Líon iontrálacha sa taifead staire: 17984 (Taispeántar anseo na 500 ceann is deireanaí.)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-06 12:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Tunnyfoyle
Tamhnach Faille - the field of slaughter

Seefinn
Suidhe-Fiinn - the seat of Finn

Greagherotta
Greagh - Crotta - the rough marshy land of the curlews

Drumanespic
Drom-an-Easpuigh - the hill of the bishop

Carrickacromin
Carraig -a-Cromán - the hanging rock

We have a field called "Seáns" garden
How it got that name was there was a man living in it called Seán so it was called for him.
We have another called the Wee Rock - it is a small rocky field,

Beglieve
Beg-Sliabh - a little mountain

Crocknahakna
Cnoc-na- h-Aiteanna - the hill of the whins

Mary Ellen Clarke
Tullawaltra
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-06 12:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Her is where the postboy sits,
Here is where he cracks his whip,
Tom thinker, eye winker, nose dropper
Mouth eater, chin choper

Anna Margaret Clarke
Tullawaltra
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-06 12:13
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Tunnyfoyle
Tamhnach Faille - the field of slaughter

Seefinn
Suidhe-Fiinn - the seat of Finn

Greagherotta
Greagh - Crotta - the rough marshy land of the curlews

Drumanespic
Drom-an-Easpuigh - the hill of the bishop

Carrickacromin
Carraig -a-Cromán - the hanging rock

We have a field called "Seáns" garden
How it got that name was there was a man living in it called Seán so it was called for him.
We have another called the Wee Rock - it is a small rocky field,

Beglieve
Beg-Sliabh - a little mountain

Crocknahakna
Cnoc-na- h-Aiteanna - the hill of the whins

Mary Ellen Clarke
Tullawaltra
t
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-06 11:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Cope - to overturn, or toss in any way, fell

Fathom - used in measuring the circumference of hay stacks

Range - sieve
Gopan - (máin) lifted with both hand
Fans - a winnowing machine
Fog - moss
Muzzle - D of a plough
Meat - pro. mate - victuals for consumption
Naive (box) - the hub of a cart wheel or trap
Bugog - an unshelled egg
Yilly Yarra - yellow yarling - yellow hammer

Cut Woody - bróg - the loop at the ends and middle of swingle tree used for hitching horses to plough and farm implements

Paltóg - slap
Wallop - slap
Skite - slap
Cuff - slap

Tanner , a greyhound = a sixpenny piece
Kid's eye, a hare - a three penny piece
Hóke - root, as a sow

Sod, scraw some place Portán, the upper layer of peat with grass, rushes, or heather which is cut in bricks for fuel

Loss - very commonly used for lose ( i.e. dont LOSS yourself)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-06 11:37
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Cope (?) - to overturn, or fell in any way
Fathom - measurement of hay stacks etc.
Range - sieve, riddle
Gópan - (máin) lifted with both hands
Faus - a winnowing machine
Fog - moss
Muzzle - D for plough or harrow
Meat - (pronounced Mate) food for any creature

Nave (Naive) (?) - (box) The hub of any wheel on a farm implement

Bugog - a soft egg - unproperly shelled
Yilly-Yarra / Yellow Yarlan - yellow hammer
Cut Woody (bróg) - iron mounting of a ploughing tree
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-06 11:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Smaurth - silence stopping a scolding match

Porthon - a scraw or piece of bog with grass or rushes attached
Polthoge - an untidy bandage or dressing on a wound
Mockswelk - a kind of knave
Mareing - like a finger of a glove, made from calico for a sore finger
Rucky - spots on face
Pinkeen or Corabawn
diminutive fish foundin bog-holes
Spalpeen / Squilpeen
a potato digger from the west
Skhelpeen - a young bream
Fodheroge
the first position in which mud-turf is put, one sod lying on bank and two leaning on it
Moonoge
a mixture of cows' urine and manure, plants are dipped before being planted.
Muckeries - the red berries of the wild rose
Shamshogs
little plants, larger than shamrocks, taste sweetly
Boulkeen - the hitting part of the flail
Meggileen
a strip of skin holding the two parts of the flail together
Cregera-buee
some kind of wizard
"What will we do says O, says O.
What will we do says Andy Roe,
What will we do says brother and Three
We'll throw him in the 'Say' says The Cregera-buee"
Losid
a shallow box with lid and four legs in which bread etc was kept from one meal until wanted for next; was an article of furniture in the kitchen
Braddha - an animal fond of trespassing
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-06 11:21
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Smaurth - silence stopping a scolding match

Porthon - a scraw or piece of bog with grass or rushes attached

Polthoge - an untidy bandage or dressing on a wound
Mockswelk - a kind of knave

Mareing - like a finger of a glove, made from calico for a sore finger

Rucky - spots on face

Pinkeen or Corabawn
diminutive fish foundin bog-holes

Spalpeen / Squilpeen
a potato digger from the west

Skhelpeen - a young bream

Fodheroge
the first position in which mud-turf is put, one sod lying on bank and two leaning on it

Moonoge
a mixture of cows' urine and manure, plants are dipped before being planted.

Muckeries - the red berries of the wild rose

Shamshogs
little plants, larger than shamrocks, taste sweetly

Boulkeen - the hitting part of the flail

Meggileen
a strip of skin holding the two parts of the flail together

Cregera-buee
some kind of wizard
"What will we do says O, says O.
What will we do says Andy Roe,
What will we do says brother and Three
We'll throw him in the 'Say' says The Cregera-buee"

Losid
a shallow box with lid and four legs in which bread etc was kept from one meal until wanted for next; was an article of furniture in the kitchen

Braddha - an animal fond of trespassing
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-06 11:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The swallows arrive here about the end of April. They come in ones or twos.
They build their nests in a shed or a cow-house. The most of the swallows build in the rafters.
When the swallows are beginning to go away they congregate in flocks. They congregate on telegraph wires when they are going away. They start to go away before 22nd September. The swallows hatch twice generally. When the old birds (are) going away they leave the young birds after them for a week or two.
When the swallows are flying high it is a sign of good weather. When the swallows are flying low it is the sign of bad weather. When the swallows are skimming the ground it is a sign of very bad weather.
People like to see the swallows building in the cow-house. When a swallow is coming in towards the door and turns back it is the sign of bad luck. To kill a swallow with a stone you would not have an hour's luck by doing it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 23:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
scheduled as drainage country, will loose some thousands of pounds as a result of the rains of 1938.
Down in Gowra district where the drainage systems have not yet been started the farmers are in a bad plight. More than 200,000 acres a liable to be flooded.
Motoring along Killshandra area small isolated fields showed the effects on the last weeks flooding. Potatoes and hay have been lost. At Dunwell the farmers are trying to dig their potatoes out of ponds.
Mr Thomas McDonnell who has a small farm out side of Cavan town, gave me peculiar explanation for the failure of the potato crop in some parts of the country. "The drought in the early Summer did as much damage as did the winter rains." he said. In the fairly high grounds the potato 'seeds' never gripped the soil. Either way the crop would have been small. But the streams from the mountains bringing too much moisture when it came loosened the stalks again.
The failure of the crops is not as bad in our district as the farmers have got a good part of their potatoes dug and their hay saved. As for the turf nearly them all are lost. Never before has the country saw a bad harvest.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 23:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
centre of the parish, and as most of the houses are situated up on the mountain sides many Mass-paths are running in the direction of the church.
These paths are crossed by stiles where they cross from one farm to another. There are three stones standing along the first old road which mark the spot where three men were shot by "Revenue Commissioners". It was said they were informed on.

The only ford of any importance in this parish is situated in the Townland of Corava. It consists of high stones which cross the "Big River". There is a similar one on the Shannon at Derrynatuan. The small mountain streams are crossed by small wooden bridges and in some places by a large flag.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 23:35
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Glangevlin thou hast witnessed a scene of grief and woe,

Exterminators swept your land a few short years ago.
When cursed Angleyes troops they came all armed ruthlessly

To confiscate and devastate a struggling tenantry.

(II)
St Patrick's sons in thousands run, they were always firm and bold,

Each maid and man inside of Glan, they came so firm and true,

To sympathize with the evicted and condemn the landlord's crew.

(III)
The men of brave Killinagh, their names shall be revealed,
All answered to the call and were foremost on the field,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 23:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Diardaoin Deasgabhall dachadh lá indhíaidh na hAiseirighe = Ascension Thursday

Diardaoin Corp Criosta = Corpus Christi
Pobal = Congregation
Gearan = horse
Capall = Mare

Beannugadh na dha bhannog dhéag agus an éisg.
Ball na gcúig aran agus a da íasg ar an dha mhíle seo a rinne Díá
Rath an rí go dtigidh chugainn ar ar gcuid agus ar ar gráin (lot)

Fúair mé seo omó sean-athair Sean Maighuidhir.
Ailís Ní Mhaghnuis
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 23:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Stocaí i nDoire Cham i gCillin Ciar
The Rockyshanson(?) i gCarraig na Madadh i gCillin Ciar
The Bó-leh i nDoire Cham i gCillin Ciar

The Golla i nDoire Cham i gCillin Ciar
A theory is held that this wood Golla meaning yellow clay, was introduced by Spanish princes who tradition has it studied at the old monastery of Clonaphilip.

Maoir Hill: i Carraig an Chromáin i gCliath Fearna
Carraig Cág, cnoc i Corraig na Madadh i gCillín Ciar
The Currach i Lurgan an Iubhair i gCillín Ciar

The Garra Dubha i gCarraig an Chromáin i gCliath Fearna

Loch Urra i Magh Leatt(?), i gCillín Ciar

Loch Storach, nó Loch Storail, i gCarraig an Chromáin, i gCliath Fearna

The Friars' Field i gCarraig na Madadh i Cillín Ciar
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 22:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Stachan = i gCarraig na Madadh i gCillín Ciar
The Suisín field i gCarraig na Madadh i gCillín Ciar
The Vocheen field in Doire Cham í gCillín Ciar
Cnoc na dTobar i gCarraig na Madadh i gCillín Ciar

Cnoc Beul Teine i gCarraig na Madadh i gCill i gCillín Ciar
- bíonn teine annseo gach Oidhche le' Eóin

Lochann(?) i dTermon i gCillín Ciar
Forann Finn i mBog Uisge i Leamh Thaigh
Baile Mór(?) i dTermon i gCillín Ciar
Gleann Bhuidhe i nDore Cham i gCillín Ciar
Greatha Ruadh i gCrosserlough
Gleann Có i gCarraigeach i gCillín Ciar
Poll an Laogh i nDoire Cham i gCillín Ciar
Carabhar i nDoire Cham i gCillín Ciar
Scrath i nDoire Cham i gCillín Ciar
Talamhan i gCrosserlough
Pairc Crom
The Hedge School Field i nDoire Cham i gCillín Ciar
The Cowar Field i nDoire Cham i gCillín Ciar
The Courní Field i nDoire Cham i gCillín Ciar
The Poll Dubh Field i nDoire Cham i gCillín Ciar
Cnoc na Cuma i nDoire Cham i gCillín Ciar
Pairc an Leanna i gCrosserlough
Pairc an Easa i gCrosserlough
The Cúla - a man was killed here

i
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 22:43
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Gob an Ghleanna i Lios na gCearbhaill i bParóiste Cillín Ciar

Páirc Dhubh i n-Ath na h-Oidhche i bParóiste Cillín Ciar.

Pairc Chrom
Sraith Lachan
Greathan
Camas
Puirtlín i Tunneyfoye(?) i Cnoc Brighde
Ruball Fuar i n-Ath na h-Oidhche i Cillín Ciar
The Bruiclín
Padraic's Still House in Greach na h-Airne
Mullachar
Cnocan
Parnamog
Garra Ruadh
Branra
Gob
Slughaha
Rathín
Pairc Mhór
Pairc na Míse
Cnoc na Sideóige
Pairc Bán
Pairc na Tor
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 22:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Carraigeach. Field names. Páirc Bhán, Páirc Bheag - Mollywee = Malaidh Bhuighe. Gárrdha Salach (not Saileach). Garrdha Dubh. Páithín a shrubbery. Brandhara may be Brán-Doire = Raven wood or an uncultivated shrubby place.

DRUMAGOLAND
in Killinkere = Druim a Ghabhailín = hill of the little (river) fork.
A hill here is called Corragee Cor na Gaoithe. The bridge across the river is, or was until recently known as "Balabanagher" bridge. The Béal Átha Beannchair is about one hundred yards the Murmod side of the bridge. This name like others is falling into disuse. From the stream flowing through the narrrow glen between Drumgoland and Cornaden the latter takes it name Cor an Fheadáin. Iron was smelted in Drumagoland in the past. The clinkers formed in the smelting can be picked up at a fort here.

GARTONAMRAHER
= Gallon na mBrathár. It is held by some that there never was a friary here. However the place is known locally as "The Friary". There is a Cealdra, Friar's well Friars' Garden and four or five roads converge here. A rock here is called Carraigh a' Púca.

KEELAH
= Caolach - narrow stripes. A field called the Srath - wet meadow. Before the well at Coppenagh old school was come upon when the hill was
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 22:31
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
being cut in '48 the year of the "Public Works". A number of the people of Coppenagh drew water from Keelah Well Tobar a' Caoligh.(?)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 22:15
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
CLEGGAN
Cloigheann - A skull shaped hill. There is a mass rock in the townland. A well called Tobar Ruadh - The well at the end of Lisnafana road is known as Tobar na Greabaigh or Tobar na Grabaigh. A wet field in Killaduff is called the "Grab" probably this is a root word.

DRUMDERG
= Either Druim Dearg or Druim Deirc. The latter meaning the hill of the cave. A field is called Pairc a' Laighian(?) - towel shaped field. This is the meaning of second half of Aghalion - the adjoining townland. Another field is known as "The Garrytoole" = Garrdha Uí Thuathail - O'Tooles garden.

DRUMINA
Druim Manaigh or Druim Mame. Between Drumina and Tanagh is a deep Ált. A field called "Tar Feicin" Feicin's Bush although less than a mile away we find the name in a different form Crossafehin.

DRUMGORA
= Drum Gabhra - Field names - The Grúchán little Greagh or moor. Páirc na gCearc. The Upper or Eastern end of this townland is called Cushena "Cois an Áth". A battle was fought here still spoken of as the "Battle of Cushena". A depression in a field here looks not unlike a trench made to hold up an army. A spot on the top of Cnóchan Ruadh was not tilled until lately. Possibly some of the victims of the batle were burried here.

CORNASLIEVE
= Cor na Sliabh usually. As the main-road ran through this townland it is possibly Cor na Slighe. The eastern part of the townland was called
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 21:56
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
AUGHACLUAGHEN or Aughalohan
If the former Éichadh a' Chlocháin = the field or plain of the stor-house Ácadh a Locháin = the field of the little lake

AUGHACASHEL
= Áchadh a' Chaiseal = The field of the Castle. This is the most important pagan monument in the parish. We may suppose that it was the stronghold of Rianan from whom the mountain takes its name. The road runing through this townland across the mountain is, or rather was until recently known as the Bóthar Buidhe. On this road near the top of the mountain is the spot known as "The Monument" perhaps where some person met an untimely end.

CORREAGH
Chor Riobhach = Grey round hill. Field names in this townland = Glann Mór, Poll Mór. Séan Páirc(?) under the form of Old Park we find this as a townland name in many places. Of Correagh and Drumgora the river is deeper than usual. This called "Poll Róise Báine". There is no information as to whom the "Róis Bán" refers. Deep holes in the river here are called Dubóga. The land adjoining the river is called "Cumóga" and "Currachs".

COPPENAGH
= Copánach - abounding in Copans or tillage plots.

CURRAGHMÓRE
= Currach Mór - Great Marsh. The stream between this townland and Lisnafana is known as "Sruthán".

CURRAGHKIEL
Currach Caol - The narrow marsh.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 16:13
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Nettles
Ferns
Thistles
Banweed, or (Bohleen - Buidhe) called here.
Dockens
Red-Shauk
Yellow Gowan
Briscín
Colt's foot
"Sperry"
Sit - Fast or Bishop-Weed
Red Shauk
Chicken-Weed
Deaf nettle
Scutch grass
Clock Sorrel
Crow Foot
Horse Pipes
Lamb Quarter
Fairy Flax
Praiseach
Wild Mustard
Burdock
Hemlock
Cut Finger x
Iron Rod
Horans
Meadow Daisy
Peppermint x
Blackheads
Fairy Fingers - White and Red
"Doorelonta" (fern)
Bog Bone (?)
Flagons
Meadow- Sweet
"Scouts"
Stone-crab
Robin - Run - The - Hedge
Devils Bit
Hare's Bit
Wild Vetches
Touch
The Seven sisters
Buachailín Buidhe
Garlic
Rose Noble
Ladies Mantle
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 16:00
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
April showers bring forth May flowers
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 15:53
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Ar Lean
P
Plámas
Práiscín
Poitín
Pisreóg
Pus

R
Rúitín
Rusg

S
Sceachóg aí
Seift
Sláinte
Socair - in "SOCAIR and aisy go far in a day"
Seál
Scraith = SCRAW
SGEON:- in "he got the 'SGEÓN' allright"
Sgalltaín - Pro. (scaldies)
Sleaghán
Siubhloir
Seán Áine
Sgiorróg
Sráideóg
Spailpín - pro. "spulpin" = rascal
Sugán
Seanach = (shanagh) talk
Slog - big mouthful - Sluig

T
Tobar
Turas
Traithnín
Toitín

U
Úna
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 15:43
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
F
Fáilte - céad míle Fáilte
Fear-gorta

G
Gársun
Griscín
Greasuidhe - family near known as the "Graceys"
Gcog nó Geog (?)
Gallóglaigh
Gríosach
Giostaire

L
Laighe
Laghach (loughy)
Leamh

M
Mar eadh
Mac (?)
A Mhic
Musha
"Margy Mór" heard in north: - a big Hiring Fair etc.

N
Noínín

O
Órcan
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 15:35
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
A
Ámadan
Arra
Ag bualadh BOS

B
Banbh
Barrdóg
Bonham
Bróg
Baitín
Basóg
Bruach (round moon)
The Baógies (?) (leas-ainm)

C
Cailín - Gearrchaile = (gahala)
Cearc - "hí cearc"
Cleamhnas = (clowny)
Cisteóg
Clúdóg
Céilidhe
Cogar
Cisteóg
Crúibín
Cipín
Cnagann
Carraigín
Coshering
Clabar
Citeóg

D
Dona - chualas:- ga rádh "I'm a poor "Craytur" and "Donny" in my health too".
Duidín
Deoch
Duileasc
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 15:24
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the paper about it. In the letter he asked "How long more are the people of Cavan going to wait till they fix up the Abbey and its
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 15:23
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It is very interesting to hear and read about the ruins that exist in our districts. I know there are not many to be got around my district but the few there are we should read them up as they are very interesting.
Take for example Cloch Ouchter Castle on an island in Lough Ouchter. It is very interesting to hear about it. It would not do any of us any harm to go down and look at it as it is only five or six miles away. The most important part about that castle we mus remember is, that it was there in the year 1649 that Eoghan Ruadh O'Neill was poisoned, one of the greatest of Irishmen. Another place of interest is the old abbey
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 15:23
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in Cavan. It is situated in Abbey Street which gets its name after it. There is a graveyard attached to it but the sad part of it is, that this castle belongs to the Protestants. They never do anything with it only keep the gate locked and let no one into it. Only for there's tomb stones in it you would not know there are graves in it (at) all as they are all covered with weeds. The Catholics get the blame for not having the graves cleaned but it cannot be helped when it is under care of Protestants.
Not very long ago I saw in the paper where some man was down from Dublin looking for a special grave. He asked to be shown Eoghan Ruadh's but neither of the two of them could be got with weeds and he put a letter in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 15:12
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Long ago dentists were unheard of and we are told that the old people nearly all had good teeth. Often at the present time when new graves are been dug up the skulls of people long been buried are often thrown up with the earth and these skulls in many cases are found to have a complete set of teeth and often these teeth are in a very sound state.
However when our grandfathers did suffer from toothache or who had a bad tooth they got rid of it in a simple but crude way. They usually went to a cobbler or shoemaker and he removed the offending tooth for them.
His method for doing so was simple but cruel. He made a strong wax-end and tied it firmly on the tooth. he then tied the other end of it to his heel-stick. He could not stand straight as the cord from tooth to
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 15:12
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to heel-stick was short. The cobbler walked round his patient six times uttering magical words. Finally he gave his patient a good jab in the back-side of a strong awl. The patient jumped up suddenly in pain and of course the tooth always dropped out.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 14:56
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rock in the hollow of a field about three or four miles outside the town where he thought he was hidden away from the people but the soldiers spied him from Bruce hill and went to the place and killed the Priest. It is called the Mass Rock since.

In the town land of Smear about two or three miles outside the town there is a road called the "Lady's Road". It is said that a girl and man were returning home after getting married and they were coming down a very steep hill on this road, when they had an accident. The girl was killed and ever since she appears every night.
On the shores of Gartie Lough there are twelve trees growing together and these are called 'the twelve apostles'.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 14:51
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miles outside the town there is a hill called Bruise Hill because Robert Bruce camped there on his way to punish the O'Farrels of Granard. On top of Bruise hill there is a cairn at which the McTiernans chiefs of Tullyhunco used to hold their military reviews. Finn McCumhal is supposed to have thrown a very large stone from Bruise hill which landed in a field at Coronea and is called Finn McCumhal's finger stones.

On a very large hill called Belvin about six miles from Arva is situated a house which is called "Fleming's Folly". It is so called because a very wealthy man named Fleming built this house so that his daughter could see the ships on the ocean. Before it was complete the man died and the house was never finished. Many people go to see this house. It is about the size of a two storey house with stone stairs inside. The walls are wide enough for people to walk on.
In the Penal days a Priest was saying Mass at a big
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 14:42
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Annie Moore
Main St.
Arva

Since ancient times nearly every hollow, height, stream, rock and bush in Ireland has some special name. In this district there are a lot of places which are called some particular name owing to some important event which took place there.
Arva sometimes called Drumalt means "the plain of slaughter" because it is believed that a big battle was fought there long ago and a lot of people were killed. It is also believed that the old town of Arva was drownded in the lake which is now called Gartie Lough. On a calm day the tops of the houses are to be seen down under the water in the middle of the lake.
About three miles
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 13:03
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Our home district is Killeshandra which means the church of the old fort, and which is situated in the town-land of Portaliff. Long ago the town did not stand where it does to day, it was situated at Croghan, a short distance away, where the McKiernan clan held sway.
Croghan is a quiet spot to day, yet its memory lives as it gives its name "Croghan Leaguers to the local football team.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 12:57
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third place is beside the present Franciscan Abbey in Multyfarnham.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 12:53
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The family books of the last generations were 'The Speeches from the Dock' 'Moore's Melodies' - an American Present A Moore's Almanac. A family prayer book containing on the back page the ages of the children and probably a Voster (torn) an old Spelling book and a very old, black book on "Principles of Politeness"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 12:48
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Lunacy here was not confined to families but to certain districts. The patients, though in the same district were not in any way connected by Blood Ties.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 12:47
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Luncacy here was not confined to families but to certain districts. The patients, though in the same district were not in any way connected by Blood Ties.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 12:46
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Sleep walking was not uncommon here in the age that is past. It was believed that a sleep walker was immune from a great many things. Often they fell from high windows and were unhurt. It was believed that a sleep walker could walk on the water across the lake but if he wakened he would go down on the spot. Besides a sleep walker will find the key no matter where it is hidden. One remedy is to put it in a basin of cold water but this plan is considered dangerous as it might bring on a heart-attack.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 12:41
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Around this locality Cock fighting was indulged in long ago. The fights or mains were carried out in out of the way place and many such places
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 12:39
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70
Bird Lore
The wild birds commonly found in my district are: the cuckoo, corncrake, swallow, swift, martin, lapwing gull and the numerous other birds like robin, sparrow, etc. The cuckoo leaves this district in July, the corncrake in August and the swallows, swift and martins some time later. When the swallows are about to go you see them in flocks on telegram poles and such places, then after a few days, they start off southwards. Before the cuckoo goes, you notice her voice getting quite hoarse, and some say, she never leaves our country but is changed into the hawk. In this district the robin builds its nest in a close hedge, the lark in a meadow field, the corncrake in a meadow field, the swallow in an old barn, the sparrow in the eave of the house, the wren in a hole in the wall, jackdaws in a hole int he wall, and maigs high up in the tree-tops, and all other birds in trees, hedges and sometimes lone bushes.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 12:36
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Around this locality Cock fighting was indulged in long ago. The fights or mains (?) were carried out in out of the way place and many such places
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 12:35
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are to be found around here.
The most famous game cock ever raised in district was called "Piley" and his owner James Farrell then a young man brought the nick name Piley with him to the grave. He died at the age of 90 years.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 12:24
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-Sergeant Spires - on Mr. Bell's brother becoming magistrate was complained upon by that gentleman and accused of being responsible for his brother's murder and in deference to Mr. Bell's wishes he was transferred from the district.

- As told by Luke Reilly, Drumavaddy born 1857 to the writer Seán Ó Murchadha.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 12:18
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spittle. He was a good story teller and his fireside had always its complement of neighbours on their "Céildhe". His family has now died out and there is no one of his stock living.
With regard to Dolan, on landing in New York he was ably be-friended by neighbours of his out there and by all Irishmen generally. Several of his one-time protestant neighbours who were famiar with him went to America to trace him with a view to claiming the reward offered for his capture. None of those ever returned to tell the tale. Dead men, then, no more than now, told tales.
When the news of Mr. Bell's murder spread it was thought that the Protestants would burn the village of Ballinagh and to defend it the Catholics armed with iron pikes mustered from all parts of the surrounding district. The Prots. also gathered but the good words of priest and parson alike had the effect of cooling passions and the various companies returned peacefully home.
The man indirectly responsible for the murder
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-05 12:10
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for sale. The ground was covered with a heavy fall of snow and he assumed when he saw rushes growing up through the snow that the land was of good quality. He immediately purchased the place at a handsome figure and his disappointment was very great indeed when the snow melted and he found that his farm was mostly covered with a very poor class of earth with here and there flat stretches of rock. He, however by skill and industry improved his holding very much and he and his wife and family lived happily and comfortably.
It may be a matter of surprise as to how he was allowed to settle in this district. Lough Uactar is however several miles away and the feeling at first engendered by his treachery had in the space of the year greatly subsided except among those with whom he constantly came in contact. He came to this district a perfect stranger and he had been here a considerable time before his identity was established. By that time he had become quite popular and no one had any desire of opening up old sores.
It is told of him that he make his own tobacco - the "tow" of flax moistened with
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 22:14
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Drumahoppal - Druim Chapaill
Drumhowna - Drum h-Aibhne
Dromhaney - Drum h-Aibhne
Dromlummhan - Drum Iomáin ?

Finea - Fiodh an Atha
Freeduff - FRAOCH DUBH

Granard "Is(?) grána árd e Grian Árd? Gran Árd? high rock (O Máille)

Lisnadara - Lios na Dara

Moynagh - Mágh n-AÍ - See Hist do réir Stoive(?) Dindshinchas 112

Sheelan - Silinde lived in Mag n-Ath and gave her name (Silinde) to Loch Carraigín. Hence Sidhe Linn = Fairy Lake, 'enchanted' *

Maughera (Machaire)
Moydristan (Mágh Druisceach)
Moat (Móta)

Thowlagh (Tamhnach?) a field producing fresh sweet grass

Tullygwillan - Tulach gCuilinn (Holly hill) Note O Ir Neuter eclipsed cf(?) Sliabh Mágh etc

Cloonoose - Cluain Uas

Kilnahard - Dara son of Dreitell has his sepulchre at the "4 half moons" in the direction of Kilnahard

* Stories - Recorded - See P P 1-7-7-8-19 of Compositions further on
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 21:55
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(Lough Gowna / Scrabby Sketched Map)
featuring:-
Aidan's Well
Scraith Buidhe
Village
Fair Green
Cistercian Monastery

Above is a rough diagram of the village of Scrabby (Cavan). Beside the village the one time monastery can be seen. As before referred to this monastery was robbed and its monks banished in the time of Queen Bess.
It is now the Protestant Church. The chief saint of this place was Aidan. His well is marked X above and it is known by his name to this day. This saint died on 11th of December and all down through the ages the 11th of December was the Pattern Day of Scrabby. This is still the big day (fair) day of the village.
The village though small had a very large fair-green and horses were sold principally a the 11th Dec Fair.
Good horses were raised around this locality especially in one district which is still known as "Dernagapla" or the oak wood of the horses.

* * *

The Water Races from Sidhaun Hill referred to before was an outcome of this horse raising Industry.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 21:51
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100 years ago Scrabby had a famous horse fair on the 11th December. Horses were raised and trained here. Coming on to fair day, races took place along the shore of Lough Gowna one mile distance. The finishing place was Sidhaun Hill or the Splink.
The Races of Sidhaun Hill were held every year - water races - The Race was across Lough Gowna from Sidhaun Hill to The Cottage of Cornadrung. The horses galloped to the waters'
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 21:33
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swing here.
Clothes were dyed in the townland of Corfree. It was a famous Dye centre. It was a good recommendation for the durability of the dye in any article to say:-
"It was dipped in the Corfree Pot"
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 21:31
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Other cottage industries carried on here were carpentry, shoe making, coopering, dyeing, tanning, hat-making, button making, forge work.
The ruins are all that remain to give evidence that all these industries were once in full
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 21:29
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use:-
Its uses:-
Thatching houses
Making ropes
Sugán chairs
Tying for goat's cows etc
Mats for the floors
Bottoms for beds
Hives for the bees
Binding boots in bad weather and at the digging of the potatoes
Dressing up for bandbegging at weddings.
Part of the ceremony in curing warts
Used in home curing and smoking bacon
Making of hats and bonnets
(It was considered indispensable)

Flax was grown extensively in this corner of Cavan. All tradesmen engaged in this (the linen industry) lived in cabins here, weavers, hacklers, scutchers and of course every woman knew how to spin.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 21:26
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In fact years ago straw was in universal
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 21:26
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use:-
Its uses:-
Thatching houses
Making ropes
Sugán chairs
Tying for goat's cows etc
Mats for the floors
Bottoms for beds
Hives for the bees
Binding boots in bad weather and at the digging of the potatoes
Dressing up for bandbegging at weddings.
Part of the ceremony in curing warts
Used in home curing and smoking bacon
Making of hats and bonnets
(It was considered indispensable)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 21:15
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sport and a good scold he will be able to turn the tables on his tormentors. A man always loses if he gets vexed. In the course of this game personal and often nasty references are made but this was all pardonable in the night of a wake.
sort of (-) sometimes by usage.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 21:12
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Very many old customs still survive here regarding wakes and funerals. Long ago the wake was an event to be looked forward to. All kinds of tricks good and bad were played and whiskey was plentiful. The reason for the latter was that the dying man's last expressed wish was "Bury me decent".
Some of the games played were slapping, "The drunken Tailor", and "Mobbing;
In slapping one man was taken out on the floor, his hands were put behind his back and every one tried its mettle(?) by means of slapping of his(?) work crusted hands. Very often this game ended in an Irishman's holiday ie. a free fight.
MOBBING still exists. When some one dies the young men come together and agree to "mob" some people at the wake in other words single out some one present there and before all in a half joking way ridicule the doings, sayings work of his seven generations in a biting way, to all appearances to make fun of the person for all the neighbours enjoyment. If the person mobbed is a good
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 20:53
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the Church. The inscription on his tomb throws some light on the family.

In the lake in front of the church there is an artificial island - (unexplained).
When the monks lived there they erected a mill. They found out that a small lake - Swan Lake was of higher level than Lough Gowna so they constructed a mill race from Swan Lake to Lough Gowna, and had their mill worked by the stream thus formed. The Ruins of the well remain but in its last days it was a bleach mill. (probably reconstructed so - at the turn over from the woollen to the linen Industry - The Bleach Green is still pointed out.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 20:47
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On the shore of Loc Gowna beside the village of Scrabby (Cavan) stands the Protestant Church today. It stands in a circular graveyard, which contains an equal number of Catholic and Protestant tombs. This church was once a monastery manned by the Cistercian Order, but was at first founded by disciples of Columcille and was erected as an auxillary to the Monastery of Inch Mor (Loch Gamna)
The present townland of Cloone was monastic land. This land was at first given to (?) the monastics (?) by the ruling chief MacKiernan who had his castle on the shore of the lake about a quarter of a mile from the monastery. The ruins of the castle are to be seen today and was inhabited until 1800, after the Battle of Ballinamuck.
The monastery lands and castle were taken over by Queen Bess as a ruling of the Inquisition of Scrabby 1588. The monks were banished and the church was taken over for Protestant worship and remains so to this day.
Pallas was the last family to inhabit the castle (Chief Baron Pallas - an authority on English Law was a member of this family)
The last chief (native) to inhabit it was Brian Oge McKiernan and he is buried beside
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 17:29
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On the shore of Loc Gowna beside the village of Scrabby (Cavan) stands the Protestant Church today. It stands in a circular graveyard, which contains an equal number of Catholic and Protestant tombs. This church was once a monastery manned by the Cistercian Order, but was outpost founded by disciples of Columcille and was erected as an suxillary to the Monastery of Inch Mor (Loch Gamna)(?)
The present townland of Cloone was monastic land. This land was outpost(?) given to (?) the monastery(?) by the ruling chief MacKiernan who had his castle on the shore of the lake about a quarter of a mile from the monastery. The ruins of the castle are to be seen today and was inhabited until 1800, after the Battle of Ballinamuck.
The monastery lands and castle were taken over by Queen Bess as a ruling of the Inquisition of Scrabby 1588. The monks were banished and the church was taken over for Protestant worship and remains so to this day.
Pallas was the last family to inhabit the castle (Chief Baron Pallas - an authority on English Law was a member of this family)
The last chief (native) to inhabit it was Brian Oge McKiernan and he is buried beside
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 17:13
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Carrick a Kil - leh - (for Carrickakillew)
Explanation:- Old thatched Church as shown on map overleaf given the name to the rocky hill (See 27)
Carraig a' Cille (Irish form)

Carrick - An Charraig - from rock at back of school.

Carrick Bawn and Brack Luh
(Breac Loch from a lake near Kilgola)

Arley (al - ee) (?) Árd Liath

BALLYWILLAN - preserves its old pronunciation
Baile an Mhuilinn

Ballynarry - Baile an Réidh (Réidh = mountain flat)
Baile an Aodhaire - Post Office or BAILE na Réidhe

Cabhán (better(?) Cabán) Outside (?) Dulsíde (?)
once known as the place of the tents.

Kilcogy
explained by scholars as Cedlltrach a Chogaidh (Ceall a Chogaidh) the burial place of the mutual war (?)
This is interesting from many points.
The name is pronounced with a long "ó" and KIL
How do they account for this if its COGAIDH!!! and COILL
(I) Coill Cóiced = the wood marking a fifth part
(II) Cill Cóiced The Church (MOST LIKELY)
cf. CARTON = Cartrun = a quarter portion in so many place names in Longford Cartronboy etc.

Kilgola - Cill Gabhála - The Church in the fork (part)

(These) Explain themselves
Clonlohan - Cluain Lochlann
Coranadra - Cor Neadrach
Kilnahaird - Coill na h-Áird
Creevy - Craobhach
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 14:16
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yards.
Miss Loughlin, Phlus, Clover, hill, County Cavan, was a noted dancer and the Miss Mineys, Cavan are also noted dancers. They won many prizes and many medals. They are also invited to concerts all over Ireland.
Francis Gibbons, Enoish, Killeshandra, County Cavan, is a powerful oarsman. He can oar two miles twenty eight perches in seventeen minutes.

Ellen O'Reilly
Derinacross
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 14:11
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reason. If you meet a red-haired woman on that day you should turn back and go home, for it is considered an evil omen to continue the journey. You should not put down a fire on that day until you see smoke from nine chimneys. You should not throw out dirty water until you bring in clean water. People who used to take butter used to go out on May morning and gather the dew of the grass with a rope.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 14:08
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For these were the people here noted just the same as in other districts, and other Irish counties. When a visitor came in he got the best seat, and got lots of food and also drink of such were to be had.
If this visitor were making a round of visits he had to eat in every house. If he said in excuse, that he just took his dinner before leaving home, he was always told that he saw the tops of nine chimneys since then and on that account he had got back his appetite.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 13:59
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To bear out my statement here is an example - On one shore of the lake there is a vast stretch of fairly good land almost a peninsula. It is known as the island or Cille Traigh or Cille Traibh. It contains an area of more than a hundred acres. Now one hundred years ago up to twenty families (real old residents) lived on this land. Traces of all their cabins remain and now not even one family lives there, not a human being. Their accumulative knowledge of the water that surrounded them and their people for generations died or departed with them.
"Where are they all?" I asked a very old man
"I'll answer you" says he "by asking you another"
"Where is the snow that fell last year?"

Sd. McGovern
Cornamuckla
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 13:50
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The name of my district is Carrick. The meaning of it is a "Rock". The parish is Dumloman South. The barony is Clonmahon. The number of families in it is eighteen. There are approximately 78 people in it.
The most common family name is Reynolds. The houses are nearly all one storey thatched houses except (a) few two storey slated ones.
Most of the houses are built on open ground. There are many old people living in it. There is no one in it that can speak Irish or there is
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 13:39
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There are two saints connected with the Diocese. Both were disciples of Saint Patrick.
St Mel's feast is on the 6th of February. There is a Church in Drumloman called after Loman and a Cathedral in Longford called after St. Mell. Drumloman Church is used as a Protestant although in the graveyard there are Catholics buried in it.
St Mel is described as one of the "Fathers of the Irish Church". He also wrote a book the life of Saint Patrick which is not now available. It was he who founded the see of Ardagh. He was associated with St. Brigid. It was he who confirmed her and is supposed he gave her the veil. There are no boys called after these Saints in my locality.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 13:28
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Still used in Locality - Irish

Clúdóg - a parcel of Easter eggs
Pronounced - "KLEWDOG"

Progaidh - name used in calling cow calf etc.
Pronounced "PRUGEE"

t-Seoth - used to appease a dog
Pronounced - "CHEW-CHEW DOG"

Caorán - applied to small sods of turf
Pronounced - "KEERAWN"

Treis a Mhúirnín - said to quieten a cow
Pronounced "TRESH A MURNEEN

Cé'n leith sgéal bhí aice?
What excuse had she for calling? - Pronounced
Renders thus "What LEH SKALE had she?"
also .................."What THRESGEEN had she?"

Traithnín - to a thin blade of grass
Pron. "THRAWNEEN".

Deoch Faothain - calls to pig duck respectively -
Pronounced "JUH" "FWEETHEEN"

Gasg - used in phrase, "By GOSH it was a good one"

A Chuisle - term of endearment to anyone
Pron. " A CUSHLA"

A Mhic, A Inghean - to boys girls respectively
Pron. "A VICK" "DAUGHTER"

Mo Chroidhe -to a child
Pron. "MUH(?) KREE"

Ar do Chéilidh - Pron. "on your KALE-EE"

Cíosog young sow pig
Pron. "KACE-IG"

CIMÍR - lasting injury, "leav a mark on you"
Rendered thus:- "Tis a big KIMMER to him".

Saothar i n-AISGE
"LABOUR IN VAIN". Strange name of a FIELD
Mound of stones in field is pointed out as the remains of some monument left unfinished. Hence name "Labour in Vain"

Siar - as backward, still retained in phrase:-
"He is BEHIND with the work".

Cáir - a grin - "He was CAURING at me"

Aird - point of compass
"The wind is from a bad ART"

Gothard - appearance of ANYTHING
"You put a great "GAHOO" on it.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 12:49
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suspected treachery and once when passing Dolan remarked "Many's the fish was caught by the net". Dolan immediately sought to escape and as he passed out the back-door a number of R.I.C. their muskets in their hands came in on the front and held up the house in a vain search for Dolan who by then was lying hidden in the reeds by the water's edge. After a time their search being unavailing the Crown forces returned to the mainland needless to say Farrelly from then on was hated by his neighbours.
A year passed and in the meantime Dolan made good his escape to the U.S.A., when his friends sought revenge for Farrelly's treachery. They gathered on the island and sacked the traitor's house and carried off 5 tubs of butter and 2 tons of wheat and swam his cattle to the mainland. When departing they took with them whatever cots (small boats) he had and thus he was left stranded. When eventually he was rescued he decided on changing his residence. He came to this district (Glencurran) to view a farm that was then being offered
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 12:36
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name because there was a trade of tanning leather carried on here and it was called long ago the town of kip leather.

Tubber na Muc
Tuber na Muc in Roebuck was called the well of the pigs because of pigs would come and eat grass around the well and drink out of it.

Barna Darg
Barna Darg in Dungimmon. It is called this name because long ago there was a gap in a field and whenever a person would pass by this gap there was a red light to be seen, and its proper name is the Red Gap.

Mollyboy
Mollyboy in Lismacanican gets its name from all the rocks which are covered with furze about it.

The White Gate
The White Gate is the name of a place in Barconey. It is called the White Gate because there is a big White Gate in the district. It is called this name for more than a hundred years.

Cornamuckla
Cornamuckla is the name of a place near Kilnacrott. It got that name because a number of pigs was reared by all the people here.

The Alps
The Alps is a townland in Mountprospect and there are rocks in this place as
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 12:26
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transport was first used for the conveyance of fruit to Dublin market and to Dublin's only Jam Factory, William's & Wood's. In 1917 however there were new entrants into the jam manufacturing business. The highest prices obtained for raspberries from jam firms was during the World War when £130 per ton was obtained. The lowest price ever obtained was £10 per ton. This was the price in the year 1889. Large quantities of the fruit in this year were left unpicked; due of course to its uneconomic price.
The area under cultivation at the present time (1938) in the old raspberry districts of Duleek, Gormanston, Julianstown and Stamullen areas exceed 80 acres. These areas produced in 1937 2/3 of the Irish Free State raspberry requirement. The quantity supplied in the year was over 200 tons. There are now 10 firms engaged in the jam production in Eire.
The number of families now engaged in raspberry production in the Meath fruit Districts number over 150. Many of these families depend soley on fruit production for a livelihood. The industry now brings into Meath's fruit districts up to £7000 per year, depending of course on price and weather conditions. During the life of the industry there were many obstacles met with and the price obtained were after totally unsatisfactory due to the importation of foreign fruit,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 00:44
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XIV
On these very banks and contested the game,
Where each lad battled with might and with main
Inch by inch stiffly fought with heart and with soul.
Till home went the ball from field centre to goal
XV
Our battles repeated times o'er and o'er.
With varied success like Briton and Boer.
When victors at last we in triumph marched home
Recounting our feats like the Ceasers of Rome.
XVI
But those happy days they are gone they are gone.
Gone like the waters that hurry along,
Dancing and bubbling on the bright waves of time
To sink in the ocean of the past sublime.
XVII
Youth passed away and old age cometh on
No change in the waters the same as at dawn
O list the refrain of the song they have sung
You're grown old but the river still young.
XVII
These waters to me speaks treasures untold
By moonlight all silver by sunlight all gold
Reflecting all colours the sky ever knew
From the lining of gold to the azure of blue.
XVIV
Like prophets they'll tell of that ever blessed land
Where bright rivers roll through gold beds of sand
Whose beauties unceasing we'll see evermore
The moment we land on the paradise shore.

Written by the Late Rev Hugh Brady of Bunnoe
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 00:36
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The Valley of the Black Pig
In Upper Dungimmon there is a field and in this field there is a valley which is called - The Valley of the Black Pig. If a person stood in this valley he could not see a half an acre of land around the country. It is said by the old people that the war between the Catholics and the Orangemen will be finished in this valley and that the Orangemen will be defeated there.

Spioncop
Spioncop is the name of a hill in our land. In the time of the Boer war in nineteen hundred this hill got its name. When the Boer War was raging in Africa there was a hill which they used to fight on and it was called Spioncop and this hill in our land is the same shape as the one in Africa.

Glenmór
Glenmór is the name of a field owned by Mr Nixon Mountprospect. It got this name because it is situated in a big glen.

Geata Gorm
Geata Gorm in Mountpallas gets its name from a big bue gate which was leading to the residence of Mr Rotherham.

Ballakip
Ballakip in Dungimmon gets its
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 00:22
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Amadán - (pronounced Am-ad-on)
Cláb - (pronounced claub)
Clábar - (pronounced Clauber)
Bardóg
Dorn. nó Doirnín - (hand grip on handle of scythe)
Grís
Pus
Cearc
Muc
Bróg
Sibín
Caipín - (pronounced caubeen)
Cipín
Cár e.g. - He had a CÁR on him
Tuilleadh - pronounced tilly
Meitheal
Gobán
Gob
A Mhic mo Chroidhe

A Leanbh mo Chroidhe - (pronounced A-lanna mo chroidhe
A Grádh
Bean-sidhe
Gearrchaile
Gasún
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 00:15
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Corlislea is my native townland. It is situated in the parish of Crosserlough and in the barony of Clonmahon.
Corlislea gets its name from an old grey fort, and there are three other forts in the townland. Long ago part of Corlislea was called Corduff. There are not as many families in Corlislea now as there were long ago as many of the people emigrated to America. There are only about twelve families and forty-six people, while long ago there were twenty-four families.
The land in Corlislea is fairly fertile and it produces good crops. There are a lot of streams and small rivers in Corlislea but none of them are mentioned in any song or story. The houses in Corlislea are nearly all thatched and there are only two slated houses in the townland. There is only lone old man over seventy years living in Corlislea. He is Mr McCabe and he can speak Irish fluently. Corlislea is one of the largest townlands in the county. It contains about two hundred and eighty eight acres.
I got this folklore from my father Mr. John Galligan, Corlislea, Ballinagh, Co. Cavan.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-04 00:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Corlislea is my native townland. It is situated in the parish of Crosserlough and in the barony of Clonmahon.
Corlislea gets its name from an old grey fort, and there are three other forts in the townland. Long ago part of Corlislea was called Corduff. There are not as many families in Corlislea now as there were long ago as many of the people emigrated to America. There are only about twelve families and forty-six people, while long ago there were twenty-four families.
The land in Corlislea is fairly fertile and it produces good crops. There are a lot of streams and small rivers in Corlislea but none of them are mentioned in any song or story. The houses in Corlislea are nearly all thatched and there are only two slated houses in the townland. There is onlylone old man over seventy years living in Corlislea. He is Mr McCabe and he can speak Irish fluently. Corlislea is one of the largest townlands in the county. It contains about two hundred and eighty eight acres.
I got this folklore from my father Mr. John Galligan, Corlislea, Ballinagh, Co. Cavan.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 23:53
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declared that he would do it. Dolan is spoken of as being a young man, fary haired, tall and well-built and noted for his sharpness of mind.
The following Sunday afternoon when Mr. Bell and his wife were driving to church they were stopped outside of Crossdoney village by Dolan who enquired as to what was the correct time. While Mr. Bell was fumbling for his watch Dolan took from under his coat his pistol and shot the Rev. gentleman at point-blank range killing him instantly. Dolan was a fugitive from Justice for a very long time and eventually made good his escape to the U.S.A. in an egg-box.
It is said that Mr. Bell's coachman, an (?) Protestant gave the murderer shelter for the first few days after the crime being committed. A great hue-and-cry was raised and Dolan but narrowly evaded arrest. On one occasion he was attending a dance in a house belonging to Pat Farrelly on one of the small islands in Lough Uachtar (R. Erne). Farrelly was in the pay of Dublin Castle and it was to trap Dolan that the dance was organised in his honour. Luckily the maid-servant
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 23:32
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Some 70 years ago the Rev. Mr Bell, Vicar, Magistrate and landlord of Drumcarbon, Crossdoney, Cavan was shot dead. The deed was planned and executed by one of the "Molly Maguires" - Pat Dolan Tullalion, Templeport.
Mr Bell is spoken of as being a "good Landlord compared with some of his contemporaries and there was a lot of genuine grief at his murder, as his whole staff was entirely Catholic. Any unpopularity he suffered was due to the over-zealousness of the R.I.C. Sergeant in Ballinagh who was wont to prosecute for the most trifling offences. When the defendants were brought before Mr Bell as Magistrate for the district Sergeant Spinks insisted on a "tart" sentence being imposed. This brought Mr. Bell rather innocently into disfavour in the district.
When his murder was decided upon, lots were cast as to who would commit the deed. The choice fell on one, whom a young man named Pat Dolan of (-) thought hadn't the nerve and courage to carry out. Dolan stepped out and took the pistols and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 21:05
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Smaurth - silence stopping a scolding match

Porthon - a scraw or piece of bog with grass or rushes attached

Polthoge - an untidy bandage or dressing on a wound
Mockswelk - a kind of knave

Marcing (?) - like a finger of a glove, made from calico for a sore finger

Rucky - spots on face

Pinkeen or Corabawn
diminutive fish foundin bog-holes

Spalpeen / Squilpeen
a potato digger from the west

Skhelpeen - a young bream

Fodheroge
the first position in which mud-turf is put, one sod lying on bank and two leaning on it

Moonoge
a mixture of cows' urine and manure, plants are dipped before being planted.

Muckeries - the red berries of the wild rose

Shamshogs
little plants, larger than shamrocks, taste sweetly

Boulkeen - the hitting part of the flail

Meggileen
a strip of skin holding the two parts of the flail together

Cregera-buee
some kind of wizard
"What will we do says O, says O.
What will we do says Andy Roe,
What will we do says brother and Three
We'll throw him in the 'Say' says The Cregera-buee"

Losid
a shallow box with lid and four legs in which bread etc was kept from one meal until wanted for next; was an article of furniture in the kitchen

Braddha - an animal fond of trespassing
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 20:55
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This School - Drumavaddy - Drom an Mhadaigh - is situated at the foot of Ardkill Mountain (1,000 ft.) in the parish of Denn about 5 mls due South of Cavan town. The land of the area is very heavy and is given much to meadow. There is however a fairly large population mostly Catholic.
The protestants in the area are of the Ulster Plantation stock (1609) - Turners, Heaslips, Achesons, Staffords, Byers, Fosters, Fegan - being their names.
The most common Catholic names are Galligan, Smith, O'Reilly, McCabe, Cahill, Gaffney, McCormack, McPhillips, O'Donohoe, O'Sullivan (Ardogher)(?) . (Lynch, McEvoy, Brady in margin) The latter probably came to the district as refugees from W. Cork under O'Sullivan Beare.
The people are very industrious and thrifty. They are also very conservative, new methods of agriculture are slow in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 20:52
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being adopted in the district - eg. growing potatoes in "ridges" rather than drills although it must be said that regards "spraying" they have no masters, each farmer applying the wash no less than 3 times.
They are a trusty Gaelic people, each one's house is always open to neighbour and stranger alike and no Knock is required before entering. However, the old people see a great change coming on the people and they speak of the "young ones" being much different to their fathers.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 20:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This School - Drumavaddy - Drom an Mhadaigh - is situated at the foot of Ardkill Mountain (1,000 ft.) in the parish of Denn about 5 mls due South of Cavan town. The land of the area is very heavy and is given much to meadow. There is however a fairly large population mostly Catholic.
The protestants in the area are of the Ulster Plantation stock (1609) - Turners, Heaslips, Achesons, Staffords, Byers, Fosters, Fegan - being their names.
The most common Catholic names are Galligan, Smith, O'Reilly, McCabe, Cahill, Gaffney, McCormack, McPhillips, O'Donohoe, O'Sullivan (Aoragher)(?) . (Lynch, McEvoy, Brady in margin) The latter probably came to the district as refugees from W. Cork under O'Sullivan Beare.
The people are very industrious and thrifty. They are also very conservative, new methods of agriculture are slow in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 20:32
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Cathedral of St. Fedhlimidh, Kilmore
Consecrated - 1860

(Photograph of Cathedral and accompanying article)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 20:26
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Field". Some of Miss Maggie Smith's fields "The Bog Field" because it is beside the bog. "The Pohara", "The Road Field" because it is beside the road, "The Field Behind the house" and "The Field behind Haggard". Thomas Briody, Ballytrust has a field called "The Whinny Hill". There are rocks beside Corr lane where people called Rourkes lived and this place is now known as "Rourke's Bray".
In Mr Conor Reilly's Farm in Ballytrust their is a field called "Páirc a' Lín" or the 'field of the flax'. Mr. Michael Reilly of Corr has a field called "The forge Field" because in olden times there was a forge there. In Mr. John Briody's farm in Urble are "The Comoch". "The Gallagh" because it's swampy ground and "The Rock Field".

There is a lone bush in Mr. James Fitzpatrick's "Molly" under which are two large flat flags stones. It is said to be unlucky to cut lone bushes. Once an uncle of Mr. Tommie Moore's, Corduff cut part of a lone bush and there came a shower of white mice from it. In the morning his mouth was in the back of his head but when Fr. Coyle attended him it went back to its usual (place) but he was never as good as before it happened.
Rose Reilly
Urble
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 20:15
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Mr James Fitzpatrick's fields are:- "The Molly," "The Cruck Cruach", "The Slosh Bottom," "Betty Moore's Field" so called because a woman named Betty Moore owned the neighbouring field. "The Boleen" and "The field behind the haggard" so called because it is behind the haggard. There is also another "The Clár Meadow". Mrs. Cullen has two fields - "The Half -acre and "Jimmy Lee's
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 16:48
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There is a very large stone in Corrac a Bridgin called Cloc Padraig. The tracks of the Saint's left elbow and the left toes and the right knee and fingers and toes can be seen in this stone.
There is water in these tracks always. In the track of the left elbow there is a cure of cuts. In the track of the left toes there is a cure of corns. In the tracks of the right knee there is a cure of pain. In the track of the right fingers there is a cure of cramps. And in the track of the right toes there is a cure of chilblans.

Information obtained from:
Patrick Smyth
Drumrora
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 16:42
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Over a hundred years ago the school for this locality was in Finaway on the farm of Mr Watson where Patrick Gaffney now lives. I has been since converted into a stable. The school was a "Hibernian school" and it was the pupils that paid the Teacher. The teacher who taught here lived in Keenagh and later taught in the "old Drumrora
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 16:29
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named Kiernans, Corrigans, Farrells, Dolans and Lynches. The people who lived in these houses are all dead. The townland does not contain bog or hills because it is nice smooth land and is good for growing crops. There are not trees growing round the house or about them except in the spot in which we live. The house is all surrounded by Palm trees. There are not any rivers or streams running through the land.
Cáit Ní Ruaidh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 16:27
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I live in the townland of Eighter. In the parish and barony of Castlerahan. There are eighteen families and 68 people in all.
The name most common is McEnroe.
There are a number of one storey thatched houses in it. There are also a good few two storey slated houses. These belong to the protestant class.
The townland gets its name from being low Iochrad means low plain.
The people over seventy are Patt Fitzsimmons and his wife Anne. Edward McGloughlin, and Mrs Mary Carroll.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 16:11
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Verse 10
Into the Cloisters of Ephers a banner is swaying
And by a pale weeping maiden is praying,
The Flag is the Trophy of Ramillies Fray
The Nun is none other than the Flower of Finea.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 16:09
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Verse 7
He fought at Cremona, she hears of his story,
He fought at Cassano, she is proud of his glory,
Yet sadly she sings 'Siubhal Arú!' all the day
Oh! Come, Come my darling, Come home to Finea

Verse 8
Lord Clara on the field of Ramillies is charging
Before the Sassanach squadrons enlarging
Behind him the 'Cravats' their 'Sessions' display
And bleeding rides Fergus and shouts for Finea.

Verse 9
On the slopes of Lough 'Juodine' the Fenchmen are flying,
Lord Clare and his squadron the foe still defying,
Out-numbered and wounded retreat in array,
And lying, bleeds Fergus and thinks of Finea.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 15:58
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Verse 4
One hearty hand clasped, and one wild look of gladness
Ah! Why do they change on a sudden to sadness?
He has told his sad fortune, no more can he stay,
He must leave his poor Eileen to pine at Finea.

Verse 5
For Fergus O'Farrell was true to his sire land,
The dark hand of tyranny drove him from Ireland,
He joined the Brigade in the wars far away,
But he vows he'll come back to the Flower of Finea.

Verse 6
Eight long years have passed till she's nigh broken-hearted,
Her reel and her rock and her flax she has parted,
She sails with the 'Wild Geese' to Flanders away,
And leaves her sad parents at home at Finea.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 13:43
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The Flower of Finea

Verse 1.
Bright red is the sun on the waves of Lough Sheelin,
A cool, gentle breeze from the mountain is stealing,
While fair round its islets the small ripples play,
But fairer than all is the Flower of Finea.

Verse 2.
Her hair is like night and her eyes like grey morning,
She trips on the heather as if its touch scorning,
Yet her heart and her lips are as mild as May Day
Sweet Eileen MacMahon, the Flower of Finea.

Verse 3
But who down the hillside than red deerruns fleeter?
And who on the lake-side is hastening to greet her?
Who but Fergus O'Farrell, the fiery and gay,
The darling and pride of the Flower of Finea!
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 13:27
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Ballew-eneshon (phonetic)
In the townland of Lurganboy there is a field called the "Shliew" and on the east side of it a small stream of clear water runs. Some time ago women of the locality used to assemble at a flag (flat stone) in the stream and do their washing there working until all the washing was completed.
Some women stood along the stream, which had been partly stopped by a dam and threw water on the clothes to be washed which had been spread on the flag; a number of women beat the clothes with beaters made of light rods tied in bundles: soap was not in use at this period. The women sang or conversed as the work proceeded and the work itself or the place was called "Ballew-eneschon" (phonetic)
The women who washed their clothes in this way were, it appears poor, and they brought their children with them as perhaps they were safer than at home.
Tradition says that when the banshee wailed for any of the O'Reillys, who lived in the neighbourhood, she went by the flat stone mentioned, and made a noise like that made by a wet cloth when "scutched", in addition to her wail. There are people still alive who heard the banshee on this spot.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 13:15
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Buddhafeeka - an earwig
Mossier or Mobier - perhaps, pretended innocence
Moontura - fawning

Ponkon
an island in a bog - a piece yet to be cut but surrounded by water

Gurreen - a troublesome pimple on neck or face
La-clea - very hard subsoil
Donny - very ill, dying
Golla land - wet heavy clay land
Porrison(?)-Bockee - a provocative little man - a brat
Kesh - an egg box, also a timber bridge on a bog
Laack - a low broad-built man
Baagh - not easily fooled
Clay-Wee - a bluish clay found under bogs

A Buth-ree-orth
a hanger on, a flatterer, one seeking favours
"He was BUTH-REE-ORTHING the bog-baliff"
= he was seeking favours from him

Cioran - a dry crumb of turf

Thahawn
a thin weak delicate fellow, usually applied to a boy

Buddha - having a frowning forbidding expression
Kronsmur - a complaining disagreeable, cranky old man
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 12:27
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After the suppression of the parish churches and during the penal days when public worship was prohibited Mass was celebrated in secluded glens and in inaccessible places.
In the townland of Cormaddyduff is a small picturesque glen known as "Gleann an Aifrinn" in which is the remains of a Mass Rock. At this Mass Rock the people of Castlerahan attended Mass during the Penal days and down to the last half of the 18th century. Local tradition states that a priest was martyred here.

Another very interesting Mass Rock is in the townland of Knocknagarton about a quarter of a mile to the South East of the old church of Munterconnaught and alongside "Tobar Phádraig". It is known locally as Carraig Crom i.e. the sloping or inclining Rock. This rock is situated on a slight elevation
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 12:27
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to the west of Tobar Phádraig, a few whitethorns surround it. A temporary Altar was erected at the base of the overhanging rock, and this open air chapel served the district during the long period of the Penal Code. This romantic situation was admirably adapted for purposes of security and secrecy: in front stretches Lough Ramor guarding the approaches from the North and East, while the higher elevations of Knocktemple and Behernagh provide excellent outlooks from which sentries could easily command an extensive view to the south and west. This Mass Rock is plainly visible from the opposite side of Lough Ramor, and it is probable that the device, resorted to elsewhere in Ireland of giving some signal of the commencement of Mass may have been adopted occasionally here also.

Mass was also frequently celebrated during the Penal times at a large rock in the townland of Knocktemple and on the south side of the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 00:58
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and unsuitable weather conditions. Importation of foreign raspberries now, however, has been curtailed and the growers have certain measures of protection.

Pete Moss, Duleek, whose family has always been concerned with this industry in Duleek. (His manuscript will be enclosed)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 00:17
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
About a mile from the New Bridge or as it is known the Nine-eyed-Bridge, along the shore of Lough Ramor there are the ruins of the Still-house, in the corner of Mr. Gilsean's land.
Here poteen was made for some years long ago; the house is situated in a small plantation. There is a noted fishing place which goes by the name of the Still house Rock. A number of men would come to this place and fish and make the poteen the whole day long. About a half mile from the Still house there is a spot in which poteen used to be hidden and kept in jars.
Nobody knew about this poteen-making and this was later on found out. The smoke caused no comment so it was thought the men were cooking the fish they caught.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-03 00:09
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Montha - an impediment or catch in the voice
Naumee - speaking with a Montha tone

Naumais
nick-name for a man who had his face almost entirely covered by a heavy beard.

Garron-geea
nick-name for a man who shaved about once a fortnight and whose stubble stuck straight out from his jaws.
The real "Garron-Geea" or "God's Horse" is a hairy grub or maggot found in gardens in Autumn.

Skaulk and Skalk-oge
a green coating on water in a bog-hole, also the little shamrock-like leaves seen there. I have also been told the name is applied to water-plants with wide leaves which grow at the lake.

Gusthoge
the dried cabbage stalk or stem after the head has been removed.

Meyhaal (Meitheal)
a number of men who assemble to set potatoes, cut turf, reap corn etc for some person who has met with misfortune.

Gishkereen
a self-willed, contankerous small man

Gishtera - an important Gishkereen, conceited
Schulk(?) - an obstinate (?) morose young girl
Pronshaa or Barshaa - a fat domineering vulgar woman
Mockon(?) - a well-shaped heavy-built young bullock

Gowanrua
a heifer that becomes a cow before she is two years old

Creel or Cleeve
a box-shaped basket for carrying potatoes, usually holds eight or ten stones.

Errish - the rope used for carrying the creel
Hurrish - a call to the pigs
Moonoo - fear
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-02 23:49
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
When St Patrick was travelling Ireland he arrived at Bolies in the county Meath about three miles from this school.
It is said that St Patrick said Mass in a field now known as Mr Sheridan's. Before he said Mass he took off his boots because his feet were sore and tired after travelling. When he had said Mass he found that his boots were missing. He searched in the briars and everyplace and he could not find them.
He said that a briar would not grow in Bolies or that it would not be without a rouge or a cripple.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-02 23:43
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11) CROCH na DAMHSA (Cnoc Damhsa)
This means dancing hill. Long ago it was supposed that the fairies held open-air dancing on this hill. It is a high level piece of land and apparently a very suitable hill for dancing as it is visible a long way off. It is owned by Mick Tighe, Rahard, Co. Meath but the owner is at present in America.

12) MONALEA
This is the name of a field owned by Thomas Smith, Rahard and means turf-sod. It is moor-land and it is probably from the appearance of the land that it got its name.

13) PÁIRC an LIOS
This is the field with the fort in it.

14) PÁIRC na DEARNAIGH
This is the field of the oak - the field with the oak tree growing in it. It is in the possession of Luke Hetherton, Crohan Munterconnaught.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-02 23:34
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the name of a field the property of the late James McEnroe of Crohan. The field is so called from a stream of clear spring water which flows along one side of it.

8) THE GARLA CÁM (An Galar Cám)
A field the property of Mr. Bernard Hetherton of Lurganboy. The Galar Cám is a disease which attacks the bones of cattle especially cows and leaves them crooked in the joints. This field was so called because cattle grazing in it always became infected with it.

9) THE CALDRA (An Cáldrac)
This field is situated about one mile from Virginia beside Dunanchory Bridge. Cáldrac is the Irish word for a burying ground and in this field the monks from the hospital of Lurgan were buried.

10) PAIRC na bPORTACH
It got its name from a bog that is in the field. It is situated in the townland of Stonefield and its owner is Thomas Smith, Rahard.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-02 23:28
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Virginia. The Irish word 'Bolach' means a place where cows are milked. People travelling through this field at mid-night claim to have seen a number of Leaprechauns milking cows through-out the field.

4) KRUCK na dTOBAR (Cnoc na dTobar)
a field with a steep round hill situated in the centre of it is the property of the late James McEnroe of Crohan. There are several springs situated on the sides of the hill which explains the name Cnoc na dTobar.

5) KRUCKAWNBAWN (Cnocán Ban)
this field is the property of the late John McEnroe of Carrick. It means the 'small white hill' and the field got its name from such a hill the grass on which is always of a pale colour owing to lack of moisture and soil.

6) PEADAR RUADH'S FIELD (Páirc Pheadair Ruaidh)
Situated on the farm of Patrick McMahon of Lurganboy this field is named from a former owner 'Peadar Ruadh' which means 'Red Peter'.

7) THE FÓRÁN FINN (An Fuarán Fionn)
The name means 'the clear or bright spring' and is
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-02 23:18
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Cnoc a' Bhalla - Knockaraheen - Mr John Tuite
Dúnán - Newcastle - Mr Peter Gilsenan
Finn - Crohan - Mr Bd. McEnroe
An Fuarán Fionn - (a stream in Crohan)
Gearróg
Gleann Mór - Cormaddyduff - Patk. Farrelly
Gob - Beherna - Mr. Patk. Keogan
Geataí Arda - Upper Fennor - Mr. Thos. Glennon
Gearrán an Locha - Newcastle - Mr. P. Gilsenan

Gleann na Fraochaighe - Carrick - Mr. Patk. Macmahon

Gobán Mór - Newcastle - Mr Bd. Cadden
Lochán - Crohan - Mr. Terence Conaty
Luighe na nGréasaidhthe
Móinín
Mullach Ruadh
Páirc Mhór
Páirc an t-Seipéil
Páirc na gCloch - Knockgarton - Mr. Peter Conaty
Pairc Clochach - Newcastle - Mr. John Smith
Poll Dubh - Lr. Eighter - Mr Matt McEnroe
Poll Buidhe
Poll Uisge
Poll a' Phuca
Páirc na bPlanntaí
Sruth Ban
Sliabh
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of a year great changes were wrought in her home.
V
The Geancanach another form of Leprechaun appears with his hands in his pockets and a a duidin in his moth. It meant marriage for a girl to meet him ill luck for a man.
VI
Merrows or Mermaids are still locally believed in and many folk tales exist describing their intermarriage with mortals. It is the general opinion of many old persons versed in native traditional lore that a mermaid was brought to shore in Foynes by a fisherman who so much admired her tresses of golden hair that he made her his wife.
VII
This lady of the sea possessed a magical cap without which she cold not return to the sea, but by a condition of the marriage her husband had it stowed carefully away.
VIII
However unthinkingly he cast it from its hiding place, his wife seized it and for the third and last time in her worldly life she laughed a hoarse croaking laugh and was gone. Her descendants are believed to inhabit this parish and are known by their long golden hair greyish blue eyes and rather pale face.
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2020-04-02 17:05
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A man who lived in Muff near Bailieboro' was on his way to the August fair of Bailieboro. His wife was with him and they had a horse and cart. The man was leading his horse by the head and he saw a Geanncanach and caught him.
The Geanncanach gave him two wishes and one to his wife. Anything they wished for they would get it no matter to whom it belonged.
A tinker's van was passing at that moment and amongst the tin vessels was a basin. The woman wished she had it, and immediately it was in the cart beside her. Her husband was angry with her for wasting her wish on such a trifling thing, and in his anger expressed the wish that it was stuck to her back. He at once realised that one
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2020-04-02 17:04
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of his wishes was granted for the basin was fastened to his wife's back. His second wish was that it might be removed from her back, and it was. He intended at first to have wished for gold.

Story told by Mr. Patrick McEnroe of Carrick, Munterconnaught. This story as told by Patrick Curran appears six pages further on.
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An Stairricín:-
a cairn on Lough Crew hills, visible from this school on south side.

Adhart na Beiltighe
An Garraidhe Mór
An Chorróg
An Buaile Beag
Bóthairín na Sip

An Baile Mór - field on farm of Mr. B. McEnroe Lakeview
Cnoc Dick - field on farm of Mr B. McEnroe Lakeview

Cnoc an Tobair - field in Crohan, Mr. T. Conaty
Cnocán Gorm Liath
Cnoc Dubh - field owned by Mr. Bd. Conaty Coronagh
Cnoc Stéighe - bog owned by Mr. Battersby
Cor Carrán - field owned by Mr. H.P. Gilsenan
Caenaidh - Mr Peter Gilsenan, Newcastle
Carraigín
Carrán Mór
Cnoc an Philibín
Cnoc an Mhoil-sidhe - Mr. Michael Lynch Lurganboy

Currach
Carraig Mór
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2020-04-02 16:43
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Local Place-Names (III)
NAMES OF FIELDS:-
The fields in this locality are named from (a) Their shape (b) former owners of the fields / present owners (c) their physical features (d) events which took place there (e) their natural fertility. The following is a list of field-names from the locality with their meanings. The situation of each field together with their owners is given.

1) GARRYKEEL (Gáirdín Caol)
This field is situated on the farm of Michael Lynch of Lurganboy. It means the 'narrow-garden', and is so called from its shape.

2) The POLL DUBH (An Poll Dubh)
Situated on the farm of Patrick Clancy of Carrick this field is so called from a pool. A dark coloured water which is situated in the centre of the field. The water in this hole is supposed to have the power of curing the Rose and many people come to this field for the water to apply it to the sore.

3) BOOLEY (Bólach)
This field is the property of Patrick McMahon of Gallonfree,
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miles from the Parish Church this townland borders Crohan.
(Lurga = a shin-bone; Buidhe = yellow) It means 'the yellow shin-shaped hill' and so called from a long low hill which runs through the townland.

17) RYEFIELD (ACHADH a' tSEAGAIL)
'the field of the Rye'. It is probable that the land in this townland was particularly suited for the growing of rye. Ryefield is situated about one mile from the School and one mile from the R.C. Church.

OTHER NAMES

1) GLANAHERIN (Gleann an Aifrinn)
This name is applied to a little valley in the townland of Cormaddyduff. It means 'the glen of the Mass'. In Penal times Mass was celebrated here and tradition has it that a priest was killed here by English soldiers.

2) LUG na bFEAR
This is applied to a little hollow or glen in the townland of Lurganboy and means the 'hollow of the men' and so called from the number of people who lived there. The ruins of six houses are to be seen there to the present day.
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2020-04-02 16:25
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I got this from:-
Vera Westoro
Castle Street,
Macroom
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2020-04-02 16:23
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among,
Ruin gave back his cry till cheerless morn,
Return thee to thy God, Jerusalem return.
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2020-04-02 16:22
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Or gaze upon those orbs so fair and bright,
Still burning on in Heaven's unbounded space,
Like seraphs bending o'er life's dreary night,
And with their look of love their smile of peace,
Wooing the weary soul to her high resting place.

Such was the hour the harp of Judah pour'd
Those strains no byre of earth had every rung,
When to the God his trembling soul adored,
O'er the rapt chords the minstrel monarch hung,
Such was the tune when Jeremiah sung,
With more than angels' grief the sceptre torn,
From Israel land, the desolate streets
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2020-04-02 16:15
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'Tis a delightful calm! there is no sound,
Save the low murmur of the distant rill,
A voice from heaven is breathing all around,
Bidding the earth and restless men be still,
Soft sleeps the moon on Inchidony's hill,
And on the shore the shining ripples break,
Gently and whispering at Nature's will,
Like some fair child that on its mother's cheek,
Sinks fondly to repose kisses pure and meek.

'Tis sweet when earth and heaven such silence keep,
With pensive steps to gain some headland's height,
And look across the wide extended deep,
To where its farthest waters sleep in light;
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2020-04-02 16:10
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of Callanán.
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2020-04-02 16:08
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a marsh or wet land. The name is explained from the fact that the land in this townland is wet and marshy.

11) ISLAND (Oiléan)
This townland borders Ballydurrow the townland in which the school is situated. It got its name 'Oileán' because a river flows right around it and forms as it were an island of this townland in the middle of the Parish.

12) KNOCKNAVEIGH (Cnoc na bFiadh)
This townland borders Island. It means 'the hill of the deer'.

13) KNOCKARAHEEN (Cnoc an Ráithín)
Bordering Knocnaveigh this name means 'the hill of the little Fort'.

14) KNOCKTEMPLE (Cnoc an Teampaill)
This townland is about two miles from this school and in this townland is situated the R.C. Church. The name Cnoc an Teampaill means 'the hill of the temple' (or church)

15) KNOCKNAGARTON (Cnoc na gCeárdchán)
'The hill of the forges' and so called from a number of forges which flourished there in ancient times. This townland borders Knocktemple and reaches the southern shore of Lough Ramor.

16) LURGANBOY (Lurganbuidhe)
About 1 1/2
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2020-04-02 15:57
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St Fehin of Fore on one occasion passed through this townland carrying a cross on his shoulders to erect at his Abbey in Co. Westmeath (Fore Abbey) He rested here and earned for the townland its name Crossafehin which means 'Fehin's Cross'.

6) CASTLERAGHAN (Caisleán an Ráithín)
'the castle of the little fort' (see Parishes)

7) CORMADDYDUFF (Cormáidedhuibh)
This name means 'the little hill of the Black dog'. Tradition has it that a spirit in the form of a black dog frequented this townland long ago.

8) DUNANCHORY (Dún Aoncaire)
This townland is situated about half-way between Lurgan R.C. Church and the town of Virginia about one mile S.W. of the latter. 'Dún' here means a residence and 'Aoncaire' means a holy man who forsakes the world and keeps to himself in other words a Recluse. It is not known to us who this holy man was but probably he was one of the 'Braithre Dubha' who had charge of the old hospital in Lurgan.

9) EIGHTER (Iochtar)
This townland is situated next to Crossafehin. The name can be explained in two ways (a) Íochtar = low-lying; the land being wet and low-lyiing or (b) Íochtar = lower it being the last townland in Munterconnaught.

10) Eanagh (Eangach)
The word 'Eannach' means
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2020-04-02 12:17
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survived and even tradition does not remember it.
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ANCHONQUILLY
This townland seems no longer remembered locally. It is marked on the O.S. map as situated between Knocktemple and Coronagh and extending to Lough Ramor. The Irish is Achadh AN Coille, the plain of the wood. The noun "Coill" is generally regarded as masculine in Breffni Gaelic.

KNOCKNAGARTON
Cnoc na gCeardchan, the hill of the forges. According to local tradition a number of tradesmen of the O'Reilly clan settled here. Evidently the forges were the factories where weapons of war were manufactured.

CROSSAFEHIN
At the lower end of Munterconnaught part of this parish, and adjoining Loch Ramor is the townland of Crossafehin (Crois Fheichin) i.e. St Fechin's Cross. No doubt a cross existed in Crossafehin, but no trace of it appears to have
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2020-04-02 11:47
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Local Place-Names (II)
Townlands:-

1) BALLYDURROW - (Baile Doire Máighe)
Situated in the Barony of Castleraghan, parish of Munterconnaught and on the Cavan-Meath border in the S.E. end of the Parish. It means the 'town of the Plain of Oaks'. The land around is level and probably in bygone ages an oak wood flourished there. The School is situated in this town land.

2) BEHERNA (Beith-Áirne(?))
Nest townland to the R.C. Church in the Parish of Munterconnaught. It probably got its name from beech trees and blackthorn hedges which grew there in ancient times: Beith = beech - Áirne = Blackthorn or Sloe.

3) CARRICK (Carraig)
This townland is situated about two miles N.W. of the Parish Church. It is so called from the great Collection of rocks to be found in it.

4) CROHAN (Cruachán)
Situated about 1 mile N.W. of the Catholic Church this townland borders Carrick. The word 'Cruach' means a high peak. The name was derived from the high hill which rises up in the middle of the townland on the farm of Mr. Daniel Kiernan.

5) Crossafehin (Cros Fheichín)
Situated in the N. end of the parish this townland borders Crohan.
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some ninety years ago.

PRINCIPAL TOWNS

(A) VIRGINIA (ACHADH LADHAIR)
This town is situated on the Northern Shore of Lough Ramor. After the Ulster Plantation (1609) the town was built and named Virginia in memory of Queen Elizabeth. The ancient name of the district was Achadh Ladhair (Aghaleere), of the lands given to Sir Garrett Moore by James I we have mentioned in State papers "Aghaleere in the Barony of Castleraghan part of the lands of Brian McPhilip O'Reilly attainted".
The Irish word Achadh means Páirc or a field and Ladhair means the portion of land between two rivers. We realise the suitability of the name by remembering that Achadh Ladhair is situated between two rivers which flow into Lough Ramor.

B) BALLYJAMESDUFF (Baile Shéamnuis Dhuibh) See Parishes

C) KILNALECK (Cill na Leac)

D) MT. NUGENT (Droichead Uí Dálaigh)

C) OLDCASTLE (SeanChaisleán)
situated about 2 miles from the Cavan-Meath border. It got its name from an old castle built on the moate which is situated beside the present town.
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100) Surdhan
101) Sreat a Mhathair
102 Storacan
103 Slothan
104) Tobhair Sile
105) Tobhair Mór
106) Tathar
107) An Alth
108) Lislea
109) Cnoch a Caisil
110) Cnoch na nGostor
111) Cará Bhán
112) Cnoch ná Ginní
113) Cnoch na Ballá
114) Carad Coilthe Beagh
115) Caradh Coilthe Mhór
116) Cnoch ná Geagha
117) Cul ná Cáislean
118) Cnoch na Moinfhear
119) An Cacá Cruinn
120) Páirch ná bPlanndha
121) Pairch Dúin
122) Pairch ná Coille
123) Breighbhain
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A very long time ago when Crohan hill was covered with woods and shrubberies it was said to be infested with a host of wild cats. The people in the locality were very much afraid of them.
At times they were ferocious and it was dangerous to go near the woods or shrubberies without a weapon of defence. These cats were often seen jumping from rock to rock. At other times they were said to be as tame as ordinary cats and would visit the houses in the vicinity.
They had the power of speech and each year they selected a king cat. The name of one of their rulers was "Siabhra Gortach".
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Tobar Sileadha
An Tachar nó an Tochar
Cnoc a' Chaisil
Páirc na Coille
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2020-04-02 00:27
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Magauran Tombstone continued.

The inscription is done with considerable skill, only block letters being used. There is not record of the residence of Magauran, probably this information was purposely with-held.
The stone could be easily carried on a man's shoulder - as it is not more than ten or twelve stone weight.
Green stone is common, in fact it is the only stone, around this neighbourhood. It is very hard and resists the ravages of the clements better than any other, not excepting limestone.
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2020-04-02 00:20
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He will "Malavogue" us, viz He will give us a severe castigation

"Mararougle" a broad-leafed plant which grows along side the road, producing hairy or bristling knobs or buttons which when pulled and thrown fasten to clothes or in girls' hair.
Some call it "Mararoudle"
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Clonasillagh
means Cluain na Saileac or Meadow of the Sally trees.

Balgree
means Baile an Gaoith or the townland of the Wind as it is a very bleak place with hardly a tree or a shelter of any kind.

Ballinavalley
Baile an Bhealac or the townland of the road as the road runs right though the centre of it dividing it into about equal parts.

Lisnagon
means Lios na gCon or the fort of the hounds
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2020-04-01 23:43
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"the castle of the little fort" and was so called because the O'Reillys of Breifne once had a stronghold built on a little fort a short distance from the present R.C. Church.

(C) BALLYJAMESDUFF (BAILE SHÉAMUIS DHUBH)
The name was first applied to the town - "the town of Seámus Dubh". Séamus Dubh was an Englishman who owned a large tract of land around the present village. Later on the name was applied to the whole parish.

(D) KILNALECK (CILL na LEAC)
This Cavan village is situated about a half a mile N.W. of Lough Sheelin. The name means the "Church of the flags" and was first applied to the town where such a church existed in olden times and afterwards the name came to be applied to the whole parish.

(E)
MOUNT NUGENT
Daly's Bridge (Droichead Uí Dálaigh) This little village is situated on the Meath Cavan border about 1/2 a mile from the shores of Lough Sheelin. The name Mt. Nugent came from an English settler; the name "Daly's Bridge" (Droichead Uí Dálaigh) from a bridge built across the river Inny beside the town by a Revd. Fr. Daly
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2020-04-01 23:33
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and it is proposed to explore them next Summer. Old people tell us there are ancient ornaments and weapons and perhaps gold entombed in the caves.
The hag's chair is to be seen and it is made of four slabs of stone weighing fifteen tons. The back of the chair is broken away now. On many stone slabs the ancient writing called "Ogham" is plainly visible. Other ancient stones are to be found on the hill-top mentioned, are Granite and quartz which are only found at Howth Head. This shows that they were brought to the Loughcrew hills.
In the Penal days we are told the Priests took refuge in these caves and Mass was celebrated near by. The stone altar is still to be seen. Many circles of stones are also beside the hills where the wild swine was fed long ago. It is quite easy to reach the summit of the hills as a new road has been
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2020-04-01 23:28
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honour. The Loughcrew hills are about seventy five high and from them on a clear day can be seen sixteen counties with the aid of a field-glass. The tops of the hills are not grassy as one might imagine but are covered with massive piles of stones. We are told that the "hag" collected these stones in her apron and dropped them on the hills already named. Every step she took was a quarter of a mile long and if she had taken the fourth step she would have burned the village of Oldcastle.
There are caves in each hill and an underground channel leading from one to the other and thence to Loughcrew house the property of Captain Napper. It is not possible to go further than ten feet inside as the walls have been built up leading to the inner chambers to keep sheep from going inside. During recent years the Antiquarian Society put fences around the hills
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87) Reala Bheagh
88) Sruth Ban
89) Sliabh
90) Slang
91) Sceathach Dubh
92) Sciatagh
93) Sraith
94) Sciath na nGaisghin
95) Sean-Teach
96) Sreath Tobhair
97) Scilldhrogh
98) Stuch
99) Siodhan
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2020-04-01 23:18
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75) Poll Bhuidhe
76) Poll Uisghe - Coronagh - Mr Berd. Conaty
77) Pairch Lios - Knocknagarton - Mr Thos. Tighe
78) Pattla
79) Padhogh
80) Poul a Pouchair
81) Poll ná Chisin
82) Pairch ná Reamhaire - Newcastle - Mr. Battersby

83) Pairch na bPlanndha - Knockaraheen - Mr. Matthew Tuite

84) Pairch Dúin
85) Pairch ná Choille
86) Reaothan (?)
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62) Mullac Ruadh - the name given to a stream coming from the red bogs - Crohan and Beherna

63) Páirc Piochail
64) Páirc Mór
65) Pairc na Rinní - Knocktemple Mr. Hugh Gilsenan
66) Pairc an t-Seipheil
67) Padhna Dreasa - Knocknagarton - Mr Peter Conaty
68) Pairch an Toirne - Newcastle - Mr Patrick O'Reilly
69) Para Buidhe - Coronagh - Mr John Conaty
70) Pairch ná gCloch - Knockagarton - Mr Peter Conaty
71) Pairch Para
72) Pairch Clocach - Newcastle - Mr John Smith

73) Pollashin - Bolies "Patrickswell" - Mr Patrick Sheridan

74) Poll Dub - Eighter (Lower) - Mr. Matthew McEnroe
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49) Gearrán Fonta - Beherna Mrs Thos. Fitzsimons
50) Gcarraigh Gruam - B
51) Greithimh
52) Gealaigh Dubh
53) Geathaí Arda - Upper Fennor - Mr. Thos. Glennon
54) Gearrán an Locha - Newcastle, Mr Peter Gilsenan

55) Gleann na Fraoiche - Carrick (Gallonfree) Mr Patrick McMahon

56) Garbh Caol - Carrick - Mr. Terence Conaty
57) Gobán Mór - Newcastle - Mr Berd. Cadden
58) Imeartha Dubh
59) Locan - Crohan - Mr Tere. Conaty
60) Luighe na Greasaidhe
61) Moinin - Crohan - Mrs Matthew Tuite
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38) Dunán - Newcastle - Mr Peter Gilsenan
39) Finn
40) Featagh
41) Figheator - Newcastle - Mr Nulty
42) Forran Finn - Crohan - Mr Terc.(?) Conaty
43) Gearrtaigh - Newcastle Mr Berd. Cadden
44) Gearr Ubhlaí

45) Gutáigh Dubh - Newcastle Co. Meath Mr James Donohoe

46) Gearróg
47) Gleann Mór - Cormaddyduff - Mr. Patk. Farrelly
48) Gob - Beherna - Mr Jack Keogan
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27) Corran Mor
28) Cnoc na Filibín - Knocktemple Mr Berd. McEnroe
29) Cnoc na mBán

30) Cnoc a Belsidhe - "Cruckawelshee" Lurganboy, Mr Michl Lynch
"Lookout" at Mass Rock

31) Currac
32) Carraig Mór
33) Cnoc-a-Caisil
34) Cnoc-na-Gostor
35) Carán Bán
36) Cnoc na Ginní
37) Cnoc a Bhalla - Knockaraheen - Mr. John Tuite
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14) Cnoc an Tobair - Crohan - Mr Terence Conaty
15) Cnochan Gorm Liath
16) Cnoc Dubh - Coronagh Mr. Berd. Conaty
17) Cor Cíoraín
18) Carraigin
19) Cnocan Ban - Coronagh - Mr Berd. Conaty

20) Cnoc Stigh - "Crucksthyee" Bog in Dotley(?) Mr Battersby

21) Cacanaigh - Newcastle - Mr Peter Gilsenan

22) Cor Carán - Knocknagarton - Mr Hugh Gilsenan

23) Currac Beataigh - Cormaddyduff - Mr. Chas. Brady

24) Cnoc na h-Ataí(?) - "Crucknahackie" Lurganboy - Mrs Edd. Fitzsimons

25) Creis - Newcastle - Mr. Michael McDonald
26) Cnoc Dic - Knocktemple - Mr. Berd. McEnroe
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2020-04-01 14:37
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1) Airt na Beilsigh
2) An Gearraigh Mór
3) An Sídeogh
4) An Corrog
5) Buailidhe Beag
6) Branog - Townland of Fennor - Owner Mr Larry Smith
7) Betlag
8) Bratlán
9) Bóitrín na Sip - In Newcastle Co Meath
10) Baile Mór - Knocktemple, Mr Berd.(?) McEnroe
11) Baa Ban - Knocknagarton, Mr. Peter Conaty
12) Barraí Arog
13) Brígóin Beag
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2020-04-01 14:29
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made through Summerbank to the townland of Newtown.
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2020-04-01 14:27
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The Loughcrew hills are situated two miles from the town of Oldcastle in the County of Meath. They are very ancient-looking and historical. There are three hills namely Cairin Bawn, Loughcrew and Patrickstown. These hills are often called Slieve na Cailligh or the Caileach Beara hills and are a quarater of a mile apart.
Long ago a hag lived there and the Tailtean games were played there and she was the Queen of the Tailteans. Several people of noble birth went there every year to join in these games. It is recorded that Ollamh Follamh was a constant visitor at the Loughcrew hills and when he died his body was cremated and the remains were buried there. King Laoghaire also lived there and a neighbouring townland was called Drumlaoghaire in his
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2020-04-01 14:15
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Places in Ireland have got their names from their natural characteristics or physical features, also from famous people who lived there (e.g. Ballyjamesduff = the town of Séamus Dubh) or from events which took place there ( e g. Glenaherin (Gleann an Aifrinn) in Cormaddyduff in the Parish of Castleraghan)

1) Cavan (Cabhán)
The word "Cabhán" means a hollow or low-lying spot - The name was first applied to the valley wherein the present town of Cavan is situated and afterwards it was applied to the whole county.

2) Parishes in the County of Cavan:-

a) MUNTERCONNAUGHT (Muinntir Chúconnacht)
This parish is situated in S.E. Cavan on the Meath border and in it this school is situated. In the 12th century Cúchonnacht Ó Reilly with his followers settled down in S.E. Breifne. His followers and decendents were called Muinntir Chúconnacht or the people of Cuconnaght and in this way Munterconnaught came.

B) CASTLERAGHAN (Caisleán an Ráithín)
This parish borders Munterconnaught. The name means
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-01 13:57
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"Ballyjamesduff means "Black James' Town". Bally signifies town, or building land, to distinguish solid ground from the surrounding bog. Duff means black. Ballyjamesduff is a market town in the County of Cavan, Province of Ulster, in Northern Ireland. The area of Ballyjamesduff in 1901 was twenty-eight acres and the population six hundred and fifty. There are in the village Catholic, Presbyterian and Methodist chapels. Two national schools, our convent school and a constabulary barracks. Fairs are held January 12 and February 4. The pig fairs are held on the day before the general fairs.
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2020-04-01 13:45
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34) Bundurgus
a big heavy person, generally applied to a big girl, as "Sh's a big "Bundurgus". Same meaning as "Bramach" which is used in Co. Wexford.

35) Bullabawsheen (Bullabaisín)
as the child was crying like "Bullabawsheen" = like one mentally deranged.

36) Bundun (Bundún)
a foolish fellow. An old tramp who resided between Bailieboro' and Killenkere was locally know as "Bun Dan". He lived about fifteen years ago, he was slightly mental.

37) Puck
to butt. Go away from the goat or she'll "Puck" you.
One boy may say to one who is teasing or annoying "I'll "Puck" you. One who "Pucks" another is called a "Pucker".

38) Clout
a blow - I'll give you a "Clout".

39) Cluff
a blow or a slap. "I'll give you a "Cluff" or He "Cluffed" him.

40) Cuff
to strike - as He "Cuffed" him.

41) Fuster (Fustar)
a rush. Don't be in such a "Fuster": Don't leave so soon, you're always in a great "Fluster".
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2020-04-01 10:51
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26) Khitah (Ciotach) left-handed. "He's a "Kithah" = he's left-handed. "Use the Khithah" = use the left hand.

27) Kesh (Cis) a path over a stream, usually made by placing branches of trees (thick bramble) across the stream and fixing them securely in position on either bank and covering them with thick sods. A "Kesh" is usually about 6 to 8 feet wide.

28) Kishogs (Ciseóg) Thick bulrushes or other other tall plants which grow in marshy or swampy places
"I found the cows among the "Kishogs".

29) Sphag (Spág) a flat foot (pl) Sphags.

30) Spawlpeen (Spáilpín) a worthless person
as "you little "Spawlpeen" (expresses contempt)

31) Súgán - a heavy overcoat

32) Klawn (Clann) family. "She came and brought the whole "Clann" with her".

33) Kishte (Ciste) fortune. "I'll leave you "the Kisthe" when I'm dying" meaning "I'll bequeath to you all I possess".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-01 10:34
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There is a monument at Raven's rock on the road, half way between Virginia and Cavan town. There was a man who ran after a pig and he fell dead. Everybody who passed that way threw a stone where he fell dead. And after that
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-01 10:31
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There is a place called "Croc Foladh" in a field of Mrs. Garrity in the townland of Ballaghanea. There is a treasure of gold hidden there. There was to be a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-01 10:27
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a man was digging a hole near the site of the church and he found bones in it. There was a hard bank each side of the hole. The stones belonging to the church were used to build a ditch. There are a few old people who remember seeing the old walls standing. When these old people asked their grandfather how old was the church he said it was over two hundred years old.
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2020-04-01 10:25
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The church was rectangular. There was an arch in the chamber extending from the North West gable to the transverse wall. The inner part is filled with debris so it is hard to know what height the church was. After the Reformation it was taken over for Protestant worship and was used until the present Church in Virginia was built in 1818. The reason why so much of the Lurgan Church walls are missing is because stones were carted from it to the present Protestant Church in Virginia.
Local tradition says that Lurgan Church was knocked by Cromwell's cannon off the hill of Gallanumbraher.
The names of many
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-01 10:20
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castle in Ballaghanea was Philip Brian O'Reilly who was attainted of treason by Queen Elizabeth about 1585. His lands were confiscated and in 1608 they were handed over to Captain Culme, first local landlord. Cavan was changed into Ulster by Sir John Perott to facilitate James I plantation.
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2020-04-01 10:17
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water and on the fourth side it was protected by a strong wall.
There was a winding passage under the water from the mainland over nearly to the Big Island. When the O'Reilly clan would be attacked they would go part of the way through the passage to the Big Island. Boats would be waiting at the end of the passage to take them over the rest of their way to the island. If the enemy tried to follow they would not know the path and they would plunge into the deep water and either be drowned or killed by the O'Reilly clansmen.
The last O'Reilly chieftain who lived in the
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2020-04-01 10:13
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O'Reillys' principal residence was on Lough Oughter. Other O'Reilly castles were at Mullagh and Virginia and Muintirconnnaught.
In the townland of
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2020-04-01 10:13
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Ballaghanea, in the barony of Castlerahan and in County Cavan on the shores of Lough Ramor and opposite the Big Island stood an O'Reilly castle. The reason all the castles belonged to the O'Reilly's is this. Cavan was Breifne O'Reilly and Leitrim, Breifne O'Rourke. O'Reilly was the chieftain of Cavan and he had castles all over. The chieftain who ruled there was Connachta O'Reilly. Muinntir-Connacht is called after him.
The rectangular track of the castle in Ballaghanea can still be seen a foot or two above the ground. It was built on a point of land jutting into the lake. It was protected on three sides by
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2020-04-01 10:07
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Long ago there was a church near the top of Murmod HIll. It has completely disappeared. A few years ago
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2020-04-01 10:06
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of the clan-families of Lurgan can be read on the weather-worn tombstones. On one of these tombstones the name of Most Reverend Doctor Daniel O'Reilly, bishop of Clogher from 1747 to 1778 can be read.

A branch of Colmcille's monks from his monastery in Kells established a monastery in Gallanumbraher. The proof of this is that Gallan means land belonging to the church and Braher means brother.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-04-01 09:50
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1) When we see blue blazes in the fire we may be sure of wind and snow.

2) When the wind comes from Crossakiel we may be sure of rain.

3) When the cat scrapes wood and when she lies with her back to the fire it is a sign of rain.

4) When the trout rise out of the river it is a sign of rain.
5) When soot falls down the chimney it is a sign of rain.

6) If the sun is very weak in the morning or if it rises early it is a sign of a wet day.

7) There is a mountain down about Ballyjamesduff and it is called Sliabh Renach and the old people say if it is shrouded in a mist it is a sure sign of rain.

8) If the Wicklow Mountains can be seen clearly it is a sign of rain.

9) Another sign of rain is to hear far away bells.
10) A mist on the hills in Summer is the sign of great heat.

11) If it is going to be a wet season the swan builds her nest up high, and if it is going to be dry she
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2020-04-01 09:50
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will build it down low.
12) The day before wind every crow leaves the crowy island and comes inland for shelter.

13) When there is going to be a storm the cat washes his face and it is said the first person he looks at when he is finished is the first person in the house will die.

14) On a bright night when the sky is covered with bright stars it is a sure sign of frost.

15 When a bird is flying high it is a sign of good weather, but when he is flying low it is a sign of bad weather.

16) It is a sure sign of rain to see the sheep eating hay.

17) The worms go down deep in the ground when we are going to have rain.

18) If the seagulls and other birds come inland it is the sign of storm.

19) When there is a lot of midges round the cattle it is the sign of rain.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 23:55
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March and April are the great months for bird migration and one of our earliest arrivals is the handsome wheatear.
In Spring and Summer the male is blue-grey above; in Autumn it is reddish brown. The feet and legs, part of the tail, wings, beak and a strip through the eye are black and the underparts are white. The female is ash brown above while all the under (parts) colours are less bright.
Like all the members of the thrush family to which it belongs the wheatear has a fine upright carriage and extreme grace of movement. It generally runs rather than hops and when at rest repeatedly flicks the tail.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 23:49
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The blowing of the Christmas horn is indulged in, in this part of the country. It starts about the beginning of December and continues until Christmas.
The horn is made in the following way. A five naggin bottle is procured. Some water is put in the bottom of the bottle. Some bread soda is dropped in to bottle which is then securely corked. It is then placed on a red coal and in a few moments the bottom falls out of the bottle. At night the horn is brought outside by some person who blows with all his might. The horn produces a sound which can be heard for miles around.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 23:40
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There are not very many poets at the present day. There was a family of poets in the O'Dalys. The way they got to be poets is from their learned ancestors. They slept in a field in the Summer and dreamt about writing poetry. The name of the poem he wrote is called "The Land Far Away".

James Daly,
Rahardrum

Terry Dunne
Ath-na-Druim
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 23:34
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There was an old mud lane long ago where Lislea lane is now. The old people used to call it the "Bóirín". There was a river going across the lane and there was a "Ciseach" it for the people to go across. The horses and carts would have to cross in the water. There was a bridge built across it about ten years ago.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 23:26
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The name of the district I live in is Virginia, the parish of Lurgan and the Barony of Castleraghan. The number of families in the town is seventy-five. There is up to 352 people in the town. The most common name in the district is Kellett. Micky Reilly is the oldest man in the town. He can talk some Irish. The houses in Virginia and for upwards of a mile outside the town all the houses are slated. There wasn't as many houses in the town long ago as there is now. A lot of people emigrated from this town and locality to America and England in former times. The land around this area is fairly level and rank.
There is not much boggy land in this district. In one or two places in the townland there is a lot of wood. There is only one lake and a few rivers in this townland.
The origin of this town dates back to the Plantation of James I. Captain Ridgeway received a grant of 1,000 acres around Lough Ramor. Two hundred and fifty acres of this was assigned to Captain Culme with orders to build a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 23:26
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town on the shore of Lough Ramor. A town was needed so that the planters should have the necessaries of life.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 23:16
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The townland I live in is Burreen in the Parish of Lurgan and in the Barony of Castleraghen. There are ten families in the townland and about sixty people. All the houses are thatched. There are three people over seventy in it. Miss Cullen, Burreen, Virginia can talk Irish. Houses were more numerous in this townland long ago.
One part of the townland is called Burreencaragh because it is very stony. The other part is called Burreenrea because it is red from the sun. It is always shining on it. There is a river flowing through the townland called the Burreen River. Lough Ramor Lake is bordering the edge of the townland.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 22:00
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They used play picky long ago. They used put a line of stones after on another and hop around them. They used play thaws and buttons. The way they used play thaws , they used stand a reel on the floor and leave go the thaw at the reel and if they would knock it, it would be game. The way they used play button, they used get a button and go around to every one with the button and leave the button fall into someones hand and then ask what hand was the button in and the once that would be wrong would get a slap. and then one that would be right would go around with the button again.
They used play another game. They used get a stick and burn it in the fire and when it would be red take it out and spit on it and the one that would quench it, the rest would say Cuirfidh an trom trom ort and they would put the chairs and stools on the top of his back.
They used play Buidhe. They used stand a stick in the middle of the field and they used get a stick and try to knock it and the one that would knock it would back away
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 21:40
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The three borrowed days are the first, second and third days of April. There was an old cow long ago and when March was out she let three leaps because she lived during the month of March. Then
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 21:40
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March borrowed three days from April and with the cold of them the old cow died.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 21:35
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There is a hill in a field of Thomas Mullen's in the townland of Ballaghanea called the "Cnoc Ruadh". There were monks on an island called "Tighe's Island" on Lough Ramor lake. A band of robbers came and robbed them. When the robbers were going home they fell out over the money and began fighting and they spilled others blood. There never grew grass there since and the ground is red. The monks left the blame on the people of Maghera and they left their seven curses on them. They also said that there would be widows and orphans in Maghera and what they would gain one year they would lose it the next year.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 21:29
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There was a National School in Murmod about ninety years ago. The subjects taught in it were writing, reading and arithmetic. All the subjects were taught through English. One of the Farrelly's of Raffoney was the teacher. Charlie Maguire repaired it and made a dwelling house out of it.
If a pupil spoke a word of Irish he was put on another boy's back and the trousers taken off him and beaten with strip of leather called the "thaws". People of all kinds of religion attended this school. This school was known as the "Kildare Hibernian Society".
The reason why this school is not existing is because Lord Farnham came down from Dublin and gave the poor, bacon for nothing. They turned
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 21:29
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over to Lord Farnham's religion and ceased to send their children to Murmod school. The Farrelly's stuck to the school and they were called "Ram-eaters" ever after that.
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2020-03-31 21:28
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to eat. They were always called the "Ram Eaters" after and every where they showed their faces at Land League meeetings etc, it was always thrown at them.
About twenty years after the Famine times got bad again. The potatoes failed but they were not depending altogether on them, however they failed three years after each other and people were rendered very poor as all they had spared was gone buying food. The potatoes grew so badly that a man and his son would be digging all day and a duck would swallow all they would have dug. Another man said they were so bad you could put eleven of them in your mouth together and talk to the Lord Lieuntnant after.
To add to their misfortunes the landlords kept pressing the rent and evictions were taking place every day. The parish committees set up under the parish priest and funds were collected and relief was sent out to the deserving . Some schools also were set up, one was John Shea’s house Erinagh another was near Blackwater cross; however people didn’t send their children to be fed to them as they were proselytisers.
The Land League sent up after a time and all the people massed together to fight for their holdings and stop evictions. Where people would
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 21:25
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This was to be a great test for the Catholic cause. Some of the Landlords had threatened their tenants with eviction if they went to vote for O Connell. Arthur forbid his tenants to leave their homes for to vote or out they would go. Fr. Bourke of Broadford went to each one of them and they refused, however three promised to go. He said unless they felt they were needed he wouldn't send for them as they were poor men with large families and they would surely be evicted. The long car came for them the last day of the election and Paud Moroney, Springmount, Michael Hayes, the Wood and Tom Dinneen, Ballyda were the three faithful stalwarts of all Arthur's tenants that recorded their votes for the great Dan in Ennis. Tom Dinneen was working in the bog when the car came and he went just as he was in his flannel waistcoat and no stockings as he didn't spare the time to go home for them. There orders were to hurry and not spare the horses. One of the horses fell in Spancilhill and they made the journey with the other two. It was a huge victory and there were no evictions. Arthur gave a great feast to all his tenants that didn't go to vote and they got a roasted ham.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 21:09
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In Ballaghanea there was a house in which all the neighbours went to night-school. There they learned to read and write in "Irish". Charles Degnan was the owner of this house. The man who taught there was Thomas Sheridan or he is better known as Peety Sheridan.
This night when all were present for the usual instruction a great wind arose. It struck the house with such force that it began creaking. All escaped from the house except an old woman who lived there. The school-master's son apparently the bravest of the company went back to rescue her. No sooner were they out than the house collapsed. He lived in the district named Barrackstreet in Ballaghanea. He was carrying her home on his back when she said to him
"Peety a ghearríd Mhúirnín tá pluchán orm"
and he answered her in Irish saying
"It's not for the want of wind".
This happened on the night of the "big wind" in 1839. That same night a haggard of corn owned by Pat Cullen of Murmod was blown five or six hundred yards away.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 20:51
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Parnell was an Irish leader. He got Indian meal, and had it divided among the poor people. This is called Parnell's meal.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 20:50
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MARY GLENNAN
There was a well known old woman in this district named Mary Glennan. She died about forty years ago. She was the oldest woman in the district. She told some terrible tales about the
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2020-03-31 20:50
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famine. She pointed out a lane, in which nine men were lying dead, and amongst them her own husband. Owing to the terrible state of the country she had to wheel him a mile to Lurgan, and bury him herself, because there was no people to be got to bury him.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 18:48
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In Anglesboro' the Great House is known as Massy Lodge. It was bought by John Hanley R.I.P. in 1913 from the Honourable Hugh Massy. In April 1934 John Hanley dropped dead suddenly at the Church door in Anglesboro' as they were about to take out his sister's corpse, Mrs Kent, who was being buried that day. At the present moment Nov. 1937 the place is in dispute.
A man called Keane in California is proving a will made by John Hanley, when he was in America and met with an accident, leaving Keane his possessions.
In the year 1776 the Massys built the present Massy Lodge as a shooting lodge.
In 1780 the 3rd Baron Massy decided to come to live at Massy Lodge, Anglesboro, Co. Limerick, Coshlea (Cois Shléibhe) as he considered the Duntryleague House too noisy due to all the visitors at his place for the Sunday service. Captain Massy who built the Church in Duntryleague was buried under the floor of the Church.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 18:42
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Co. Limerick, barony of Coshlea. He was paying a small rent to the Major Crone family. At this time the Lynch family (family of the late General Liam Lynch I.R.A. (Beannacht Dé leis), the Roche family and the Lowe family had 7 years lease of the land in Barnagurraha.
On the 12th Nov. 1852 old James Lynch was shot by his tenants at William Casey's gate Barnaguraha, Anglesboro, as he had threatened to evict them. It appears he was on his way from his own place to visit his daughter who was married where John Regan Quane now lives in Barnagurraha and Lynch lived where Paddy Spider Mullins now lives in Barnagurraha and where General Liam Lynch was born and reared.
Lowe now became landlord of Barnagurraha, Boulanlisheen and Inchacoumb and the Lynches were now Lowe's tenants.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 18:36
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Pattern Day is August 3rd. Anyway Lowe went into a farmers house there, threw down his bag on the floor, struck his stick on the doorflag and shouted “Gather up. Gather up”.
The servant girl came out and said
“We’ve no rags today but I’ll give you some old wedges that the boys dug up in the bog the other day”.
He took home three or four of the wedges with him and found they were wedges of gold. He went back again the next day and got the rest of them. He sold them to a gold-smith in Dublin.
He now purchased several big places, one near Bruff and also Fairy Field House near Kilmallock Co. Limerick and near the present Mount Coote. He also bought two posts in the British Army for his two sons.
Lowe became the middle man in the three townslands of Barnaguraha, Inchacoumb and Boulinlisheen near Anglesboro (Gleann-na-gCreabhar)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 18:26
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help of his men and the tenants of his estate.
The order was then taken over from the O'Callaghan man by the 2nd Baron Massy who dispossessed Croft.
A son of this 2nd Baron Massy and one of his servants went to look at the place. They were standing on a big double ditch behind Stag Dale House when Croft saw him and fired at him but he missed Massy and killed the servant.
The Massys made several attempts to put out Croft but he always managed to beat them off. At length Massy succeeded in gaining possession by a trick. He marched to Stag Dale with a body of men from Duntryleague and the surrounding districts. Some of the men made an attack on the front of the Great House while the others went ahide around the back.

Croft and his followers and servants
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2020-03-31 18:25
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made a rush out at the lads who were attacking in front and never thought of minding the back. The men at the back then slipped in by the front and that's how Massy got Croft out of Stag Dale House.
On the 10th March 1814 Captain Massy's son-in-law, Buchanan, who lived in Tipperary town was visiting his father in law's house, Stag Dale. Buchanan and Captain Massy went into the Armoury to examiner some flint pistols that Captain Massy was very proud of. One of the flint pistols that Buchanan was looking at went off suddenly and Captain Massy was shot dead. He was succeeded by his brother William Massy.
In the year 1815 the Massy family built Riversdale house, almost directly opposite Stag Dale House, and now in the possession of John Noonan Esq., who bought if from the Massy Dawsons in the year 1922.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 18:23
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Croft as I said before owneed all the land from Athnaslinga stream, Anglesboro, in the Co. Limerick and the barony of Cois Sléibhe (Coshlea) to the Glen of Aherlow in the Co. Tipperary. The Massys now got possession of this land as well.
Croft had a steward from the North of Ireland named Handcock and he also left when Croft went. They had a herd also called Lowe and he came to live in Galbally, Co. Limerick, where he got a house from the Samsons ancestors of the present Samsons of Carrickaroche in the Galbally Parish Co. Limerick, Coshlea.
One of the Samson family, Lieutenant Samson, was killed inside the Church of Galbally which stood in the Catholic Graveyard and the remains of which are still to be seen there. It appears he had concealed himself behind the high altar after the retreat from Aughrim and the game was given away to the soldiers.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 18:17
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In 1810 the Massy family bought the Hermitage, Castleconnell, on the banks of the Shannon.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 18:16
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The branch of the Massy family who lived at Riversdale House, Lisvernane, Aherlow, Tipperary until about 1922 were known locally as the Massy-Dawsons.
Colonel Dawson lived over at Ballinacourty House, Aherlow, Tipperary. The heiress to Colonel Dawson's estate of Ballinacourty was his daughter. She became attached to one of the Massys who lived at Dundryleague (Dún Trí Liag) House, Galbally, Co. Limerick.
A Yoeman came to the then P.P. of Galbally to marry the pair but he refused. The soldiers then forced the curate to do so and he married them during the night on the bank of the Aherlow River. Opposite the village
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 18:11
ceadaithe
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of Galbally.
In 1823 my ancestors (William Casey, Barnagurraha, Anglesboro, Co. Limerick, Coshlea) were evicted from the Kingston Estate Mitchelstown called locally the Demesne, at the time of the building of the Demesne wall. Their field was beside where the Gamekeepers house was.
My Great Grandfather lived at Bárr-na-Nóinín,
They had buried two or three of their children. They always kept two or three coolers of milk in the house. One bright moonlight night they saw the children, all dressed in white, coming in through the window with mugs in their hands and going over to the coolers and drinking some of the milk.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 18:01
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service held there now.
A man called Croft at this time owned all the land from Anglesboro, then called Gleann na gCreabhar, to Aherlow in the Co. Tipperary, that is a distance of five or six miles.
Croft built a Great House in Aherlow Co. Tipperary beside the present village of Lisvernane at the southern entrance to the famous Glen. The remains of this house, called Stag Dale, may be seen almost directly opposite Riversdale House gates to the present day.
To build Stag Dale Croft borrowed the money from O'Callaghan's of Shanbally, near Clogheen, Co. Tipperary, ancestors of the Viscount of Lismore. He was unable to pay back the loan and an order was obtained by O'Callaghan against the place. The O'Callaghans were unable to execute the order and they gave it over to a solicitor in Clonmel. When they came to execute the order again they were pursued by Croft with the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 17:59
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
in 1641 General Hugh Massy was employed by the English Government to suppress the rebellion of 1641. He came up with the Earl of Mountrath Light Infantry and at this time there were some heavy arrears of pay due to him from the British Government.
He got a forfeit estate as payment in Duntryleague (Dún Trí Liag) Galbally Co. Limerick in the year 1659. There had been a great house there for some hundreds of years. Later they usually had a lot of visitors at Massy's place in Duntryleague and for their convenience one of the Massy family built a church beside the Great House and its still to be seen there but of course there is no
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 17:56
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
National School opened on the 5th July 1869. Pat Fitzgerald stayed in the pupils homes.
School began about 9 o'clock and ended about 3.30. There was an hours break or so at noon when the scholars who lived near the school went home to their dinner.

There was another Hedge-School in the same spot before and was taught by a man called Broderick who came from the Midleton Co. Cork direction. Broderick was a bit of a rake who had run away from his people. He was a very educated man and used to lodge in the farmers' houses around. He did not teach Irish as the people did not like it and were opposed to our National Language. One time he ran away from the school but he returned again later.
Broderick stayed at O'Donnells place in Inchacombe, Anglesboro' Co. Limk. now occupied by Ned Dunne. This family were known as the "Stirabout O'Donnells". Tom O'Donnell
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 17:45
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road is situated about two miles to the east of the Village of Galbally.

Mícheál Ó Foghludha
from his mother
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 17:44
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over the mountain. He saw the huge pig approaching. He got ready his two hunting speaks. He hurled one of them at the furious animal but missed. He hurled the second spear and he killed her.

There is a hill on the northern side of the Glen of Aherlow called Corn which means the pile. There is a huge pile of rocks on top of the hill.

There is a townland called Ballinamona about two miles to the west of Galbally. It is called Ballinamona because there is a turf-bog there.
There is a field down in Lizard called the moate field because there is a big moate in it.
Ardnamoher which means the height of the
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 17:40
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There is a field on Mr Hedigan's land (Galbally, called Inish Caman). Long ago there used to be a lot of hurling played there and that is how it got its name.

The townland of Lizzard which means Lios Árd got its name from a very high mote that is there. The mote is situated on Mr O'Brien's land.

The townland of Ballycrana (which means the town of the sow) is in the County of Tipperary about two miles from the village of Galbally. Long ago there lived on the top of Sliab na Muc a huge sow. She killed so many people that people would not venture near the mountain. One day Finn Mac Cool was passing
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 17:29
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Mr Quirke of More Abbey has a field called the Stay Field because people often go astray there by night.

Mícheál Mac Flanncadha
ó'n a athair
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 17:28
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Keylogues means the young woods. It is called Keylogues because long ago there were a lot of young woods there.

Mr Ml. Noonan has a field called the Boot Field because it is shaped like a boot.

Mr Tim Ryan (More Abbey) has a field called the Cnocán because it is very hilly. He has another field called the Free Field because there is a tree growing in the middle of it.

We have a field called the Well Field because there is a well in it. We have another field called the Rushy Field because there are rushes growing in it.

Mr Stanton of Keylogues has a field called the Moate Field because there is a moate in it
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 13:53
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Particular names are given to fields, rocks, bushes, etc in every farm.
These names may be derived from the name of the former owners, or from some natural characteristic.
Our field called the "Inis" (inch) because surrounded by water.
The "Cluain" field
The Quarry
The Hill field
The Granary field etc.

"Ínse Comáin"
Hedigan's field near village - Fairies seen hurling there several times.

Cloca t-Eibheára" - granite rock in field

"Two-trees"
two men were hanged on two trees in the field

The Lis Field - contains a Lis
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 13:42
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Cloghera stream, Rossadrehid stream, Ardane stream, Kennedy's stream, flow from the mountain down to the river Aherlow.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 13:41
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I live in the townland of Curraghvoke, in the parish of Bansha and in the Barony of Clanwilliam. There are seven families in the townland and twenty four people altogether.
There are two iron covered houses and five slated ones.
Thomas Kennedy is the only person over seventy years living there. The houses were more plentiful there during the famine times. There are no ruins of old houses in the townland.
The townland of Curraghvoke is on the south side of the river Aherlow.
There are four lakes on the mountain. They are Lough Muskry, Borheen, Diheen and Curra.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 13:31
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In the Valleys at the foot of the Galtees were settled at a remote period the non-Milesian tribes of the Crottraigh and the Eatharlaigh. From the first-named originated Crotta Cliach, the ancient name of the Galtees, while the Eatharliagh bestowed their tribal appellation on the Glen of Aherlow.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 13:23
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are some very good singers in the parish of Bansha, among whom Rena Grogan is well known. Her favourite songs are "Mary of Argyle", and "The Arabs farewell to his Stud".
Doreen Hogan of Tipperary is also a talented singer. She broadcasts her songs some of which are "She is far from the Land" "The Kerry dances" and "Mother Machree".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 13:19
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2. The Wells of Duleek St Cianáns Well.
There is an ancient well at Keenogue, Duleek, called St. Cianáns well and this is how the well got that name. There was a boy one time called Cianán working in Keenogue. The job he had was keeping the birds out of the wheat. This time his mother was living in a little house in Keenogue, and she was very sick. They had a wake in the house, and she wanted a drink. When Cianan came in for his dinner she told him she wanted a drink. At that time he had a little bit of a stick in his hand, and he put it in the ground, and the well sprang up, and when his mother saw that she told all the people that her son Cianán made a well in the room by her side, they all looked surprised and would not believe him.
The Sunday after that, the Walsh's were going to mass and they left Cianán behind them to mind the wheat. And they told him not to go to mass. Then he began to gather the crows and he put then in the barn. Then he went to Mass.
When Mass was over the Walsh's saw Cianán and began to fight with him for leaving the wheat unminded. Then he told them he put them into the barn. When they went home they opened the barn door and out came all the crows. They knew that he was a saint and they called the well St. Cianán's well. It is 6 feet deep. There is no wall round the well.
Séan O'Concubair ó n-a shean athair Risteárd (76)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 13:10
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March or early April. By this time the frost [?] had broken it down, and left it very easy to be forked even with a digging fork. This operation lifted all the weeds and roots so that they could now be picked off by hand and burned. The next operation was raising drills. This was done with a long-handled shovel in preparation for potatoes. Liberal dressing of Faringans manure was then applied, the potatoes dropped, and every second drill closed in. The ground was left in this state for a few days. It then got a dressing of slaked lime and all the drills finally closed in. The ground was then kept free from weed until the potatoes were moulded up. The potato crop was harvested in the month of Sept. The ground was again forked over, and cleared of stalks and litter.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 13:09
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The first thing was to consider the variety. There were not many varieties to select from in those days. It was found of course that raspberries change when planted for a number of years. This change takes place by what we call today "roguing" what is meant by this is: when the berry in some cases, are ripe they shed their fruit to the ground. The seed of the fruit take root, and forms in new
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 01:06
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with it.
There is a place in the river Aherlow near Castle Mary called "The Soldier's Hole". It got its name because of a soldier who got drowned there some thirty years ago.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 01:05
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There is a place in the mountain overlooking Rossadrehid, known as "Sturric". It gets its name from the rocks rising abruptly breaking the slope of the hill and there is also a place in the Galtee mountains, "Drum Luck". It is a round bare hill at the back of one of the Galtee lakes. There is another place called "Coole Laura", It gets its name from its situation between the two lakes. Another place called "Tukereen" gets its name from the heaps of stones which are said to be the remains of old houses which were once there.
In this locality there is a field called, "The Kyel Field". It gets its name from the remains of an old church which stood there, and there is also an old graveyard connected
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 00:47
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I read the following interesting inscription on an old tombstone in Clonbeg graveyard.

"Though boisterous winds and Neptune's waves
Hath tossed me to and fro,
Yet by the order of God's decree
I harbour here below,
Where now I ride at anchor's deep
With many of the Fleet
Waiting one day for to set sail
Our Admiral Chief to greet"

Though I tried I could not find out date or name.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 00:39
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Foyle (Poll - a hole)
a place in Toureen on the banks of Clydagh Glen full of holes, near it being (Poll an Easa) the hole of the waterfall.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 00:37
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Aherlow:-
gets its name from a tribe known as, "The Eatarlaigh" that settled at the foot of the Galtees very long ago.

Lisvernane (Liosbhearmáin)
gets its name from a remarkable Lios between Fahey's and Hennessey's farms quite close to this school. This Lios is exactly facing "Barna" (Bhearna) a gap in the Galtees from which most of the wind and rain comes to the Glen.

Glencushabinna:_
a town land at the foot of the Galtees right under the peak known as "Cush".

Lyre (Ladhar)
a townland here where a number of Glens in appearance like a fork flow on to join Aherlow river.

Dromleigh:-
a townland forming a ridge or shoulder on the Galtees under the peak "Chnochán"

Longford:-
a townland near Dungrud where probably the O'Briens had in olden days a strong fortress.

Monaboula:-
a townland here getting its name from "Móin a Bhuaile" - milking bawn.

Ballycrehane (Baile Críochán)
near the school - the townland of small potatoes.

Ballinacourtie:-
the townland of the court (Dawson's Castle or Mansion)

Clonbeg (Cluan Beag)
local graveyard - means little meadow.

Tooreen:-
near Clonbeg on a height, meaning the little bleach green.

Coach Road (Bóthar Cóiste)
the old coach road from Clonmel to Tipperary passed here - where inn stood still to be seen.

Carn:-
a remarkable pile of rocks on the Sliab na Much hills.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 00:16
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Moore Esq. owner of Ashgrove Ho. was married to a Miss Connery, daughter of one Clem Connery, hedge-schoolmaster at Ashgrove Green. This Miss Connery was very beautiful and a sort of rural Venus, but far beneath Moore in social status. Moore had travelled much and tasted of most of the joys of life and wealth and could have married within his own social circle, but decided to ask the hedge-schoolmaster for his daughter's hand in marriage. Connery was slow to give his assent reminding Moore of his wayward past and expressing a doubt as to his fidelity to his daughter.
Moore asked if he might have a word with the young lady and Connery agreed. During the interview Miss Connery referred Moore to his past life, and said that if he promised to be faithful to her she was willing to become his wife because she believed "A
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-31 00:16
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Moore never broke his word".
Connery consented and Moore was as good as his word.

Darby Ryan, the poet of Ashgrove wrote a poem eulogizing Miss Eliza Moore daughter of Moore of Ashgrove House in which he referred to her as "the celebrated beauty of Bansha".
There were three sisters of the Connery's. One, as stated, was married to Moore Esq.; another was married to Thomas Burke Booleen grand-father of the present Tom Burke (1938) and another is said to have been married to a man named Quirke.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 17:15
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telling about the amount borrowed from him by "Father" Ashe and its repayment in full.
The Castle was never completed and the portion erected was never inhabited.
By a strange error of judgement the site chose for the Castle was a sand-cliff some 40 feet high. Being exposed to the prevailing S.W. gale the building began to crumble in a very short time, and all that now remains to mark the spot is a heap of fallen masonry.
In a secluded spot in the chapel yard of Bansha Trevor Lloyd Ashe is buried. The inscription on his tomb is as follows:-
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 17:11
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In the townsland of Clashoquirke, Bansha, on an eminence overlooking the River Aherlow are the remains of Castle Mary. It was built by Trevor Lloyd Ashe about 1820 or later, and dedicated to the Blessed Virgin. The story is told that "Father" Ashe as he was called, was given a hint by the masons working on the building that it would be advisable to mix some whiskey or "poteen" through the mortar and so render the Castle everlasting.
"Father" Ashe acted on the suggestion and provided the necessary quantity of whiskey which needless to remark, was used to appease the thirst of the workers rather than that of the mortar. To provide funds for the building expenses "Father" Ashe supplemented his own means by borrowing money from the local farmers which he honourably repaid.
Evidence of this was given me by Mrs. Margaret Grogan, Montanavoe, (76) who remembers her father-in-law
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 17:02
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Rathclogheen:- (Rath-Cloichín)
A towns-land on the Golden-Bansha road about a 1/4 mile from Thomastown Cross. Supposed to have got its name from a large fort in Fitzgerald's farm. Most of the land is covered with small stones like paving stones.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 17:02
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(Rath-Cloichín)
A towns-land on the Golden-Bansha road about a 1/4 mile from Thomastown Cross. Supposed to have got its name from a large fort in Fitzgerald's farm. Most of the land is covered with small stones like paving stones.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 16:58
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more robust than ever, and rousing National Ballad after ballad flowed from his prolific pen.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 16:57
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either to read or take a loan and as he was an omnivorous reader very few important contemporary works were unknown to him. The fruits of this gleaning is quite evident especially in those of his mature years.
At the suggestion of Father Matthew, a personal friend of the family, and a keen admirer of the poet, Darby was sent to a French Seminary but his studies there were interrupted by the unexpected demise of an elder brother and whose place on the farm, he was recalled to fill.
And so was the Poet deflected from his projected spiritual career and cast back into the welter of worldly affairs and Irish political agitation. Naturally the family bereavment occasioned a lull in Darby's poetic activities but in due course the pent stream, in response to the call of the times, burst forth anew, stronger and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 16:52
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Diarmiad O'Riain or Darby as he was usually styled was born about 1770 at Ashgrove 3 miles S.W. of the picturesque village of Bansha at the eastern end of the famous Glen of Aherlow.
Darby was the younger son of a well-to-do farmer but it would seem that wooing the "Muse" appealed more potently to him than the prosaic paternal avocation. Darby's early education was of the usual contemporary "Hedge School" "Sub Rosa" type but so insatiable was his thirst for knowledge that distance presented no difficulty when it was a matter of securing or exchanging a desired work.
To the spacious libraries of Bansha Castle and Father Matthew of Thomastown he was always heartily welcome
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 16:45
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The Bridge over the River Suir at Cahir, Co. Tipperary was being completed and this day was being tested as to its capacity to take heavy loads etc.
Amongst those looking on was the local R.I.C. sargeant - Sg. Patrick Shine. Shine was a man with a very ruddy complexion and a rather big red nose. He was commenting on the perfection and magnitude of the work and said in a voice that all present could hear:-
"Men and money can accomplish anything".
Darby who was standing close by, spoke up and said:-
"All the men and money from the Suir to the Rhine
Couldn't change the nose on Sargeant Shine".
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 16:39
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Go tell Stephen Maher, Cole Bake and George.
To have their horses well shod at the forge,
Till we chase this old "CUCKOLD"
Right out of Ashgrove
And we'll raise a loud shout upon Darby.

* * *

Darby had a peculiar taste in shoes. The following was the order he gave to the local shoemaker, Jimmy Clifford, who lived below Bansha where Jacky Farrell now lives (1938)
Make them nice and tight and straight
For right and left you know I hate.

* * *

The Poet was very friendly with Fr. Matthew, of Temperance Fame and often visited Thomastown Castle where the well-stocked library of the famous Sagart was at his disposal.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 16:34
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Diarmaid O'Riain or "Darby" as he was known locally was born at Ashgrove, Bansha, Co. Tipperary about 1770.
Darby composed both in Gaelic and English and when any event of local or national importance took place Darby was called on to immortalize it in verse.
Examples of the Poet's work are to be found in the following pages.

Mrs Margaret Grogan (Aged 76) Foxfort, Bansha told me the following items re Darby.
"There was a poet named Cummins who lived in Rehill near Cahire, Co. Tipperary and who was by no means very friendly with Darby. Whether he was jealous of Darby's fame as a poet or not I don't know but anyway he sent the following verse to a friend of his in Bansha. Two of the men referred to in the message were landlords in the district of Bansha - The Bakers.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 15:18
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Well stocked with game and fat-lowing droves.

(VII)
He has a tender indulgent agent,
Who will not crush or oppress the poor,
The tenants property he will not seize on,
Till they can with ease the rent procure,
They're not tormented by prowling bailiffs,
Or best depraved pretty foreign tools,
The mean descendents of vulgar parents,
Matured and reared in corrupt schools.

(VIII)
These lines are void of exaggeration
To fulsome praises I ne'er was prone,
I hate gross, vulgar adulation
I did not kiss the smooth Blarney Stone.
I've travelled, roved all o'er this Irish Nation,
In all it's bearings from shore to shore,
And to New Forest I saw none to equal
Brave Dawson's Seat and I'll say no more.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 15:13
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It is not squandared at hagard tables
Where dissipated loose "rakes" resort,
Or spent or lavished at balls or races
In any wanton luxurious sport.

(V)
His pleasure-ground is a second Eden,
Where grapes and peaches in heaps are strown,
The sweet perfume of Arabis's phoenix
Is here by genial mild zephrs blown.
There's not a flower in sweet Samaria,
Or in the Torrid or Temperate Zone,
Without transplaning they grow spontaneous,
In this Elysium which can be shown.

(VI)
The Ash, the Elm, Pine, Birch and Cedar
The Maple, Beach, the Spruce and Oak,
That with the Deluge appear co-eval
And still disdains the proud fallers stroke
Are here in forest and wide plantation
Delightful shades and cool verdant groves,
That raise their heights to the starry Eastern
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 15:08
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And for their country 'gainst all invaders,
Like valiant heroes oft drew the sword.

(III)
This worthy man's a true Milesian
As all profound antiquarians know
The genealogy of Dr. Keating
Gives to his name the righ Irish "O"
His brave ancestors in hot engagements,
The fierce Norwegians did overthrow,
And to their sovereign they bore allegiance,
Against each daring usurping foe.

(IV)
His ample fortune, among his neighbours,
Like a quick stream in profusion flows,
He gives employment to needy creatures
And means to purchase both food and clothes.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 15:03
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(I)
Hibernia's tourists of every station
To foreign nations who idly roam
For your improvement and recreation,
You have inducement to stay at home.
If you would visit these distant places,
Expense and dangers you'd undergo,
For all that's beauteous by art or nature
Are in the valley of Aherlow.

(II)
A splendid court was erected lately,
In this fine vale I've named before,
By a bright gentleman of high attainments,
Whose sires were famous in days of yore,
They in the Senate-house were brilliant statesmen
Sublime and saged at Council-board.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 14:58
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Shrove Tuesday;- Pancake night.
1; Blowing horns at old Bachelors
2; Rings in the Pancake and whoever gets ring is supposed to be married soon after.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 14:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Cun eitinn do laigheas beirbhigh duilleóga an chaisearbháin, nuair atá siad beirbhighthe sgág iad agus annsin beir an t-uisghe a gheibhtear uatha do'n duine le h-ól. Fuaireas an laigheas seo ó sean duine 80 bl. d'aois.

Cun cnead do laigheas fáigh madadh seanmaighdene agus bíodh air í a lighe. Fuaireas an laigheas seo ó m'áintín, 54 bl. d'aois.

Ainm agus seoladh an céad duine:-
Mrs Myles
Watergate St.
Navan
Ainm agus seoladh an dara duine:-
Miss Brigid Duignan,
Cannon Row,
Navan

Ainm agus seoladh and duine do scríobh:-
Ríta Ní Bhrádaigh,
67 Árdán Emmet,
An Uaimh.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 14:47
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
1) Leigheas fá choinne Sleamhnan.
Dá mbeadh sleamhnan ar shuil duine rachfad sé go dtí 'n crann spionóige agus beirfad sé leis naoi gcinn de's na dealgan ó'n chrann. Nuair a thiocfadh sé na baile cuireadh a mhathair gach ceann aca suas go dtí na shúil. Annsin cuirfad sé na dealgáin síos faoi cloch agus nuair a bheadh siad lobhtha beadh a sleamhnan imthighthe.

Fuair mé an ceann seo ó:-

Nóra Ní Chearraigh,
Baile-Gib,
An Uaimh,
Co-na-Midhe
Aois = 36 bliadhain

Ainm agus seoladh an duine dó sgriobh:-
Eibhlín Ní Chearraigh,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 14:42
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Tá luibh san talamh agus an té a mbéádh faithne air ba cheart dó an luibh sin a bhaint agus í a chogaint go maith. Ba cheart an luibh a chaitheadh amach as do bhéal annsin agus an sugh a chur amach ar phláta agus é a chumailt go maith de'n áit a bhfuil an faithne.

Fuair mé an ceann seo ó:-
Mháire Nic Pháidín
Baile Gibb,
An Uaimh
Co-na-Midhe

Aois = 38 bliadhain

Fuair sise é ó na mathair.

Ainm agus seóladh an duine scríobh
Caitlín Nic Pháidín
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 14:37
ceadaithe
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If the sun goes down like a red golden ball it denotes that the next day will be a warm one.
When the moon rises brightly the next day will be fine. When the halo is near the moon a storm is far away. If the halo is far away from the moon the storm is near. If the moon appears lying on its back with its horns sticking up severe weather may be expected.
When the sky is clothed with heavy dark clouds rain is certain.
When tiny clouds or scud are seen floating over the sky a large rain cloud is near.
The old proverb says. "When Howth puts on its cap let all Fingal beware of that.

Eileen Brophy,
Feltrim,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 14:30
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the new-married couple, and the people who light it shout at their best.
In olden times people used to race against each other on horses on their way home from the wedding, and the shouting and leaping of horses were heard everywhere. In olden times also, old people say that wives sat on horse-back beside their husbands.
The days of horses were considered wonderful times. The motors of the present time are not half so exciting. It is often, when speaking of a wedding, old men with bearded faces are heard say"God be with the weddin's of our day. It was then we had the barrels o' porter and the jugs o' whiskey, and we drank a health to old Paddy's land. But things were far cheaper that time.
The old people of to-day scarcely remember of marriages taking place in the houses, but they say that they did take place.
If old people meet marriageable people during Saraft, they say "we will have to" salt "you again this year. By salting they mean to throw a fist of sat at the bachelors and old maids, so that they will keep good, as they say, until next Saraft.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 14:25
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Oíche Lá Seáin an ceathrú lá fichead de Meitheamh. Deintear tinte móra ins gach baile agus bíonn na daoine óga ag rinnce ina dtimpeall go déanach ins an oíche agus de réir mar bíonn an lasair ón dtine ag dul i luighead bíd ag léimt thairstí.
Domhnach Cásca an lá d'aiséirigh Chríost ó marbhaibh. Itheann gach éinne níos mó ubh ná mar is gnáth.
Ach féach dlí na n-ubh
Ubh fíor dhuine uasal
Dhá ubh duine uasal
Trí h-uibhe féile bhodach.
It was an old custom long ago not to dig a grave on a Monday. If a person was to be buried on Monday the grave would be made on Sunday and this custom is kept up to the present day.
Potatoes were never sown in olden times until after St. Patrick's Day and if anyone had them sown
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 14:23
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Tá páirc in aice mo thighe. Páirc na n-ubh a tugtar uirthí. Fadó do bhíodh sé lán de uibheacha. Do bhíodh pláosganna na n-ubh comh cruaidh le cloch. Ní fhásfadh aon bharra ach prátaí ann. Bhíodh na prátaí comh mór le tuirnipí.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 14:17
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heads of hair signifying that of Mary Magdalen. It is said to be lucky to die on Good Friday because the soul of the deceased is said to rise the third day in glory. On this day the principal food was home-made water cakes signed with a cross called "hot cross buns".
Easter Sunday morning dawned rather bright and fair in every home. The sun is said to dance on every pool of water with joy and gladness on the Resurrection of its Creator. On this day all the ancients arose at cock-crow to watch the sun dancing and some of them are said to have seen signs in the sky such as the cross, the hammer and the nails.
After a hearty breakfast of bacon and eggs the people made their way to the church in their clean and new clothes comemorating the Glory of the great Mystery and new Life. In the evening the youngsters assembled in a neighbouring field and there boiled eggs on a bonfire of whin and called it their "Cludog". After this merry meal they again assembled on the crossroads and held a scud of a dance. Dances are yet held throughout the district and everybody is enjoying life on this holy day.

(Received the above from my mother)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 14:09
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They then received holy ashes on their foreheads after offering of the Holy Sacrifice to put them in mind of their death and their return to ashes again as the words of the priest illustrate "remember man thou art but dust and unto dust thou shalt return". They then broke their fast about twelve o'clock, their meal consisting of water-gruel with onions, salt, pepper and potatoes mixed called "scud him up the road". Their supper, the second meal of the day, consisted of black tea and water pancakes. No milk was allowed on Ash Wednesday, Spy Wednesday or Good Friday and so they are called "black fast days".
On Good Friday the people arose rather sorrowful thinking and meditating on Our Lord's Passion and Death on the Cross. They always said the Rosary three times a day in comemoration of His Crucifixion. In the evening all the faithful went to devotion at which the Way of the Cross was made as well also as the kissing of the Crucifix and the reading of the Passion. Long ago the men went up to the rails for the kissing of the Crucifix in their stocking-soles while the women went with their long flowing
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 14:00
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The first of our lenten days is Ash Wednesday. The vigil of this day is Shrove Tuesday sometimes called Saraft or Pancake Night because in olden times the people used to make pancakes for the supper and they would (-) bacon and potatoes on account of them abstaining from bacon for the seven weeks of Lent.
On this holy day the faithful began by attending Holy Mass in the morning fasting.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 13:56
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Mary Whelehan an aunt of Paddy Moran was at service with my great Grand Father about ninty years ago. At that time people used to fast very hard during lent. This girl started her fast on Holy Thursday, planted potatoes on good Friday and Holy Saturday and went to Mass fasting on Easter Sunday morning.
My father heard his grandfather, the witness tell Father Fitzsimons about it and he said he was not a bit surprised that God would give strength to any one with such faith.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 13:49
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eating the greatest number of eggs.
In this district very few people get married in Lent for the old proverb says:-
"Married in Lent live to repent".
In some parts of Ireland it is believed that a girl born in Lent will never marry.

Margaret O'Connell
Dromreague

My teacher helped me with this Composition
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 13:46
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There are many items of folk-lore associated with the Season of Lent, especially with the Sundays which in bygone days had each a special name which was derived from the psalm or lesson of the Sunday.

The First Sunday in Lent was known as Chalk Sunday. The young people and some of the old unmarried people were chalked on that Sunday, as a reproach for having let Shrove pass by without getting settled in life.
The Fourth Sunday in Lent was known as Mid-Lent or Mothering Sunday. On Mid-Lent Sunday employees and apprentices got a holiday and came "a mothering". Often they got the present of a griddle cake with a hole in the centre.
Palm Sunday passes by almost unnoticed in Ireland except by sprigs of yew, box or willow worn, which do duty for palm.
Easter Sunday is called Domhnac na n-Ubh in Irish. There is often a competition in egg eating amongst the young people. The winner is he who succeeds in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 00:16
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CHADWICKS WELL
This well is in a field about 300 yds from the road on the Golden-Balygriffin road about 1/3 mile from Golden. It is supposed to have changed from the other side of the road long ago.
The story goes that a woman used to go "bittling" clothes in the well and some unseen hand did this to prevent her. The water of this well is excellent drinking water. The well is a remarkable one cased in cement and paled in, in the form of an hexagon.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-30 00:15
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CHADDWICKS WELL
This well is in a field about 300 yds from the road on the Golden-Balygriffin road about 1/3 mile from Golden. It is supposed to have changed from the other side of the road long ago.
The story goes that a woman used to go "bittling" clothes in the well and some unseen hand did this to prevent her. The water of this well is excellent drinking water. The well is a remarkable one cased in cement and paled in, in the form of an hexagon.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:56
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(II) Continued
My property I will divide,
Between my next door neighbours,
And Parson Cole with a grey goose quill,
Will take down my (-) my dictation.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:49
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(VII)
Through bog and fen tho' hunted still,
To upper hill I hastened
To Galteemore my course I bore,
And sat on Dawsons table,
I entertained the pleasing hope's
That in those dreadful places,
My fell pursuers would sure be thrown,
And the falls prove surely fatal.

(VIII)
But those fond thoughts were all at fault,
Like all vain speculations,
For down Frisheen just at my heels,
They tore like hellish demons,
At the church ford I crossed the stones,
For courage never failed me,
And such fine speed as then I showed,
Will not be seen for ages.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:46
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(V)
When I despaired from them to take
My way by navigation
I, back again, to Cappa bridge
Repaired to Ballydavid.
No fence or gate ditch trench or drain,
Or rapid stream restrained me,
Till with ears cocked awhile I stopped,
I Parson Cole's plantation.

(VI)
Through famed Ashgrove, they then me drove
And back by Castle Mary
The Aherlow I waded o'er with vigour strength and safety,
Out Derryglen thro' thick and thin,
I scampered closely heated,
And took a draught at Muskerry lough
For my re-animation.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:41
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(III)
But if they could at all events,
A prisoner then have made me,
Bright Gannon he would quick insist,
Such capture was illegal,
Or Bain by his genteel address,
And complaisant behaviour,
As a request would for me get,
His Lordship superseded.

(IV)
I cleared away without delay
In spite of all there scheming,
The deer park wall without a balk,
I vaulted most completely,
Then in full view thro' Lismacue,
To the deep Suir they chased me,
But to my woe there was no boat,
To take me over safely.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:37
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(I)
In Bansha woods long time I lived
And all my generation,
Till that grand peer from Curraghmore
Disturbed my habitation,
The cry of hound and horn-sound
From slumber roused me early,
In Father Kane's enclosed demense,
I cleared the rural paling.

(II)
Through hills and dales and verdant vales,
I soon reached Bansha Glebe lands,
The mill pond I nimbly swam,
Close by the "peelers" station.
Those chaps they thought to make me halt,
With loaded guns and bayonets,
But Brave Mc Cloud gave them no power,
On me to make a seizure.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:32
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Sin cnámh a bheith amach as a áit in áit éighinteacht fá do chroidhe. Bhéarfadh sé do bhás muna bhfuighfáe leigheas dó.
An dóigh leis an leigheas a dhéanamh:-
Bhéarfáe leat pighinn agus gloinne. Leagfáe an phighinn an thóin an ghloinne agus bhruighfae isteach é san áit a raibh an phian. Nuair a thógfac an gloinne agus an phighinn arís dheanfadh an cnamh scoilt agus rachadh sé ina áit féin arís agus bá ghoirid go mbéadh biseach ort.
Fuair mé an ceanns eo ó mo mhathair,
Síle Nic Pháidín,
Baile Gib,
An Uaimh
Co. na Midhe

Máire Nic Pháidín
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:26
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2) Leigheas fá choinne Doch-Croidhe:-
Dá mnbeadh duine tar éis rud a ithe agus gan é bheith maith fá choinne a ghoile bheadh sé ag cur suas uisge searbh. Seo leigheas fá na choinne sin, soid aráin a chur iseach fríd báinne milis agus súicre a chur air chun an droch bhlás a bhaint de. Ól sin agus deirim leat nach mbeidh Doch-Croidhe níos mó ort.

Fuair mé an ceann seo ó m'athair,

Domhnall Mac Cearraigh,
Baile-Gib,
An Uaimh
Co-na-Midhe
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:21
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1) Dá mbeadh duine ag ithe éisg agus gur stad cnáibh de in a scórnach an rud is fearr dó a dhéanamh ná an bánacán de ubh d'ithe chun an cnáibh do chur sios.
Fuair mé é sin o mo leas-mathair.
Máire Ní Shíoráin,
Caiseal Martín,
An Uaimh,
Co na Midhe

Ainm agus seoladh an duine do sgríobh
Ríoghna Ní Shíoráin,
Caiseal Martín,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:17
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2) Leigheas do aicid scamhain
Báinne do bruith le lus darbh ainm "Cranes Bill" agus an feocadán baineann. Annsan é sin do sgadadh agus é d'ól gac lá. Sin an leigheas is fearr agus is aosta.
Fuaireas é sin o mo leas-mathair freisin. Tá a seoladh ar an leathanac eile. Fuair mo leas-mathair gac leigheas on a h-athair is a mathair agus bhí a h-athair an-aosta nuair a fuair sé bás.

Ainm agus seoladh an duine do sgríobh.
Rioghna Ní Shíoráin,
Caiseal Martín,
An Uaimh
Co na Midhe

Seo an "Cranes Bill".
(sceitse)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:09
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2) Laigheas fá choinne cois aithuighte:-
Faigh lus mar ainm an fhleit. Bruith é agus cur isteach i goite éadaigh é. Nuair atá sin déanta casadh thart fá'n cois é.

Fuaras an laigheas ó sean chara,
Pádraigh Ó Mhairtín,
Árd Bracáin,
An Uaimh
Co. na Midhe

Ainm an scríobhneór
Caitlín Ní Loingsigh,
Dubh Comair,
An Uaimh

(Sceitse)
(Seo sampla an fhleit)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 23:04
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1) Cun doghadh do leigheas:-
Faigh goite beó-aol agus duilleóga an crainn truim agus íle milis. Measg iad go léir le chéile go dtí go mbéidhis in a ola bhán. Cuir sin ar an doghad gach lá agus béidh biseach air i gceann cúpla lá.

Fuaras sin ó mo mhuinnteór,
An t-Suir Colm
Clochar-Loretó
Teach Naomh Áine

Ainm an duine do scríobh,
Caitlín Ní Loingsigh
Dubh Comair,
An Uaimh
Co. na Midhe

(Sceitse)
(Seo sampla an crann trom)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 14:31
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member of the present generation works at the trade for the reason that there is no demand for such articles. Churns made of strong tin or iron coated with tin are used by all the farmers in the District at the present day (1938)

There is a ford on the River Aherlow near the residence of this family and it is called "Ath na gCiléirí", "the ford of the 'Keelers' or 'Coolers' ".
During a spell of dry weather the churns, tubs and "coolers" were wont to contract with the heat and to this ford the neighbours used bring them and leave them immersed in the shallow water with large stones in them to keep them from floating away. They were usually left there for a week or so.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 14:25
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A shallow wooden vessel into which fresh or hot milk was put to cool or set and so allow the cream to form in readiness for churning.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 14:22
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swift would stand in the four corners of the ground or school yard. They would then try to run from one corner to another. The other boys tried to catch them on the run.
Ducksheen: A stick was put standing in the ground. The boys stood a good distance away from it and tried to get their sticks as near as they could to it. Whatever boy owned the stick farthest away from the standing one had to put his stick standing with his cap on the top of it and allow the others to try to knock his cap off the stick.
Flogging tops, and pegging tops were very common some years ago but they are not seen with the boys for some years past. The only games played by boys are skittles and a game called Cat. The latter game is played somewhat like cricket with the exception that a small ring is made on the ground and used instead of stumps. A small piece of stick is used instead of a ball. The boys use a long piece of a stick for striking the smaller one.

The girls play games like Hide and Seek, Hop-scotch and Jackstones.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 14:14
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Many of the old games that used to be played in this district up to thirty years ago by the children attending Rathwire School are no longer played in the school yard. Chestnuts, Hole and Taw, Ball in the hat, Hunt the hare, and ducksheen down. The inside kernel or seed of a chestnut was bored with a nail. Through the hole was passed a piece of twine or cord. A knot was put at one of the ends of the twine so that the chestnut could not fall from
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 14:03
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Some years ago there was a cooper named Monaghan who lived in Killucan. He made churns, barrels, and tubs.
Perhaps the last of the old keelers to be found in Éire at the present time lived in Raharney. His name is Tom Harris. It is delgihtful to watch this old man at work turning out wooden dishes tubs and churns. He makes stools (round ones called "creepies" and chairs of the strong old kind that one sees in farm houses. They have been in the family for half a century. He also makes ladders and pig troughs. He attends the local fairs and sells the articles he makes to the local farmers. It is a pity that no young lad has learned this craft from Tom Harris for he is a master craftsman.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 13:57
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When dash churns are used the dash is worked upwards and downwards. People know when butter is made by observing the size of the particles of butter that adhere to the handle of the dash or that force their way out on the lid. The churn stands about 3ft in height 2 ft at bottom and 1ft 8ins at top. Small churns are 23 1/2 inches high 18 1/2 ins at bottom and 16 1/2 at top. Water is poured into the churn about twice during the churning to wash down the lid and dash, and also to help to collect the butter. When the churning is finished the butter is collected with the dash. It is taken out
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 11:36
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government, but most of the old people say that the gentry supplied it at their own expense.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 11:35
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and placed in a keeler of pure spring water. Then it is salted and the salt worked into it with patters.
It is always considered very unlucky for a stranger or neighbour to go into a house when churning was going on and not give a hand and say God bless the Work. Buttermilk is used for making bread. It is given as a drink to pig, fowl, calves and horses.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 11:30
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Horses generally kept loose in a stable. All the shoeing is done by the local blacksmith. The clipping is done by a hand machine in Autumn
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 11:29
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they say "Woe there" when calling a calf they say "suck suck". When calling hens they say "tuck tuck". When calling ducks "week week". When calling a pig "hurish hurish". The cow houses are now near all slated but there are still some thatched ones. The cows are tied in a row to the manger by a chain fastened to the manger by a staple.
In some cowsheds the cows are separated by a partition of wood or concrete when this is so the cows chained to an iron bar in the side of the partition. The chains can run up and down this bar when the cow raises or lowers her head. Where a big number of cows are kept the cows are held by means of two bars. The cow's head is placed between the bars and when she is to be liberated one of the bars is so arranged that it will swing apart from the other.
When a person is milking a cow he sings while milking. And when finished he dips the top of his finger into the milk and makes the Sign of the cross on the cow's udder.
A bottle of holy water is generally kept in the shed when an animal is bought it is blessed with the holy water.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 11:17
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Nearly all the churning in this district at the present time is done in an end over end churn; very few of the old dash churns are used now-a-days. On farms like Mr Purdon's Lisnabin and Mr Nolan's Derrymore the churn worked by horses are still in use.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 11:14
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Children in this locality began to wear boots when they were about two years old. The very poor children did not wear them till they were three or four years old. All the children attending Rathwire School come bare-footed during the summer months. There was an old woman living in the village about thirty years ago and she never wore boots winter or summer. Her name was Moll Mack. She was a fine strong hardy woman. Boots are repaired locally. There are two cobblers in the village. Years ago there was a shoemaker in the village of Rathwire named Dinny Connor. He made and repaired boots and amassed an immense fortune. His people are the biggest and wealthiest cattle-men in the district. We have no shoemake in the village at present for the farmers wear Shop or factory boots.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 11:06
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There are three forges in the parish. Two in Rathwire village and one in Killucan. The names of the smiths are James and John Gaynor and James Cooney. The trade has been hand down in the families for years. The forges are situated on the side of the street and are just ordinary sheds. There is only one fireplace in each forge. The bellows is a big wooden one with leather sides and is worked by a pull chain. The smith uses a sledge hammer rasp, tongs, shoeing knife, punch and cutting iron. He also uses a square and compar(?) when making fancy articles. The smiths shoe horses and asses.
James Cooney won prizes for sets of shoes he made. He is also a great gaelic footballer and handballer. He makes gates, harrows, firegrates, drags, and fish spears. The water used for cooling the hot iron was supposed to cure warts on the hands. The smith was always respected and a favourite with the people. All the smiths have a knowledge of horses and farmers consult them about any defects or ailments. The local forge is a great place for news and many old stories are told in it when farmers meet together there. There was a third forge in Rathwire. The smiths name was Tom Lynch. There was another in Thomastown.
The shoeing of cart wheels and barrow wheels
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 10:48
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Poll a múrdaigh -
Uaig a slabhach - edible sea weed here.
The curran knowls - where currant bushes grow.
The Roisín - little point.
Skelp a Gamhna - cliff where calves lying out at night find shelter.
Na trí mic ua Gorr - three big stones standing out in sea, beartched Tuatha De Danan.
Skelp a ruagach = cockles plentiful.
Carrick a Lach - wild duck here.
The Fialtas - ?
Leac-leathan - broad rock or flag.
The lochán - sheltered pool where boats rest to shake herring from nets.
Uaidh garbh - rough sea rushing into cave.
The pinnacle - highest spot - good view of point.

Irish is spoken only or rather known by 2 or 3 old age pensioners. Only one of these can tell stories in Irish and another in English. Inhabitants emigrated to America and New Zealand via Derry. There is only one Holy well in the district but devotions of all kinds connected with it have long ceased. It is situated at eastern end of Shanaghan Lough and is called St. Connell's Well. An old monastery was built by same saint near by but all trace of it is gone.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 10:46
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Cloughboy (Cloch - bhuidhe)
The Skelp - scealp - steep bank.
Poll-a-tarive - where a bull fell into sea.
Lobster-rock -
Port a lán - long narrow strip of bog.
Ard a mhaoirigh - shepherds height.
Cnoc a h-úan - frequented by sheep, sloping bank.
Poll a madaidh-ruaidh - foxes den.
(mín na n-ionghan / mín an iongan) meaning not known.
The Minister's Rock - Protestant minister swept off rock while fishing and drowned.
Oilean machaire - level island
Poll a leathaigh - hole where sea weed is plentiful.
Traigh bán - white strand.
Oweygrania - Grania's cave.
Uaigh na muirrigh / Úg-na-muirrigh - Cave where bent or sea grass grows.
Carrich a duivan - where sea birds rest.
Meádal - rock over submerged and causing sea swell or builg.
Tobar Anna - Anne's well.
Inis bearnog / Inis bearnach - gapped island.
Tobar Ruaidhri - Rory's well.
The Bailtee - high bank of sand on strand.
The Dóirlins - Collection of round stones washed up by tide.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 10:41
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Poll a múrdaigh -
Uaig a slabhach - edible sea weed here.
The curran knowls - where currant bushes grow.
The Roisín - little point.
Skelp a Gamhna - cliff where calves lying out at night find shelter.
Na trí mic ua Gorr - three big stones standing out in sea, beartched Tuatha De Danan.
Skelp a ruagach = cockles plentiful.
Carrick a Lach - wild duck here.
The Fialtas - ?
Leac-leathan - broad rock or flag.
The lochán - sheltered pool where boats rest to shake herring from nets.
Usadh garbh - rough sea rushing into cave.
The pinnacle - highest spot - good view of point.

Irish is spoken only or rather known by 2 or 3 old age pensioners. Only one of these can tell stories in Irish and another in English. Inhabitants emigrated to America and New Zealand via Derry. There is only one Holy well in the district but devotions of all kinds connected with it have long ceased. It is situated at eastern end of Shanaghan Lough and is called St. Connell's Well. An old monastery was built by same saint near by but all trace of it is gone.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 10:21
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
A Bardic son of Drimolague
One morning rid it of the plague
And marched the rats to Ross, from where
Off to the Sea, the tide, did them bear.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 10:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Drimoleague was once infested with a plague of rats. One O'Sullivan, then Bard and Genius of Drimoleague, one morning succeeded in assembling together a large number of these rats who covered half a mile of the road. By means of tunes played on the Ivy Leaf, he enticed them to follow him to Rosscarbery, 14 miles to the South, where the tide washed them out to sea.

It is spacious, clean, inviting and
Beside the Ruagach stream doth stand
And once upon a time, a plague
Of rats infested Drimolague.
They held their own, despite the cats
And through the cemetery made paths
They gnawed the corpse in tomb and grave
And even did the Bulldogs brave.
They bathed in the pans of milk
And tore the linens, tweeds and silk
Meat, butter, meal and flour destroyed
And left the casks of liquor void
(P.T.O.)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 10:13
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
I heard the following account from Mr. E. Driscoll, Dreenlomane, which was told to him by his mother. During the year, called the black '47, people walked to Ballydehob, where the local depot for Indian meal was.
One day as Mrs Driscoll was returning from town, she was met by a horse, pulling a cart of dead bodies, which were picked up from the wayside. She compared the bodies with "fir scolbs[?]" at sight. They were later cast into a pit at Stuaic graveyard, without distinction.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 10:08
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
A Plague broke out in 1832 known as the Cholera. It made a havoc in the district and Carrick suffered severely as no business was done in the town for 9 months. Half of the population died of the disease. On the May fair of that year only one black miley cow was offered for sale.
Margaret Shankey
Rakeragh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 10:02
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
out the mounds, or graves of this clan. It was like scarletina fever that came on them. Housed under-ground in damp and cold, scarce food and bad food there were no crops only a barren waste, no fresh air wrought what Cromwell and his officers wished, death to all who would not join England's Reformation. Tullaghnabasta is given to mean burial ground of unbaptised children. There is nothing now, but shrubery and an odd stone on its edge to mark the burial ground of the once famous Clan of the McGraths.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 09:58
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
In the townland of Oram in a place named Tullaghnabasta is a burial ground where the McGrath clan were buried who died in the Penal Days. In Oram, as in many other places were clusters of houses. These are some of the old place-names Pullafeka, Bunduh, Nough, Monafarawaka, Mullac Oram, Ballinnwara, Conoc Ceann, Uid Tarac, and Carrig Sagart or Priests rock where Mass was said in Penal Days when England's laws hunted priests, and people to the bleak hillsides or to caves under ground to hear Mass.
The clan assembled at Carrig Sagart to hear Mass, when Cromwell's soldiers rushed upon them and the most of the men gave their lives to save the priest. The clan went to a cave on the hillside close to Tullaghnabasta where they remained in hiding for six years. A number of small children, close on one hundred, were housed in this tunnel; for at that time close on fifty families lived in Oram, where to day there are about fourteen. These children poorly clad and ill-nourished, were a prey to infections diseases one of which as far as tradition goes wiped out the entire clan. They are all interred in this burial ground which overlooks the Drumleek road where to this, can be traced
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-29 09:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This prayer I learned from a poor travelling woman 50 years ago who often got lodging in a neighbour's house:-

The Star of Heaven that nourished the Lord drove away the plague of death which the first parents of man brought into this world. May this bright star now vouchsafe to extinguish that foul constellation whose battle has slain people with the wound of death. O most pious Star of the Sea preserve us from plague, hear us O Jesus for whom Thy Virgin Mother supplicates Thee.
Pray for us o holy Mother of God.
That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.
God of Mercy, God of pity, God of benign Clemency. Thou who hast had compassion on the affliction of the people say to the Angel striking them
"Stop thy hand for the love of this Glorious Star whose breast Thou didst sweetly drink as antidote for our crimes. Grant the assistance of Thy Grace that we may be safely freed from all pestilence, and unprovided death and mercifully save us from the gulf of eternal perdition through our Lord Jesus Christ, King of Glory who livest and reignest one God world without end.
Amen

S. S. O'Dúnaidhe
Caisleán Aoibhne
Teampoll Mór
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 17:28
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About the year 1890 in the Spring-time of the year a great epidemic visited this district. In most houses all the inmates were in bed as they were too weak to be about and there was no one to look after those who were sick. In some cases all the inmates of a house died and not one of them was left. Persons suffered from weakness, cold and shivering, great perspiration and a severe cough. It was called the "Hen" which is a contraction of influenza. It lasted for about three months and very many old people died of it. The local doctors were visiting houses all day and night. Persons who had "The Hen" were very weak, for a long time after it and were unable to work.
The clergy of most parishes compelled the people afterwards to remove dung-pits and cess-pools from near the doors of their dwelling
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 17:28
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houses, for at that time it was customary to have the dung heap of farmyard manure in front of the door. It was thought that the evil smells from these pits caused the plague. The plague called "The Hen" was the talk of the people for many years afterwards. There was no second visitation of it till after The Great War of 1914 and then it occurred again and in a far worse form than in 1890. Hundreds of people young and old died in this district from the plague after the Great War.
Information was obtained from:
John Hetherton
Ballydurrow
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 17:13
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St Ultan today is an outstanding hero of the "Buidhe Chonnail", or the yellow plague, a dread visitation which ravaged the land about the seventh century. This mysterious pestilence made its first appearance in this country in the middle of the sixth century. It lasted about ten years and was proceeded by famine and followed by leprosy.
The name Yellow Plague implies a sickness which produced yellowness of the skin, resembling the colour of withered stalks of corn.
The second visitation of the plague occured again in the year 656 being more deadly in the Autumn and Winter than at any other time of the year.
The population of Ireland had become so dense that food enough could not be produced for their support. The rulers invited clergy to meet together and pray that the lower class
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 17:02
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This prayer I learned from a poor travelling woman 50 years ago who often got lodging in a nieighbour's house:-

The Star of Heaven that nourished the Lord drove away the plague of death which the first parents of man brought into this world. May this bright star now vouchsafe to extinguish that foul constellation whose battle has slain people with the wound of death. O most pious Star of the Sea preserve us from plague, hear us O Jesus for whom Thy Virgin Mother supplicates Thee.
Pray for us o holy Mother of God.
That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.
God of Mercy, God of pity, God of benign Clemency. Thou who hast had compassion on the affliction of the people say to the Angel striking them
"Stop thy hand for the love of this Glorious Star whose breast Thou didst sweetly drink as antidote for our crimes. Grant the assistance of Thy Grace that we may be safely freed from all pestilence, and unprovided death and mercifully save us from the gulf of eternal perdition through our Lord Jesus Christ, King of Glory who livest and reignest one God world without end.
Amen

S. S. O'Dúnaidhe
Caisleán Aoibhne
Teampoll Mór
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 16:08
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goes to disturb the dead.
The monastery was first built in the year 1600. Some time after this, a cruel man came over to Ireland, his name was Cromwell, he did not know about the monastery, the monks called it a club, so that Cromwell would not to destroy it, because he hated monasteries.
Charles 1 was king in England at this time. He was beheaded, then Charles 11 became king.
There is a strange story about one of the towers that was in the monastery. In one of therey used to live a knight. God appeared to him three times. The first time he was dining the second time he was drinking and the third time he was sleeping, God told him to keep on sleeping and it is said he is still sleeping with a wolfhound by his side.
When monks were driven out in the penal days the monastery went into ruin. Some kind person bought this, on which the old monastery was, and built a new college they called it Castle-knock college, and it still remained so, until the present day.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 16:03
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There is an old cemetery in Castleknock, behind the college. The majority of the priests and brothers who were in the ancient monastery, are buried there. The Danes built the big tower as a fort or defence.
There are some remains of the old monastery, that was there about three-hundred years ago. There was a cave from the college to Chaplizod, and the Danes hid a lot of swords in it, and covered it in.
In the year 1884 there was a priest who tried to go through this tunnel and he found the swords also some valuable books in it. He ordered his men to dig down, and when they to a gate, the Bishop would not let them go any further, he thought that this was a gate to a cemetery.
The swords and books are still to be found at the college. One of the books is very useful, because it tells the history of the college.
Attached to the monastery are twenty five acres of land. Some of it is tilled, and the remainder is for grazing pastures. One particular piece of ground is for a grave-yard where the old brothers are buried. It is still left untilled and no one ever
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 15:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I
Dear exiles all who hail from Boyle.
I bid you gather near
Let us to night in fond delight
Recall our places dear
In foreign land to toil
By night and day for you I'll pray
My native town of Boyle

II
I never can forget the day
I left my native town
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 15:55
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And the grand old waterfall,
How swiftly that great river runs
Through isle through bridge
and glen,
And murmurs softly as in prayers
As it sweeps by Asylynn.
VIII
The old back lane I see your plain
Twas oft I went your way.
The workhouse wall I do recall.
Likewise O'Conners bray
The old flax mill I see you still
With your big wheel turning about
As the water from Lough Gara
Makes the old mill brightly glow.
IX
Farewell old ruined abbey
Twas tyrants caused you fall
The Curlew mountains are looking down.
Upon your roofless walls
The ivy green your ruins serene
Will save you from decay
And the wild birds nest within your crest
Old Abbey lone and grey.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 13:43
ceadaithe
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There are a number and variety of animals kept on every farm. Some are kept for the produce they give us, others for the work they do.
They general breed of horses are half-bred Clydesdale. They grow between sixteen and seventeen hands in height. The horses are trained to do farm work from two years old. The general farm work is ploughing, reaping, and carting. Horses get about three feeds in the day which consists of a half a stone oats and about ten lbs of hay or straw and with three drinks of cold water.
The general breed of cows are cross breed Shorthorns as they are the best kind for milk and beef. The milk is sent to the Lagan creamery, and the young cattle are sold when they are two years old for beef. The house where the cows are kept is called a byre. Every two are tied in a stall by the neck with chains. The cows generally generally get three feeds in the day of turnips with three foddering of hay or straw in the day, with a ration of Indian meal
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 13:36
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the twine. One boy held his chestnut up by the twine while the other boy tried to break it by striking it with his. The chestnuts used to be put up inside the chimney to harden or season them as it use to be called.
Hole and Taw was a game played with small marbles. The marbles used to be sold in the local shops at the rate of three for a penny. Some of the marbles were nice glass ones and had colours through them. Three holes were made in the ground about five feet apart. The idea was to go up and down the three holes three times by shooting the marble with your thumb. As many boys could play this game together it was difficult to get from one hole to the next because the other boys could shoot at your marbles and drive it away from the hole.
Ball in the hat. This game was played by the boys placing their caps along a wall. The boys stood about ten feet away from the caps and and tried to roll a ball into them. When the ball went into a cap the boy to whom the cap belonged ran to get the ball and tried to strike any of the other boys with it. If he failed to strike anyone a stone was place in his cap. In the end whatever boy owned the cap with the most stones in it was beaten with the other boys caps.
Hunt the hare. Four boys who were very
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 13:23
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Period. There was a well a few hundred yards away from the present Protestant Church and just opposite the Rectory gate known as St Meenan's Well.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 13:21
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was done in the open air just outside the forge.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 13:20
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There is only one tailor in this district. His name is Patrick Bracken. His father and grand-father carried on the same trade. He stocks his own cloth but people can buy their own and bring them to be made by him. He employs two or three men. Some of these men spend a few years in the village and then start travelling about from one tailor's shop to another. They usually come back again and spend a few more years working in the village. When the freize mill was in Thomastown the local farmers brought their wool to it and got it made into freize cloth. Clothes and top coats made of this freize was often handed down from father to son.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 13:15
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There are the ruins of an old catholic church still standing in the Protestant graveyard. It is said to date back to the early Norman
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 13:14
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for the Catholic farmers. He also succeeded in getting some of the house property bought out for the catholic tenants. The Longfords were always English soldiers. It is told that an ancestor of the present Moore family of Killucan was an officer's servant and during one of the English wars on the continent either in Spain or Russia he saved the life of one of the Longfords. He was given as a reward a vast track of land and a house in the village of Killucan.
Other landlords were The Norman Darcys'. The Nugents owned Cushinstown Cooke of Cooksboro owned Porterstown. The Fitzgeralds who had a castle in Kinnegad owned Derrymore, The McGills of Griffinstown and Renolds of Renella. They all had possessions around the district.
Many stories are told of the cruel way the agents and rent-warners of the local landlords treated the poor small catholic farmers. They had whenever required to give their services free. If they improved their land by drainage the rent was raised or the land was taken from them and given to some friend of the agent.
Cooke of Cookesboro evicted a family named Carroll on a cold snowy day. He leveled the house and gave their farm to a family called
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 13:03
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The local fair in Killucan is held in the fair-green and in the streets of the village. All the big cattle are sold in the fair-green. The calves sheep and horses are sold in the streets of the village. Toll is paid by the person who buys cattle
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 13:03
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in the fair-green. The toll is collected by Lord Longford's workmen. The toll varies according to the size of the animal sold. 3d to 6d per head. When an animal is sold "luckpenny" is always given. Sheep and lambs the luckpenny is usually 6s per head. Calves 1/- . Cattle from two years old upwards 2/- and 2/6 per head.
Some years ago it used to be the custom to spit on the luckpenny when handing it to the buyer but that has been discontinued. When men are making a bargain they strike hands but when it is over the cattle are sometimes marked by taking a piece of dirt on the end of a stick and rubbing it on one of the animals hind quarters. The cattle are sometimes marked with raddle, or by cutting a piece of hair off with a scissors on the hip bone or on the hind-quarter. When a young horse is sold the halter is usually given to the buyer, but if the horse is brought to the fair with a bridle, the bridle is generally retained by the owner. The fairs in this village are very popular and well patronized by English and Scotch Shippers. There is a fair every month but the March fairs are the biggest. These are old fairs.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 12:52
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
When times were bad in this district people lived on two meals a day. Oaten stirabout, potatoes and oaten bread were the chief kinds of food. Potatoes were eaten at both meals. Men brought lumps of oaten bread with them when they went to work. The very poor used buttermilk. Those with cows used new-milk. The table was placed in the centre of the floor and all sat around it.
The potatoes were put on the centre of the table. They were often placed in a low(?) basket made of sallyrods. Farmers and others who could afford it used bacon. Bacon is still used in the morning and middle of the day in nearly all the farmers houses in this district. Very little fresh meat is used. Farmers and labourers kill and cure their own pigs.
Noggins were used when stirabout was used at a meal. They were washed and polished and placed on the dresser when the meal was over.
There was not much tea drunk in this district
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 12:51
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eighty or ninty years ago.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 12:45
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The only account of a football match played in olden times is one between the parishes of Killucan and Kinnegad. It was played at Aughamore. The ball was a leather one stuffed with cork or hay. Often one hundred a side took part. There were no goal posts so the ball could be kicked any distance. The game was played on the borders of two parishes.
At the start of Gaelic football Killucan Parish used to play Ballivor. They played twenty one aside. There were goal posts and point posts. The players played wearing their own strong boots. The knickers were worn below the knees. Coloured caps with long peeks were also worn by the players.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 12:41
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The late Rev Mr Falconer Protestant Rector Killucan has already described the monuments in this parish. I am not sure if he has published an account of them in book form but I saw a copy of his work. There are two old crosses one on the road between Killucan and Coralstown and one in the Village at the beginning of the Delvin road. The cross have been broken and the parts broken off are still lying on the ground. They are said to mark the graves of some very old families
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 12:36
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(-)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 12:36
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One bears the name McLoughlin. Mr Briscoe tells me they were Catholics. There are very anceint tombs and crosses in the Protestant graveyard some of them dating back four hundred years and more. At Porterstown there is a very big flat stone standing in the centre of Paddy Lynam's field. There is another big stone lying on the ground. People say they mark the burial place of some great Chieftain.
Some years ago when men were rising sand in a sandpit nearby they found bones. The bones were replaced in the ground again. At Greenhills Killucan in a field belonging to Joseph Scally locally called Keeffe's land there is a large stone and in this stone is small hollow that resembles very much the holy water fonts used in our churches. Some of the local people say that the stone was a druid altar. Others say that mass may have been said there during the Penal Times.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 12:29
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There were shops in Rathwire in olden times because there used to be a market in the village. The shops were opened after Mass on Sundays. This old custom still prevails. The farmers wives bring butter, eggs, and sometimes oats to the shops and get other
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 12:27
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
The different kinds of bread used in olden times were oaten bread, potatoe bread and wheaten bread. All the flour used in the making of bread was ground locally, for there were several mills in
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 12:27
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the locality. There was a mill along the river in Tom Leavy's field in Riverstown. Another called Reilly's mill on the Carrigeen road that joins Raharney road with the Derrymore road. Another at Thomastown that the local landlords erected. This mill is still working but it was rebuilt some years ago by the farmers. It is the only mill in the district. Then there was the big Mill at Riverstown.
It was all home made bread that was used in this parish up to a few years ago. The women made splendid bread and some of them even at the present time get prizes for their home made pot oven cakes. Old Mrs Leech Rathwire has the reputation for making the best pot oven bread in the parish. A cross is cut on the top of the cake to make the bread rise and keep the top from breaking. This old woman makes splendid oaten bread and griddle bread.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 11:33
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When the fish leap over the water.
When the dust rises off the road.
When the water turns a dark color.
When there are streamers from the sun.
When the curlew sings in the evening.
A hen picking herself under a brush.
When the ashes turn a blue color.
When the midges are sharp in the evening.

Weather lore, Good weather.
A clear sky.
To see the cattle going up the hilltops.
When the mountains look far away.
A mist rising off the water.
A mist in the valley.
A mist going out the mountain.
The wind from the north.
When the sun sets clear.
When a cement floor gets damp.
When the crickets leave the house and sing out in the field.
When the cock crows on the top of a ditch.
A fog in the valley.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 11:31
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
To hear a curlew whistling is a sign of rain.
When the crows are flying low it is a sign of rain.
When the horse stands against the ditch it is a sign of rain.
When the sun goes down red, it is a sign of rain.
When there is a ring round the moon it is a sign of rain.
When the sky is red it is a sign of rain.
When the sky is clouded, it is a sign of wind.
When there is a fog, it is the sign of fine weather.
When the soot is falling, it is a sign of rain.
Another sign of rain is to see a blue blaze in the fire.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 11:30
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Its bells soft vibration a - calling the faithful
To join in the praise of the heavenly band.

(VI)
Dear home of my fathers in wild vivid dreaming,
I'll e'er see thy mountains and blue shimmering shore
Although I be far from thy kindly seclusion,
Yet in dreams I'll be with the Clonmany, Asthore!
Each spot that I love to behold
Refilling my heart with a joy that is endess
As I gaze on the scenes that fond memories unfold

Written by
Bella Doherty
Magheramore,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 11:24
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In crumbling ruins stands Carrick-a-Brahy
On the verge of the waters where white seagulls tread,
From its site dimly seen is the island or Tory
And Glashedy embosomed in it's green ocean bed.

(V)
By Magheramore's plain in a glen dark and lonely
Where the quivering ash bends its arm o'er the vale -
Stands a mass Rock of old, where the priest oft repeated
In tones soft and reverent - the Mass for the Gael.
In beauty sublime towers St. Marys tall spire
Its bright Cross proclaiming the faith of our land.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 11:22
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And loudly the waters that form the deep cascade
Roll down in wild haste into deep Pohl-an-Eas
Clonmany’s bright river glides forth in its beauty
From the lake of Mindoran to Binons calm bay;
Its waters roll on amid wild rural gardens
And sparkle like gems 'neat the sun’s golden ray.

(IV)
Sublimely and wild looms Crock Aughrim's dark mountain
At its feet gently ripples Strabreggs blue bay
Where Manannan oft in his light boat of magic
Sped swiftly o'er billows in dazzling array.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 11:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
(II)
In towering splendour proud Buliba raises
Its high mountain peak to the blue summer sky;
And ere’s lowering shadows fold gently around it
And shroud its rough crest, as the clouds hurry by.
Tall Raghthan looks down from his vigilant station
On Tullagh’s bright waves as (-) break on the shore,
His dark towering form stands as sentinel keeping
A watch o’er Dunaff and the hill of Mamore.

(III)
Glenevin unfoldeth her fair scenes of beauty
The curlew calls forth from its rough mountain pass
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 11:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There's a spot in our (-) of sweet sylvan beauty
Far out in the north at at the fringe of the sea;
Each heather-clad mountain and green grassy meadows
Is dearer than all else in Erin to me.
Away in the distant Slieve Sneact proudly rises.
To catch the first gleam of the sun's golden light.
And gently each beam casts its soft light of beauty
Upon the white brow of the fair queen of might.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 11:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The change in the weather is known by the sailors and old people of Wexford by different signs such as:-
Signs of Rain:-
(1) A ring around the moon
(2) A red sunrise
(3) A cat sitting with its backs to the fire
(4) Sea-gulls flying over the land.
Signs of a Storm:-
(1) A new moon or half moon on its back.
(2) A "cock's eyes" around the moon.
(3) The curlew's cry at night
(4) Swift clouds
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 11:04
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
When you hear the curlew.
When the swallows fly low.
When there is a ring round the moon.
When you see soot falling from the chimney.
If rain comes with the moon it is going to bad weather for the quarter the moon is with us.
When a cat washes her face on a dry day.
When a dog eats grass.
When a cock crows on a nice day.
When you see goats high up on rocks.
When seagulls are flying high.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 11:02
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
or silver clouds it is a sign of rain.

10 If you hear the wind whistling and moaning through the door it is a sign of rain.
11 When you see a dog drinking water or eating grass it is a sign of rain.

12 If the curlew is heard calling it is a sign of rain. They say he calls for rain.

13 When the wind blows from the east it is a sign of fine weather.

14 If the smoke rises straight from the chimney it is the sign of rain.

15 When we get white frost it is the sign of rain.

16 When the crows go high in the sky in the evening it is a sign of fine weather.

17 When the crows crowd together in the fields it is the sign of fine weather.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 11:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1. If the wind blows from the south-west it is the sign of rain.
2. If the wind blows from the north it is the sign of snow.
3. If the goat comes down from the top of the mountain it is the sign of a storm.
4. To see the dog eating grass is the sign of rain.
5. To see a hen picking herself is the sign of rain.
6. To hear a curlew whistling is the sign of rain also.
7. If a person who has corns feels them very sore it is the sign of rain.
8. If the clouds run fast across the sky it is the sign of rain.
9. To see soot falling is the sign of rain.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 10:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
When the dog begins to eat grass there is a change in the weather.
When the sheep go under the wall there is a sign of rain.
When the curlew begins to whistle there is a sign of rain.
When the cricket begins to sing there is a sign of rain.
There is a sign of fine weather when sun is shining early in the morning.
There is a sign of rain when the hills look near.
When the dust is flying off the road there is a sign of rain.
When the river is roaring there is a sign of rain.
When the fire is blue there is a sign of rain.
When the clouds are running in the sky there is a sign of rain.
When the smoke from the chimney is going up straight there is a sign of rain
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 10:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
"When the wind is to the east, 'tis neither good for man or beast." Southerly winds bring most rain. "When the wind is in the west then 'tis in the very best" point.
The loud note of peacock denotes storm and rain. Farm-yard fowl searching eagerly for food fine weather. "Low o'er the grass the swallow wings" and gulls fly inland bad weather. Swallows flying high very-fine weather.
When the curlew flies inland a sign of bad weather.
A dog eating grass ravenously is a sure sign of very bad weather. A dog resting peacefully a sign of fine weather. Restless pigs a sign of storm.
Cattle stampeding a sign of broken weather. Cattle resting sign of very fine weather.
Apparent nearness of hills a sign of storm and rain.
Dust rising in circles a sure
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 10:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
(1) Any animal born on Whit-Monday must be put under the sod as it was considered unlucky.

(2) If face is washed with dew off grass on a May morning it was supposed that a person would not get sunburnt durring the Summer.

(3) If the vessels used milking cows were being washed it was consider wrong to throw rinsing water in the pond as the cows would give no more milk the rinsing water should be thrown on the green grass.

(4) If a curlew was heard at night it was thought to be the sign of bad weather.

(5) If cat sits with its back to the fire it was said to be the sign of a storm.

(6) When a cat washes its face the first person it looks at after the act was said to be the first to die.

(7) If churning was going on in a house and a man came in to put a coal in his pipe and he went out without taking
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 10:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In each district there are many local beliefs with regards to weather. The people observe the sky, the flight of the birds, the domestic animals, and give indication of the weather to be expected. The sea, lakes and mountains also show signs which may be reads as weather omens. The following is a list of local sayings in this regard.
If a curlew double whistles it is a sure sign of rain.
When the crow or the swallow fly low it is a sign of storm.
If a flock of hens gather together and start picking their feathers is a sign of storm.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 10:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The people of our district can judge the weather in many ways. Old Paddy McCabe says that when there is a red sky in the west in the evening the following day will be good. When heavy clouds float across the sky, or when there is a ring around the moon it is a sign of storm.
When the clouds are rolling across the moon it denotes rain. A rainbow from east to west fore-tells a shower. When birds come to the door it is a sign of rain. When birds fly high it is a sign of good weather but when they fly low it denotes rain. When sea gulls fly inland it is a sign of storm. When the curlew sings over dry
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 10:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
People who study the habits of birds get much useful information as to weather conditions. If the swallows fly low it is a sure sign of rain but when they fly high good weather is not far off. When the curfews call shrilly it is a sign of rain. The robin sing in the center of the brush if the day is likely to be wet but when fine he sings on the topmost branch. When the wild geese come early we can expect an early and a severe winter.
People in this part of the country have many superstitions about birds. When one magpie is seen it means that bad luck is coming but when there are two it means good luck.
One for sorrow, two for joy, three for a marriage, four for death, five for a funeral, six for gold, seven for silver, and eight for a story that never was told. There is another version of this. One for a letter, two for a cheque, Three for a marriage, four for a birth, five for silver, six for (-) and seven for a story that never was told.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 10:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
When there is a dark black moon.
When the rain sticks to the glass of the windows.
When the curlew goes to the south.
When there are no stars in the sky at night.
Signs of frost.
When there is a ring round the moon.
When the stars shine brightly.
Signs of snow.
When the wind is from the east.
Signs of Dry weather.
When the curlew goes to the north.
When the crane goes to the north.
Signs of Storm.
When the cat scrapes a tree with his claws.
When we see the crows diving in the air.
These weather signs were told to me by,
Mr. Thomas Fennessy,
Ballysaggart.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 10:42
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This district was connected with the Rebellion of 1798. The battle was fought on Ovidstown Hill, Co Kildare, Barony of Ikeathy and Ougheranny and the scene is quite convenient to Newtown N.S.
Sometime before curfew was enforced in certain parts of the country but not in the peaceful village of Cloncurry. One evening a Captain of the Yeos was riding home from Kilcock, through Cloncurry, when he came on an old man named Dixon, (descendants still living there) repairing a cart. The officer accused him of breaking the Curfew Law and carried the old man off on his horse. It was dark and when they halted at the Toll Gate in Cloncurry, Dixon aged though he was, slipped off the horse and tried to escape but was shot by the Captain.
It is said too that the students from Maynooth College took part in the Battle of Ovidstown. The rebels were defeated and so many were killed that a ditch there is called the "Murdering Ditch".
A lone bush in a nearby field marks the Croppies' graves.
The family named Clinton, (only descendant now, a
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 10:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
When the curlew is heard whistling, rain may be expected. When the curfew flies towards the Curlew Mountains, it is a sign of good weather.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 00:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Daoine Cáileamhla
A few years ago a man lived in Ráth Luirc. He was a great man to use a scythe. He cut an acre of hay in the day. He had competition with another man and he beat him. The man's name was Patrick O Leary.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 00:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Oh adorable Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ dying on cross for our sins altogether.
Oh holy cross of Christ see how I believe in Thee,
Oh holy cross of Christ stir up in me all good and truth
Oh holy cross of Christ that I will be in the right way of happiness
Oh holy cross of Christ warn me from all danger death and Sin also give me life
Oh Crucified Jesus of Nazareth have mercy on me now and for ever more.
In honor of Jesus Christ bring us in the right path to heaven.
True as Jesus was born on Christmas day in a stable at Bethlehem,
Here as Jesus was circumised on New Years day
True as He ascended into Heaven on the 40th day.
So in honor of Jesus spare us from our enemies
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-28 00:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
to be seen and not to be seen now and for ever,
Into thy hands I offer my self to Thee.
Oh Lord Jesus have mercy on me
Blessed Mary and Joseph pray for me.
Through Jesus and Joseph of Arcubic who took him down from the Cross and burried him.
Oh Lord Jesus through the bitter Passion thou didst Suffer on the Cross when thy Soul was hung from thy body have mercy on my Soul when it parts from my body and in the Sinful world.
Oh Jesus save me that carried the cross with me that I may my dangers be all forward to thee Amen.

I offer up this prayer in honor of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ hoping the Father will think of me. The Spirit of the Sun will help me and the Blessed Trinity will preserve and bring my Soul to everlasting happiness Amen.
I got this prayer from my Mother.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 23:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
called "Little Matthew".
"Kilfree" or the church of the heather is so called because at one time a church was built there amongst the heather.
"Doon" which means a fort got its name because the fairies are supposed to have lived there.
"Carrantample" got its name because there was a church in it at one time.
"Cuilmore" which is a big wood is so called because at one time it was covered with trees.
"Annaghmore" is so called, because at one time it was a big bog.
"Annaghin" was at one time, it was a small bog.
"Gurteen" which means a little field
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 23:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As I lay on the hill-top mid the heather perfume,
I feel that my features a bright colour assume,
This sweet balmy air blowing in from the sea,
To brighten my memory and bring past thoughts to me.

As I gazed on the hills in a circle around,
With none to disturb me no voice to resound,
The sight that's before me no picture can show,
No fonder impression could Nature bestow.

My own native birth-place I plainly do see,
With its pleasant green fields smiling on me,
Where my school-days were spent without sorrow or care,
To roam and to wander enjoy everywhere.

Oh! what history there in these mountains doth dwell,
Too much for a poet or historian to tell,
Where our forefathers prayed by night and by day,
Till the laws of the Sassanach drove them away.

That Carraig an Aifrinn or Mass Rock on the hill,
Would make you feel sad and your heart it would trill,
Where our priests and our people gave honour to God
Both hungry and cold and not properly clad.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 23:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I can see Derrynane the home of brave Dan,
Just on the horizon the sun it shines on,
On through the mountains to the gap of Dunloe,
From that to Mangerton and the Valley below.

The Vale of Dromaughty is historic to me,
Where the English historian wrote on history
And only God's mercy that lake did not swell
And sweep Froude and his writings right onward to H -

And o'er the Atlantic that tyrant did sail,
The names of the Irish he tried to blackmail,
But our famed Fr Burke who did him pursue,
And out of the States he banished him too.

My holidays ending I must bid adieu,
To that beautiful scene I now hold in view,
Although I am leaving my thoughts will remain,
Mid the hills and the valleys till I come back again.

For all the kind favours that my friends did bestow,
And indelibly printed where ev'r I may go,
To all friends and companions I must bid farewell,
Going back to Cork City for there I must dwell.

Froude lived on the shore of Cumar Loch (Harringtons live there now) It is said that he wrote his histories of Kerry.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 23:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
MONEEN
the little bog in the townland of Clooncunny

FEREDGRA
the field of the plover, a place beside the lake near Moneen where the water birds come to feed.

THE SHROUGH
A long neck of land beside the lake usually covered by water in Winter time.

LONG GEARRA
an island opposite the village of Clooncunny Lough Gara

ANNAGH
situated in the townland of Derrycough Kingsland contains many interesting things. THE CREE which local tradition has it was a place where mass was read - a large flat stone in the shape of an altar. A holy well called ST PATRICK'S WELL which never dries noted for curing broken limbs.
NB:- One old man says there were priests ordained in Annagh in the Penal Days.

THE COLAHEE BUSHES
which mark the site of a convent. Tradition says that three old pious ladies came there and erected a home for old pious ladies and gentlemen. There
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 23:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
CLUAIN COINNEADH
The hill of the firewood the old people of the district say that in days gone by this place was thickly wooded. The presence of a good deal of bog bears out that statement.

CALDRAGH
A graveyard. This place is situated on the top of a hill on the land of a man named Casey in the townland of Clooncunny. Many tales are told of the place. One may be found under the heading of "Ghost and Fairy Stories".

CLUANAFORT
The meadow of the fort, in the adjoining field to Caldragh

ACKRAGH
The place of the slaughter. Legend has it that there was a great fight there between the North men and the men of Connaught and that the bodies are buried in a field about half a mile away.
NB:- This has since been give to me as Ath Gíorra - short cut and was used by St. Attracta to cross the lake to this side. There are rocks all way across.

CLUAIN na CILLE
A field about half a mile away.

EISCIR
is a sandy place on the shores of Lough Gara.

BLAINE
A bay on the shores of the lake.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 22:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
it on the Altar. In the centre of this Dish was wrought a Cross with a circle around it. Then St. Patrick proceeded with the Mass. From this incident we see the great belief St. Attracta had in prayer.
St. Attracta also visited Clogher (my locality) in which to-day a blessed well stands in her honour. It is surrounded by three walls. On the middle one is carved, on a limestone flag, Our Lord's image hanging on the Cross the hammer and nails and other things that were used. On the top of the middle wall are twelve of those mysterious round stones which are met with in so many parts of the country. On the 11th of August a pattern is held each year in her honour at her well. The well consists of two wells (although our ancestors say there were three formerly but that one was evidently filled in) one of which is circular in shape. In a rock near the well there is a hole where the saint was supposed to kneel in constant prayer. Some people say that the waters of St. Attracta's Well will not boil. St. Attracta lived in the fifth century.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 22:44
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
No Saint honoured locally holds such reverence as St. Attracta. People differ about her birth place but most people say she was born in "Tír Fhiachrach". Many hands sought her in marriage but she made up her mind to give her life to the service of God. On doing this she disobeyed her father, we are told, for the first time in her life, since he had always wished her to get married. Eventually he grew so angry that she had to fly from her home taking with her a few of her father's servants. She journeyed towards Lough Gara and a district called Killaraght (Church of Attracta) where she built her Church, Convent and hostel.
Around this vicinity she came in contact with St. Patrick and as her Church had yet been consecrated she was pleased to have the opportunity of having the first Mass said by St. Patrick. Before he began to say Mass he informed St. Attracta that a Paten was missing. St. Patrick was about to postpone the ceremony when St. Attracta besought him to continue, saying that God would provide a Paten.
Mass was begun and a golden Disk appeared over the saint's head. Slowly it came down and rested on her shoulders. The Virgin bent her head in silent prayer then she advanced to the Altar steps and laid
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 16:08
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The mortuary chapel erected by Lord Castletown is a stone building with a slated roof. It is 15 feet long and 12 feet wide. It has a large stained-glass window on the side facing the road and four small windows fitted with stained glass on the western side.
This building adjoined the old chapel and entrance to the mortuary Chapel could only be made from within the old chapel. The side which adjoined the Old Chapel is now closed with boards and a door fitted in this side.
A caretaker is still employed to keep the tomb clean. This caretaker, who has a small house in the village of Clough, is a tenant on the Granstown (Lord Castletown) estate.
The late Lord Castletown, a nephew of Richard Wilson Fitzpatrick Esq. regularly visited the tomb, and had the building kept in good repair.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 15:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Monasteraden's patron saint is St. Aiden, who lived about the year 500 and died in 557. During this period he spent most of his time in Monasteraden. The word itself tells us that it is one of great history. It means "The Monastery of Aiden". The monastery was built by St. Aiden but it has now faded from view. The walls of it - or at least one wall - forms the boundary wall of the Monasteraden cemetery. This great man - who was a native of Co. Sligo was a very good and holy man. Besides in Monasteraden, he had monasteries and churches all over the diocese of Achonry. The parish itself, is called Kilcolman or the church of Coleman, for St. Aiden's name was "Hugh Coleman".
There are many people called "Hugh" in this district at present after St. Aiden. His feast-day is on the eleventh of August, but is not a local holiday, which is, indeed a great pity.

Mary McHugh
Island Road
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 15:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Ainmneacha Lustraidhe a bhailigh an múinteóir féin, Micheal O'Braonáin, i nDaimhliag agus san Uaimh on mbliadhain 1907-1938:-

1) Fearbán = explained as the "creeping buttercup" by Jas. Meade, Duleek

2) Brioscán = silver-weed ("an herb which is eaten" - Mrs Louth)

3) Bocán Bearach = "a kind of mushroom"
4) Johnny Mugóirí - berry of wild rose
5) Muggle-dee Mooneys = do. (Duleek name for 4)
6) Seamsán(?) = wood sorrel
7) Biolar Scraab - explained as watercress

8) Boltarán Buidhe = ragweed
"Ridlum ró: ró do dhruim lee
I'll send you to hell in a Boltarán Buidhe"
From Mrs Lowth, Downstown, Duleek.

9) Cliabh na gCleath - explained (Mrs Lowth) as "a kind of flower"

10) Slánlus = St Patrick's leaf

11) Cupóg eé -aán = "wild rhubarb
Dineen (2nd Ed.) has Copóg Feain P. 246.

12) Cur-loch(s) - explained (Mrs Lowth) as a root called fairy's potato.

13) Meáachán Muire = lady's fingers

14) Lus na Laogh - Plants make a dose (Mrs Lowth)
15) Lus na Pighne - Plants make a dose (Mrs Lowth)

16) Praiseach = charlock. Pron Presha

17) Bog-Lus - explained as "a little flower growing in the mud" and pron. bug-lush. Dineen gives it as bristly ox-tongue (688)

18) Bliotán = a weed. (Mrs Lowth. See Bleachtán, Dineen P.102
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 15:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1) The Mollee Waun (Pentony)
2) The Bawl Braddhin's (Tully's, Orel.(?))
3) The Parrick (Do)
4) The Quarry Field (at Susan Kelly's, Downstown)
5) The Rushy Field (Lenehan's)
6) The Pigeon's Meadow (Saurin)
7) The Clock Lee (Do)
8) The Burnt House Field (Do)
9) The Church Field (Saurin)
10) The Con Field (Saurin)
11) The Kiln Field (Do)
12) The Old Clover (Do)
13) The Bushy File (Do)
14) The Bottoms(?) (Mrs W. Hatch)
15) Thor na Bran
16) The Burnt Home Field
17) The Tenant's Field
18) The Lay Field
19) The Church Field
20) The Long Leg
21) The Bárr na Vee-an (field near Somerville)
22) Mullach na h-Ainghe (near Matthews, Ml Hanover(?)
23) Gogadhaun
24) The Mullogh Bwee (near Bellewstown)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 15:00
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
25) The Bleach (on Abbey Road)
26) The Karnah (field under the Park)
27) The Maudlin (Down Drogheda Rd. near(?) Reilly's)

28) Creeve (big long field in front of Avenue going into McKeever's of Annabrook)

29) Chapel Field (Mr. McCourt's West Barns(?))
30) The Well Field (track of well in it) Do.
31) The Dharris (last field of Smith's on Abbey Road
32) The Barn Field (Fitzharris)
33) Pairch a Raithnigh (up at Cluskey's Ladymoor)
34) The Quinicker Do.
35) Cargantown
36) Clara Munkeens (over at Rosie Wall's)
37) Acra Kaa-rah - beyond Knockisland
38) The Molish Field (near Garballagh)
39) Crock Muc (Lenehan's Gillintown)
40) Cill-a-Meshan (over at Tom Callaghan's)
41) Munkeens (over at Rosie Wall's)
42) The Slang Ditch (Mr Lenehan's)
43) Parkee Ackee (Paddy Curley's at Bughloch(?))
44) The Review Field (Col. Smith's)
45) The Galleys (Do)
46) The Creeve
47) The Creeogs (Pentony)
48) The Crottagh (Do.)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 12:06
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
19) Sponnc = Coltsfoot
20) Bainne Muc = Sow thistle
21) Cupóg = dock

22) Plobaiscín, - explained (Wm Louth)(?) as "Flower that grows in a ditch
Dineen's give Pleibistín (P. 547)(?) and Plobairscín (P. 848)(?) as marsh marigold

23) Mionnán Muire
24) Samhadh dhóan (plant)
25) An Thoolan (plant)
26) Ev-lann (plant)

Na focla roimhe seo: Micheál O'Braonáin, an múinteóir féin, a bhailigh ó'n mbliadhain 1907 - 1938
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 11:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
50) Fra-han (Cluskey's Ladymoor)
51) The Mullagh (Boylan's Bellewstown)
52) Crocka Fotha (Do)
53) The Little Moors (Platter)(?)
54) The Big Moors (Do)
55) The Gravel Paths (Annagor)
56) The Piper's Field (Curley's, Dugloch(?))
57) The Cruach (Do)
58) The Lay Wollee (Gernon's)
59) Move na h-Annee (Do)
60) Crock Skerry (Do)
61) Lay More (Do)
62) The Little Nanny (Do)
63) Sir James' (Do)
64) The Bawl Braddhim(?) ( Green's Gaulstown)
65) Knock Roo-an (field at John Warren's Gaffney(?)

66) The Quallahfyin (Jack Meade's Field) Is it a river or field?

67) Rank-ons (field at Gernon's)
68) Crock a Thubber (at Bellewstown)
69) Port na Mulloch (along Nanny - Smith's)
70) The Carnan (at Doctor's- Smiths)
71) Mollee Wee - Wm Smith gave me
72) Luggersnah - (Down at Cornolly's)(?)
73) Kraa-thah - Gogarty's field at Mass's
74) Thollach - Cleirigh - Lowth's (?)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 11:27
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I can see Derrynane the home of brave Dan,
Just on the horizon the sun it shines on,
On through the mountains to the gap of Dunloe,
From that to Mangerton and the Valley below.

The Vale of Dromaughty is historic to me,
Where the English historian wrote on history
And only God's mercy that lake did not swell
And sweep Froude and his writings right onward to H -

And o'er the Atlantic that tyrant did sail,
The names of the Irish he tried to blackmail,
But our famed Fr Burke who did him pursue,
And out of the States he banished him too.

My holidays ending I must bid adieu,
To that beautiful scene I now hold in view,
Although I am leaving my thoughts will remain,
Mid the hills and the valleys till I came back again.

For all the kind favours that my friends did bestow,
And indelibly printed where ev'r I may go,
To all friends and companions I must bid farewell,
Going back to Cork City for there I must dwell.

Froude lived on teh shore of Cumar Loch (Harringtons live there now) It is said that he wrote his histories of Kerry.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-27 11:17
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
As I lay on the hill-top mid the heather perfume,
I feel that my features a bright colour assume,
This sweet balmy air blowing in from the sea,
To brighten my memory and bring past thoughts to me.

As I gazed on the hills in a circle around,
With none to disturb me no voice to resound,
The sight that's before me no picture can show,
No fonder impression could Nature bestow.

My own native birth-place I plainly do see,
With its pleasant green fields smiling on me,
Where my school-days were spent without sorrow or care,
To roam and to wander enjoy everywhere.
Oh! what history there in these mountains doth dwell,
Too much for a poet or historian to tell,
Where our forefathers prayed by night and by day,
Till the laws of the Sassanach drove them away.

That Carraig an Aifrinn or Mass Rock on the hill,
Would make you feel sad and your heart it would trill,
Where our priests and our people gave honour to God
Both hungry cold and not properly clad.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 17:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
About a hundred years ago there was a terrible big wind. It happened about the year 1839. It is said that this terrible wind rose on the Bog of Allan and it only had a certain breadth with it because there were parts that it did not touch at all.
It is said that it was going at the rate of 90 miles an hour. It did terrible destruction everywhere and it did not leave any thatch on the houses for miles around. It started at eleven in the night and did not cease until the next day. It was worse up on the hill than down low. It knocked a big building in Bellewstown, and nearly blew down the chapel in Ardcath. In some houses the delph was even shaking on the dresser, with the force of the wind outside.
There was another great wind on the 26th February 1903. It was also very strong and took thatch and galvanize off the house. Some people have not got the galvanize it was carried that far.

Seumas O'Gormáin,
Station Rd.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 17:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Some people say that if you went near a weasel, he would put his tail in his mouth and whistle for the other weasels.
They say that a weasel will not go near a stoneychatter's nest.

Seumas O'Gormáin,
Na Coimíní,
ó Liam O Gormáin
Na Coimíní
Oibrightheoir ar an mbothar iarainn (55)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 17:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Sally Picker or Pecker (a Bird)
The sallypicker is a little small bird and he is of a blue and yellow colour. Some people call him "the blue bonnet" because he has a blue dot(?) on the top of his head. He can hang out of a tree with his two feet, and he upside down just like the way a fly hangs out of a ceiling.
Seán Sainsuin,
Duleek,
ó bhéal oideas na ndaoine
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 17:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
75) The Buggans, a field up at Crickstown (?)
76) Killameshan, a field at Cullaghan's, Bellewstown
77) The Grolla, a place at Mallawho(?) above Garristown
78) The Scallernagh, a townland near Riverstown, Duleek
79) Crinch-a-Crann, River on New Long Road, Duleek

80) Balywaltha, townland where McGuinness live (Dug (?)

81) The Clooney, a valley at Ardcath
82) Quallafina(?), a river on East Commons, Duleek
83) Slough, an old river on the Commons, Duleek
84) Chrishnalanagh, field at Carntown(?), Duleek
85) Tobeen, a bog at Garristown
86) Clonlusk, Taaffe's, Duleek

87) Skeharnagh, a place name over Downstown Rd. Duleek

88) The Mulla-dhu, field at Rathfeigh
89) Pullbrock, field at Rathfeigh
90) Lisafona - Gate at Macetown
91) Pullbuee(?), field at Rathfeigh
92) Killafakie, field at Ballyhack
93) Bohan, field at Danestown

94) Tuberskeen, Gilleen(?) - Well at Cushenstown, Duleek

95) Crucknahackna, field at Warrenstown College
96) Lagenna, field at Warrenstown College
97) Mouleywure, field at Warrenstown College

98) Boreen-a-Willa, a small road at Knockmark Church
99) Corewella, land beside Borrawaddy Road
100 Borrawaddy, Road Rathfeigh
101) Knockcommera, wood at Bellew, Rathfeigh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 12:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
102) Pullawinny, - field at Rathfeigh
103) Arrrabunk, - field at Thomastown, Dunshaughlin
104) Pullucy, - field at Reask, Dunshaughlin

105) Ballinfethog - Townland between Bective and Kilmessan

106) Porrickawoe, field at Gillianstown
107) Codderliss, a Common at Rathoath
108) Borniska, a field at Rathoath
109) Legnagunnia, - a farm at Ratoath
110) Toberquakie, field at Macetown
111) Bohog, a field at Kentstown
112) Cranacrisha - Hill at Riverstown
113) Tobar Fionn, Donore
114) Lag a Bhainne, a field, Donore
115) Leig an Easaigh, a field Donore

116) The Lab, field Donore (an Láib ?) said by native (means "mud")

117) An Srath, field in Donore

An Múinteóir féin a bhailigh ó am go h-am on bhliadain 1907 - 1938
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 11:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Latham family or the founder of them came with Cromwell's army and got a grant of land belonging to the Graces near Graystown castle. A mansion was built by one of them in the present townland of Helenpark then part of Graystown; A high wall was placed around a farm about 20 acres; This was known as "The Deerpark". Vestiges of the wall still remain but its fast disappearing. The stones are being sold for building purposes. It was said that Latham kept deer in this park and used them for sport as they are used yet in Kildare.
The first Latham came to Graystown after the Siege of Clonmel; The last died about 1815. The name lives yet around the district and even some of them are called Oliver which was the principal Christian name probably because of their being adherents of the Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 11:05
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Directly oppostie the Catholic Church gates lived a famous character called Baker. He was a captain in the Killenaule Yeomanry in the years 1795 to 1800. He had as a colleague Captain Sam Henderson of Glengoole. Their Colonel was Oliver Latham of infamous memory. Latham left no direct descendants. Neither did Baker. The Henderson family still occupy the old home in Glengoole (1938) but with the death of present occupants, the race will be extinct: The Yeomen were known as Latham's Lambs or "Baker's Braggers".
They occupied their time as local bullies and settling private differences or having revenge on the peasants who might have offended them in any way. I can find no trace of the great Cromwellian families of Langley or Going interesting themselves in the 98 trouble.
The Lanes were another powerful family who lived in Lanespark. They are remembered chiefly as having sheltered Father Sheehy; Their estates became encumbered and were taken over by Englishmen who ran a tile factory on the lands: It subsequently fell in to the hands of a bank clerk Wm. P. Hanly who became famous as a trainer and owner of racehorses. Hanly was more famous locally as the owner of a Battering Ram with which he destroyed hundreds of houses in Modeshill, Mohober, Drangan and Mullinahone. in the early Land League days: He was greatly admired for his courage and
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 10:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago there was a hedge school in Kerryhead. Held in a field which Tom Roche in Dreenagh owns now. A good many boys and girls went to that school.
The master was Master O'Connor. The subjects that he was teaching them was how to read an write. He was paid for his work. He got money from every man who had a child going to him.

Donal O'Reidy
Clahanecleesh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 10:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
and oats. If you opened a pit of potatoes and if you throw away the bad ones, the pheasant comes and eats them.
A lot of people come out from Tralee to shoot pheasants every Sunday. If you showed them where a pheasant was, they would give you a lot of money.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 10:47
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A Pheasant is a very big bird. She is about the size of a hen. Her colour is brown with white and red spots. She has a small tail. You would know her from the cock because the cock has a long tail.
She always stays in a wood, or in a field of hay, or in a field of corn, or in a place where there is a lot of briars or ferns.
She lays about seven or eight eggs. They are about the size of a chicken's egg. They are spotted eggs.
She sits on the eggs for about three weeks. Then the young pheasants come out.
Then she goes out every day gathering food for the young ones. When the young pheasants are big they are able to provide food for themselves.
The food she eats is turnips
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 01:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Pheasants are few here now. The pheasant builds builds her in scrubs and underwood. She lays from 12 to 14 eggs and it takes her three weeks to hatch. She is also a contrary shot because when she rises she doubles back to earth again. It is not considered a sportsman's act to shoot a pheasant while she is running on the ground.
There is a farm in this district called the pheasantry. It is the first farmhouse on the right hand side of the Castlecomer Kilkenny road when you pass Heneberry's Cross going towards Castlecomer. There is a long avenue leading up to the house from the road. This is the story of how it got its name.
When the Lord and Marquiss of Ormond were in occupation of the castle pheasants were reared here for the shooting season. The people around the place were able to know when it was going to rain by the pheasants screech.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 01:07
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A Pheasant is the most beautiful of all the wild birds. The Pheasant is a game bird. She is preservered. Game keepers are appointed to keep guard on the mountain and to let nobody kill the pheasants until the hunters come along. There are two kinds of pheasants a cock pheasant and a hen pheasant.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 00:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Tankardstown:- Richard Murphy R.C. Pay school 2/2 - 5/5 per quarter. School a stable 10 chn (6 boys - 4 girls)
Other schools were at Boolies, Clatterstown, Yellow Ford, Princetown Low Cross (McCourts' hill)
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 00:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There was a hedge school in a small field called Boyle's field. Two Miss Clarke's from Kilmoon taught in it. Irish was spoken by the children and the teacher and they spoke very little English. The field is in the townland of Philpotstown, Garlow Cross.
There was another one at the bottom of the same field in which my Grandfather's brother-in-law taught. It would begin at six in the morning and finish at ten that night. Mr Clark from Kilmoon was his name.
There was another hedge school in Belinter but I do not know who taught in it. There was another one in Lismullen a man named Boyle from Rathoath taught in it. It was there for about six months.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 00:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
We know of at least one hedge school in this district. The school is known as Companas school and the teacher is known as the "Compana". The school was where the present Dillon's Bridge school now stands. The teacher was an ancestor of my own. His name was Sheridan. He was my grand-father's grand-father. He afterwards became an National School Teacher. And his name is one of the first in the records of the board National Education. He taught from a book known as "the Redimedaisy" (or Reading made easy) Amongst other things this book contains information about the stars in a rhyme. We do not know how hard they worked in this school but one day a black cat tried to kill the masters chickens and the children spent
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 00:22
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are two graveyards in the parish. "Mountown" and "Temple Kieran" are the names of them. They are both in the parish of Walterstown, "Temple Kieran" is in the townland of Lismullen. Temple Kierans is round in shape and the other is square. They are both still in use. There are no churches in any of them.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 00:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
le feiceal.

Fuair mé é só ó m'athair:-
Eoghan Mac Pháidín,
Baile Gib,
An Uaimh,
Co. na Midhe
Aois = 46 bl.

An té a scriobh:-
Máire Nic Pháidín,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-26 00:15
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
siad-san ortha na bróga agus sin an áit a mbeadh an chuideachta.
Ansin deireadh an fear eile:-
"Déanamh gach duine mar dhéanfas mise:-
Chaitheadh sé de a bheiste agus b'fheidir go gcuirfeadh sé air í leis an taobh chontráilte amuigh agus chuirfeadh an chuid eile órtha an bheiste agus an taobh cheart amuigh de agus an méid na rabh dubh daobhtha an chéad uair bhí sé dubh go leór an dara h-uair. Ní rabh a dhath le féiceal bán daobhtha ach a gcár agus an bán a bhéadh in a súila agus na liobra dearga,
Bhal dá mbéadh sruthan beag ar bith a chomhair an toighe chaitheadh siad a ghabhail agus iad féin a nighe agus bheadh siad tamall maith ag baint an t-suidhche as a gcraiceann. An mhuintir a bá bhrónaighe ins an teach chaithfeadh siad gáire a dhéanamh faoi na buachaillí dóigheamhla nach rabh aon bhall daobhtha
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-25 23:55
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
straightness. His life was attempted on several occasions but he came out of all with flying colours. He died in 1937 and was buried in "Teampall Goll" on his own farm. This churchyard has the remains of an old church about the usual size of the 15th century models.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-25 23:49
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Mount Taylor
Laffans Bridge (Mill) - A mill was worked by the Laffan family for generations here. When Rail company built bridge name was changed.
Cattaganstown - No definite knowledge of the origin of the name but in civil survey it was called BALLYCATTAGAWNEE.
Graystown - Supposed to be called after Graces who occupied Graystown Castle, which was supposed to be built by Raymond Le Grós
Mortlestown - Mortells Town ? Has this anything to do with a family now known as Martleys (existing)
Helenpark - Called so by Oliver Latham after his daughter Helen who ran away with last of the Gracess about 1800
Castle quarter - Believed to be connected with old castle which stood on the Rocks at the other side of the river in Killenaule
Springhill - Seat of Hemphills, formerly Cnoc a bhFile: Many wild stories are told about this townland, also bearna gcapóg
Burnchurch - Ruins of Old church. Underground channel to Graystown Castle
Day's Hill - Called after a local seer who lived in a cabin at the foot of hill. Billy O'Dea died about 1840
Cashins' Hill - Named after Cashin family who lived at Railway gates now known as Foley's gate
Mansergh's Hill - Owned by Southey Mansegh: Charles Manser operatic singer is a descendant of this family.
Church Hill - Old church on top. Frank Macker An English reformatory boy was shot here by "Lincolns" IN 1921 or 22.
Taylors Hill - A Hill in old parish of Ballinure called after the Taylor family who owned it (the family is gone)
Bosheen Bog - A bog in Ballintogher so called because an old stone causeway led into it.
Killenaule Hill - The hill on which Killenaule is built. The rise at north side coming from Thurles gives it the name K.H.
Cashel Road - Boherlug. The road to Cashel from Killenaule. The older people called it Boher lug.
Main Street - The principal or part of the principal street extends from Barricades to the shambles.
River Street - The street leading to the stream - The Anner which rises t
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-25 23:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Mount Taylor
Laffans Bridge (Mill) - A mill was worked by the Laffan family for generations here. When Rail company built bridge name was changed.
Cattaganstown - No definite knowledge of the origin of the name but in civil survey it was called BALLYCATTAGAWNEE.
Graystown - Supposed to be called after Graces who occupied Graystown Castle, which was supposed to be built by Raymond Le Grós
Mortlestown - Mortells Town ? Has this anything to do with a family now known as Martleys (existing)
Helenpark - Called so by Oliver Latham after his daughter Helen who ran away with last of the Gracess about 1800
Castle quarter - Believed to be connected with old castle which stood on the Rocks at the other side of the river in Killenaule
Springhill - Seat of Hemphills, formerly Cnoc a bhFile: Many wild stories are told about this townland, also bearna gcapóg
Burnchurch - Ruins of Old church. Underground channel to Graystown Castle
Day's Hill - Called after a local seer who lived in a cabin at the foot of hill. Billy O'Dea died about 1840
Cashins' Hill - Named after Cashin family who lived at Railway gates now known as Foley's gate
Mansergh's Hill - Owned by Southey Mansegh: Charles Manser operatic singer is a descendant of this family.
Church Hill - Old church on top. Frank Macker An English reformatory boy was shot here by "Lincolns" IN 1921 or 22.
Taylors Hill - A Hill in old parish of Ballinure called after the Taylor family who owned it (the family is gone)
Bosheen Bog - A bog in Ballintogher so called because an old stone causeway led into it.
Killenaule Hill - The hill on which Killenaule is built. The rise at north side coming from Thurles gives it the name K.H.
Cashel Road - Boherlug. The road to Cashel from Killenaule. The older people called it Boher lug.
Main Street - The principal or part of the principal street extends from Barricades to the shambles.
River Street - The street leading to the stream - The Anner which rises t
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-25 23:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There yonder lies Bunratty's towers;
There Labasheeda's bay;
On every isle some saintly pile
Once famed in sacred lay.
Thus graceful bending, to ocean wending
To take her toil-worn rest,
Then with the sun, her day's work done,
Sinks to the golden West.
May strife thus end, as these waters blend,
In union blessed from above;
Come happier days and peaceful ways
To the island of our love.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-25 23:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Let Wordsworth sing of Duddon's stream,
And Southey of Lodore,
In verses sweet, they ne'er compete,
With our sweet Shannon shore.
Our purling rills and mist-robed hills,
With many a bank and brae;
There's not the like from Tweed to Forth,
From Solway to the Tay.
From Quantochs and the Mendip range
You mark a prospect fair,
But I'd rather see old Shannon glide
By the cliffs and banks of Clare.
Through fields so green and each boreen,
Where the yellow gorse doth blow,
And far and wide stems on the tide,
In grand and ceaseless flow.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-25 15:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Dhullans - a kind of vessel for measuring corn - grains of corn when carrying the grain from the barn floor on which it was threshed to the winnowing machine - were made extensively in the district. These "Dhullans" had a bottom of soft leather or chamois and the sides were of wicker.
Basket -making, too, was carried on; "skips" (baskets made of "sallies") for gathering potatoes were also made.
The last man who made these baskets and chairs lived in Dunshaughlin and was called "Jack the Sally". He used only his hands.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-25 15:14
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A little farm (four acres) belonging to Joseph Donnelly Odder, Tara is called "the Faudeen" (?) Willie Doyle, Collierstown, Tara owns a field called the "Raheen". There is a Rath at the top of it. The field round Skryne Castle Tara is called the moat-field. In the corner of it is fort or moat.
The "Rappogs" also belongs to A.B. Wilkinson of Skryne Castle. The "Connaberry" is another field on the same farm. Others are the Chapel field, in which an old chapel was supposed to have been and the upper and lower Church.

"The valley of the Black Pig" runs from Collierstown bog through Lismullen to the Boyne.
A height called "Rath Maeve" is in Belper Tara.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-25 14:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Park Murders
and verses composed about the Shooting of the Informer:-

Mrs Reilly remembers the Park murders. She saw the jarvey Brabazon who drove the murderers to the Park on that day. He never got a fare afterwards. He was called Skin the Goat.

A young fellow of 19 called Kelly from Donegal was one of the two who did the deed. They meant to to do no harm to Lord Cavendish and didn't know who he was but when he tried to defend himself - and Burke they turned on him too.
A man named Carey informed on them. He had to leave the country but was followed by a man named O'Donnell and shot.

My name is Pat O'Donnell and I came from Donegal
I am you know a deadly foe to traitors one and all,
For the shooting of James Carey I was tried in London town
And on the fatal scaffold boys my life I must lay down.

* * *

I sailed on board the ship Melrose in August '83
And on my voyage to Cape Town there all alone was I
And when I found out Carey we had angry words and blows
The villain he strove to take my life on board the ship Melrose

* * *

I stood up in my own defence to fight before I'd die
I drew my pocket pistol and at him I let fly,
I fired the 2nd volley which pierced him to the heart
And I gave him a 3rd one boys before I did depart.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-25 14:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Park Murders
and verses composed about the Shooting of the Informer:-

Mrs Reilly remembers the Park murders. She saw the jarvey Brabazon who drove the murderers to the Park on that day. He never got a fare afterwards. He was called Skin the Goat.

A young fellow of 19 called Kelly from Donegal was one of the two who did the deed. They meant to to do no harm to Lord Cavendish and didn't know who he was but when he tried to defend himself - and Burke they turned on him too.
A man named Carey informed on them. He had to leave the country but was followed by a man named O'Donnell and shot.

My name is Pat O'Donnell and I came from Donegal
I am you know a deadly foe to traitors one and all,
For the shooting of James Carey I was tried in London town

And on the fatal scaffold boys my life I must lay down.

* * *

I sailed on board the ship Melrose in August '83
And on my voyage to Cape Town there all alone was I
And when I found out Carey we had angry words and blows

The villain he strove to take my life on board the ship Melrose

* * *

I stood up in my own defence to fight before I'd die
I drew my pocket pistol and at him I let fly,
I fired the 2nd volley which pierced him to the heart
And I gave him a 3rd one boys before I did depart.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-25 14:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a peculiar custom carried on in this district which I think is a survival of paganism.
It is this:-
When a widow or widower remarries they are what is known as "Kettled".
Crowds of young men prepare for the homecoming of the newly weds. They arm themselves with horns, bottleless bottles tin cans etc.
They hide in the woods and fields as near the house as they can get without detection and coming on towards dark they start blowing horns and creating a terrible din.
They keep this up every night for about a week, and there is no use in the serenaded parties getting mad and trying to stop it.
In olden times this din was set up either to scare or propitiate the ghost of the deceased spouse!!.
It is carried on now as a protest against re-marriage.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-25 14:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Ag faire a ba mhó a dheanfaidh é seo agus sé an dóigh a ndéintí é:-

Rachadh beirt bhuachall taobh amach den doras agus deireadh fear aca leis an fear eile a ghabhail isteach, bomhal suidhche a fhaghail, braon uisce a chur air agus é a mheascadh go maith. Thiocfadh sé féin isteach annsin agus a bhróga scaoilte aige agus deireadh sé leis na daoine:-
"Déanamh gach duine mar dhéanfas mise.
B'feidir go mbainfeadh sé de a bhróig amhain agus go mbainfeadh an chuid eile daobhtha an dá bhróg agus bá truagh iad annsin nó bhí fear an t-suidhche gnaitheach ag cur snás ortha.
Deiread fear an cleas arais
"Déanamh gach duine mar dhéanfas mise".
B'fheidir go mbainfeadh seisean dó an bhróg eile annsin agus go gcuirfeadh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-25 14:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
sé sásta gabháil leis, ac ansan Fear Gallda " ó ní dheanaidh sin dochar ar bith duitse. Sin an Bean Sídhe a thig againn sul a bhfuig muid bás". Bhí iongantas ar an bfear eile mar níor chuala sé iomradh ariamh ar a leiteid. B'éigin dó Sheamús an fear a fhágáil thall san teach. Bhí dochas ag Seumús in Dia agus ní raibh dochas ar bith ag an fear Gallda. Pé fíor nó breaga an sgéal seo fuair duine bás san teach ceadhna cupla lá indiaidh sin.

Fuair mé an ceann se ó m' mhathair,
Nóra Ní Chearraigh
Baile Gib,
An Uaimh,
Co. na Midhe

Ainm an duine dó sgríobh:-
Eibhlín Ní Chearraigh,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 23:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
St Patrick during his peregrinations in Ireland called at a house in Follestown which was situated beside a stream of water.
He asked for some butter and was told there was none altho there was a crock of it in the house at the same time.
He changed the crock of butter into a stone which he put in the stream as a stepping stone. Mrs King says she often walked on this stone.
I never heard this story before but will make inquiries in the Follestown district.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 23:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The following crude way of extracting teeth was practised in this locality some years ago.
The patient went to the local blacksmith who tied the offending member to the anvil with strong twine.
Then he reddened a piece of iron and put it on the anvil in close proximity to the patient's face.
He gave such a jump (?) back from it that the tooth was pulled clean out of his head.
Mrs Fitzpatrick says that she knew people who got painful teeth extracted in this way and there were never to her knowledge any ill effects.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 23:43
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
"The oak for a soak".
The ash for a dash

If the oak buds before the ash it is taken as a sign that the season will be good.
If the ash buds first the weather will be bad.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 23:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
LACKEN AND GURTEEN:-
"GLEANN na LAR" is about half an acre of Lacken mountain. The mares were let out to graze there in olden times.It is common.
"CRUCÁRD" a hill on Glenbarrow mountain higher than the rest of the mountain.
"CASFHÉIR" a field in Gurteen. It belongs to Fitzpatrick.
"THE COBBLERS FIELD" a field in Lacken.James Egan owns it.

DERRY:-
"THE HURLING FIELD" is a field where hurling matches were played.
"THE STONY MEADOW" a meadow with a lot of stones.
"THE BEES GARDEN" is a field where the bees swarmed one time. All those fields belong to Murrays.
MEELICK:-
"THE TWO COCK FIELD" it is called that because only two cocks of hay are got out of it .Lynams owned it.
"THE PIER FIELD" it is not known how it got the name.It has been called that for years. Merediths owned it.
"THE HOLLOW PIT" is a field with a hollow in it. Lynams owned it,
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 23:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Crosses were made of strong tape or plaited straw and were placed in the cow-houses on St Brigid's Eve to protect the animals form disease during the year.

Collected from
Mrs Fitzpatrick,
Kilcarne - a native
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 23:30
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
"When the 1st of March falls on a Sunday,
The d---- a stick will we lay till "Monday."
Crows start building their nests on March 1st. It is noted in this locality that when March 1st falls on Sunday the crows postpone their operations until the following day.

It is also noted that if the weather is to be wet and stormy for the beginning of the month they defer the building until such time as it is on the point of clearing up.

If crows forsake their usual building places in the neighbourhood of residences it is said to portend misfortune to the family.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 23:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Oidhche amháin bhí Seamús Mac Ceanainn ag teacht 'na bhaile indiaidh a bheith san "Carn na Coille". Nuair a bhí sé ag teacht fríd an "Ros Cirt" casadh fear gallda air. Gall a mbunas seo a bhí na comhnuidhe thart fá'n áit seo. Shiubhail siad leo agus iad ag cainnt ar gach rud. Leis sin féin chuala siad an caoineadh, agus an caoineadh. Sgannraidh Seamús agus dubhairt sé leis an bhfear eile go raibh an caoineadh sin cosamhaáil le caoineadh leinbh. "D'feargar an fear eile agus dubhairt sé gan a bheith amaideach. "Níl annsin ach éan " arsa seisean.
Níor leig sé a dhath air níos mó fá dtaobh de ach indiaidh an iomláin dó réir mar bhí siad ag siubhail bhí an caoineadh ag siubhail leo istoigh san chlaidhe. Bhí go maith 's ní raibh go h-olc go dtáinig siad fhad le Crios Bhealach. B'eigean dó'n fear gallda an fear eile a fhágáil. Ach a mhic o; caidé dó bharamháil ach nuair a bhí Seamus gabháil d'iarr an fear air gabhaíl leis go dtí na theach féin. Ní raibh
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 23:14
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
"AR LEANAMHAINT"

Trathnóna deas ciuin Samhraidh 'na dhiaidh sin. Bhí an fear indhiaidh a theacht ó na chuid oibre agus é ag tabhairt deoch de'n chapall ins an loch. Leis sin féin d'éirigh an ghaoth mar bhualfác dó dhá bhóis ar a chéile agus siabadh an fear bocht amach agus báitheadh é.

Fuair mé é sin ó m'aintín,
Nuala Nic Pháidín,
Loch-na-nDeóran
Ath-na-gCoire
Tír-Chonaill,

Aois = 55 bliadhain
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 23:12
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
ins na creathaí:- “D’anam dá Dhia ‘s dá Chríosta”. Scannruigh iomlán a rabh de dhaoine ag an bhainfheis agus thug siad iarraidh amach. Tháinic oiread feirge ar na daoine beaga agus gur imthigh siad leo agus fhág siad Pádraic i gConnacht. B’éigin dó féin siubhal as Connacht annsin.
Ba é an rún a bhí ag na daoine beaga nó: - an cailín a thabhairt leo, nuair a fhuair siad an mhathair ag déanamh réidh an tae. “Shaoil siad nac n-abrochadh duine ar bith, :- “d’Anam dá Dhia ‘s dá Chríosta” nuair a rinn an cailín srólfach.

Fuair mé é seo ó m'uncal:-
Eadmonn Mac Grianna,
Rann-na-Feirsde,
Ath-na-gCoire
Tír-Chonaill
Aois = 35 bliadhain;
Fuair seisean an scéal o na athair
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 23:08
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Ainm an Scoláir:-
Caitlín Nic Pháidín
Baile Gibb,
An Uaimh,
Co-na-Midhe
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 11:32
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
St. Messa is the patron Saint of Kilmessan. He had his church at the back of Mr. Donnelly's house in this village. This church was but a small one. It was on high mound. This mound was about fifty feet in height.
Then Saint Messa had a thatched chapel beside the back of Mrs O'Brien's garden in this village. This church was in use for many years.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 11:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
shot beside my great grand aunts house. They came to her for bread. She gave them the bread and they went away. About half an hour later she heard six shots. She went outside and saw the six croppys lying dead, covered with blood. She went inside and told her husband. He got a spade and dug a grave. He put the bodies of the six croppy's in it and clsoed it in. After many years a stone was erected on the site.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 11:26
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
In the townland of Bellinter there is a wood. It is called the croppy's wood. In this wood there are croppys buried. On the top of the grave there is a stone. It is a bout two feet in length and two feet wide. On the stone is written "This is where the croppys of 98 lie". It was erected by Mr. J. Preston. The stone is there about fifty years. It is made of marble. Every year Mr. Briscoe sends someone to clean and shine the stone. These croppys were
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 11:23
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a large stone on Tara Hill. This is locally called the Croppy's Stone. It is erected over the Croppies grave. This grave contains the remains of those who were killed in the battle of Tara 1798. The tradition has it that this is the celebrated "Lia Fail" or "Stone of Destiny". It was placed under the coronation chair of the Ancient Kings of Ireland.
There is also in Tara churchyard a rude stone about ten feet high. It is supposed to be the shaft of the cross of St. Adaman.

At the entrance to Dunsany Castle there is a stone cross on the roadside. This cross was on the centre of the road until about ninety years ago. It was knocked down one night by a load of timber. Michael Fitsimons' grandfather of Dunsany joined the pieces together and the repaired cross was
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 11:14
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There is a well in Kildalkey called St. Dympna's well. It is in a field near the churchyard. There is a local belief that this well started in the following way. One day when St. Dympna was living in Kildalkey, she went out into this field and began to cry. She cried so much that a well sprung up.
Long ago there used to be processions to the well on the Saint's feast-day. Prayers used to be said and water brought away from the well. All this has been discontinued and now no notice is taken of the feast-day or of the well. The well at present called St. Dympna's well is now almost dried up. In fact it is believed that this well is not the original holy well at all.

In Kieran there is one large well known as Saint Kieran's well, and several other small wells. There is a day set aside for devotion on the first Sunday of August. There is Rosary and Benediction. Great crowds remain all night and numerous cures have been obtained.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 10:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
There are two old people over seventy. Mrs. Commons Moyfeigher Mr Tom Lewis Moyfeigher Ballivor They do not know Irish. They can tell stories in English. There were more houses in our locality long ago. The ruins of these can still be seen overgrown with grass. I do not know of any emigrants. I never heard of any song or story of the townland. The land is good and it is not hilly or boggy. It is good for grazing. There is a big wood and it is called Scariff wood. It contains about a hundred acres. It was formerly the propty of Lord Darnley. In it he had a shooting lodge. Many men were employed by him and the place was kept in perfect order. Now it is neglected and has been sold. Large numbers of trees have been cut down and sold. The Stoneyford river runs into the Boyne.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 10:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
this townland. There is some bad and some good land in it. It is good for both grazing and tillage. There are three woods in it. These have no special names. Many streams drain the land. There are 630 acres in Carnisle
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 10:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I live in Carnisle. It is in the parish of Kildalkey in the barony of Lune. There are twenty one families in it. There are twelve thatched houses and nine slated ones. Carnisle sometimes called Cloncarneel comes from the Irish "meadow of the heap of lime".
The following people are over seventy,
Mrs Corrigan, Carnisle
Mr. Michael Kennedy, Carnisle
Mrs. K. Kennedy, Carnisle
Mr. James Gallagher, Carnisle
Mrs Cassidy, Carnisle
Mr. P. Sherlock, Carnisle
They do not know Irish. They can tell stories in English but not in Irish. There were more houses in this locality long ago. The ruins of these can be seen overgrown with nettles and grass. There are six people emigrated from Carnisle. There is no song made about
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 10:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Late Francis Ledwith killed in Great war was a famous story-teller.

Freddy Harvey V.C. born in Athboy Rectory served with Canadians

Bishop Arnold Harvey also born in Athboy Rectory

Late Gerald Walker bred two Grand National Winners - Leinster and Sergeant Murphy. The latter was called after the R.I.C. Sergeant in Athboy who saw him foaled and reported it.

Late Harry Dyas bred Manifesto and trained it and won Grand National twice.

Tom Moore of Fordstown became a film star.

Gillens live between Athboy and Delvin. Chamion long distance cyclists, one did Dublin to his home paced by a car in one hour and twenty minutes.
Laurence Ginnell their uncle famous M.P. in British Parliament.

Late Father O'Growney started revival of Irish language.

Two men in Frayne, Patrick Priest and James Donaghue cut 13 Irish acres
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 10:25
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Decoy
A small level field belonging at present to Patrick Daly of Rahoney.

Crannagole
a large field with a well in one part situated in Dressogue

Deerpark
the field in which Rathmore Churchyard is situated. A high wall surrounds it and it was probably a park for deer when the neighbouring Castle of Rathmore was inhabited.

Stillpark
a field, triangular in shape, near Rathmore Church.

Gathnaraba
a field along the narrow road from Rathmore to Jamestown Bridge. It at present belongs to Thos. Clarke.

The Revellan
near Gathnaraba and on same farm

Armenia
large field in Cloneymore near Rathcarn school

Clonmellon / The Hanging Field
fields in Cloneymore - Walker's farm

The Cruacan
field with small hill in Mooneystown - Manning's farm

Laneygorra
probably Léana Garridh - small field in Gillstown

Carrickbeg
on way across the fields from Moyaugher School to Jamestown

Bannon's Garden
at back of Moyaugher school - one field away

Ardluan
along road known as Boreen McCaura: behind Smith's cottage

The Winshogue
field in Milltown on Millian's(?) farm

Church Field
three fields near Moyaugher churchyard bear this name - one is in Finegan's farm, another in Millian's farm and the third a very large field in which the churchyard is situated belongs to Mr. Dolan
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-24 10:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Oidhche amháin bhí fear ag teacht 'na bhaile ó'n margadh. Bhí sé mall san oidhche agus bhí an fear ag teacht leis féin. Nuair a tháinig sé fad leis an "Dun Bhig" shiubhail an bhean amach roimhe. Bhí sí gleasta go h-aluinn agus bhí cuthlaith mór bán uirthi síos go dtí na cuid sála. Níor labhair an fear ariamh leithi. Bhí sé ag siubháil go tapaidh agus thiocfadh leis a chuid cosa a thogáil.
Shiubháil an bhean comh gasta leis. Nuair a tháinig siad fhad le Crios Bhealach shil an fear go rachadh an bhean an bealach eile. Ach mo lean! ní deachaidh. Shiubháil sí leithi an bealach ceadhna leis an fear. Annsin tháinig eagla iongantach ar an fear agus bhí athas an domhain air nuair a chonnaic sé solus ó'n chead teach. Nuair a chonnaic sé an solus d'éirigh a chroidhe agus fuair sé misneach iongantach. Nuair a tháinig sé fhad leis an teach thionntuigh sé suas an t-sráid agus leis sin bhuail an bhean trí búille san
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-23 22:24
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
These are names of fields in Milltown on Mrs Millian's(?) farm.

The Three Thoors
The Minister's Meadow
Cruckafustha
Thubberruntha *
The Pound
* A townland about here is known as Balruntagh - Baile Roinnte = the divided townland

* * *

Lugawoolie - (Log-an-Mhullaigh)
- a field in Newton belonging at present to Mr. Moorehead. It has a little hill with a hollow on top.

The Ranelagh
- bordering Cortown, on Mr Dolan's farm.

The Kaldhree
- a field in Cloneymore on farm which belonged to Mr Hopkins - now divided into small farms

* * *

The Crathie
The Gorryorth
- near Hill of Ward belonging to Mr Parr
* * *

Brickfield
- near Rathmore graveyard belonging to Mr Wilkinson
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-23 21:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Once there lived a man there named Mr Herbert who was very great in growing Herbs, and ever since it was called Herberts town. He is dead now.
There is a hollow in our district called Bradlies hollow there is supposed to be a ghost in it.
There is a place called Pigotstown. A man named Mr Conall shot 100 wild boars in the woods long ago.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-23 21:51
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The fair green
- because there is a fair there the first Saturday in every month.

The Scarlet Field
- because there was a battle fought there between the Irish and the Danes and there was much blood shed.

The well field
- because St James' well is in it.

The Yellow Ford River
- because the clay beside it was very yellow

The Stony Ford River
- because there was a lot of stones in it.

The Mass Rock
- because the priests in olden times used to say Mass there.

St Laurence stones
- because St. Laurence was supposed to sleep there a night

* * *

About two miles from Clonmellon
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-23 21:46
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
there is a field with a large rock on which St Patrick lay down the tracks of his hands and feet and head are on it. This place is called Crocknere. Cruach na Riogh.

There is a field a few miles from Clonmellon belonging to Mr. P. Molloy. This is named the threatening field because there is a large tree in it, called the Hangman's tree.
There are many fields round where we live, The Coneymoney which means the bog field.
The Glen is a field which is between two large hills.
There is a river which is called Millbook(?) River there is a mill working up to this day.
There is a river in our Land which is called the New Town River at one time it was talked of that there was to be a new town built in that district.
There is a town land in our district named Herberts-town.
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-23 21:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The Trim road is very flat. About a mile from Athboy there is a very dangerous turn called the Doctor's turn because some years ago there was a motor accident there
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-23 21:36
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Scala Park - (Wooded field of Cogills(?))
Carddís - big gravelly field on River Bank - Newmans
The Crottee(?) - next to field of Thlacas(?) Nount - Major Parr (?)

Glen na Sagart
hollowed field with stone in Martinstown - rock on which was Mass in Penal Days

The Bull-bait Hollow
hollowed field also in M O'Connell(?) Martinstown in which were bull fights

The Deer Park
outside Plunketts castle and abbey of Rathmore - Mounds

Lime-Kiln
Martinstown. Cassell's man was burned in Kiln

Bailanaer
Newmans Tullaghanoge probably means grassy field

The Commons
P. Sheridan, Martinstown - Rushy land

The Fiddlers Bush
Deyos(?), Gillstown field with height on which there is a bush and large stone

The Stalks
Mrs Douglas, Ballyfallon

(1) The Well Field
(1) Tom Moore, Danescourt - St James Well
(2) Halley's, Hill of Ward
(3) Mrs Murtagh's , Castletown - Bridgets Well - Walsh , 88 acres(?)
(4) P. Carey, Martinstown (?)
Seoin Cam(?) - J Ledwith, Otterstown (?)

The Bleach Field - always rains when hay is in it (?)

The Stong - Higgins Kilkgelan(?) - big hill on field with stone on top
ball sinsearach (stair)
2020-03-23 21:10
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
was located in the district in which is situated the Hill of Uisneach, in the barnoy of Rathconrath in W'meath XXIV O'Cairbre or O'Carberry, chief of Tuath Binn XXV. O'Heochadha or O'Heoghy, chief of Conel-Aengusa(?) XXVI. O'Maelcolain chief of Delvin Beag, or little Delvin adjoining the barony of Delvin.

1176
A castle was erected by the English at Slane. The castle of Slane, which was occupied by Richard Fleming and his forces, and from which he was in the habit of making