and asked Ahern to sing the song. He was very pleased at the Composition and rhyming of the song. So much so that he ordered the lime burners to give all the lime free for the season. And made a handsome present besides.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 11:19
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
to signify that Summer has come. Water from a certain well in Ballyvourney is kept in almost every house.
It is supposed to cure any disease, by rubbing this water to the affected parts. Lourdes water is also supposed to have the same charm. When people visit Gougane Barra they bring pieces of wood when returning home and these are placed in a safe place and are kept there for ever. The image of St. Patrick is kept in every house and it is supposed to bring luck on the household.
There are no crosses erected in honour of a saint in this district. There is a cross in the "Priest's Leap", a mountain in Coomhola. Every Catholic house is decorated with holly and ivy during Christmas in honour of the birth of Christ. House-leek is put on the roof of the swelling house, because it is supposed to bring luck to the people of the house.
People visit the holy well in Ballyvourney on Whit Sunday in honour of Saint Abbey, and they make "rounds" there. There is an old ruin near this well. There is a stone in one of the walls of the ruin and the people rub a handkerchief to the stone, and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 11:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Many ancient customs are still carried out in various parts of Ireland, in honour of some certain feast or saint. It is said that on St. Brigids Day, a linen handkerchief used to be put out on the grass before sunrise, and used to be brought in again before sunset. This was supposed to cure a certain disease. On that day also, a sally branch is placed on the house top.
This signifies the Convent, which St. Brigid built under the oak-tree. Tiny crosses are made and worn by everybody on St. Patrick's Day, and about and around these crosses, is to be seen tiny sprigs of the three leaf shamrock.
On Palm Sunday, palm is blessed and worn in honour of Our Lord's triumphant entry into Jerusalem as the people on that day carried palm branches in their hands and strew them along the way before Our Lord. On May morning, before sunrise, a branch of the white-thorn or furze is brought into every house. This is
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 10:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The following song was written by Charlie Dennis and it is called the "Rapideen".
On Baker's height I stood one day
I got an awful fright.
I thought it was a headless coach
Came down from Baker's height.
Miss Baker stood upon a rock.
She was like a fairy Queen.
Saying, "upon my faith those yanks are great
There goes the Rapideen.
The Rapideen. she flies between, both Bantry and Traghcaol.
She picks up all that throng the road. Until the engine fails
But when the engine goes on strike, The driver is no fool.
For he'll have Coffey to drive him home. With Duffy's lashing mule.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-20 10:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a big glen between Cornasaus and Tievenanass just across Lough - na - Caer and about
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-19 20:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Do bhí feirm mhór ag Seán na gCaorach.
Do bhí an cailín sásta go maith leis an pósadh agus dubhairt sí léi féin go mbeadh airgid a dóithin aice anois.
Do bhí an fear go h-ana dheas air fad agus do bhí sé go h-ana mhaith ar fuaid an tíghe agus do thabhairfheadh sé dínnéir maith nú cupan té d'es na daoine bochta a thagadh go dtí an geata nú go dtí an dorus cúchu.
Do bhí mórán caoire aige leis sa feirm agus do bhí alán ba aige leis, agus muca, agus gamhain agus alán ainimídhe mar sin acu.
Do bhíod obair a dhóithin ag an bean le déanamh sa feirim agus mór thímpal an tíghe leis agus do caitheadh sí é a dhéanamh.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-19 20:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Nuair a bhí tamall maith caithte acu ag maireáchtaint le na chéile. An driofúr agus Tomás Ruadh na mBréag.
Do bhíodar ag déanamh go maith a ndóthain agus do bhíodh an inghean ag déanamh gach aon rud. Do chaitheadh sí na ba do crúdh gach maidin agus gach oidhche.
Ní thabharfhadh Tomás Ruadh na mBréag aon congamh in-aon-chor di. Ní eireóchadh sé aon lá amháin go dtí go mbeadh sé tímpeall a dó dhéag a chlog.
Uaireannta eile d'eirígheadh sé ar a naoi agus uaireannta eile ar a dheich.
Nuair a bhí tímpeall dhá bhliadhain caithte acu ag maireachtaint le na chéile dubhairt an inghean go bpósfhadh sí agus do phós sí fear dár b'ainm do Seán na gCaoarach.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-19 19:31
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
teine is d'oidhche chun iad féin do choimeád teasaidhe mar ní bhíodh mórán in áirde ortha agus sa ló do chuiridís an leabaidh ileath taobh.
Do bhíodh teine breágh món agus adhmaid aca, sa chuinne abhíodh an teine. Ní bhíodh aon lampaí aca an uair sin ach dheinidís féin saghas coinnle ar adtugtar stráilóga.
Do geir adheinieís iad agus do bhíodh solus breágh uatha. Do leagaidís geir istig in oidhean annsan thógaidís amach é ag fuaradh ar feadh tamaill annsan geibhidís blúire eadaigh agus cimiluigheadh an geir leis an t-eadach idir a dhá láimh agus dheinidís stráilóga breágha dhe. Fágaidís mar sin é ar feadh cúpla lá agus bhíodh an geir cruaidh annsan agus seasóchadh na stráilóga ar feadh mí nó mar sin.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-19 19:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Is olc an crích abhí ar na sean tighthe fadó ní raibh aon tig slinne ann mar atá anois.
Bhí na tighthe fadó beag deas agus compordach do bhíodh doras beag ins gach tig agus fuinneóg beag leis ná bhíodh aon gloinne air. Do bhídís oscailte sa Samhradh agus do dhúnaidís iad sa Gheimhreadh le baclaisí eadaigh agus le sean mhálaí. Ní cheannuighidís aon adhmad igcóir na tighthe mar bhí a dhóíthin de le fághail ins na coillte mar bhí Éire clúdaighthe le coillte an uair sin.
Nuair abhídís ag cur dian ar an tig do bhainidís scrath sa chnoc ar a dtugtar biríneach nó fionán bán. Do bhíodh leabaidh in gach cistin aca in aice leis an
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-19 19:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
devil would have him.
Long ago there were two men passing Druminduff Fort late at night and the fairies were our cheering and shouting, "There is gold in the country.
One night late when a man was passing a house he saw a strange figure like a woman standing outside the bedroom window. He knew that she was not a living being, so he stood to see what would happen. In a short while there was a baby handed out on the window, so the man took the baby from a ghost inside He brought it home with him, and the next morning the people all heard that the child was dead in the other house, but the man still had the child that he got out of the house. He then brought it back to the people who owned it, and as soon as it was brought into the house, the dead child in its place left the bed, and went up the chimney in the shape of a crow.
The people say that only for the man happened to be passing the house, the people of the house would think it was their own child that was dead and the fairies would have the right child with them for ever.
Long ago if a man was going to build a new house he would did a sod beside a fort, and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-19 19:08
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
in Currower which is supposed to be haunted.
(19)
There is a fort in John Barretts land in Currower. There are a lot of "sceathac" bushes at this fort.
(20)
There is a big fort in James Walsh's land in Bofield. There are often little lights seen at it. There are a lot of "sceathach" bushes in it.
(21)
There is a big fort in James Padden's land in Rathreedane (Ráth Rí Dán) near Bonniconlon. There are three drains around in a circle and in the centre there are a lot of bushes and stones. One time a woman in that village died and a few nights afterwards her ghost was seen at the fort.
(22)
There is a fort in John O'Neills land in Currawer. There are a few drains around in a circle and there are bushes and trees in the centre
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-18 22:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
On the eastern shore of Cork Harbour stands a modern castle, which stand on the site of many more ancient ones. This is Rostellan Castle.
Many years ago this castle was inhabited by a Catholic chief and people of the same clan lived at Cork Beg, which is situated on a peninsula further south from Rostellan, but still on the eastern shore of the harbour. The occupiers of Corkbeg were also Catholics. A little church stands near Rostellan castle in which Mass was celebrated on every alternate Sunday. Rostellan and Corkbeg were connected by a secret passage that was said to be laid beneath the waters of the harbour.
The event which is the subject of my first tale probably happened during the Penal days when a price was placed on the priest's head. English soldiers ransacked the countryside but the priest was not to be found. A certain man volunteered to spy on the priest's movements. The authorities promised to pay him a large sum
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-18 22:29
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Chuaidh sí go dtí an sagart agus d'inis sí an scéal dó. Dúbhairt sé léi gan uisce na gcos do chaitheamh amach san oídhche go deó arís.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-18 22:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
té agus an mhéas in a nighe sí na cosa chúaladh sí é sin ag corr uidhe tímhcheall an t-úarláir agus na sídhe 'a líonadh le h-uisce agus bhí muínntir an tíghe go léír 'na gcodhladh ach an bhean. Núair a bhí soílse an laé ann, d'eirig an bhean agus d'imhthig léi go dtí an chistin
Do leath a súile uirthi núair chonoic sí an t-uisce a chaith sí amach roimh dul a chodhladh sa mhéas arís agus an teine ar lasadh. Thosnuig sí ag scread aig núair d'fheach sí ins an mbórd. Bhí an bhreicfeast ollomh agus té istig ins na cupáin agus siuicre agus bainne ann. Ghlaodhaig sí ar an líon tíghe agus léímeadar amach as na leapan agus thanadar chuiche agus bhíodar ag gáirí fúithe mar ní fheaca siad na cupaín ar an mbórd ná an teine ar lasadh ná an mhéas lán d'uisce agus cheap siad ghur ar buille a bhí sí ach níor b'eadh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-18 22:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Bhí seana- bhean ina cómhnaídhe in Aoragóíl darabh ainm di. Peig Mhór agus níór chaith sí aon bhróg do dtí go raibh sí seasca bliadhain d'aoís Bhí gréasaidhe ann agus ní féidir leis a cos do thómhas, bí sé chómh mhór san agus fúair sé fóid móna chun na mbhróg do thómhas di. Bhí siad go breágh mhór aici, agus ní raibh pian ná méisgre aice ortha. Bhíodh gach duine pósta sar a bhfaghadh siad bróga an úair sin. Bhí bean ann agus do nigh sí a chosa sar a chúaidh sí a codhladh. Núair a bhí siad nighte aici do chaith sí an t-uisce amach. Níor bhfada gur chaitheamh isteach len' a h-agaidh é agus thosnuig sí ag gol go mór. Núair a chúaidh sí a codhladh cúl aidh sí glór duine ag [?]
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-18 22:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Deirtear go mbailigheann na daoine maithe le chéile é agus go nígheann siad a gcosa féin.
Nuair a bhídís ag tarrach asarach nó ag baint aitinn do dheinidís bróga de seithe na bó agus cuiridís tímcheall a gcosa iad. Buataistí a thugaidís ar na bróga san agus sa Geimhreadh nuair a bhídís ag tarrach móna do cuiridís ortha na buataisí mar bhíodh a gcosa lán d'oidhir.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-18 19:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
to go to six o' clock mass Christmas Morning.
They used to catch the wren Christmas Day for Saint Stephens Day, they used to have a holly-bush and decorate it, and the wren used to be in the centre of the bush.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-18 15:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Monday is considered to be an unlucky day of the week in this locality.
My mother said that she heard that some people do not like to hatch chickens the end of May because they would be coming out in June and then they say the chickens would not be any good.
In our district it is said that you should not cut your hair on Monday and if you did it would never grow again. I often cut my hair on Monday and nothing happened to it. Others believe that it is not right to cut out a coat or dress on Monday but I think this is nonsense.
If a corpse was to be buried on Monday the grave would never be opened on that day. They would dig at least one sod on Sunday and that would do, as they say if you redden a grave on Monday it will never be finished.
The Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays of every week are looked upon as unlucky for marriage and for that reason you would seldom hear of a marriage in any of those days.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2021-08-18 15:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
it is said to be a bad sign and when he flows down with the river we expect to have good weather.
Seabirds often fly inland such as the seagull but it is a bad weather omen. To see a rainbow at morning is also a bad sign, "A rainbow at morning is a shepherd's war