Líon iontrálacha sa taifead staire: 31670 (Taispeántar anseo na 500 ceann is deireanaí.)
duine anaithnid
2020-03-30 00:28
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Is mó sgéul innstear timcheall na háite seo mar gheall ar na fir láidre a bhí ann fadó. Seo sgéul acu fadó timcheall 80 no 100 blian osoir, thagadh na daoine ogac áird go h aonach bhéil Átha buidhe agus bhíodh a lán comórtaisí nirt ann imeasc na bhfear. Bhí cloch mór i bpáirc an Aonaigh agus ní raibh duine ábalta í a árdú ón dtalamh idir lámhaibh ach aon duine amháin.
Protastúnach do beadh é sin. Nuair a dhein séan ghníomh seo tug sé an dubh-slán do aon "Papise", an ghníomh san a dhéinamh. Bhí seirbhrean ar na Caitilicigh agus chuarduigdear an dúthaigh feichaint an bhfaithidís fear a thógfadh an chloch. Sa deireadh fuaireadar fear mór láidir i gCúl Sneachtaigh in aice Dúnmaonmhuithe na raibh fhios a nirt aige, acht fear sgáchmhar dob eadh é, ná céigeadh amach acht go hanamh. Tháinig a chomarsain chuige aon oidhche amháin aguis chuireadar ar meisge no geall leis é agus thógadh ar leó é go páirc an aonaigh i lár na hoidhce. Thaisbheánadar an chloch dó agus thóg sé suas na bhaclainn í sa chead iarracht. Fuareadar cloch mór eile agus chuimeadar anuas ar an gcloich eile í agus thóg sé an dhá chloich gan trioblóid. Annsan, thógadar suas an dubh slán agus chuireadar sgeil go dtí an Protastúnach "Tyner"
á ó í é ú
duine anaithnid
2020-03-30 00:07
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Evictions in Duleek. 190.
There were not many evictions about Duleek, but still there were some. People of the name of Hatch were the rent-warners for the agent. About this time people called Branningans used to live in the bug house at the Cross. The priest of Duleen used to live with them. This manowed about a years rent and when the year was uphe was given three days to pay if not to be forced our of his house.
When the man did not pay the rent and did not leave the house, the landlord and the sheriff came with a few griffers. They went into the house, took the the furniture and left it on the road. That night the Hatches went to live in the house. The Brannigan man had to sleep in a kind of hut along the road with the roof made of flaggers.
A short time after this one of the Hatches whose name was Charlie was shot down in Culligan Street, not far form the Nanny Bridge and it was thought that it was one of the Brannigans that did it.
When they would be evicting any of the poor people they would set fire to the thatch. If anyone built a shed on the farm for cattle the landlord would raise the rent and so the people used to have to bring the cow and the hens with the house. It is said that a big band of tinkers came to Duleek and when they saw the waste land
duine anaithnid
2020-03-30 00:02
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since went near the room in which the crime was committed because it is said that it is haunted. A few months ago a boy who was lodging there had to leave because he could not sleep a night on account of sounds which came from the dreaded room.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 23:59
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A Local Happenings.
There is a big ancient house in Bakers' Road , Charleville. It is said that about fifty years ago, there lived there a man named O Sullivan who was a boot maker.
One day he was repairing a boot which was very badly broken. When he would put a stitch on the leather, the leather and it annoyed him so much that he lost his senses and seizing the first knife he could get he cut his throat.
The blood spurted out his throat and stained the window and other things that were near him. The stains could not be removed from the window and so a new window was put in, but by some supernatural power, the moment the window was put in, the stains appeared also on it.
The window was changed several times, but the same thing happened. In the end the window had to be blocked up. Nobody ever
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 23:59
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Weather Lore.
The sky gets dark suddenly when the weather is going to be bad only for a short time. If you see a rainbow on a Saturday it is a sign of a coming bad week. A rainbow in the evening is a sign of good weather. If swallows fly low it means weather will be cold and rainy. Faoileans fly inland when a storm is coming. The donkey turns his back to the fence if the day is going to be wet. When birds fly high it is a sign of good weather. Hens will run to shelter if there is going to be a shower only but will stay out if the whole day is going to be wet. If the lark goes up singing the day will clear. When the clouds are low down on the Partry mountains you may xpect bad weather. If you can see the Twelve Pins and that Croagh Patrick has no cloud on it the day is sure to be fine. If it rains on St James Day (25th July) it will rain for forty days after. If the sun goes down red in the evening the next day will be fine. If the moon has a ring round it that means rain. The south west wind brings most rain. But if the rain starts in the morning from the East, it will rain all day.
When the cat turns his back to the fire it means rain, or he scrapes the leg of the table it means wind coming. When the sky is like copper it means a storm. If it is mackeral sky rain will come within twenty-four hours. When you see webs all over the ground in the evening it means frost. Spiders leave their webs on the approach of bad weather.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 23:54
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(IX)
Above the pound I gained some ground,
My spirits quite elated,
And up Coach-road I slyly stole,
For then my course seemed easy
Thro' Scallagheen by the Fair Green
Till I landed in Tipperary,
Pursued hot-foot by the town brats,
And idle lounging tradesmen.

(X)
So out by Crogue I slyly stole,
In order to evade them,
And 'twas my lot, by a sling trot,
Ere night to reach Kilfeacle.

(XI)
Up at the moat caught by the throat,
Poor Reinard he was seized on,
"O noble lord call off your dogs,
Or they will surely tear me,
Till my last will and dying speech,
I will make in all its bearing,
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 23:43
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world?
A clock
13. Round the house and round the house and sleeps behind the door?
The twig.
14. When I went out in my fathers yard I met a man roaring and bawling. His feet were made of bone and his nose was made of hom and sahra such ameneen ever was born?
A cock, crowing.
15. What is friendliest thing in the world?
A briar.
16. A little red thing on a tree. Two saw it five pulled it and thirty two chewed it. What is it!
An apple.
17. Under the water and over the water and never touches the water?
The moon shinning in the water.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 23:33
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1. What is it that is under the fire and over the fire and still never touches the fire?
A cake in the oven.
2. What is it that is smaller than a mouse and has more windows than the Lord Mayor's house?
A thimble.
3. Twenty six (sick) sheep went out a gap one died how many came back?
Nineteen.
4. I went out to the garden and I met my uncle Dan. I cut off his head and brought it into the house. What did I bring in?
A head of cabbage.
5. What is it that is as big as a ball, as red as blood, as white as milk an as sweet as honey
An apple
6. A father and son went down the
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 23:23
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1 - 8
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 23:22
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9 - 20 Mairghreád Ní Cionnaich,
Pairc Listeár
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 22:12
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32
Unofficial place names in the townland of Suncroft. (Crochta-na-Gréine).
EasCanrath: This is an area adjoining a river which ultimately flows into the Barrow. Just as the small river Enters the area known as Eascanrath it flows Across the road. (Easca). One morning I inquired from a pupil the cause of her absence from school on the previous day. And she informed me that she could not Cross the "Easca" on account of the flood. There is a raised bank in a field close by which in the distance gives one an idea of a rath. Be this as it may the place is known locally as "The Rath".
Seaumas' Bridge. A bridge on the road leading from the village to Kildare town is known as the above.
Shaun's pit. A depression of about 30 yards diameter, and a depth of 6 to 8 feet in the corner of a field a short distance behind the school is known locally as Shaun's Pit:
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 22:11
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72
10 .V1. 38 Cures.
If a person's breast bone is down there are some people who have the art of lifting it using the following -a tumbler ,a blessed candle about am inch long and a halfpenny.The person on whom the operation is to be performed lies flat on his back on the floor or table with his chest uncovered .At first he is blessed with holy water and then a candle stuck to the halfpenny is placed lighting on the chest .The tumbler is pressed down over the candle which remains lighting until all the air is burned when it quenches .It is then the operation begins .The suction of the tumbler is so great that it draws up the bone with the flesh into the glass and will remain so until the glass is removed.This has to be performed three times on three consecutive mornings. The person has to be fasting each morning.
Collected by teachers of Dangan School.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 18:07
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Long ago in Ireland there were many kings there lived a widow who has only one daughter. When the daughter was young she was very delicate so her mother never asked her to do any work. When she grew up she was not accustomed of doing any work so she would not do any then. Her mother was so angry with her one once occasion that she gave her a beating.
At this time a prince happened to be passing the house and he heard the girl crying. He went to the house and asked why was she crying. The mother was ashamed so she said that she beat her because she was doing too much work. On hearing this the prince asked her to let her go to the palace and she would be very useful. At first the mother pretended that she could not live without her but at last he persuaded her to let her with him. Then he brought in the coach to the palace. When they arrived at the palace the prince brought the girl to the queen. When he told her the story the queen was surprised and said she would get married to her son if her work was satisfactory. When
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 17:11
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Long ago there lived a man named Noble[?] Johnson. He was a Protestant. He went to this holy well one day to take some of the water. He filled a flask with some of the water, which he took home and put it into a cupboard and locked it. Next day he took it out and put it into the kettle to boil it. After a while he took kettle off the fire to see if water was boiling, but the water was as cold as when he put it into the kettle first. He put water back into flask again, and locked it into cupboard. After a couple of days he said he would try to boil the water again, but when he opened flask again there was no water in it.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 14:16
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71.
V1 lining of the gizzard of a chicken is boiled is good for an empty reaching.
The froth of fresh milk takes away the scar left by a cut or burn.
A fox's tongue is said to extract piece of a needle or thorn.
To tie a piece of housewife thread round the wrist for a tráluch.
To put seven different pieces of iron into water for twenty-four hours and to drink the water for poor blood.
Dry sulphur for rash or itch.
A piece of timber kept on the person or worn as an ornament or in the stem of a pipe or cigarette holder is said to be a cure for tender eyes.
A cure for a backache is for the patient to lie downwards on the ground and allow the seventh son of a family walk along the patients back.
A child or person whose father died before child was born has a cure for sore throat.To breathe into the patient's mouth mouth is sufficient to cure a sore mouth or throat.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 14:01
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63
31-V '38 To chew three mouthfuls of the grass which grows on a grave for three different occasions.
To stop bleeding.
To lie on the flat of the back stops bleeding from the nose.
To put a bit of blotting paper under tongue.
To let something cold such as a door Key or any cold piece of iron down the back.
To put the hands in cold water.
To bathe the feet in cold water.
Wet paper or wet cloth.A cobweb.
The leaves of Tóirpín stops bleeding.To immerse the wound in cold water.
The shock received from the sudden application of cold water will stop excessive bleeding.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 13:53
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62.
31 .V'38. Burns.
The froth of fresh milk.
Olive oil.
Paraffin oil.
A person who has licked a lizard is supposed to cure a burn .
Snow water.
To shake flower on the burn.
To shake bread soda on the burn.
To apply the leaves of Tóirpín plant to the burn.
The leaves of Slánlus sewed together and applied to the burn.It is said it was the leaves of this plant which were applied to Our Lord's Wounds on the Cross.
To apply butter to the burn.
Salt and water.
To put pepper in tooth.
To steep a piece of cotton wool in Jeyes Fluid and put into the tooth or rub Jeyes Fluid to gum .
To suck a clove.
To bathe the feet in cold water.
To put sulphur in tooth.
To chew the leaves of the Yarrow Plant.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 13:52
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The Irish Soldiers then repeat–
Yes, we have got some bread and wine, bread and wine, bread and wine.
Yes, we have got some bread and wine for we are the Irish Soldiers.
English Soldiers the say–
Will ye give us some if it, some of it, some of it?
Will ye give give us some of it for we are the English Soldiers?
Irish Soldiers reply–
We will give ye none of it, none of it
We will give ye none of it for we are the Irish Soldiers
We will tell Mary Mac, Mary Mac, Mary Mac
We will tell Mary Mac for we are the Irish Soldiers
English Soldiers reply–
A lot we care about Mary Mac, Mary Mac, Mary Mac
A lot we care about Mary Mac for we are the English Soldiers
We will tell the Black and Tans, Black and tans, Black and Tans
We will tell the Black and Tans for we are the English Soldiers
Irish Soldiers say–
A lot we care about the Black and Tans, Black and Tans, Black and Tans
A lot we care about the black and tans for we are the Irish Soldiers
Are ye ready for to fight, for to fight, for to fight
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 13:44
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English & Irish Soldiers (Game)
Two rows must be provided. One row to represent the English Soldiers and the other row the Irish Soldiers. Then the English Soldiers start of and say–
Have you got some bread and wine, bread and wine, bread and wine?
Have you got some bread and wine for we are the English Soldiers?
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 13:32
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wine? agus amach leó arís:
"We are roamy roamers.
Isteach: Will ye have some bread and wine?
Amach: For ye are Irish Soldiers."
Canann na h-Irish Soldiers agus an dá bhuidhean ag dul i dtreo a chéile agus ón a chéile dhá uair arís:
"Yes, we'll have some bread and wine,
Ye are Roamy Roamers.
Yes, we'll have some bread and wine,
For we are Irish Soldiers."
Agus mar an gceadna deireann an dream eile:
"Half gallon of it will serve ye all,
We are Roamy Roamers
Half gallon of it will serve ye all
For ye are Irish Soldiers."
Agus deireann an dream eile:
Half gallon of it wont serve us all,
Ye are roamy roamers.
Halkf gallon of it wont serve us all,
For ye are Irish Soldiers."
Agus deireann an dream eile:
"We will kill the old police,
We are roamy roamers
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 13:19
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Roamy Roamers and Irish Soldiers
Bíonn scata páirtí roinnte ar dha leath agus iad in dhá leath ar aghadh a chéile cúpla coiscéim ón a chéile agus beiridh na páirtí ar gach líne ar lámh an duine eile. Na "Roamy Roamers" líne acu agus na h-"Irish Soldiers" an líne eile. Suibhalann siad i dtreo a chéile agus canann na Roamy Roamers: "Will ye have some bread and
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 13:03
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59
30' 5' 38 Cures -Jaundice.
A mixture made up of the infusion of the Barberry bark boiled in water sulphur and porter .A concoction made by boiling purging flax in beer.To boil the flowers and leaves of the dandelion in water -strain and drink the water.
The following cure was given to me by John Marlborough ,Barefield.He himself performed the cure which is effective in all cases.The person suffering from jaundice came to him for the cure .He got a twig of the elder bush having nine buds or notches on it .He cut the first three notches in the name of the Father ,Son and Holy Ghost.A bottle of the patient's urine was then got and the twig of the elder put into it.The bottle was then corked and buried in the dunghill.This cure was repeated for three days-either on one Monday and two Thursdays or vice versa.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 12:57
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There are different kinds of travelling folk namely the tinkers, the tin-smiths, and the pedlars, all of whom have their different ways of making their living.
The tin-smiths make their living by making vessels such as cans, milking galons, porringers, oil fillers, and lamps. The men who make them seldom go through the country selling them. They send their biggest sons to sell them. Some times they get no sale for their tins. Often when the tin-smiths have not been about the district for a long time they get a lot of their tins sold as those they sell are much stronger and better than those bought in the shops. Those tin-smiths do not remain long in the
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 12:55
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same place. When they have their tins sold they go to some other place.
The pedlars make their living by selling combs, hair-pins, rings, brushes, laces, ear-rings and a lot of other things through the country. They usually get all these articles sold and the people give a good price for them.
The pedlars make their living by going round from house to house begging. Some of them are very cross and bold. When they come in to the house they look all around them to see what would they ask for. Some of them are very impudent. Nearly every body gives them a small alms. Some of them ask for bread and butter, eggs, flour, milk, potatoes, and a lot of other things.
The tinkers travel in families and those we know best are the Malloneys, the Dohertys, the Cullens, the Boyles and the Calderbanks. My father recognises the same faces of the tinkers coming for the past thirty years. Some of the tinkers give news to the people who buy off them. They tell them about fairs in other counties and about the prices of goods and cattle.
The tinkers, tin smiths and pedlars have different ways of travelling. The richest of them have nice caravans made of boards painted different colours with a felt roof and one window. These
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 04:49
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Any number of children may play this game. The tallest girl stands in front of the others. The is the “hen” and the girls behind her are the “chickens.” Another one goes out of the ring and is the “fox.” The “fox” sits down and pretends he is blowing the fire. Then the “hen” asks, “what are you blowing the fire for?”
Fox: “To boil the water.”
Hen: “What do you want the water for?”
Fox: “To scald knives and forkes”
Hen: “What do you want the Knives and forks for?”
Fox: “To eat your chickens”
Hen: “Will you fight for them.?”
Fox: “I will.”
Then they begin to fight. The fox ran now trys to take the “Chickens” from the “hen” and the does hen best to prevent him. All those the succeeds in taking from her be brings to the “Hen” and “kills” them. The beat two
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 04:49
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left without being caught now become the “fox” and “hen”.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 03:58
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converted into a manor known as Manor Villors. In 1698 a Catholic gentleman named Carroll took the Manor He was an active supported of Jame's & was outlawed by the Williamite but was early pardoned. During the Penal laws he had to pratise his religion secretly. He succeed in doing so for a long time until he was betrayed by one of his servants who was a spy. This spy saw him through the key-hole attending Mass in a private
Freshford Area
There was an open Mass station in Deer Park at Barna
The oldest Chapel in Freshford after the Reformation stood close to the back entrance of Uppercourt. It continued up to 1778. The next Chapel was built where the present parish church stands. It had no bell as the Penal Laws forbad "the hanging of bells in Popish Mass houses", but a bell was suspended over the door of the P.B. house, then in possession of a Catholic gentleman named Shawn Oge Fitzpatrick. In Tullaw mass was offered up in Penal Times in a cave in Carraigeen.
There is a chalice in Freshford bearing an inscription in Roman Capitals & date 1635. There is an other chalice the gift of Lady Marid Juliana Morris, daughter of William Ryves of Uppercourt.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 03:52
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1. Bally Larkin Church
This which now consists only of four walls in the parish of Freshford - about 1½ miles South west of Clomantagh School. on the opposite side of the road (to the Church.) are the Ruins of Bally Larkin Castle - the home of the Shortalls who arrived with or shortly after Strongbow and held large posessions in Kilkenny They were disposessed by Cromwell Settlement 17th Century. I can find no account among the people as to its origin. With regard to the name of the town-land there is no "Larkin" family in the district now
There is a story prevalent in the district that seven bishops were massacred near here by Cromwell(?). The site of their grave is pointed out about three hundred yards to the west of the Church.
2. Clomantagh Castle.
This building in good repair is about half a mile from Clomantagh school to the north-west. This castle is supposed to have belonged to the Shortall's mentioned under "1" above. The present occupier of the castle
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 03:46
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1. Bally Larkin Church
This which now consists only of four walls in the parish of Freshford - about 1½ miles South west of Clomantagh School. on the opposite side of the road (to the Church.) are the Ruins of Bally Larkin Castle - the home of the Shortalls who arrived with or shortly after Strongbow and held large posessions in Kilkenny They were disposessed by Cromwell Settlement 17th Century. I can find no account among the people as to its origin. With regard to the name of the town-land there is no "Larkin" family in the district now
There is a story prevalent in the district that seven bishops were massacred near here by Cromwell(?). The site of their grave is pointed out about three hundred yards to the west of the Church.
2. Clomantagh Castle.
This building in good repair is about half a mile from Clomantagh school to the north-west. This castle is supposed to have belonged to the Shortall's mentioned under "1" above. The present occupier of the castle
duine anaithnid
2020-03-29 03:46
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1. Bally Larkin Church
This which now consists only of four walls in the parish of Freshford - about 1½ miles South west of Clomantagh School. on the opposite side of the road (to the Church.) are the Ruins of Bally Larkin Castle - the home of the Shortalls who arrived with or shortly after Strongbow and held large posessions in Kilkenny They were disposessed by Cromwell Settlement 17th Century. I can find no account among the people as to its origin. With regard to the name of the town-land there is no "Larkin" family in the district now
There is a story prevalent in the district that seven bishops were massacred near here by Cromwell(?). The site of their grave is pointed out about three hundred yards to the west of the Church.
2. Clomantagh Castle.
This building in good repair is about half a mile from Clomantagh school to the north-west. This castle is supposed to have belonged to the Shortall's mentioned under "1" above. The present occupier of the castle
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 23:18
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Written down by Mary O'Neill
v111 Standard 15 years.
Drimgorman,
Inver, Co. Donegal. 10.11.37.
We have two cows.
When we are driving the cows out of the field we say "Chay, Chay" and when we are calling home the calves we call "Suck, Suck".
The cow house is divided into two stands and a walk in the centre, and a drain which is called a "group". There is a hole in the wall for putting out the manure. This hole is called a "bole". The cow house is called a byre. The cows are tied with a chain round their necks and it is a stake to which to which they are tied. The chain is attached to the stake by a big ring called a "bow rug". The stakes are put down into the ground with a big stick across the stakes. This is called the "running tree": and between every cow there is a big stick leaning from the group up against the wall.
St. Brigid's cross is hung in the byre to bring luck on the cattle and horses. The horse is kept in a stable and there is a little place made of wood for the horse to eat his fodder out of and this is called a manger. A horse gets hay to eat in the winter time and
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 22:09
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in the same way. With their backs towards each other and their hands still held they say the words again and at the words “Draw the blanket over your head” the front girl who turned now turns back while turning her arm over her head. The words are same way. They game is now finished but if they like they may start to play it again.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 22:07
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Two catch hands and shake them saying “Shake the bed, Shake the bed, turn the blanket over your head.” One then turns her back to the other girl at the same time drawing her arm over her head, but the two must keep holding hand all the time. They now repeat the same words again and the other girl now turns her
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 22:02
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fire. She escaped but suffered from shock.
An epidemic of influenza broke out in Ireland in the year 1918 and it lasted for about three months. There were a lot of people stricken down with it and many of them died from the effects of it. It was different from the usual influenza cold, as very often people were nearly better of it, but got pneumonia and died. In some houses all the inhabitants were sick together, and as the neighbors were frightened of the dread disease they did not like to go near them, so they suffered great hardship as they had nobody to nurse them. The Doctor was kept so busy that he had not time to visit all his patients every day. The shops in the villages were closed and a gloom was cast over the place. When people died their coffins were not brought to the Church fearing the germs of the disease would be spread, when crowds congregated for the funeral.
It is said that over a thousand years ago Turgesius the
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 21:33
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
I live in the townland of Innishammon (Innis Cámain) which means the crooked island. It is in the parish of Roslea, in the baroney of Dartrey. Innishammon is one mile from Roslea and two from Smithboro. There are five houses in my townland and the population is 31. The land is good but in some places it is boggy.
Three of the houses are slated and two are thatched. All the families are of different names, Guthries, Schlolses, Farrrells, Holdens and my family. The oldest person is William Guthrie who is 73 years
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 21:29
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago a man named John Kennedy who lived at Latteragh went to Nenagh one day and he met a number of his friends.He gave the day drinking until evening when it got late, all his friends deserted him.He started for home but he was not able to go. He sat down in an arch-way and fell asleep.Two men who were making coffins in a yard off the arch-way were going home and they saw him.They said they would take him into the house for shelter for the night.They put him into one of the coffins and went home. When they returned in the morning, they found him still asleep, they awoke him up ,he looked in surprise at the men.They asked him how did he get there or what was he doing. He rubbed his eyes and looked around and when he saw all the coffins around him he said "I am afraid,I am late
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 19:57
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
never heard of fire in centre of room. I saw an old church at Killeshandra Co. Leitrim that never had glass in windows, just bars of iron.
Old floors made of clay are yet to be seen occasionally. Yes, half-doors to keep out the chickens are frequently seen were very common formerly turf, wood commonly used also "shows" from flax mill and whins (forge) dips and rush lights. I heard of newer saw. Every woman made her own candles(to be a good candle maker was considered an asset to a girl when a man went looking for a wife).
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 19:56
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
put the child in possession of a very large number of pins which were sometimes carried loose in the pockets and as they were liable to be lost or dropped into animals' food such as pigs' meat, cows' tubs or calves' drinks the parents naturally became nervous when they saw the children with
unfinished
rem. in enclosed copy-book
Margaret Rooney,
Killcreen,
Selloo,
Monaghan.
from
Thomas Maguire (56 yrs)
Derryartery,
Selloo, Monaghan.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 19:46
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
by saying the words "Heads" or if he desired "Trahs".
The hand was now opened if he guessed "heads" he won if the heads were both in the same direction he lost anf forfeited his pins to his opponent. By saying "Trahs" he meant that the pin heads or points were in opposite directions and if his guess was correct he won otherwise he lost.
This was sometimes played with both hands and was intensely interesting to children who could vary the hiding and guessing in a very large number of ways.
The game sometimes
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 19:38
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
kind of gambling on a large scale.
In the second case and which was oftener played the "stakes" were not so large. In this case one person placed a pin in the left hand with the head either pointing to the thumb or little finger. The hand was now held out to the opponent with the order "Cover me". The other person taking a pin placed it, head pointing to the thumb or little finger of the closed hand, the pin being placed in the space between the closed fingers and the back of the hand. Having placed his pin as he wished he proceeded to guess and this was done in one of two ways
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 19:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
the opponent the question, "Odd or even; The other guessed either odd or else even. The hand was then held steadily and opened carefully to see if the guess was correct.
The pins were taken singly, the person saying as he did so "one's odd and two's even and so on until the last one was accounted for, when if the guess was correct the whole lot were forfeit to the person making the guess. If he guessed wrongly he paid for the mistake by giving the opponent as many pins as were concealed in the hand.
This was as far as playing pins was concerned, a
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 19:27
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
the contents of the bottle would be able for anyone. Pat drank the contents of the bottle and came out. He saw the Kings daugter coming in a carriage. He went to where the serpent was to come in. They were not long there until they saw the huge monster coming up out of the sea. When he came Pat made a sweep for him and cut off three of his seven heads. The serpent cried for mercy but Pat said "I did not come here to let you go" and cut
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 19:14
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Games Played Formerly
and now.
Many of the games which were played in former times, about forty or fifty years ago are hardly ever played now. As a rule each season of the year in times gone by, had its own set game.
About Chtistmas boys and girls played a type of game with pins which we never see played at present. The game was played mostly in two ways viz. by guessing "odd or even" and by what was called "covering".
In the first case the boy or girl took a number of pins and having closed the hand on them, held it out (so closed) asking
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 18:40
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
some places, and "straw-boys" in other places.
In these days when people (get) married they go on honey-moons, but long ago they never heard of them but had a good (this) time at home.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 18:38
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
hat which was wide on the edge and had a big plume of feathers on one side and anoth big one which was of all colours, on the other side. She wore a pair of white stockings and a pair of high laced boots. Be this time cloaks were worn. These cloake were costly.
The bridegroom wore a tall black hat, a stiff front, a pair of knee-breeches, a pair of long stockings and shoes. He wore vest and a swallow-tail coat, When the pair w prepared the horses got ready and the bridegroo and the best man rode before the side-car in which the bride and the bridesmaid. Behind the a group of men on horses, went before all the others The other people went on side-cars, and were dressed in way gay colours. When they reached the church all alighted from the horses. and side-cars, When the pair were married the bride went up on the horse be her husband. The bridesmaid went home in a and the best man followed on, All the people came to the (wedding) bride or bridegroom house, and a great feast w there for them. Dancing and singing and music would be there. At night all the boys around would dress themsel in straw and rags and would come in and dance the bride. These boys were called "sappers" in
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 18:20
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago the wedding customs were quite different from those of late years.
The pair to be married were dressed in different clothes to our people.
the bride about forty or fifty years ago wore a tight fitting dress with wide skirt and boops to keep them wide. This dress was without a collar and the sleeves were wide on top and narrow at the bottom. On her head she wore a
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 18:09
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
That a serpent used to come into that town every seven years and devoured the most beautiful girl in it. Lots had to be cast and the lot fell upon the Kings daughter. The proprietor of the hotel showed him where he used to come in. Next morning he woke very early and went out to where he used to come in and saw a castle beside it and went into it. He saw a big flag in the middle of the castle. He overturned it and under it was a bottle and a sword what was written on it was whoever would drink
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 18:03
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
carried on in this district. Long ago the people never made matches outside shrove Thursday. On the first of January the match-making used to started, and every neighbour used to be looking out to see who would get married, and also go around matchmaking to see how much money she would get.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 18:00
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
This is called the hauling home: There would be another great feast on that day.
The old people were very superstious. They had the following rhyme, and believed every word of it:-
Monday= wealthy
Tuesday= healthy
Wednesday= better than all
Thursday= Crosses
Friday= Losses
Saturday= Nothing at all.
In later days the side-cars came out, and they were used instead of horses. After a while the traps came out and last of all the motors.
The people long ago used to throw showers of rice on the Bride and Groom, but now we use Confetti instead
Matchmaking is
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:58
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
1.6.'38 Soot is given to young children as medicine.
To bathe a poisoned wound in hot water and salt.
To bathe a cut with whiskey.
Barley water is drunk for Kidney trouble .
If a child had a colic and to lift him up by the legs with head downwards it is said the colic would go .
To drink the milk in which the
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:54
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Long ago the people were out working at 5'o'clock in the morning, but they ate no meal before their work.
The cows were brought in in the yard at 6'o'clock, and the people ate their breakfast after milking the cows.
They worked then until 12 o'clock, when they went in to their dinner which consisted of porridge, and milk, or potatoes, and milk.
The ate potatoes at every meal.
At 7 or 8 o'clock they ate their supper which consisted of the same diet, and they sat around the fire talking about the work of the day, and telling stores.
They drank whey and ate curds too, and they liked this very much, because they believed it was healthy food.
Oaten bread was made, and they ground their own oats between two big stones called a quern. The oaten meal was mixed with water, and a griddle was then put on the fire.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:54
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"What is the difference between the north and the south poles?"
"A whole world of difference."
"When is a black dog not a black dog?"
"When it is a greyhound."
"What has four legs and only one foot?"
A bed?
"What is the best but ter in the world?"
A good hefty goat.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:53
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70
31-V -'38 Cures.
The yolk of an egg is good for a delicate person.
The juice of the dandelion heals a skinned heel.
The ashes of a sally tree for proud flesh.
Cowdung cures cures itch in the heels.
A weak solution of bluestone cuts away proud flesh.
A tea made from flax seed and lemon juice for a bad cough.
A poultice of cowdung boiled in milk takes the poison out of a septic wound or cut of any bad sore.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:48
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Wedding customs long ago were far different to the customs adopted nowadays.
Over seventy years ago there were no such things as motor cars or bicycles, so when a man intended (bride) to get married, he and his intended bride travelled on foot or if the bride resided some distance away, the bridegroom saddled a good horse, adjusted a pillion behind the saddle for his lady to sit on. What ever friends he had invited to his wedding, would also travel on horse-back, to the brides house, and bring her from there to the church, and from that to her own home, where there would be a great festival, of wines and meats and all sorts of food. This ws contined until late in the morning. Then the bride would stay at her parents home for about a fortnight. The man would then come and bring his bride home
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
15-6-38 To Raise the Palate or Tongue.
Mrs Kelly ,Quin says in her young days there was an old woman in Newmarket on Fergus who used to raise the palate.She used put the patient sitting on the floor .Then she caught the crown of the head in a firm grip and pulled the hair suddenly upwards and immediately the palate fell into its proper place.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:40
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Worms -usually in young babies.
A teaspoonful of the child's wine drank fasting for three mornings by the child.
A drop of turpentine in a lump of sugar taken fasting for three mornings and then a dose of castor oil.
To eat cold potatoes and salt fasting.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:34
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Hiccough..
To give a start or a surprise or a fright to the person having the hiccough causes it to disappear immediately.
To pretend to drink out of an empty cup or other vessel.
To give a good pulling to the lobes of the ears.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:31
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
To extract a thorn.
A Fox's tongue.
Bee's wax.
Poultice with bakers bread and water .
To apply a piece of fat bacon.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:28
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
68.
31-V-38 Ring -worms.
A paste made of Sulphur and Linseed Oil .
A poultice of garlic
To put a ring round a ring worm with a lead pencil or with ink prevents it from spreading .
To apply tar .
A paste with lime and water .
Application of paraffin oil at intervals of three or four hours.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:23
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
near the borders of Aughavas and Carrigallen and not far from the Ballinamore District. The occupants of the house were Protestants. The woman was very kind and helped them in every way. She brought them out to a barn and covered them up with straw to conceal them. She gave them nourishment galore
and did all she could to staunch their wounds. Now the woman's husband was Yeomanry Captain. He came in with all his men in pursuit of the wounded rebels whom she had concealed in the barn. She, evidently, had great influence with her husband for she called him aside and made him promise to save them. And he did so. "Be quick boys! They are not far ahead. They went past not long ago,. Come on! I must get them at all costs".
Needless to say the rebels got away to North Leitrim later on. We may be certain that they and their relatives prayed for the kind woman
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:23
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67
31-V -38 Fractures -Sprains and Swellings -Lumps.
The leaves of Ground Ivy applied to the swollen part.
A poultice made of the Bog Onion and applied to the affected part .
Comfrey bound around or a tea made from it taken as a medicine.
A leaf of cabbage placed on an oven cover over the fire until it gets black is good for a swelling of any kind.
To apply a penny to a lump reduces .
A poultice of chicken weed and hen's droppings applied between two pieces of cloth to the swollen part.
To rub a clothes iron to a lump takes it away.
Poultices of cow- dung boiled in milk and applied to lump prevents festering.
To rub lumps with several different irons such as nail ,put horse shoe staple ,screw, pincers and file.
To hold the sprained foot under a cold water tap.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:16
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
The land war was about fifty years ago.The reason why the land war started was because the Landlords made the rents so high that the people could not pay them.When they were not able to pay the rents they were evicted and if they refused to have the sheriff would come with his solders and tumble down the house with a heavy log called a battering ram. There is one of the battering -rams still in Ballyconnell that Wybrant Olphert used during those days.
During the land war there was a battle between the people and the soldiers at Brolly.A company of soldiers came to evict the people.The people had no means of defence but all the women of the place came out and began to throw stones at the soldiers and for every stone the woman threw there was
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 17:15
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
arose one night at mid-night and set out to secure his wealth. He journeyed on through his own estate until he came to the estate of his so called enemy and here he buried his gold in a field known to this day as Ballysconnell Field. This of course was a great trick and well played for the old miser knew that if his suspected enemy was to make an effort to find the gold he would never dream of seeking it on his own farm. Having completed his work and secured his gold, he put an awful curse on anyone who should ever chance to find it. The field in which the treasure is said to be hidden is now on the estate of Mr. Bradley but at that time it was attached to Mr. Broughan's estate. Even though everyone is aware of the "hidden treasure", no one has ever so much as attempted to find it, as stories are told that people who in olden times did search for it came to a bad end.
Story told and written by May O'Brien, Ballybromhill,Fenagh, Bagenalstown, Co. Carlow.
Story of "Hidden Treasure" was told to Mary O'Brien by her father, Patrick O'Brien, who resides at Ballybromhill, Bagenalstown, Co Carlow - age about 40 years
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 15:45
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house.
On May eve holy water is sprinkled on all the animals to safeguard them from harm.
On Easter Saturday turf and holy water are blessed and the water is kept to save people from drowning and the turf is kept in the house to save it from burning.
People visit holy wells on the fifteenth of August and keep the water as a cure.
Bridie Neville
Drominuna
From Mrs Patrick Neville, 45
Drominuna
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 15:37
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On St Brigid's day across is made of rushes and put under the roof to keep it from burning. The cross is left there throughout the year. A piece of blue cloth and a piece of white equal dimensions were put out on St Brigid's eve and next morning the blue was longer than the white piece. Both were kept as a cure during the year.
On St Martin's day an animal or fowl is killed and some of the blood is sprinkled in the four corners of the house. The remainder is kept as a cure during the year. Long ago the carcase was put out for the 'Good People'.
Holly and ivy are put up in the ? at Christmas to decorate the houses. These greens are lighted to cook pancakes on Shrove Tuesday. Every family take apiece of palm home on Palm Sunday and keep it in the
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 15:25
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
and hands. The nose, mouth and eyes are made with black thread or with pen and ink.
Bridie Neville
Drominoona
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 15:11
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
15. It is not lucky to disturb or to till a fort.
16. If a dark haired person comes in first to a house on New Year's Day it will be lucky for a year.
17. Good luck to see two magpies.
18. If magpies are continually searching around the house it's a sign that some of the stock are going to die.
19. When a bride & bridegroom are returning home after being married an oaten cake should be broken over their heads as they come in the door - for good luck.
20. In Spring when you see the first, if his head is turned towards you you'll have good luck for that year.
21. When going through fields, if you are going astray, if you turn your pockets inside out you will be put on the right road again.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 15:04
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
Sunday.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 15:03
ceadaithe
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
6. If you are going a journey and if you forget anything you must set backwards fir it or you will be unlucky on your journey.
7. You shouldn't give a present of a pin without sticking it in wood or it will cut friendship.
8. When enlarging a house do not move it to the west because it will be bad luck.
9.If a frog crosses you on the road you'll have bad luck.
10.You'll have seven years bad luck after breaking a mirror.
11. It's unlucky for two out of the same house to get married the same year.
12. Seven years bad luck after killing a swan.
13. It's unlucky to work horses or disturb clay on May day.
14. It's not lucky to give away anything on a
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 15:01
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A Nettle Sting.
To apply dock-leavesto affected part.
To apply flour .
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 14:59
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Stomach Trouble.
Root of cockle boiled in water and to drink the water fasting.
To boil root of dock-leaf and drink the water.
To eat the leaves of Dandelion.
To drink the tea made from the leaves of the dandelion.
To eat the burnt crust of stirabout.
To bury a bottle of butter -milk corked tightly in the ground for three weeks -then uncork it and drink an occasional glass of it.A sure cure for fatilence or wind in the stomach.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 14:52
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Wildfire .
To apply some drops of the blood of person named Walshe.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 14:50
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Head aches.
To drink hot tea without sugar.
To rub the leaves of the Daisy to the forehead.
To rest quietly in a darkened room.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 14:48
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
A backache.
To drink a drop or two of turpentine .
To drink the water in which young nettles is boiled.
To drink 'celery tea' or 'parsley tea'.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 14:45
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
64
31- V : 38 Ear -ache.
To apply a roasted onion as hot as it can be to the ear.
To hole the head over a jug of boiling water allowing the steam to enter ear.
To heat olive oil and pour it into the ear.The natural oil of the wool is supposed to have curative properties .
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 14:40
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
31:5:38 Sore Eyes -continued.
Sixmilebridge and wash the eyes nine times in the well before day break.A paste made from a well solution of bluestone and lard .
To pick the 'sty'with a gooseberry thorn.
To wash with luke -warm milk .
To wash with salt and soft water.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 14:39
ceadaithe
diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
Q What flies with four wings?
A Two bird
Q A man without eyes saw apples on a tree, he took no apples from it yet no apples left he?
A He had one eye, he saw two apples, he took one and he left one.
Q As I looked out of my window I saw a white thing hunting a white thing out of a white thing?
A A white Dog hunting a white goat out of white cabbage.
Q What is more afraid of the cock and the hen than he is of a King and his Army?
A A snail
Q Long and narrow thin and tall many a man gets a fall?
A A gun
Q What is always behind time?
A The back of a clock
Q Why is a horse never hungry?
A Because he always has a bit in his mouth
Q Forty sheep went out a gap, forty more went after that , twice eleven six and seven , three and two how many is that?
A Five
Q Too short cut a bit off and it's long enough?
A A grave
Q There is a little house and a mouse would
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 14:35
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
58.
30 : 5; 38.Cures Chilblains.
to blister with turpentine.
To immerse the affected parts in cold water.
To bathe with hot water and salt.
To apply washing blue.
To rub with salt.
To rub with ice or snow water.
To rub with pickle that is the solution in which home bacon was cured.
To rub with fasting spit but the spit must first be spat on the flag of the door and then taken up with thumb applied to affected part .
To rub with fresh butter .
To rub with parrafin oil.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 13:50
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
trousers what time would it be. Time to get a new one. As round as an apple, as deep as a cup, but all the men in Derry wouldn't lift it up.
Round the house, round the house and stands at the back door. A twig a head like a thimble a tail like a rat. You could guess until morning but you couldn't guess that. A pipe. If the clock struck thirteen what time would it be. Time to fix it. Is it with your right hand or your left hand you should stir your tea. Neither of them- with your spoon.
A kitchen full, a room full but you could not catch a spoonful. Smoke. As round as an apple as flat as a pan one side a woman, the other side a man. A penny.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 13:49
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
52
30.5.38 Cures Rheumatism.
The leaves and stem of the yarrow plant boiled in water to be taken every morning fasting.
To rub a ball of nettles to the affected part of the body or to beat it with a beart of nettles..
Chickenweed in water and then strained and a wine-glassful of the water taken three times daily.
An ointment made from lard and the root of the Common Mallow is good for stiff joints.
A half glass of the 'tea'made from of the Mountain Ash taken before meals
The leaves of Bishop's Weed boiled and put up to the affected parts .
Young nettles boiled in water and a glass of the water taken three times daily.
The Bog Onion boiled in water and a small dose of the water taken after meals like a tonic.
To soak sugar lumps in turpentine and eat the sugar
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 12:57
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diúltaithe
ag fanacht le cinneadh
15'4 '38 Cramps.
To put the feet in cold water reaching above the calves twice daily for fifteen minutes and at the same time to wash over the feet with a towel ,immediately after to hold the arms in water up to the shoulder for one minute and was over the hands hands .Feet to be covered up with warm bedclothes ,a warm footbath with salt and ashes for fifteen minutes twice weekly and once a week a sponging of the whole body immediately after getting up in the morning .
To turn ones shoes or boots upside down before retiring.
Prayer :Crampa mara tú .gan spreacad mar A Mháthair gan peachadh nuair a nocht Sí Críost.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 12:44
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
51.
asked her if she was going to be married.She replied that her father had forced her to do so as she thought Pat was dead she had agreed.Pat and Mary were married that day but not before he had given a well deserved beating to this Englishman with the bewitched hazel stick. Told by Pat Clune,Quin,Co.Clare.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 12:40
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50.
These scenes disappeared and looking up Pat saw fishes swimming over his head.he realised then that he was below the surface of the lake.He was then led to a treasure vault crammed with gold pieces .On being told to take as much as he could carry he filled his pockets and hat with gold.
When he walked into the sunlight again he saw his cow grazing peacefully in the field. The man gave Pat a hazel stick and disappeared.The demense vanished also and pat found himself in the field near the lake.On arriving in Tulla he was surrounded by the people who enquired his whereabouts for the past twelve months.
pat thought he was only one night under the lake .he asked if Mountain Mary were there and he was informed that she was going to be married to the Englishman that day.Pat made his way through the crowd with the the aid of his stick and on finding Mary
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 12:23
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49
and fear.
Before very long a black clothed man bade him good morning. Pat returned his salute and when the stranger requested that Pat should follow him he did so quite gladly .His guide conducted him to a stately mansion which they entered.Pat gazed around him and saw hundreds of the ancient Irish chiefs talking and drinking and amusing themselves as they used to in those times.He joined them on request ad they toasted him and praised him.
Pat was next conducted into a large room where he saw many famous Irish battles fought over again as Clontarf,the Siege of Athlone and the Siege of Limerick.
This last maddened him so much and were it not for the fact that hands were laid upon him he would have gone to the aid of the women he saw fighting with stones in their stockings as he himself said
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 12:13
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48.
Pat O Leary
23 : 5: 38.Some time ago a man named Pat O Leary lived in this locality .He wished to marry a girl named Mountain Mary who had her home among the Glandree Mts.The girl's father however desired her to wed a local English man .The girl though not wishing to displease her father preferred Pat .She told her troubles to Pat and they agreed that pat should sell his cow at the next Tulla fair which was near at hand and they should then elope together.As Pat was driving his cow to the fair his way led him past Cullane Lake.
The cow jumped over a wall and into the field which borders the lake. Pat began cursing the cow black and blue and followed her into the field .he had not gone any distance until he found himself in a beautiful demense.
His cow had disappeared and he not knowing what to do stood gazing around him in wonder
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 11:14
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in on that morning for the loan of money or a bit of butter.
On New Year's Day and on the first Monday of the New Year it was the custom around here not to clean out out-houses nor even to sweep out the kitchen floor nor throw out any dirty water on this day. neither would they throw out the ashes.
I think the idea was fearing they would throw out their 'luck' for the year.
On New Year's morning it was customary for people to go to the house of the neighbours to wish them luck. He was treated royally to whiskey and best food they had.
* The majority of the lore in this collection has been collected from two old men living at Knockfune, Newport , Co Tipperary, named Tom Kennedy and Tim Kennedy both brothers - The latter is confined to bed for some years but appears to have a wealth of information about the old times & the methods of living in these districts.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 11:05
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running water.
If eggs or meat were found they were burned behind the fire.
On May eve in order to prevent piseogues used stick bits of quick beam in the dung heaps. All along from Killoscully to Shallee the dung heaps used be dressed with the quick beam.
On May eve some people would not allow others to take water from their wells others used to put salt in the well & others would take in a cup of water & leave it until morning without using.
The idea as regards wells was that people could make 'piseouges' at a well against the owner.
They used say that lighting ones pipe at a house gave a person a chance of working 'piseogues' & no one was let light his pipe in another house on May eve.
The cows were in many places locked up on May eve.
The first Monday of the New Year was another day for piseogues & I remember when I was young hearing them say that people often came
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 10:55
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The practice of making 'pishogues' was widespread in this country and in some places is still practiced on smaller scale. Butter was the commodity chiefly affected although it was also directed to cattle and crops.
Of course it is very hard to know how they were made or to find the culprit but the findings give different lights e.g. Eggs were commonly found in gardens when digging potatoes & in many cases the ridges or drills of potatoes in which they were found were useless.
Pieces of meat or lard would be found in gardens or in 'pits'. Eggs were put in hay against cattle. Imitation fires of turf, cracked cream on windows, a dead goat , kid, cat &c placed in positions by no other way than by human hands were all supposed to be 'piseogues'.
The means to prevent 'piseogues' were many & varied & people yet do these things without knowing the reason why. When cows were milked the person milking was not to wash the hands
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 10:40
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and 'four year olds'. In other parts the factions took the names of 'Seanavests' (old waistcoats) and Cravats (or Caravets) from their dress.
The famours fight in Barnagore about 2 1/2 miles from Dolla was the end of the faction fights between the 'Black Hens' & 'Magpies'.
In connection with this fight it is believed the famous 'skull' doctor of Barnagore "Dr" James Rohan (whose son still lives there) owed his life skill in mending 'skulls' to the practice he had during the 'factories' between the 'Black Hens' 7 the 'Magpies'.
The Cappawhite faction fights arose owing to a row a between two fellows as to whether a beast that was being was 3 years old or 4 years old.
The members of the faction fights used to go to the Fairs prepared for fights used go to the Fairs prepared for fight & had the ends of their blackthorn filled with lead - when they had drink taken it was easy to start the fight.
The Xmas Fair at Newport & December fair at Cappawhite were famous for their fights.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 10:19
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and 'four year olds'. In other parts the factions took the names of 'Seanavests' (old waistcoats) and Cravats (or Caravets) from their dress.
The famours fight in Barnagore about 2 1/2 miles from Dolla was the end of the faction fights between the 'Black Hens' & 'Magpies'.
In connection with this fight it is believed the famous 'skull' doctor of Barnagore "Dr
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 10:15
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In every town and village there were generally two factions who were bitterly opposed to each other & met generally at fairs where they had a fight hard and bitter & there was hardly any fight without a couple of heads being broken or perhaps some one being killed.
The two factions in Newport were very famous & were the Coffeys & the Ryans (Riaskawallas).
In Borrisoleigh they were called The Magpies and The Black Hens - those were the Stapletons , & Kinnanes & Ryans and Kellys.
The factions in Cappawhite were known by the names 'Three - years old'
duine anaithnid
2020-03-28 09:17
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Tá áit thíos ag an gcladach i mBaile na hAbhann a dtugtar an Ancoire air.
Bád mór a bhí ag tarraingt adhmaid go Gaillimh fadó tháinig lá garbh uirthi agus ruaigeadh isteach annseo í agus do déanadh píosaí beaga di. Acht do sábháladh na fir a bhí innti agus do tugadh aisti an t-adhmad a bhí innti. Thug daoine iarracht faoi dhó ar an mbád a thabhairt as acht chinn sé ortha. Tá anncoire an bháid ann ariamh ó shoin agus tá sí le feiceál ann fós. Baisteadh an Ancoire ar an ait agus beidh an t-ainm sin air go deó.
Báthadh bád ar Ros a' Mhíl amuigh sa gcuan seo cúpla bliadhain ó soin - bád Pheaitir Seóighe. Bhí sí ag dul soir go Gaillimh le lucht móna agus cóir bhreagh aici. Acht dheirigh cuaifeach uirthi agus crochadh na seólta uaithe agus báthadh í. Sábháileadh na fir a bhí innti.
Báthadh bád eile ar Connamara. Ag teacht anoir ar Co. an Chláir a bhí sí thréis a bheith thoir lucht móna. Bhí an lá an gharbh agus ruaigeadh isteach ag Claidhe na Tórann i mBaile na hAbhann í.
Cuaidh beirt fhear amach ag iascach i gcurrach fadó - Pádhraic Mór agus Tomás Murchaidh. Bhí cleamhnas Pádhraic déanta agus deir na daoine nach ceart do'n té mbíonn a chleamhnas déanta dul amach - go mór mhór ar an bhairrge - mar bíonn tóir ar a leithéidi. Maidin Domhnaigh a bhí ann agus bhí siad ag marbhú goleór iasg. Péibi cé'n chaoi bhí sé ghá tharraingt d'iompuigh an currach agus báthadh Pádhraic. Ní raibh snámh na tada acu acht d'eirigh le Murchadh theacht slán. Thóg bád Seáin Ruaidh ar an gCillín thiar ag Carraig a' Logáin é.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 23:28
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Long ago people never ate but three times a day. They were breakfast dinner and supper. The breakfast was at eight or nine oclock, dinner at one and supper a six, Every morning before breakfast theyused to do an hour's work. At the dinner they used to have potatoes and milk. For supper they used to have porridge. Sometimes they used to have porridge for breakfast. The table used be put in the middle of the floor and all sit round it and eat. The cakes were made of oaten meal. Very seldom they would eat fish or meat of any kind. They used to have copper cups and jugs. Some of these are to be seen in the old houses yet.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 23:20
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There is not much difference between the food people eat nowadays and
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 23:18
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only came to use fifty years ago. There is nothing eaten now that was not eaten long ago but the people do not eat stirabout as often as in olden times. On feast days people would buy a bag of loaves and that is how they passed feast days.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 23:13
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There is great difference between food in olden times and nowadays. In olden times three meals a day were eaten, namely breakfast dinner and supper. Those meals were eaten with about six hours between them. The breakfast at seven or eight, the dinner at two or three, and supper at seven oclock. The people would have two hours work done. The breakfast consisted of stirabout and a few hours a junk of oat bread would be sent up to the working in the field. For the dinner potatoes and buttermilk and a slice of butter. An odd time salty meat was eaten. The table from which the the people ate their meals was by the wall under the window. The sort of bread they ate was oat-meal, and drunk milk. No tea was used in olden times. It
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 22:46
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work in the morning before meals. Potatoes were eaten on fast days. Milk was drank along with the potatoes. The milk was cows milk. The table was in the middle of the floor if there was a big family and against the wall if the family was small. Wheaten bread was eaten. The cups the had were wooden cups and plates.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 22:32
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We have a churn at home. It is a machine churn with two handles in it. We churn about twice a week in the Winter time and three times in three times in Summer time. Our churn is about two feet high and the sides top and bottom are round. If strangers come in when we are churning they take the handle and churn for a while. The way we know that the churning is done is, if you take out the stopper and if there is no milk attached to it the the milk is churned. We put the cold water in the churn when we are churning in the Summer time and we put hot water in it in the Winter time. The parts of the churn are:- "The handles" "the "lid" "the stopper" "the rubber for the lid", and the irons for keeping the lid tight." These parts are needed for the churn. When we have the churning finished we draw the buttermilk from the churn and put in water and then draw the water. After the churn has been put away the butter has to be made up into rolls and
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 22:07
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when the churning is going on in & it is said that he would bring their luck.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 21:12
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The number of people is 53.
The most common name is Gibson.
There is an old woman in one of the houses, and she is over 70 years. Her address is Cornacrieve, Emyvale, Mrs F. Gibson.
There are 8 slated houses and two thatched houses.
There are many houses in ruins.
The people did not emigrate from this Townland to America or elsewhere. The land is boggy and hilly, There is no Wood in the Townland.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 21:01
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Benny Connolly Cornacrieve, Emyvale
Cap Ball.
Cap Ball is a game in which any nimber of persons can take part in, to start the game each person must have a cap, and places it against a wall, each person takes his throw at the caps with the ball in turn, and who ever owned the cap that the ball goes into runs and lifts the ball out of his cap and fires for to try to hit someone, who ever he hits a stone is put in his cap when a person has four stones in his cap he is put out of the game.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 20:58
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now arose between them and a man was killed after that no more fairs were held in Emyvale
I heard this from my father age about 43. Eileen Kelly Emyvale
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 20:56
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About 100 years ago a fair was held in Emyvale in the cow commons. In those days before coins were in use cattle were exchanged for gold. When a deal was made the cattle were marked with mud if lifted on a stick (and a stick) and put on the cattles back. Drink was cheap and after most deals the men would have a drink. The last evening the fair was held some men got drunk and a
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 20:16
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at Killeen. There is another going in the oposite direction from Killoscully to Clonagheen. There is another path through the fields from Killeen to Killoscully & another from the main road at top of
Crisanagh?? Hill to Coolrea.& at Maunsells height there is a mass path leading to Shallee & Aughlee ??
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 20:12
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There are many old roads in this locality some of them now extinct. There is an old road leading from Kennedys Lough across Killeen still & opening onto the Glown Road at Killeen. There is another old road from Killoscully to Ballinahinch by Ballycahane. Another road branches off Killoscully village and leads to Aughaveher, Bearnabawn & Maryglen.
Mass Paths
There are several Mass Paths in this locality. Some are a kind of double-ditch on which two or more people could walk abreast. There is one going past Killoscully Catholic Church to the Mulcair River.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 20:03
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continued.
In later days herrings began to be used and it was not unusual for a farmer to bring a barrel or quarter cask of them together. Before tea came into use herrings and potatoes were used at wakes and it was a hard task to boil potatoes and roast herrings (this was usually done on a a 'gridiron' or spit) for a large crowd.
(Rody Kennedy told me there is a spit on which meat & fowl were roasted at Tim Kennedy's Glencrow)
When American bacon came into use at first it was called 'Longbottom' from the man who first sold it in Limerick. It could then be bought at 2d per lb.
Tradesmen were treated as gentlemen and got special fare. They dined in the parlour with the man & woman of the house.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 19:56
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named Paddy Ryan (Cait) a farmer living at Knockinroe coming on his cuaird to our house at Sivermines on Summer & Autumn evenings without any boots on him.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 19:54
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About 60 years ago before it people tooks hides to the tanner to be tanned and cured.
There was an old Tannery between Shalee & the Mines. There was another in Nenagh & over in Limerick. After a time the tanners would not tan hides for people but bought the hides & sold the heather. In those times the shoe-maker came to the houses & generally made shoes for the whole family together. Up to about 60 years ago it was all shoes that were worn & and those were generally strong nailed ones. Even nowadays when old people are speaking of boots I have often heard them referred to as "shoes".
I heard of one man who 70 years or more ago went to Limerick in the bad times & bought the makings of 11 pairs of shoes. He brought an old shoe-maker Jos Sheehan who lived over in Rossaguile with him to the house & he made 11 pairs of shoes in 11 days @ 1/- per pair.
Over 60 years ago and later men women & children wore shoes at certain times of year & at certain works such as saving turf or hay &c.
When I was young I remember an old man
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 19:32
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In olden times shops were very few. People had to walk six or seven miles to the nearest town or shop. Buying and Selling took place after Mass. All kinds of goods were sold. This took place until recent years in Kilrossanty. In times gone by people gave cows, calves, sheep etc., instead of money Goods were bartered in olden times, but not in this parish. Labour was, and is given, in exchange for goods even at present.
These are some of the words connected with Buying and Selling_ "Boot" and "Tick". Boot means suppose I were selling an ass to a tinker, for example he'd give me 10/- for the ass, I'd have to give him some money with the ass. "Tick" means to give any person merchandise until they have the money to pay for it. Dealers in feathers and rags are still going around; it is by weight they buy them_ 2/6 per st.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 19:18
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There are two forges near my home: one is about a mile away, and the other about 2 1/2 miles. Mr. John Barry is the owner of the distant one, and it is situated a short distance from the road leading from Leamybrien to Kilrossanty Cross. Mr. John Harris is the owner of the other, and his forge is situated alongside of the Main Road: about 2 miles from Kilmacthomas facing the East. The forges are not very large: just a large space for a fireplace, a large bellows, and space for 3 or 4 horses, a window and a large door.
The smith shoes horses and asses, and makes and mends farm implements: ploughs, harrows, spades, shovels, pikes, axes, and other implements. In the middle of the floor is a large anvil, and some boxes with the smith's implements in them. There are numbers of old and new shoes in one corner and coal for the fire. There is also a big tank of water to cool the red iron. People pay the smith for doing any work: either for making or for mending implements, or for putting shoes on horses and asses. Everybody looks to the smith as a great powerful working man in every way.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 18:10
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1. Páirc na Sprid : The story is told that a young man was coming home from playing cards late at night. He was attacked by a pig and called his dead father to his aid. The father came, saved him and told him not to be out late in future.
2. Páirc Thomáis Céitinn : Thomas Keating late commandant of the I.R.A. was killed here by the Black and Tans and then buried there before being removed.
3. Páirc Eoin; Páircín an Eornan; Páirc a'Lice; Cláis an Uisge; Cuailín; Cobairín; Páirc na Lé Poinn na Gainibhí; Páirc Mhilis; Páirc an Aitinn; Páirc Cáit; Páirc an Phluda; Páirc a' Mhuilinn.
Tuam Bhailintín - Valentine's Tomb, notwithstanding the popular horror of this place a whole family afflicted with typhus sought refuge there in black '48
Baile Gallda; Cnocán a' chuilinn
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 18:06
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7) If you swept a yard it would start raining.
8) Fair weather after you.
9) If you broke a looking glass you would have 7 yrs bad luck.
19) Skimming the milk awn a May morning.
11) Wherever you are the weather is after you.
Terry Dwan.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 17:19
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There is a little island near Bonmahon called Trá na mBó. It is very hard to go down to that strand for there is only a path in the cliff going down to it. People say Trá na mBó is The Strand of the Cows in English.
At a little distance away there is another strand called Trá na Streille or The Strand of the Streel. It is said that a very untidy woman used often go down there swimming and that is why it is called Trá na Streille. There is also a very bad path leading down to this strand.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 14:18
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47.
A Mermaid.
27- 5- 38 Killone Lough is about a mile distant from Ennis.It was said that this lake ,was at one time ,the abode of a mermaid .There was a 'big house'an Newhall which was was occupied by a family of the O'Briens and wasn't far from the lake.it is said the mermaid used swim up a small river and steal wine out of the cellars of Newhall.The butler lay in wait for robbers ,but what did he see coming into the cellar ,but a woman as he thought....it was a mermaid that was in it and he stabbed her .As she floated away down the river into the lake she prophesied that the O'Briens in Newhall would all die out.her blood stained all the lake ,and the water still
becomes a rusty red at long intervals ,and is said to foretell a change of families in Newhall House.
Cormac Mc Namara ,Corbally, Quin.
This story was told to me by John Mc Hugh ,Corbally, Quin, County Clare.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 14:05
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26
Any person who went into a house when a churn was making was supposed to take a turn at this churning.
If a person got a present of a lump of butter or a can of milk he or she used put salt on the plate or into the can before giving them back to the donor.
Holy Water was always put into the churn when churning .
The churn used to be always made on May Eve to prevent people from taking the butter.
Shopkeepers give no credit on handset Monday or New Year's Day as a preventative against fever.
People when sowing potatoes or oats or root crops break a coal of the Paschal Candle into ashes and mix it with the seed.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 13:52
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25
Some women used to skim the the water in the wells on May morning and bring it home in buckets .The water was kept in crocks this whole year round and some of it used to be put in the churn and in this cream to keep the bad neighbours from milking the cows and from taking the butter.
If a man came into a house where a churn was being made to put a coal in his pipe he would not be allowed to touch the coal without first taking a turn at making the churn and then then another turn after putting the coal in his pipe before he left the house.Sometimes he would not be allowed leave this house until the churn was made .A sprig of palm blessed on Palm Sunday was used to sprinkle the house and out offices stock and fowl and plants with Holy Easter Water.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 13:17
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20
when making butter.
Cow-dung was put in the mouth of a calf immediately after birth to protect from the fairies.
A red cord was tied on to children women also to animals like calves and cows to protect them from the fairies.
When a person dug new potatoes for the first time or made a churn for the first time that year he always divided with his neighbours.The vessel was always brought back having some salt in it.
On November Eve a young girl who was anxious to marry use take a sheet to the river and the first young man who came along to help to draw the sheet against the current was supposed to be her future husband.
A wish was sure to come true if expressed on seeing the new moon for the first time.
Collected by the teachers and pupils of Dangan NSchool,Quin, Co Clare.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 13:13
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About two miles west of the village of Mainistir-an-Aonaig is the pretty market town of Croom on the Maigue. It was the paternal home of the O'Donovan's, chieftains of the territory as far as Kilmallock, until Henry VIII granted it to Maurice Fitzgerald, and from which the Fitzgeralds took their war-cry, 'Crom Aboo!'
The castle, built on the Maigue, was originally built by Dermot O'Donovan in the reign of King John. it was subsequently re-built by the Fitzgeralds from whom Carew took it in 1600, and invested it in the Crown. Charles II granted it to his son, the Duke of Richmond who resided there for a time. It was eventually purchased by the late Dr: Lyons M.P. for Dublin, and his nephew Mr Lyons resided there up to the time of his death quite recently.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 13:07
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19
The tongs was always left in an upright position against the chimney corner during the night.
When making a churn the head of the tongs was put in the fire and left there till the churn was made.
If a baby was sleeping in a cradle and should of necessity be left alone in the kitchen ,the person going out would always put the tongs across the foot of the cradle as a safeguard against the fairies taking the baby.In buying any animals such as bonhams or calves a 'luck'penny was always given by the seller.This 'luck penny' was put into a box until he had the price of a Mass .He then gave it to the priest to say Mass.
A crowing hen used be sold and salt bought for the money.
The women used to stop up all night on May Eve watching to get the water first from the well on May morning so that luck would be with them for the year.People put holy water in the churn
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 12:58
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In Ballycrana is a Protestant graveyard. The last person buried there was one John O'Mahony, a Catholic, because it was his wish and he had no relations to take him to this native home. Nobody knew where he came from.
There is here what appeared to be a Protestant Colony. Straws - Wilsons. One of the Wilsons had been a parson.
An old Protestant lady Wilson lived there with her brother. She wished to die a Catholic. The curate came from Lisgoold to her death bed. The Protestant brother remained up and had a gun ready to shoot him. When the priest arrived the old man fell asleep and the priest passed up the stairs and attended to the woman. She had a Catholic prayerbook, which the brother threw into the fire but it wouldn't burn.
Told by Mrs. Jos Ahern 65 years Ballinaglough
recorded J.C. Neville Leamlara
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 12:56
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The cure for warts is to put a snail on a bush let him wither then rub him on the warts and that is the old cure for warts.
The cure for a bite of a dog is to pull a few ribs out of him and put them on the bite.
The cure for cilblanes is go to your neigblours house take off your boots and stockings and rub your feet on the hearet-stone and you will leave your cilblanes behind you.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 12:55
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18
to protect a from the fairies.
people believed that if a person bought a cow at the New Year without putting some of the milk into his boots she is sure to run dry.
Should any personal remark be made about a child with regard to his health or features it was usual for the person who made the remark to spit on the child and say God bless him in order to keep away the fairies.
People used always give away a dead person's clothes.If a man's first wife was buried with her own people it was said that it was a sign that he would marry again.
A bride used always wear something old and something borrowed on her wedding day.
When a person washed the feet at night the water was not thrown out until the following day and a coal of fire was put into the water and left there during the night.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 09:12
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There are two other small lakes in the parish one is in Cahermurphy and the other is in Knockmore The land in this parish is not very good especially to the north of it where it is very mountainous. Up to twenty years ago the surplus population of this parish emigrated to America to earn a livelihood. Some succeeded very well there and gave a good education to their children which was denied to themselves at home. There was a ban put on emigration some time ago owing to the slump in America and the emigrant has to seek a living in England and in Scotland.
The only big river in the parish is a river that rises in Loch-na-mina lake and flows through the parish and enters the sea at Doonbeg.
There are about twenty farmers in this parish whose acreage allows them to keep twelve cows but the remainder of the farmers only keep from four to ten cows.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 09:11
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two men thought to remove the stones and the fairies pulled them out of the bed.
Forts are very plentiful in this district. There is a fort in Lack East in Jim Shea's lands. The fort is round. There is a large mound of earth remarkable to some extent surrounding it. The fort is covered with bushes. Light is very often seen in this fort. The light shines like a ball. It travels a long hopping, sometimes very large. Noise is very often heard in it. No body interferes with it, because they say it is the home of the fairies. There is a fort at each side of it, about a quarter of a mile away. It is said that any one that ever interfered with it, something happened them. It is often said that people going past this fort were frightened. Two men of the neighbourhood were frightened passing it, they heard great laughing and singing and a crowd of men and women were seen in a car and passed them out. It is often people are put astray in the field near the fort. It is not known who owned this fort long ago. It is said that the Danes owned it.
There was a battle fought in the "Cahir" a few hundred years ago, there were a few men killed. It is said people
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 09:09
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After Mass one Sunday herself and her son went to the Parish priest and told him about her dream They went to the place she was shown, her son dug up the rushes and the water sprang up. She drank some of it and was cured. There was a Bishop cured there afterwards named Bishop Maloney.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-27 04:21
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Long ago the people used not take a corpse to church at all but wake it at home. Unless the person died in the night, or in the early hours of the morning, they would be [surrounded by parentheses in ink:]a waked for two nights. When a person died, the corpse would be washed and dressed in a white shroud and a brown habit, and laid out on a table or sometimes in a door placed on a stand.
The water that washed the corpse, would be thrown behind the fire. Then they would light five or seven large candles, and place them on a small table near the bier. After a corpse was laid out all the relations would cry over it, and [interlined with carat in ink: "best"] the people for crying would be procured to lament over the corpse.
At the wake they would have drink, tabacco, and clay pipes. Every person smoking would get a pipe and a plate of tabacco would go around for each one to fill his pipe. They used also have snuff. It would be given around several times during the night, and afterwards it would be laid on the corpse.
At about twelve o clock the Rosary and Litany
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 22:39
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Local Happenings.
Drowning have been rare in out district (D.G.) but of the few which occurred I purpose giving a short account of one of them.
It was a bright Sunday morning when little Nellie Ryan and her small brother, Paddy, could be seen playing on the edge of a rain swollen stream, Tubberneena - amusing themselves by dipping their 'hankies' in the water. Quite suddenly the little girl's one was swept from her hand by a swift current. The boy tried to catch it but in vain for in the twinkling of an eye he was carried away by the force of
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 20:48
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My Home District
My home district is Boheroe. There are four houses in it namely our own, Ballerys, Gavins and Meehans. It is in the parish of Elphin and in the Barony of Frenchpark. The houses are one-storey, three-roomed, thatched, dwellings.
There was a red sandstone in this district and so it got its name from "Bothar Ruadh" which means "Red Road".
The number of people living in Boheroe is fifteen. This townland is mentioned in a song called The Plan of Boheroe.
Tole by Mrs Moran (46), Boheroe, Elphin.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 19:52
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myself when I was young) then the skirts were also worn long at the back and short in front.
Those hoops were made of soft wood with hollow centres like bamboo canes.
The bodice of dress was worn tight, high at the neck with great puffed sleeves.
The hats were of an elaborate type very wide and gaily decorated with artificial flowers or feathers. The older women wore cloaks with hoods and sometimes a bonnet& cape. - The bonnet were close fitting and trimmed up high in front with feather or flowers & fastened under chin with satin ribbons. Some bonnets are still to be seen in this locality - Mrs Pat Ryan (Slick) , Munnia wears one , also Mrs Berkery Lackagh. A great feature with the old women was the white cap made of linen with a frilled border. Those were ironed and starched and always snowy white while around their shoulders they wore a small plaid or coloured shawl crossed at front and knotted at the back.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 19:43
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to be so dressed was Billy Hayes Glown a grandfather of the Coghlan family who lived there up to a few years ago. There was another old man about here who used dress like this also , his name was Tom Caplis.
Another garment worn by men was the white flannel 'bawneen' used even in Summer instead of coats. A few men still wear them here. - Henry Powell & his brother Bob of Shallee & Dan Ryan"Bawnty" of same place.
Boys were 10 or 11 years before they got their 'first trousers' or first pair of boots. A workman we have tells us he was 11 or 12 before he got boots & in his day (he is only about 32 years) the boys were very big before they got a trousers.
When a man died his clothes were given to the poor - a whole suit had to be given , from the shirt out, & even footwear & headgear, & if any part of the suit was missing it had to be bought and given away.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 19:33
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Over 710 years ago all clothes were home spun from the wool of the sheep.
A tailor was brought to the house & he remained there while he made clothes for all or some of the male members of the family. Up to 12 or 13 years a go there was a tailor in this locality Johnny Ryan (Jillin) from Gleann & he went to the houses making clothes & although he was cranky & cross his visit was looked forward to, especially by the younger members of the household as they seemed to enjoy his 'crankiness' & many funny stories are told of the tricks sometimes played on him.
In those times the older men wore a long black frieze body coat & a cut away coat with two long tails to it, with two buttons at the back. With this they wore Knee breeches generally of corduroy & long stockings & a Caroline hat or as they called it a half-Caroline because it was not so high as the Caroline hat.
The last old man I remember
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 18:31
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Mo Chró beag ag Bun C[h]noc a' Tighe
I
Is iomdha áit áluinn in Éirinn
Ag filidh 's lucht foghluim faoi cháil
Acht measaim gur gleanntaí Thír Chonaill
An áit ann is deise le fághail
Cha dtabharfainn ar choróin Rí Eamonn
A Phalais 'gus a stór maoineach buidhe
Mo chomhnuidhe beag féin i dTir Conaill
Mo chró beag ag bun Chnoc a' Tighe
II
Tá'n Mhucaise mhór ar taobh shiar de
Faoi nealtaí leath-bhealaigh go bun,
Tá Caisleán Mhic Suibhne taobh thoir de
Ar bhruach glas cuan Caorach na dtonn,
Tá'n cuilinn 's caorthann 's fuinnseóg
's aiteannach glas na mbláth mbuidhe
'n aghaidh doininn dubh Gheimhridh mar ghárda
In mo chró beag ag bun Chnoc a' Tighe
III
Tá'n bheachóg go meidhreach ag drandán
ag tógail na mileach ó'n bhláth
Tá'n londubh 's na duilleogaí glasa
Gabhail cheoil le na chéile le grádh,
Tá'n smolach ag seinm le subhailce
Ar an c[h]raobh glas is aoirde na suidhe
Agus mise le lúthghair ag éisteacht
In mo chró beag ag bun Chnoc a' Tighe
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 18:16
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Making a Churning
We keep three cows and when my mother has the cows milked she strains the milk into crocks. After a day or two she skims the cream into the churn and churns it.
The churn is an old-fashioned one - the type called the dash churn or the plunge churn.
Churning is hard work and the other members of the family give a hand and take the dash on their turns, and if a neighbour or a stranger comes in while the churning is going on he too takes a round, as in this part of the country it is not considered right to leave without giving a little help and also to say "God bless the work." on entering.
In summer we churn twice a week and in winter when milk is scarce once a week.
My sister washes, salts and makes rolls of the butter with a butter spade and sells some of it in the shops in town. We use the rest.
Brendan Gannon, Clooneybrennan, Elphin, 60 yrs. Farmer.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 15:17
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40
26. 5.38 The blood of the rabbit "spattered" her face and when the child was born there were bloodred marks all over her face.
A woman who was in the family way sent her son for two ounces of tobacco.When he returned he knew the tobacco,he threw the tobacco, out of fun, at his mother and it struck her in the forehead over the eyes .When the child was born,there was a birthmark across its forehead just over the eyebrows.
The old people used to say it wasn't right for a woman in child to look at ugly things ,especially animals such as hares lions, tigers or bears as used to be seen in a travelling circus.
Women in the family way had a terrible dread of meeting a performing bear which used to be seen with Italians long ago going from village to village.
They used also say that it wasn't right
for a woman in child to pick fruit of any kind,or to fill pig's puddings .
Told by Miss M. K. Carmody,Quin, Co. Clare.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 14:30
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There are two holy wells in the parish one in Killua and one in Killallon.The one in Killua is in a garden, and the one in Killallon is on the side of the road. It is called the Warty Well because it cures warts. In order to get cured you must throw a pin in it and you must put a piece of cloth on the bush beside it. It is not called after any saint. The well in Killua is called ''St Lucy's well'' There is no cure in it. There is no story told about it.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 14:27
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135.
V1. 38 decided with candle light .
There was a famous malt house in Ardsollus and that the still in connection with it was situated in the village of Kilkishen.The old road leading from Ardsollus to Kilkishen is still pointed out and parts of it here and there now form portion of the modern road to Kilkishen.
The stuff used be conveyed to the still on horse cars the wheels of which were made of thick blocks of hard wood bound with iron bands.
The road by which Daniel O Connell travelled from Limerick to Ennis on the occasion of the famous Clare Election in 1828 led by the Dr in Bunratty,then up Mill Road to the Hurlers Cross,then it ran beside the Bishops House ,Deerpark through Drumlins,Rathlahins to Ballycar Mill ,then through Moohans to Reynold's Cross then by St Kieran's Well to Ardsollus,then by Forgs through Ballyhannon to Coolshamrock.From Coolshamrock it ran
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 14:24
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At the northern end of the parish of Killallon where the townlands of Galmoystown and Herberstown meet, the Irish soldiers ambushed Cromwells troops on their way from Oldcastle, and the soldiers who fell
The second church was built in the present graveyard of Killallon and the remains are in a fairly good state of preservation. At funerals people still practiced that grand old custom of laying down the coffin and saying a few prayers on the side of the old church. This church was attacked by Cromwell's soldiers from an eminence near Clonmellon. One of the Cannon balls which hit the church is built into the church wall at the entrance gate to the churchyard. It was found some years in Thomas Bennet's old house. The third church was built at the back of the present church convenient to where the stables now stand. Portion of the old wall still remains. The present church was erected in 1837. Killallon is the name of the Parish
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 14:10
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Stephen Clune Quin.
Old Recollections.
Dan Corbett ,Ballykilty ,Quin relates how the old people used to point out a large stones in the "furzy crag"which is situated in Pat Sammon's Farm, Ardsollus ,Quin.
It is said that Daniel O Connell on his way to Ennis in the year 1828 addressed a large meeting of Tradaree men from this stone.
They also say that Father Mathew delivered a Temperance sermon from this stone also and administered the Temperance Pledge to thousands of people on the same occasion including my own grandfather Stephen Walsh,Kilkishen .Co Clare.At this time there was a small village in Ardsollus and also a Race Course in the vicinity.it is said the races used to be run in heats and that no more than one occasion the final heat was
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 13:52
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134
22.V1 '38 old Gould it is true .
But believe me Sir John it is Gould without 'u'
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 13:50
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A Story.
Sir John Gould as a great friend of Daniel O Connell's.At the time he was an old man of eighty hears.he took the notion of getting of getting married but wouldn't marry anyone only a young girl. Daniel O Connell used be joking him about his young notions.At long last he succeeded in getting a young girl of eighteen years to consent to marry him.So he wrote to Daniel O Connell about the happy event in the following lines :So you see ,my dear Dan though eighty years old
A maid of eighteen fell in love with old Gould.And Dan replied to his note in the following lines:
A maid of eighteen may love
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 13:41
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133.
22.V1.38.The government officials were amazed when they heard the bells and when they found out the cause of the rejoicing they were surprised that the Catholics had the news before themselves.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 12:01
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Bhí beirt fhear ag teacht abhaile ó Shasana uair amháin. Ní raibh na busanna go flúirseach an uair sin ná na gluaisteáin acht oiread. nuair a thangadar as an mbád i mBaile-Átha-Cliath bhí ortha siubhal an cuid eile don bhealach.. D'aimsigheadar an turas agus bhíodar tuisreach traochta nuair a thainig siad chomh fada lé Béal-an-Átha.
Bhí an dorchadas ag tuitim agus dubhradar leó féin go mba mhaith an chomhairle é fanacht i mBéal-an-Átha go maidin. Chuadar go dtí teach áirithe agus d'iarradar lóistín ann acht dubhairt fear-an-tighe nach raibh aon seomra aige lé'na gcur suas. Acht annsin dubhairt sé leó, 'an bhfeiceann sibh an teach sin thall'? 'bhuel is liom-sa an teach sin agus is féidir lib fhanacht ann go maidin'?
Bhíodar an-tsásta leó féin agus nuair a chuadar isteach lasadar tine agus bhruith siad suipear maith dóibh féin. bhí sé timceall a dó-dhéag a chlog an tráth seo agus dubhairt fear amháin acú leis an bhfear eile. 'Go isteach agus tabhair amach crúisgín pórtair leat go n-ólfaimíd é sula ngabhfaimíd a chodhladh? Isteach leis agus chonnaic sé fear 'na shuidhe ar an mbairille.
Thainig faitchíos ar agus amach leis. D'innis sé don bhfear eile é acht thóg seisean an chrúiscín agus chuaidh sé isteach. Bhí an fear 'na shuidhe annsin. Dubhairt sé leis go múinte. 'Éirigh má's é do thoil é nó go bhfuighidh mé
duine anaithnid
2020-03-26 07:59
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obtain possession of the buts money. but unfortunately when reaching the spot or hidden treasure he was instantly put away by the approach of a fierce cat. He got terrified at the appearance of this Monster, and took to his heels glad to make his escape.
Where the treasure in Kiltumper is buried is just beside the Blessed well "Thumpars Well" about a quarter of a mile from the road. With regards to Kiltumper a story was told by Michael Cahill well known as Stanton. He died about a year ago God rest his soul, and from his own lips this is how the story ran in connection with "Thumper Gold."
He started in the Noonday one Summers day. he was passing through the fields on his way to Kilhihill. To his surprise, close to "Thumper Blessed Well" he saw the little man having the gold spread out in ins the sun. He watched him closely for some time but it appears that after a little time the vigilant money minder distracted Standtons attention and caused him to look in another direction. The moment this was done he disappeared and he could not exactly say in what
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 23:11
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Mrs. G-. Quin, Co.Clare, got her teeth taken out in Ennis, while she was carrying a baby.When the child ,a girl was born,her face was very much disfigured,especially about the mouth.
A policeman's wife was skinning a rabbit one day.She was carrying a child at the time.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 22:34
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In the Penal Days catholics were persecuted and forbidden to hear mass. The priests when found were put to death. They could'nt say mass in the churches but they said mass in the mountains and fields, at dawn of day or at night.
Mrs Gray Drumshanbo Co. Leitrim told me that mass was said in Francis McCartans field in Drumshanbo, Co. Leitrim. The stone served as an altar and the people knelt on the bare ground, and one of them stood on a neighbouring hill to see if the English were coming.
Michael Gray, Drumshanbo, Co. Leitrim told me about a brave woman who lived in Anskirt in the Co.Leitrim. Her house was raided by a priest hunter. When leaving he asked for a drink
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 22:28
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Táim im' chómhnuidhe i gCromán Íochtar, agus i bparróiste Cill-Orglan agus ar an barúntach Truic an Aicme.
Tá ceatharca tighthe sa baile anois ach fadó bhí tímcheall caoga is a sé tighthe ann.
Fadó bhí na tighthe go léir cluadachtha de tuighe, ach anois tá cuid acu cludachtha le tuighe agus le slinne.
Glaodtar an ainm sin air mar ta cuma cromáin ar an áit.
Níl ach deichnúir seandaoine i gCromán anois agus iad so h-ainmneacha na ndaoine go bhfuil scéalta i ngaeilge agus i mbéarla.
Séamus Ó Réagla, Seán Ó Siochfradha, Seán Ó Réaghla agus a bhean Bríd.
Téidheadh alán daoine go h-Americe ón ait sin fadó ach ní teigheann einne anois.
Tá chuid mór de thalamh fé cré, agus montáin.
Siobhán Ní Théachain,
Cromán Íochtar.
Cill-Orglan.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 22:26
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he travelled all over the Slieve Bloom mountains over Clonaslee, Leix, staying for some days at Brennan's Rocks, just over Clonaslee and in Glenkitt on the South side of the Slieve blooms.
The military and police spread all over the mountains and searched every inch of ground for a year and for thirty years after they were still on the watch.
After twelve months, he returned to his home, where the police were sitting at the kitchen fire. His sister was upstairs, in her room spinning wool and saw him coming.
With great presence of mind, she flung a ball of yarn through the window at his head. He looked up and she beckoned
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 22:22
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Tá go leor laethanta áirithe ag na daoine le nósanna áirithe. Lá crósta na bliadhna. Tuiteann se ar an Luan gach seachtain agus níor mhaith leis na daoine aon ghruaig a bhaint amach an lá sin, agus tá daoine ann nach maith leo pósadh Dia Luan agu déarfadh daoine gur iad na laethanta a b'fhearr le pósadh ná Dia Céadaoin agus Dia Sathairn. Tagann Diardaoin Dearg i mí
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 22:11
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Leonard was the landlord of Kilbrahan, (a small townland to the north of Shanbogh.)
He resided in Waterford and was in the habit of coming to New Ross a few times a week. This was probably in connection with his property in Kilbrahan. This Leonard was a "Good man" and "no reason for killingh him."
He was murdered on the 8th March 1834, where the Old Coach Road just enters Shanbogh. A lime-kiln is close to the spot. Leonard was beaten to death, the horse dashing towards Ross till the body was observed hanging out of the chaise or car.
An Informer
Owing to information received from a man named Cassin the police went to the house in Kilbrahan of a man named Meaney. There they found the whip of the murdered Leonard. This evidence was regarded as
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 21:03
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17.
5.38 Old Customs.
Bonfires are lighted on St.John's Eve and people make the sunward turn round them seven times in the of the Trinity.The cinders from the fires are thrown into the gardens to ensure good crops.
A small offering of a pin, button rag or pebble was always offered on visiting a blessed well.
Sometimes people used to bury coins in the vicinity of the well.
Blacksmiths were believed to have dangerous powers of cursing by turning the anvil .
Boring the ears of cattle and passing a goatskin thing through the ears where hole was made was said to prevent them from disease.
The hearth used to be swept clean when the fire was raked at night.The chairs were arranged around the fire for the use of the fairies.A jug of drinking water and a cup were also left on the table for the use of the "good people".Sometimes a few cold boiled potatoes were left on the hot for their use .Straw crosses used to be placed in the roof of the house on November Night.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 20:46
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Spancil Fair(continued)
People ware so thirsty that if he asked six pence for a glass he would get it.The following year the day was very wet and ever since the fair day is always sure to be wet.The people say that it is on account of the selling of the water that this day continues to be wet every year.
Told by Thomas Mc Namara
Hazelwood ,Quin.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 20:40
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15

.4.38.Story told by John Sammon, Quin,Co Clare.
In the bad times there lived a poor man who had a large family near the Caves in Abbeyview ,Quin. As he wasn't allowed to keep any fowl ,he had neither cock or hen to kill,to shed blood in honour of St.Martin .He had one pig and on St.Martin's Night in order to honour the Saint he said he would "bleed" the pig .The pig bled to death ,but on the following morning ,a sow with a litter of bonhams ,came out of one of the caves ,into his yard.From that day to this, the cave of called Poll na Muc.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 14:34
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When the sky is red in the evening it is a sign of a fine day.
When the sky is red in the morning it is a sign of a wet day.
If there are a lot of stars in the sky at night it is a sign of frost.
When there are a lot of clouds in the sky it is a sign of rain.
When there is a rainbow in the morning it is a sign of a rain, and if there is a rainbow in the evening it is a sign of a fine weather.
The South wind brings most rain in this district. A red sky is a sign of a storm.
Black clouds are a sign of rain.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 14:33
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In the year 1899 there was a terrible thunder storm which lasted three days. No rain fell during that time but at the end of that tie it rained heavily and the thunder cleared away.
In 1901 there was a storm of wind and rain which did much damage. There was a man in a hackney car killed at Skidoo Co Dublin.
A storm of wind occurred in 1903. There was an old tree near the chapel in which there were many hollows. Here the old men used to sit. This storm blew down that old tree
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 13:19
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143.
22.6 .38 was a girl who was very beautiful .The witch came and took her away and the witch nor the child was never seen again.
This story was told to Mary O'Loughlin by .Meaney,Creevagh,Quin,Co.Clare.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 13:14
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151.
27.V1 '38. The penance I put on you now for this sin you have committed said the abbot is that you will have to find out a place called "Gurteenagórach" and when you have found it you must build a church there You must not enquire from anybody where the place is and you mustn't sleep the second night in he same house and you must beg for the "bit"you eat.
So the poor monk travelled from place to place for twelve months until till he came to the place where Adare now stands .He was looking in over the bridge at the river Maigue flowing away for itself and thinking of where he would spend the night.All of a sudden he heard a woman crying out 'My God look at where the sheep are beyond in Gurteengórach.he made for the little paddock where the sheep were and marked out the place of his little church.he next got a few men to quarry stones in a quarry hard by and one day as he was standing over them and they
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 12:59
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150.
27.V1.'38 A Story.
There was a monk one time in one of the first monasteries ever founded in the country .He was too lazy to shave on a Monday morning and so when the Abbot met him he asked him why he didn't shave and the monk said he did not like to begin the week shaving.The abbot said that was superstitious and that he had committed a sin.
The Abbot sent the monk out to an outhouse to see would he find anything in the Corner there.So the monk went out and found six silver eggs and a golden egg.When he brought them in the Abbot asked him did he see any difference in the six silver eggs and he said he didn't but that there was a difference between each of the silver eggs and the golden egg.The abbot told him that the golden-egg represented Sunday and the silver eggs the six days of the week and that there was no difference between them in any way.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 12:37
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20. V1 '38 A Story.
Mrs Shea ,Dangan ,Quin tells a story that Jim Callaghan ,Rathluby,told her about a leprechaun that paid a visit to his mother.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 12:34
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152
27.V1 38. trying to remove a large flat stone he heard a voice saying strike easy .He asked them yo take out the stone very gently .They did so and underneath the stone were two little children .The monk asked them what brought them there and they said that they died without baptism and couldn't go to heaven.He shed tears on them and baptised them .They then said 'We are baptised now for the tears of sorrow have fallen on us .
The old people say this was the foundation of Adare Abbey .This story was told by Matty Hannon,Knockpogue, Quin,Co.Clare.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-25 09:51
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202
My mother related this list of "Fairy Forts" to me.
Her address is Clohass House,
Enniscorthy,
Co Wexford.
Written: 3rd November 1938
Age 40 years.
There are many old fairy forts, raths, cathairs and rings throughout every district in Ireland.
The following is what I heard about a "fairy rath."
In the towns-land of Finchogue there is an old fairy rath. It is circular in shape and has a ditch of briars all round it. There is an enterance hole in the side of it. It is said that fairy people built it about the time of the "Danes"
Once upon atime there was a man hunting in the field where the rath is. One of his dogs went over to the briars that are around it. The dog then entered it and was turned into a wild cat.
The owner of the field ploughed it, and left the "rath" without touching it. He then sowed turnips in the field but they were very tiny and of no use. He never sowed
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 23:44
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17-5' 38
Bread.
In former times the people of this country were forced to make all their bread from wheat, and very often when short of wheat potatoes were used. During the famine period over a century ago the people had to resort to many methods of baking, and had to use the most primitive ways of preparing their food.
The most common of these methods was the round pot, which is known as a bastible. Water was used for mixing the dough as milk at that time was very scarce. Before placing the dough on the fire there was a cross cut on the top of the cake.
Black bread was also made in this district in olden times. When they were
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 21:28
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South Wexford
An old Rath
In this district, Baldwinstown, there is an old Rath and it is supposed to have been inhabited by fairies long ago. And some people said that there was money buried under a large flat stone about twenty (20) feet down.
One day a party of men went in search of the gold, they dug down about twenty (20) feet and there was the stone sure enough. They tried to raise the stone and were just succeeding when they heard a noise! They got up out of the rath, and there within a couple of yards of them they saw a furious bull So they had to run for their lives. A couple of hours after they went back again to the Rath and found it was closed up again. So the Rath was never meddled with from that day to this.
It was said that when a man buries his money in the older times that he used to get a man and make him swears to guard the money dead or alive. The man would then be put to death, and if anyone would ever come after in search of the money. The man (guardian) would come in the form of a mad bull.
Maire U Ceallaig [rest is in irish, cant make it ou]
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 20:47
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Sixty or seventy years ago hats were mostly worn & hatters were fairly plentiful.
Henry Ryan's grandfather of Keeper was a hatter and there were several others in the locality. Many of the hats worn were black felt that had wide brims; a very odd one may still be seen. Rody Kennedy told me his father remembers the time when no one wore a cravat, front or collar & tie going to Tour mass. The older men (farmers) might wear a silk ribbon round the neck. Danny Kennedy Foilduff always did so.
'Garsoons' wore caps of cloth made by the women at home.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 20:41
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There were many old forges about this place in the olden times & many were burned down in '98 owing to pikes being made in them.
There was an old forge over in Rossaguile 100 years ago where Dan Gleeson's house now stands. The owner kept 6 men working principally at spade making - It was all spade work at that time and a man would require about 3 spades in the year.
Later when ploughs were introduced they were made of timber except the 'sock' & coulter but they were not much good and the man had to work harder than the horse.
The descendants of some old families of Smiths still work at the trade at Newport - namely the O'Connells and the Quinlans who only lately gave up the trade.
About 40 or 50 years ago the smiths made shoes out of cast iron they were much better & lasted longer than the shoes now. An old spade made a great horse-shoe. Farmers used the old spades for this purpose.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 20:33
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they burned but for this work the weather should be fine and the turf plentiful.
I have been told in those days one would get limestone enough to make 20 loads of lime (5 barrels to the load) for £1.
The lime lime now is all drawn burned from the big kilns. The nearest to this place are at O'Briens Boherbawn on the road to Nenagh , one at Malley's, Barna between this place and Birdhill.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 20:29
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In olden times a great manypeople burned lime for their own use and had lime kilns in some convenient part of the farm.
This can be learned from the great numbers of old disused kilns throughout the country. In this locality alone (Killoscully) there are several still to be seen.
In burning lime - lime stones had to be obtained & for one's own use it was turf
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 20:27
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This was a great trade up to 50 years agobecause nearly every house was thatched then. Houses were thatched with rushes & straw of oats wheat or rye. For thatching with the last three the straw was 'switched' to remove the seed. - In all cases thatching material was 'drawn' in order that it would be even & firm. 'Scallops' were cut from 'sally' (willow) trees a long time before being used. When well seasoned were 'split' and 'pointed'.
Thatchers were plentiful then & went from house to house staying in a house until the thatching was finished.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 17:52
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The Landlord of this place was Lord Sligo. The people looked on him as a bad man He put my grandfather's father out of his land although he had his rent paid. He put a favourite of his own in the place. Then he gave him land where we are now but it was a mountain nearly all of it. My great grandfather had to build a house and bring over his hay oats and potatoes a mile and a half on his back. He then began to till the mountain
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 17:35
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went out on the altar and made the following statements-:
"Fr Ryan is sick and that is no sin. Next Thursday will be the first Friday. Next Wednesday St Peter and Paul will be married. Thursday next will be the feast of John Clancy and Mary Mc Cumhaill. A Purse has been found in the Church, anyone that wants to know what it contains will find it rolled up in a packet in the sacristy.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 17:31
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Once upon a time there was a priest in the parish of Tisara by the name of Fr Ryan. This Sunday morning he was in bed and was unable to read Mass. He called his clerk to him by the name of Michael and told him that he would have to go out onto the altar as he was sick and make the local announcements to the people. Michael listened attentively while the priest was telling him what to announce to the people. The priest told him to announce the following-:
Fr Ryan is sick and is unable to read Mass; therefore it is not a sin for the parishioners not to hear Mass. On Wednesday next John Clancy and Mary Mc Cumhaill will be married. Thursday will be the feast of St Peter and Paul. On Thursday next confessions will be heard for the first Friday. A packet has been found in the church; the owner will oblige by calling into the sacristy for it. The clerk
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 17:08
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190
Before rain the cat sits near the fire sleeping .The bird picks his feathers ,and the dog eats grass before it.
Told by Martin Moylan .
Feighquin,
Quin,
Co.Clare.Age 40.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 17:05
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189
Signs of weather.
Old Sayings.
To morrow the sun may be shining although it being clouded to day.
Moon.Saturday's moon comes seven years too soon.
Stars. A star falling a soul going to God.
Rainbow.A rainbow is the night is a sheperd's delight,and a rainbow in the morning is a shepherd's warning.
Clouds.Dark clouds have silver linings .
Storm.After a storm there comes a calm.
Sign of a storm .To see crows tumbling.
Sign of rain .Old people to be stiff in their bones.
Knowledge of weather that animals .
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 15:38
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46
26.5.38. A Story.
About thirty years ago a young man in the Parish of Clooney,Quin,Co.Claretold me he was coming home, one night about half past one o'clock from a wake.As he was passing a certain house in his own townland he saw a light shining through the kitchen window.
In this house were an old man and an old woman ,a couple of boys and a girl or two as far as i can remember.As he knew none of the boys or girls was at the wake he was inquisitive to know why there was light in the house so late.
So he stole over to the window and looked in,and what did he see but the old man walking up and down the floor ,a sugawn thrown across one of the collarties of the roof ,and two ends of the sugawn hanging down and the old woman drawing the two ends of the sugawn ,like she'd be milking a cow,and filling the churn with milk.
Told by John Scanlan.
Postman ,
Quin, Co Clare.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 15:26
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45.
26.5.38. A Story.
i remember hearing one time about a priest who was called one morning to attend a sick call.As it was an urgent call he went across the fields to the house.On his way he came on an old woman unknown to her.She was down on her knees and she had a 'sugawn' in her hands.
he heard her saying "Give all to me,Give all to me.Give all to me."Do not" said the priest."Give half to me" .When the old woman heard the voice ,she looked behind her and when she saw who it was in it,she got up at once and ran away leaving the sugawn behind her.
The priest took up the sugawn and when he saw what it was ,he said to himself ."This will come handy when we are saving the hay in the harvest"So he took home the sugawn and threw it up in the garret .
When the time came to save the hay,the priest remembered the sugawn he threw up in the garret .He told one of his men to go up for it and when the man went up in the garret there was no sugawn there but a big lump of butter.
Told by Mr.Mac Fadden Ex.R.I.C.
Quin,Co Clare.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 14:27
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ever knew where he came from or where he went for never saw him before or afterwards. These old people all believed that he was one of the "good people" who had come back doing penance for some sin he had comitted and whenever they spoke of him they always said. "May he rest in peace."
Eileen Sullivan
Miss May Sullivan
Knockanes
N.S.
Age 30
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 14:24
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There was a wake in the house where we live in my great grandfather's time. He told this story. Towards evening on the second day of the wake a stranger came into the house. He knelt at the table and prayed for the dead. Then he sat down with the others who were there. He spoke to nobody and those near him thought he must have come a long journey because he was not known to anyone. He was offered a clay-pipe full of tobacco as was the custom at the time and he smoked in silence. Then he was asked to have a drink. He took it gratefully and said "]I will drink for I did not wet my mouth since the time of Tadhg and Donal. Soon after he left and no one in the
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 12:18
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these coins in exchange in several fairs, many miles apart in different counties in Eire.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 12:18
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before they could mount, as this skirt was made to stick out like an empty barrel with hoops of cane or other tough material sewn into it all around, & known as a 'crinoline'.
This old man also informed Mr Mc Elmell that he even saw a field of land sold by barter in the famine years. One neighbour man (Scott by name) gave his neighbour over the March or Mairn [?], about an acre of land in the tail-end of his farm, for about 2 curt. of oatmeal. He also informed that the saw a cooper by trade going around this and other localities in the years of the famine trying to exchange wood ferkins, wood buckets or even articles known as noggins or meddars (now extinct) for meal or any other commodity, and thus ward off hunger from the door.
The coins in general use in those days were gold sovereigns, half-sovereigns, and £1 notes; crowns, half-crowns, florins, shillings, sixpences, 4d peices and 3d bits. At an earlier date 10d peices were in common use.
Farthings were seldom used in currency in rural shops.
The 4d piece is extinct long years ago, and was supplemented by the 4/- piece. The 10d bit is also extinct & for any gold coins they have been few and far between since the big war. Certain coins have passed through the hands of some people year in, year out, for a number of years, these people having a private mark on them. Horse dealers have been known to get
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 12:08
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was bad, from 2/6 to 6/6 per stone, the latter being supposed to be a very high price. Paddy McKenna was the first man in this parish to get 6/6 per stone. He was in poor circumstances, and his old wife and a boy bettled the flax on the hearth stone, after drying it previously over the kitchen fire.
Of course at an earlier date than any stated in this narrative there were several places and cross-roads where animals were disposed of, the one nearest to this locality being situated in the townland of Killyleck, in a field the property of James Mc Elmeel.
This field contains an enormous whitethorn bush or tree in its centre, which is supposed to be of fairy origin. It stood in the centre of the horsefair when held, and is half a mile from any county road.
Buying and selling of horses and animals was carried on by barter or exchange in those bygone days.
Mr John Mc Elmeel was personally informed by very old men, in his boyhood days, that they remembered selling horses & getting other animals in exchange, cows etc; or perhaps made a 'swap', that is, exchanged horses & got some little money known as Boost' [?]. The same old man, who was almost a centenarian, informed him that he saw on many an occasion, country girls or women on the horses' backs, going to these country fairs. They would have to divest themselves of one of their garments
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 11:58
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pins, needles etc in exchange. But all these people have stopped their visits to this neighbourhood for years. The country is over-run with what are known as gypsies, and these people are not so honest or popular as the old time pedlars.
In the years of the early 80's it was far easier for the people to get their farm work done than at present. You could procure a man to plough (1/2 an acre Irish) at 7/- per day; harrowing or sowing 8/- per day; and all other farm work done by horses, the maximum would be 8/- per day. Everything you had to buy was cheap, and the country bootmaker would come to the country homes and hand-make and sew a pair of boots for 1/6, or 2/- at most, the farmer to produce the leather and the furnishings. The whole price for leather furnishings and tradesmanship being under 10/-.
At that time flax was grown very much in this locality, and the girls, and young men also, hand scutched it on wooden upright's (stalks) with a very light thin board, and a grip on the narrow end of it as handle. This board was about 1/4 of an inch in thickness, and known as a scutching handle. All these appliances were made of a timber known as sycamore. This work has been out of existence for over 50 years. The remuneration for it previous was 6d per day, and only a very poor kind of food.
The price of the hand-scutched flax at that time (50 yrs ago)
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 11:50
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when we get the crowd gathered. That was how the marketing of beasts was carried on in years gone by. Of course, pigs and sheep were disposed of in the same way; bonhams [?] being retailed in lots to suit purchasers, and there would always be 'haggling'; the farmer describing the good qualities of his pigs and also their age, which was always about ten weeks. He was always certain of that, and not a drop of milk ever crossed their trapples (throats) [?] and that's their age to an hour. They were farrowed the very night before Ketty ran away etc.
Of course there was one fair in Aughnacloy and no man would either ask or get anything on 'Tick' or 'Credit' that was the May fair. And there is an ancient custom prevailing in this and other localities, that nothing should be given away or loaned on May day.
There was a time when pedlars in all kinds of hardware, delph etc travelled around this district. They carried baskets, and sold pins, needles, hairpins and cheap jewellery. But the delph woman was a native of Aughnacloy, Alice Hagan by name.
Another class also went around collecting rags, bottles, jampots and old scrap. These people also worked barter or exchange. They came from Emyvale or Monaghan; and one old woman, partially blind, collected rags. She had an ass and creels, and gave
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 11:39
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the bag on me. etc etc
This kind of harangue went on in a lot of the transactions in the country shops.
Buying and selling is still carried on in the same way in these rural shops, but eggs and butter are a better price; and they are still bartered for groceries. As this district runs concurrent with the border for miles of the Co. Monaghan and parish of Errigal Truagh, all buying and selling of cattle across the border was prohibited until recently, but now will likely we resumed as usual. The rule in the last quarter of last century was:- if the small farmer had a beast to dispose of in the town of Aughnacloy, he talked the matter over a few days previously with his neighbour, saying:- I'm going to dispose of a cow, and I'm going to ask, say, Liz. I know its too much, but I want to ask plenty. You'll give me a wee bit of a hand, and I'll treat you to a Johnny of whiskey afterwards. When you hear me getting a bid, I want you to come and say the presamble [?] purchaser only offers 8, you split the difference. But of course, I'll not be willing to stand such a bad bargain, and we may get the purchaser to advance a little. I'll talk very loud and boisterous and gather a crowd. But you don't let the buyer off until the crowd gathers, and you will always get some other person to help at the bargain; and who knows but someone else might fancy my cow
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 11:32
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might say, all our ducks went away with the last big flood in the mountain water, and Paddy McKenna's sow pig eat two more. But I have 3 dolley's of flax in the ass' cart on the street (five small hand scutched handfuls known as 'streets' in each, about 6 or 7 lbs, value about 5 1/2 o 6d). And God knows, mammy sent this wee brick of butter for ear I'd be short. And she said if I'd have any money back, to bring a piece of red flannel for her back and shoulders, as there is a draught on our door, and she is afraid of getting the cold and she sitting so long every day and night, spinning."
Shop Assistant - That's alright now Susan' your eggs come to so much, your flax so much, and your butter so much, and here is an account of what you got and you have so much left. How much red flannel do you want? (1/2 yard.) You have still a few coffers left.
Buyer - Alright, better give me 1d worth of starch and a ball of blue, as my mother will want to have her white cap shining at the spinning match.
I think that's all I want; is there any money left?
Assistant - yes, a penny.
Buyer - Well, give me a pair of whangs [?], for the boys' boots. . Well, I'll be going now, and thank you. Have I all in the basket? What about the stone of Indy meal, oh I see you put it in a paper bag. I hope you didn't weigh
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 11:04
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they playing music. If anyone cuts these bushes down evil is said to befall.
There is a Cromlech in Mr Kennedy's field and another one in Larch Hill. It is said that some druid priest is buried there. People belive that if these stones are removed some evil befalls those who remove them.
There is a very old Churchyard in Cruagh, near the Dublin Mountains, where many people are buried. There is an old Round Tower in Cruagh where monks used to watch, as body snatchers used to come and take the bodies for medical use. People say there are bones and skulls of these men in the Round Tower where the body snatchers killed them.
There is a lane leading up to Tibradden near Kilmashogue Mountains. It is called Mutton Lane. It is very lonely and there are no houses on it until you come the entrance of Colonel Guinness's place. Many years ago there were small houses on this Lane. They were poor people and they had not much to live on. They used to steal sheep in every part of the country, and they killed them and eat them. That was how it got the name of Mutton Lane.
Near Whitechurch Road where the bus stops there is a road called the Fortification. It was
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 01:07
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Only one in this district possesses this cure which he performs as follows. Supposing you get a mote - say dust, sand, hayseed or such like, you go to him. He then goes to one room and says some prayers. He then comes down to where you are and has a look at your eye. He then gets a vessel
duine anaithnid
2020-03-24 01:07
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of water - say a cup or mug and again goes to the room. On his return the mote or whatever was in the eye, will be in the cup of water and the eye allright. I have known several cases of cures. My own brother got a mote in his eye and was perfectly cured after a visit to this man.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 23:49
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There was once a man who used to go to his neighbour's house at night watching other men card playing. As it was usual he used to go by fields and one night as he was coming home he crossed a fence out to a road and immediately he saw four men with no heads on them carrying a coffin and a girl in a white garment walking between the coffin and the man.
The man was very much frightened and he crossed the fence again and the girl walking on the fence beside him. The men then left the coffin down on the road. The man then fainted and was there for some time and when he survived the men and coffin has vanished but the girl remained there still. She told the man that these men were going to kill him and not to go that way again. The man knew the voice for the girl was a cousin of his own. The girl was dead [some?] years before that.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 21:54
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heavy meadow in 6 days.
Valda Smith,
Danescourt

Told by:-
Doctor Moore,
Frayne
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 21:53
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nín gach mí sa bhliadhain acht aon mhí amháin ainmnighthe mí na Samhna. Marbhuige ann na daoine thart annseo an girrfiad agus díolann se siad an craiceann.
An coinín. Itheann an coinín girrfiadhe acha. Comhnuidheann an coinín a bpoll faoi an talamh. Bíonn coiníní óga ag an choinín gac mí acht aon mhí amháin ainmnighthe mí na Samhna.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 21:44
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They were then put up again to dry & used when required.
Rody Kennedy told me they have the remains of a rush candlestick at his home. It is a pincer-like affair into which the rush was put & held in position by the "jaws". Some were fixed to stand and others had a spike to stick to a block of wood.
Tallow candles were also made & the moulds for making them may be seen in some houses. The mould was cylinder -shaped & about the size of a small Xmas candle with a hole in the bottom through which to fit and fasten the wick. Tallow form cattle sheep & goats was rendered (as it is done now) & poured into the mould the wick being kept held in the centre.
Almost 60 years ago I
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 21:38
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Rush Candles Young fellows were sent out good soft rushes. Those had to be pulled out of roots. They were peeled & in peeling a small bit of the peel was left at one side to hold the rush together. Peeled rushes were put into a flat basket & hung up near the fire to dry. When dry they were drawn through a gusset in which lard had been melted - a "gusset" was a boat shaped metal vessel with 3 legs & a handle thus (sketch) Some steeped the rushes in resin instead of lard.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 21:35
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This was always done at home in the old days & was done so well that the colour never 'ran'.
Copperas (sold in lumps like washing soda) and logwood (brownish black powder with chips in it) were used.
I have also seen saffron used & sometimes it was used to give butter a yellow colour.
The copperas was to be got in different shades and some of the old flannel quilts were beautifully dyed.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 21:30
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There were many weavers brought into the locality by the landlords. From Munnia cross - one mile from this school to B.hinch cross (called the Yankee's cross) there were once 32 weavers, brought by the landlord named Phelps (or Phillips). Later Lord loomfield bought the estate from the landlord. Now only two of the 32 families are left - all were Protestants - those families are Allisons and Phillips - The Waltons of Rossaguile - of whom only one member now survives - Maunsells, Hewitts all of this locality were weavers.
All clothes made an worn up to 60 years ago were homespun - frieze being made from wool and linen from flax. Sheep were kept by almost everyone & the flax grown as it was wanted. Much flax did not need to be grown because when linen was made from it it was so strong that it lasted for years. My informant (Rody Kennedy) told me that they still have at his house a piece of homespun sheet. There is another at Ryan's (Carney's) Tour & a couple at Mc Graths, Gortshane.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 21:20
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Very many of the old people were skilful at weaving - The wool was then taken to thr weaver to be woven into cloth. The thread was first put on warpers for the loom - A warper was a stick with spikes in it (e.g. (sketch)) one of those warpers was near the door always & another some ditance away the thread being attached to the spike of one of the warper and wound from that to spike on the other warper & so on until the ball was wound off the warpers. A weaver knew how many yards of cloth the thread would make from the number of 'winds' of thread round the warper.
The loom was a square frame with fine wires going in the same direction thus : (sketch) The thread was taken from the warpers, cut, & one thread passed through between each wire. Then there was a second row put over the first(or i n flannel two more rows). The weaver then worked the shuttle which was a kind of case carrying the bobbin or ball of thread necessary to make the cross threads or filling. The rows of warp threads were connected by bars
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 20:50
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An old woman once came into John McCarron's forge to get an old pot repaired. She put it down on the forge floor and asked the smith to mend it for her.
The smith was shoeing a kicking horse at the time and the horse knocked him into the pot. He was so angry that he threw the pot out on the street and broke it in pieces. The old woman was also very grieved as she said it belonged to her grandmother and her great grandmother, and she wept bitterly.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 20:43
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Reminesence of the Local Landlord
Local landlords were numerous in this part of Co. Monaghan about 50 years ago. Their estates being small, a number of them resided in their homes or castles on their estates for at least a few months of the year.
The landlord resident in this district was William Francis De. Vesmus? Kane, Drumreaske House, Monaghan. He resided for some months of the year in an adjacent holding which he farmed in the townland of Tireran, having built a house there and tried to runa model farm on the adjacent lands from which he had evicted his miserable tenants.
This man's predecessors were owners of a fairly large estate in Co. Monaghan, having been planters from the days of Oliver Cromwell or the days of the Reformation. They obtained their estates like all other landlords by the confiscation and plunder of the monassteries, as all lands and property prior to that date belonged solely to the Catholic church.
This man's father, Colonel Kane and his predecessors had the good wish and a good name from all their tenants in the generations that have gone past. But this last man W.F.De.V. Kane was a professional tyrant and was looked upon by his
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 19:03
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the food people ate long ago. Long ago the people ate their meals the same time as they do nowadays but their food was not as good as the food people eat nowadays. If the people took a piece of work by contract they worked for about two hours before their breakfast. For their breakfast they ate stirabout. they ate potatoes and buttermilk for their dinner. Very seldom they ate meat as they were too poor to buy it. The table was usually under the kitchen window. No tea was drank long ago.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 18:58
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There is a churn in every house about here. It is used to churn the milk so as to get butter from it.We have a churn at home. It is a machine churn and it is about four feet high when it is on the stand. The churn without the stand is just like a half - barrel and about the same size. There are two one on each side of the churn to hold it upon the stand. My mother always does the churning and when she puts the milk in the churn she closes the lid on the churn tightly so as the milk would not spill. There is also a handle attached to the churn and when you twist the handle the churn goes round about and churns the milk. It takes about an hour to do the churning. When the milk is churned the butter comes to the top of the milk. There are a great many old sayings told about the churning and here are some of them:- If you throw a coal under the churn when you are churning you will have a lot of butter. If a person comes in
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 18:51
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31.5. '38 Sore Eyes.
To wash with an infusion got from elder leaves.
Fasting spit rubbed to the 'sty'nine days in succession in the name of the Father ,Son and Holy Ghost.
To rub Holy Water especially Easter Holy Water to the sty.
To rub a gold ring to the sty.
To look through a married woman's wedding ring for the sty.
To bath the eyes with cold strong tea .
People suffering from sore eyes used to stop up all night on the vigils of the feasts of Our Lady .At the blessed well near Kilmurrey Churchyard-
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 18:51
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Golden Tansy is another plat which spreads rapidly. It chokes any plants that grow beside it. It is very easily pulled and does not grow far down in the ground.
Rattly-boxes are found in poor land They are long stalks with seeds on top. When shaken, they rattle hence the name.
Spunk another plant which grows in poor land. It is a finer plant than dock leaf which it resembles. Long ago, it was used by people as tobacco..The leaf was rolled into fine powder. This was put into a tin and roasted and it was then ready for use.
Wart herb. This is a green little plant which is found in tillage ground. Old people rubbed it on to warts and it was supposed to cure them
Burst herb. This plant is found along banks and ditches. Ointment was made from it by the old people which acted as a cure for the 'burst' - a disease which comes on peoples finders.
The herb was boiled in lard and then applied to the sore.
Nettles were used plentifully as vegetables long ago
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 18:43
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57.
a penny to the part o the sock that was touching the corn.Every night he used to put a coating of pig's lard on the piece of linen and in this way he banished every corn he ever had.To put the skin of a raw potato to the corn for a few nights on going to bed.After a few applications the corn came out from the root on the skin.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 18:39
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56
30.5 . 38. Cures : Corns.
The leaves of the Celandine .
To walk in the dew barefooted .
Ivy that the sun does not shine on.
To rub the sheep's suet .
To rub with ground sugar mixed with cream.
To apply ground chalk.
To cut an onion in two and to put the cut side up to the corn.To apply a piece of fat bacon .
To apply caster oil to corn.
To make a paste with bread soda and paraffin oil and apply to corn .
Ivy leaves steeped in vinegar.
Droppings of geese applied between two pieces of cloth to the corn.
The 'pith'of baker's bread steeped in Vinegar.
To get some ivy lives ,mutton suet and breadsoda and to chop and mix together until they form an ointment.Then apply to corn.
William Clune ,Ballymarkham,Quin,Co Clare.told me his father used to sew a piece of linen cloth about the size of
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 18:23
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31.5.'58 Boils -continued
Another part of the body .
An ointment made from leaves of the Elder tree and lard.
A teaspoonful of Olive Oil taken fasting every morning for a week and three or four teaspoonfuls the third week .By that time the boils have disappeared.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 18:18
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55.
according as the snail is dying away the wart withers away too.
To rub with the juice of the Spurgs plant.
To tie a horses hair around it .
To tie a cobbler's wax end around it.
Dan Kelly ,Drim ,Co.Clare had a cure which was -If a person complained of having warts .Dan used to -I will buy them from you for a penny.When the person gave him the penny the warts disappeared shortly afterwards one by one.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 18:10
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54
30-5-38. Cure- Warts.
To steal a piece of meat from some one and bury it in the manure heap.When the meat starts to rot the warts shall begin to disappear..
To wash them in the water in the smith's trough in a forge.
To wash in the water in the hole of a stone that would be found unexpectedly in a wood.
To hide a piece of meat in an unknown to anybody.
To bury a piece of the elder tree for every wart but the pieces must be exactly the same lengths and according as the pieces wither away the warts wear away too.To rub one's 'fasting spit 'to the warts for nine mornings in succession in the name of the Father ,Son and Holy Ghost.
To rub with pig's lard.
To get a black snail and rub it to the wart and then go to a whitethorn bush and stick a thorn in the snail ,then leave the snail on the bush and
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 17:45
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Hopscotch is a very nice game. s many as like can play it. You make five squares with chalk on the ground. You put one two three four in each square and you put B in the last one. Then you get a box of a flat stone. You throw it into the first square and hop it out f it with your foot. Then you throw it into each square till you come to the last one. Then you stand in the last one for a few minutes and hop it out again. If you put down your foot in the wrong square you are out or if you stand on the line you are also out.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 15:44
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The Breicleach put him up on a table to kill him but the daughter begged him to have mercy on her father. He did so and the Breicleach promised the daughter that if she had any troubles he would do his best to help her. She said she was in love with a boy for seven years and he now refused to marry her. The Breicleach went to the boy and made him consent to marry her and Lord Muskerry made the pair a present of £20. The Breicleach escaped capture until his although a huge sum was offered for his capture.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 15:44
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same as no 14
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 15:41
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He asked the weaver's daughter if he could rest for a while. He told her he came from Scotland to see the race and it was late. The daughter told him her father was gone there and would be back soon. When the father returned the Breicleach asked him who won and the replied the wild Irishman and you are very like him. The Irishman denied it.
When the Breicleach went to sleep the weaver place a net over him to prevent his escape and then went off for the military. During sleep the wild Irishman dreamth he was falling down a great height and jumped up in terror to find he was a prisoner. He screamed that he was dying and so awakened the daughter. He asked her for God's sake to release him. She did so and he had just left when the military arrived to find he was gone.
The Breicleach returned to Ireland. Later he went to England with Lord Muskerry to have revenge on the weaver. The Breicleach put him up on a table to kill him but the daughter begged him to have mercy on her
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 15:18
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Lord Muskerry having heard what a great runner the Breicleach was asked the government to grant him a reprieve for three years to train him up so that he might race a mule in England that had never been beaten by any racehorse. The reprieve was granted. At last the day of the race came. It was to take place around a lake enclosed on the outside by a wall seven feet high. The Breicleach had told Lord Muskerry that when coming near the winning post if he thought he could pass out the mule he would rub a white handkerchief to his face. This was a sign to Lord M. to bet what he had and what he hadn't on the Breicleach. All happened as expected and when the race was finished the mule dropped dead and the Breicleach jumped the seven foot wall to escape the anger of the crowd who had lost thousands of pounds.
When he got beyond the reach of the military who pursued he entered a weaver's cottage. He asked the
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 10:05
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1. "Forts"
There is an old fort near our house in the townland of Cahernalough. It is round. There is a bank of earth around it and there are bushes growing on top of the earth. I do not know if there is a hole down or not. I never heard of anybody going down. I do not know any story about this fort. There are cattle grazing near it.
Once upon a time there was a man and he ploughed a fort and on the following morning the ploughed ground was a field again.
Another man cut bushes in a fort and all he had died and his children were all paralysed. There was a light seen in the fort about 30 years ago.
Peg McDonnell
Told by Patk McDonnell. Age 68 years.
Toureen
Ennis
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 09:56
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in crowds to the houses of people but only one or two come now. They come in crowds now but they do not come to the houses of the people. Some of them tell stories and recite old poems.
Tilly McDonnell
Told by Patk McDonnell. Age 68 yrs.
Toureen, Ennis
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 09:19
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ground inside on it. Some of them had no cover. They slept inside in that. They begged their food. They used ask charity. They never went in crowds.
Told by father of Philomena Brooks.
Crogane, Ennis. Age 47 years.
(Joe Brooks)
9. "Tramps"
Tramps go from house to house begging and looking for food. Different people come every time but an odd time now and again they come twice or three times. The tramps that do not live very far away come often. I do not know the names of any of them. They come from far away places. Some people do not know where they are from. Some of them sell things and make money of them. They make them themselves. Some people buy things from them and others do not. Some people have welcome for them and others have not. They generally come as far as the door and they do not stay long. They sleep in tents or vans. The people give them food sometimes. They never ask charity. I do not know any prayer they say. Long long ago they used to come
duine anaithnid
2020-03-23 00:59
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Bhí bean i mBheara fadó agus an Chailleach Bheara do tugadh uirthe. Deir na seana daoine gur sprid do beadh í. Bhiodh sí ag dul ó áit go h-áit agus bhi eaghla ar na daoine roimpi. Deirtear go suibhaileadh sí trí Condtae gach aon lá agus thagadh sí tar-nas airís gach tráthnóna. Bhiodh sí ag dul go dtí an tráigh gach aon mhaidin chun rud éigin d'fiágail le n-ithe
á amhain bhí so ag siubhal timceall Cualach agus bhuail scoláire bocht uime. D'Fiarfruig sé dí Cad a bhíonn agat chun bhreicfeasta gach aon maidin agus an freagra a thug sí air
Bíonn mibhan fiadha fíor glan
An dilisceac ó Chontaibh Clár
An bhriac ó Gleann i Dtuaidh
Is an Cnib ó Beallach Beámh
Nuair chuala an scoláire bocht an fhreagra, Do bhuail sé í leis an slaitin draoidheacte agus do léim si treasna na faraige anon go Cill Caitirin agus d'fag sí rian a coise ar an leac ar a raibh sí na seasamh sa Cualach agus tá an
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 21:26
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From the same source I have got some songs composed by local poets. The following is part of a song " BUN CIAMALTHA VALE " by an uneducated boy named O'Brien who emigrated

In Summer time in Flora's prime
When our people mount its peak
Each lass and sire in grand attire
For berries there go seek
'Tis there our hill-side peasantry
Receive a wholesome gale
While Sol displays her glittering rays
O'er Bun Kiamaltha vale
Of I refer to days of yore
When Sarsfield and his men
Did promenade with pike and blade
Through this old verdant glen
His words when leaving Limerick
Were " Ballyneety Hail "
Through Killaloe, Glenculloo
And Bun Kiamaltha vale"
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 21:24
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I have been told that when faction fights were at their height'fencers' used to go around teaching men how to 'fence' just as dancing masters go around.
After a fight there were a great many jailed - at that time there was an old jail in Newport & there is a street there which is still called Jail St.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 21:20
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as large as the wheel of asses' car. On the other end of stool was another shaft (about 9" wide). In the side of this were 4 or 5 holes for spindles. The spindles were fastened with straw or rushes to keep from wearing. There was a band going from the big wheel around the cogs of the spindle. A roll of wool was attached to the top of the spindle & then the woman took a thread from this roll in her hand, put the big wheel spinning & that would twist the thread by spinning the spindle rod & the woman would draw the thread back along - she had to even the thread too to keep it from being lumpy. The thread was all drawn out a second time to give it a better twist and to make it more even. This work was all done very fast. When all the thread was spun off a roll it was attached to lower part of the spindle & the wheel reversed so that all the thread was wound onto the lower part of the spindle then the next roll was done and so on until the spindle was filled up. It might take 9 or 10 rolls to fill a spindle. Thread was then taken off spindle & made into a big ball.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 21:10
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Spinning was done in almost every house in the old days. The spinning wheel was fixed on a kind of stool. Out of one end of stool stood a shaft to which the wheel was attached (the wheel was about
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 21:10
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application of fat bacon and when the shin is broken a dressing of soap and sugar should be applied.
Goitre is said to be cured by putting the fingers in a Sanctuary lamp and rubbing the oil on the throat while the lamp is burning.
Gumboils are cured by washing in water (in which) salt is dissolved.
Hiccough is cured by drinking from the off-side of an egg-cup.
Boils are cured by taking a spoonful of milk covered with nutmeg powder.
Chilblains are cured by rubbing with glycerine or iodine.
Earache is cured by putting warm oil on wool and putting it into the ear.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 21:04
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In Ireland the seventh son has always been regarded as a sort of doctor.
In my district there is such a man Christopher Byrne of Hanstown and he cures ring worm.
Measels are cured by giving the sufferer plenty of very of whey or whiskey punch and keeping the room dark.
Mumps should be poulticed with roasted potatoes or boiled turnips.
Neuralgia is cured by drinking very hot milk and bathing the feet in hot water.
Rheumatism is relieved by bathing the affected parts in hot water and then in cod water for at least ten minutes and rubbing with a rough towel. The sufferer should eat no meat.
Stonebruise is cured by the
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 20:59
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Roasted salt put in a stocking and tied around the neck will cure sore throat.
A slice of bacon applied to a thorn in the finger will draw it out.
Holding the nos so as to keep from breathing will cure hiccough.
Soap and sugar will draw any badness out of a sore.
Raw beef will cure a black eye.
Point nine gooseberry thorns as a sty in the eye and then throw them over your left shoulder and the sty will be cured.
A key of a door or a slat stone put on the back of the neck will stop the nose from bleeding.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 20:55
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a cold.
Roasted onion put into the ear till cure an earache.
Beaten white of an egg and vinegar will cure hoarseness.
Nettles boiled will take away a rash if rubbed on it.
Bathe warts in a trough in black smiths forge and they will be cured.
Also if nine straws are rubbed on the warts and buried in the dung heap the warts will be seen to disappear as the straws decay.
Bog water will cure sore feet.
Breadsoda applied to burns will keep them from rising.
Bathe sore eyes with salt and water and they will be cured.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 20:51
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Old Cures
Long ago people believed in old cures for instance -
Tea leaves and salt made into a poul tice and applied will cure chilblains.
Brown paper steeped in vinegar and applied to the forehead will cure a headache.
A hairy maggot put in a bag and tied around a child’s neck will cure whooping cough. By the time the maggot is dead the child will be better.
It is said if the child passes three times under an ass it will be cured.
Also if the godfather ties a red string around the child’s neck it will be cured.
Boiled buttermilk with an onion sliced into it a piece of butter and a spoonful of sugar will cure.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 18:55
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perform the cure. Then he is sent out to some field to get nine gooseberry thorns and points each thorn at the stye. s. He does not touch the stye. When the boy is doing this says "I am curing you in the Name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost." Then the boy who is performing the cure throws each thorn over his right shoulder.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 18:13
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Different industries which were formerly carried on & mostly all now discontinued, would include spinning, weaving, candle-making, dyeing, thattching, rope-making, tanning of leather, making barrels, churns, firkins, tubs &c , lime burning.
Spinning and weaving wool
Treatment of wool before Spinning
Sheep washed & wool shorn as at present. Then the wool was teased & usually taken to the mill. Here it was heckled (hackled) by machines. A certain amount oil was put on every stone of wool.
It was 'hackled' twice by machines and was dropped cut in rolls about as thick as the finger & 2' or 3' long. This was called carding or rolling. Sometimes carding was done by hand - 'Cards' were timber boards with fine wire teeth. All the wool was pulled through the comb & the fibres straightened. Most of the people of this place took the wool to Clare Glen mills.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 16:48
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I only know of one fort in the school district. It is called a fort. I do not know what townland is it in. There is a fort in view of it. It is the square in shape. There is no fence around it. There is no entrance to it. I do not know who built them. I do not know of any stories of the Danes connected with them.
There are no stories told of cats or other animals in the neighbourhood. The owner of the fort never interfered with it, but he lets cattle graze on it.
Nothing remarkable has ever been heard or seen in it.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 12:45
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30.4.38.On a stone gate pier leading to Mr Blood's land in Ardsollus ,Quin,Co.Clare was a large flat stone on which was written in large"cut" letters:"Entertainment for Man and Horse"It is supposed it was in the wall of one of the hostels which stood near the famous Race Course of Ardsollus.This stone was removed from the pier by some person unknown and cannot now be traced.
Told by Dan Corbett, Ballykilty,Quin, Co. Clare.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 12:39
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14.
30.4.'38.Story told by John Sammon,Quin .Co. Clare.
Quin Abbey was built as a result of a vow made Macon Macnamara ,Lord Clanculein in 1402.At the time he was living in Dangan Castle.His son and heir,a boy of four years of age was found missing search being made for him,he was found in a pond in the lawn and taken out dead. His parents made a vow that if God restore him to them they would found a church in Quin as a thanksgiving offering.The boy was restored to life on the Feast of St.Francis the 4th of October 1402.On that day the boy received the additional name of Francis ,a name much honoured by the Macnamara family from that time to the present.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 12:27
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3.
4. 38 A Funny Story.
This story was told by James Mac Namara ,Ballyhickey, Quin,Co.Clare. to Eilish Mac Namara,Hazelwood ,Quin.
A man named Mickie Devaney had an Irish Terrier and he used to let him sleep in the kitchen every night.Before Mickie went to bed he used 'rake' the fire, fill the kettle and hang it down .At seven o'clock every morning the terrier used scrape out the ashes,light the fire and boil the kettle ,and hop on to the bed and bark into Mickie's ear to call him when the kettle was boiled.This same dog used always fight with a dog belonging to Jack Halpin of Ardsollus .At last Mickey's dog died and he was so fond of of the dog that he got a waistcoat made of the skin .One night as Mickey was passing Halpin's wearing the waistcoat he met the dog that his dog used fight with .Immediately the hair stood upon the waistcoat preparing to fight as if Mickey's own dog was present.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 11:26
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Hedge Schools in Summer thees schools were carried o. Generally a cabinwhere animals were housed was cleaned and a "poor scholar" gave lessons in it. These 'poor scholars' came from different parts of the country & lodged in some farmers house. Some of the old people around here went to those schools. There was one at Clare Glens & some old men (then young boys) from this place went to school there.
Those poor scholars were often employed by the farmers to teach their children as schools were few and far distant.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 11:21
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In the year 1888 - May 9th - the heaviest fall within the memory of the old people. All the valleys were filled & houses were completely covered.
Great loss of cattle sheep , poultry and birds died in great numbers.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 11:18
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with some workmen were in Glown that day saving hay. They ran into the house & were sitting in the kitchen. Before long the river Mulcair overflowed its banks & was lapping against the windows. The water poured in the door & they had to go upstairs. They said the whole house shook with the thunder. They thought they would not see home again (and my father was not a man who was easily frightened especially of thunder and lighning). Torrents of water poured down from the mountain side and carried off everything that lay in it's way , hay , cars, tubs, cattle , sheep. A dairy owned by Wm. Clifford (Seain) was knocked and eight firkins of butter swept away in the flood.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 11:11
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In August 1906 there was a terrible on in Keeper. I remember this well. There was terrific thunder & lighting with torrential rain. My uncle and aunt (now both deceased) lived in Power Lalor's lodge Glenculloo at the time and my father (now dead)
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 11:09
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Big wind 1839. Rody kennedy (Student at St Patrick's College Thurles) gave me some particulars of the above event which he got from his grandfather Brian Kennedy, who remembered it well & for whom it was a memorable event. It was at it's worst at night time. Houses were levelled trees uprooted - the havoc was indescribable. some very exaggerated stories were told of the "Big Wind"
On Feb 28th 1903 there was another terrible wind storm which did untold damage. Hay ricks were blown in but notwithstanding all this there was a man called Johnny Kennedy who lived on the bleak side of Keeper & who slept right through the storm.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 11:02
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last Spring aged 96 or therebaouts was a very hardworking man and a great mower in his day. He could easily mow an acre of hay in a day.
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2020-03-22 11:00
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In these old days all mowing was done by scythes & there were men who were renowned for their skill in the use of the scythe. Then a man set his hay by contract to scythe men. They were great men considering the food they got. Mowers usually got up at 4am - breakfast of potatoes & salt & milk or stirabout and then cut away in the cool of the morning up to dinner. They usually stopped for a couple of hours about mid-day from the heat of the sun.
Pat Ryan (Stack) Munnia who died last
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2020-03-22 10:57
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another, occasionally taking a rest & then they took off their shirts to 'squeeze' them and then danced away again.
Dan Ryan (Cooper) of Kiloscully village & who only died in May 1934 was a great step dancer also. Other noted dancers were Pat Ryan Fiddane and an uncle of mine Pat Ryan (Malachy) Glenculloo. Those three were noted for their step-dancing at the local weddings and dances - the dances includes "A Priest in his Boots", "The Orange Robe" &c.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 10:53
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Great dancers around here were Jack Dunbar before- mentioned. He learned dancing from an old dancing master named O'Shea. At this time a a man named Quirke, a fiddler at Shallee opened a dance always on Easter Sunday. He charged 1d a head & generally made a pound on that day. One day a famous dancer from Limerick challenged Dunbar. They spent the day dancing - one dance after
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 10:50
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beef for you" There was a second anvil in the place equally big. Corney took an anvil in each hand & went to the door and back saying "There is Irish stirabout for it"
Big stones were thrown off the shoulder. This was a favourite past-time in this part of the country & and in other countries the "Tipperary stone- throwers" were often spoken of.
Another favourite 'cross-road' past-time' was taking three standing jumps.
Men used to walk long ditances to fairs in olden times. They walked to Castleisland for Kerry cattle from Glencullen and to Clare.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 10:43
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collect eggs during Lent for Easter Sunday morning. Dunbar and another workma collected 64 eggs & on Eas. Sunday the Brown family were at church they boiled the eggs and Dunbar ate most of them.
It is said that a man named Gleeson Shallee (father of Christ Gleeson 'Skelper' ) had a big appetite but the fact seems to be exaggerated as seen from the following : a few men made a bet that he would not eat a calf - he sat down to table ate the calf in a short while and then turning round to one of the lads said "I have the little chicken here picked, where is the calf you were talking about?'
Local Heroes
Denis Ryan (Corney) Tour , father of the present family was a great man to lift weights. There was an old forge in this locality at a place called Munnia and une day he went in there and challenged a local 'peeler' who was a very strong man, The 'peeler' lifted the anvil from the block carried it to the door and back again to the block saying "There is Queen's
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 00:36
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the married couple are first to have breakfast.
It is a sign of bad luck if the party meet a funeral going to the chapel and also if they meet with an accident it is a token of bad luck. The night of the wedding strawboys go to the house with masks on their faces. Some of them go in and enjoy themselves and others stay outside and do considerable damage to the house.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 00:34
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Local marriage customs
Marriages take place throughout the year except during Lent and Advent, also in the months of May, August, October and December. People usually get married during Shrove.
When the matches are made it is an old custom that the matchmaker goes to the house and carries a bottle of whiskey with him.
Some time ago stock was given as a fortune but is now discontinued. It is usually money that is given. On the wedding day it is an old custom that Confetti and rice are thrown after the married couple as a token for luck. Also when the parties are going home an old shoe is thrown after the motor.
The friends and neighbours of the married couple go to the bride's house on that day and enjoy themselves dancing and singing. A wedding feast is held at the bride's house and it an old system that
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 00:27
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an abnormal appetite, He was supposed to kill a few hens for his dinner & boil them without plucking. When ccooked it was easy to peel off the feathers.
A story to prove the veracity of "Mittol's" appetitie: There was a meiteall of men working one day about Dolla & and was composed of men from different places. One of them was eating off the same plate as "Mittol" but did not know him. According as the meat was put on the plate 'Mittol' ate it all in big 'chunks' & the other man being able to get none became very exasperated & said "you must be the devil, or "Mittol" from Curryquin"
In the house in which I now live in Cainaltha, in former times there lived a man named Brown & he had a workman he named Jack Dunbar the son of a policeman who was in Knockfune barracks (now the house of Martin Ryan "Lackan" T.D.)
This Jack Dunbar was famous in many ways. He was also noted for his appetite. Eggs were rare & it was customary to
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 00:17
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Speaking of foods leads to mention of men who could consume much food so that they became famous for eating.
There was a man named Gleeson from Curryquin near Dolla, commonly known as 'Mithol' who worked at Lord Dunalleys, Kilboy. One day when there was no one at the 'big house' but the servants they took him in and gave him a feed. Evidently they wanted to test his 'eating powers' weighing everything they gave him including soups, meat bread &c he ate 32lbs of food.
There was another man in the same place called Paddy "Bazceen" (Gleeson) who died about 20 years ago and who worked at Kilboy. He also had
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 00:10
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used as well.
For dinner the table was placed in the middle of the floor & was heaped up with potatoes. All the family sat round and each got a bit of the goose and a steaming bowl of soup or gravy. This was all the meat most people had for very few then killed bacon or beef. When a cow was killed it was hung out of one of the rafters of the house by sugans before being cit up and put in the pickle barrel. The sugans then, were made better than ropes now.
Sometimes the man and woman of the house ate in the parlour and had perhaps special fare.
Butter was seldom used unless on churning days or when a bit was left over after filling the firkin.
On special occasions there were special foods e.g. Prople killed a bull calf for St Patrick's Day, & a cock or a goose for St Martin's Day; when the new potatoes were dug they made colcannon; they had 'boxty' when the potatoes were being dug; on a Sunday they had a goose.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 00:04
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Stirabout (now called porridge) was a favourite article of food. It was made of yellow (Indian) meal and baked for hours in a pot oven beside the fire. This was eaten with the skim milk. In those days before stirabout the people had for dinner when potatoes were out bread and cabbage dressed with cream.
In these times the country was full of geese & the farmers had a goose on Sundays for a good part of the year. The goose was boiled and the soup
duine anaithnid
2020-03-22 00:00
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Two or three friends or neighbours joined in making butter i.e. one week a farmer took all the butter he had to spare to the house of the friend with whom he was "joined" & all their butter was packed into a firkin & sold & the proceeds divided between them. Next week they changed and the firkins were filled in the house of the other farmer & so on the work was done in turns.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 23:56
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This was always done in the home as there were no creameries then.
The milk was strained into shallow wooden tubs called 'Keelers'; after twelve hours or so the cream was skimmed into a wooden 'can' with one handle at side. The skim milk left was drunk with ptatoes or given to calves and pigs.
After 4 or 5 days the cream was put into churn and churned into butter. There were two kinds of churns. A large churn barrel with a handle at each side for large amounts of cream and a small churn standing on ground with a dash through the lid.
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2020-03-21 23:50
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dish. It is still used especially when potatoes are still new. The potatoes are first scraped to remove peel, then boiled and mashed with a 'pounder' which was like a mallet. Pepper, salt and butter were mixed with the potatoes and the mixture eaten with a spoon.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 23:48
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In the olden times people ate only two meals per day. The principal food of the poorer classes was potatoes eaten with salt. Skim milk or buttermilk was drunk at the same time.
The potatoes were thrown out on the table and the family sat round and dipped the potatoes in the salt before eating. Meat was seldom used except at Christmas or on very special occasions.
Wholemeal bread made from the wheaten flour ground at home was much in use and it was very palatable when eaten hot with the fresh home made butter.
Buck-bread or 'bogsti' was very commonly used. It was made by grating raw potatoes. Sometimes a little flour was mixed through this and baked on a griddle. This is never made now-a-days.
Griddle bread is sometimes made now but not so much as in the old days.
Colcannon was another favourite
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 23:42
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pounds. It is said that if a person comes in to light his pipe you are not supposed to give a coal to him while you are churning. The buttermilk is used in making cakes and sometimes it is given to the pigs in their mash at dinner time.
We have a churn at home. It is about two feet high or a little more. It is round on the top and round on the bottom. The sides are round. There is a mark on the top of it to show you how to put on the lid. The various parts are:- the lid, the handle, the catch for holding the lid on, and the axle. Churning is done once a week in Winter and about three times in every fortnight in the Summer. My mother does the churning. You put milk in a basin in the morning and in the evening you put the cream of the milk in a crock and put more milk in the basin and next morning you do the same. You do that for about a week and hen you put the thick milk in the churn. If people come in when you are churning the should take the churn or you will have no butter in the milk.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 23:37
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of chalking the backs of marriageable young men and women who failed to marry during Shrove.
The custom of eating a great many eggs on Easter Sunday still goes on. It has come down from the very old times when fasting during Lent was very strict and no eggs were eaten during the seven weeks.
On St Martin's eve it has been a very old custom to spill blood in honour of St Martin. It is usual to kill a pig or fowl and the bird or animal so killed was said to be 'given to Martin'. The blood was usually 'spilled' in the manure heap in the farm-yard or in the ashes.
On St Stephen's Day it was and still is the custom for crowds of young men and boys to gather and dress themselves in fancy dress and go around to the houses with holly and ivy bushes on which a dead wren is hanging singing a wren song + sometimes playing musical instruments.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 23:31
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are invited to the home of the bride and this hass been called the 'hauling home'.
The custom of making pancakes on Shrove Tuesday and dropping a ring into the mixture still exists. The young boy or girl who was 'lucky' enough to discover the ring was supposed to be the next to marry.
Om Hallow Eve this custom of pancake meeting is still also practiced .
May, October and some other months were and still are considered unlucky for marriages.
On St John's Eve (23rd June) the country was ablaze with bonfires in honour of St John. Few fires are lit nowadays, the custom appears to be dying out.
On St Brigid's eve a silk handkerchief is sometimes spread out on a bush. This is supposed to cure a headache if tied around the head of the sufferer.
The Sunday after Shrove Tuesday is called 'Chalk Sunday' from the custom
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 23:23
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We have a churn at home in our house. It is one of the old time churns. It is about two - and - a - half feet in height. The wood that is in it is oak. Before churning the churn should be rinsed with cold water. Then the churn should be scrubbed and washed with boiling water. When it is scrubbed it is rinsed again with cold water. Then the churn is left out to dry. When it is brought in again it id rinsed again with cold water. It takes three quarters of an hour to churn milk. In the winter it is necessary to put hot
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 23:22
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Shrove was the name given to the period during which the marriages took place. It began after 'Twelfth Day' (6th Jan) and ended on Shrove Tuesday - the day before Ash Wednesday. The marriages mostly take place still during this time and the festivities are still almost the same. The match is 'drawn down' and then the friends of the parties meet, usually in a public house in town or at a fair, the 'fortune' or dowry is fixed after much 'splitting' and dividing. The 'day' is then decided on, when all meet at the house of the bride-to-be. On this occasion the friends and neighbours are invited and there is a party at which there is dancing and singing. The marriage ceremony is usually attended by a long train of vehicles belonging to the friends of the newly-wed. The all night wedding of former days is no longer held.
After a month the newly-wed
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 23:17
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51. The cure for tonsils if they are ripe is to boil vinegar in a vessel with a spout and hold the spout to you mouth and it will cure the tonsils.
52. The cure for any swollen part of your body is goose grease.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 23:13
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39. The cure for water warts is to rub a snail on them and leave the snail on a bush but never look at him again and when the snail withers the warts will also wither.
40. The cure for a hard cough is to take a beaten raw egg every morning before breakfast until it is gone.
41. To put a snail to a burn or any cut he will cure it.
42. A cure for a corn is to take off your shoes and run in the bog.
43. AA cure for a head-ache is to a plant called a house league to your head.
44. A cure for whooping cough is if you go into a house where two would be married with the same name and ask them for a bit of food that they left after the dinner
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 23:02
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by visits to the town.
Kildare owes its origin to st.brigid and may date its foundation from the period when that saint founded her monastery there, about the year 470.
Kildare Catherdral- this church was erected in the time of the St. Brigid and the St. Conleth. It was a simple cross church without aisles. A tower arose above the intersection of the arms of the cross, whilst a noble round tower stood and still stands not far from the western end. The nave was divided by a wooded partition into two equal portions and St. Conleth with his Chapter occupied the right or south side and St. Brigid with her nuns watch the left or north side.
Time after time the
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2020-03-21 23:00
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nest but goes around to all the other birds' nest and lays her eggs in them. When the young ones come out, they are much bigger than all the others and eat all the food which the mother brings in.
The Robin is the bird with the red breast, and in song and story is known as "Robin Red Breast." An old legend explains to us how he got his red breast. On Good Friday he is supposed to have picked a thorn from Our Lord's head and the Precious Blood got on his breast.
Magpies are very nice birds too.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:55
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body noticed the little wren on its back and when the Eagle could not go any higher, the wren flew off its back and went higher and said "I am King"
In the beginning of Summer the Swallows comes and migrate in the Winter. If the Swallows are seen flying low over the ground it is a sure sign of rain and if they fly high it is a sign of good weather.
The Cuckoo is another bird which goes away in the Winter and makes her appearance again in May. She never builds her own
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:50
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Bird Lore,
As every King is at the head of his state so is the Wren the King of all birds. There is an old story which explains this to us. One time all the birds of the air met together and they wanted to know what bird would be King. Then all the birds tried to fly and what ever bird flew the highest was to be King. When all the other birds had tried and failed, the Eagle flew up into the air and no
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:45
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and they saw St. Stephen. Every St. Stephen's day the boys go around catching the wren.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:44
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eagle's back and when the eagle was high up in the sky he said: "I flew the highest I am the king of the birds". But just then the wren flew up above the eagle and on that account he became king of the birds.
It is also said that the wren betrayed St. Stephen. This was how it happened. One day when St. Stephem was hiding from the soldiers he climbed a tree a. There on the same tree a wren had his nest and when the soldiers came they stopped to rest under the tree where St. Stephen was. When the wren flew out the soldiers looked up
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:39
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a boy robs a nest he will get a wart.
When Our Lord was nailed to the Cross it is said that a robin tried to pull the thorns out of His Head. If you look closely at him you will notice that his beak is crooked and it is also said that some of the Sacred Blood dropped on his breast and that is why he is called robin red breast.
One day all the birds decided to a king of the bird that flew the highest. When they were ready the little wren got on the
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:37
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water as a cure. It is said that a man named John Dineen of Cleandries was one day asked by a woman to bring her a bottle of forge water as she wanted it as a cure for her son.
He brought her the forge water and it is said that the son got cured and that the man who brought the water got disabled.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:35
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The Local Forge
There are five forges in the parish of Causeway, and the smiths who own them are Maurice Lawlor, Jeremiah Sullivan, Stephen Carroll William Halloran and Patrick Delaney.
One of these forges is situated at a cross-road, another by a stream and the rest by the roadside. There are two forges in Meenogahane and one in Causeway. The implements a smith uses at his work are hammer, sledge, pincers and bellows. The bellows has an oblong shape narrow at one end and wide at the other end.
The local smith makes ploughs, harrows, pikes, spades and other things but horse-shoeing is his principal work. He irons wheels in the open air near the forge and often he has to get men to go far away for water to quench the irons.
In the local forge there are three small windows and two fireplaces, It is built with stones and mortar and roofed with timber and thatched with straw. The anvil is of a V shape and it can be heard far off when the smith hammers on it.
There is a story in connection with the use of forge
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:34
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Bird Lore
The cuckoo is a very lazy bird. When she lays her egg she drops it into another birds nest and the other bird has to feed the young bird (has to feed) when she comes out of the shell.
When she grows up she pushes the other young birds out of the nest in order to get enough of room for herself.
The the black bird flies low it is a sign of rain. It is said that if
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:28
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cure there. U is for Ulcer. Vervaim, brings back lovers - it's never too late. Walnuts you can pickle - the vinegars' good, if you've a sore throat, then use it you should.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:26
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if in hot milk they steam. G, is for Ginger, it's good for the gout. H, is for Honey, it makes you grow stout. Ivy, and Vinegar, makes a corn cure. Jelly from Carrageen's nourishing and pure. K, is a letter from which I will keep. L, is for Lettuce - eat this and you'll sleep. M, is for Mint, which is good for headache. N, is for Nuts, they a wholesome dish make. Oats, make fine porridge, so highly nutritious, P, is for Parsnips - when cooked they're delicious. Q is for Quince, which cures gumboils quite soon. Raspberries keep you from gout pains immune. S, is for Sage - it is good for the hair. T, is for Thyme tea - an Asthma
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:24
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by a local poet.
This is a verse of the song.
"Come find me a spot in our
Emerald Isle,
When the glory of Summer all
round flings a smile.
When soft Summer bells deck
each upland and lawn
To compete with the beauties
of Meenogahane"
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:21
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My home district.
Meenogahane, my native townland, is situated on the left bank of the Shannon. It is in the Parish of Causeway, and in the barony of Clan maurice. It occupies the two slopes and bottom of a lovely valley. A river which takes its source in a neighbouring bog runs through it and discharges its waters into the estuary of the Shannon.
In this pretty valley stands the ancient seat of the Pierces - a family, whose name has been held in grateful memory by the neighbouring peasantry. The approximate number of houses in Meenogahane at present is nineteen, but local people state the houses were more numerous in olden times. The ruins of some of these houses are still to be seen.
Some of the old people state that Meenogahane means "the meadow of the echoes" while others say it derives its name from the family name - Keane. The portion of Meenogahane where I live is locally known as the "Paddock".
People say it got this name because it adjoins the ancient mansion of the Pierces. The townland is mentioned in a song which was written many years ago
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:17
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Those people who had sore eyes were advised to visit some holy well and take a bottle of the water and bathe his or her eyes in it. They were also advised to make the Sign of the Cross with a gold ring on the sore eye and then to look through it three times, this was supposed to sure a stye on a person's eye. The Herbal Alphabet in olden times was, as follows. A, is for Almonds, for coughs, colds, and chills. B, is for Barley, it cures many ills. C, is for Cabbage, it's good for the skin. Drink Dandelion Wine; and you'll never be thin. E, is for Elder, it makes fine face cream. Figs cure toothache,
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:13
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in the townland, the majority of them are built of concrete and are two storey slated houses. At the time of the famine a big number of the poor people emigrated to America, Australia and Canada to seek a living for themselves. The land in this district is on the whole good and is very suitable for the cultivation of all kinds of crops.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:10
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My home district
Drumnacurra is the name of my native district. It is situated in North Kerry quite close to the estuary of the Shannon. It is in the Parish of Causeway and in the barony of Clan-Maurice.
Local people state that the townland derives its name from the word "Currach" or marsh, as some of the land in the townland was at one time boggy or marshy land, and is now reclaimed.
There are twenty five families in the townland of Drumnacurra and the number of people living there is approximately one hundred and forty. Six old people over seventy are at present living there, but they do not know Irish. Their names are :- Mrs Nora Donoghue. Mrs Anne Hanlon. Mrs Kate Hanlon. Mrs Johanna Donoghue. Miss Hannah Canty and Mr John Hanlon.
The address of each of the above-mentioned persons is Drumnacurra Causeway Co Kerry. Houses were more numerous in the locality in olden times than they are now, and the ruins of some of them are still to be seen here and there throughout the townland. There are very few thatched houses
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 22:10
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Local Cures.
In olden times as there were no dentists the people had to seek sick remedies for their own ailments. Some people when they got toothaches used iodine to relieve their pains. A goose or a gander was made use of in order to cure thrush. If a person got up early in the morning and while fasting take a goose or a gander and allowed it breathe into the child's mouth then the patient would be cured of thrush. The food which a ferrit left behind was used as a remedy for whooping cough.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 21:01
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The Gibbert Rath on the Curragh was during the rebellion of 1798 the scene of one of the most cruel acts connected with that unhappy epoch.
On 28th May a large number of the insurgents, who had encamped on Knockawlin Hill surrendered their arms on condition of being allowed to retire peaceably to their homes. Three days later another large body assembled at the Gibbert Rath for the same purpose. After delivering up their arms they were fired on and an immense number were slaughtered in cold blood
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 19:11
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X
Then nearer home we've Brown's Castles old walls,
Where the wild birds of night fly to rest to its halls.
But a ruin, a ruin is all you now see,
Alas! for the fall of the gallant and free.
XI
Come, find me a spot in our Emerald Isle,
When the glory pf Summer all round flings a smile
When soft Summer bells deck each upland and lawn
To outrival the beauties of Meenogahane.
XII
O Meenogahane! thou art dear unto me,
As I roam on thy bowers with my Cushala machree,
'Tis then I oft tell her thy weird legends old.
When I sing of thy male sons
The war like and bold.
XIII
A health to the scion of Fitzmaurice's race
Who at present resides in this grand ancient place,
Long, Long may he gaze on that green tinted lawn
To keep up the old splendour of Meenogahane.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 19:03
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V
Let not strangers come here with the lisp of the slave
They could not abide with in sound of yon waves[?]
When it seems to re-echo with musical glee
The glories of Ireland the songs of the free.
VI
Afar to the north in their bold outline there,
Rise in majestic beauty the grand hills of Clare[?]
To the west running out like a sentinel bold
Appeareth Loop Head with its radiance of gold.
VII
Away to the west, see, away far away,
Outflanking the bosom of yon throbbing bay.
Rise Nature's tall bulwarks of storied Cape Leen,
With those rock circling barriers of bright dazzling sheen.
VIII
See away far away where the sea breezes blow,
And the silvery Atlantic leaps madly below,
Blush our Kerry Alps, like a maiden when kissed
With their feet in old Ocean, their forehead in mist.
IX
To the east, Ballybunion will next meet your eye[?]
Uphung like a gem in the brow of the sky,
No prettier a village the tourist can see
Overlooking old Shannon dancing on to the sea.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 18:44
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Meenogahane
I
Come, find me a spot in our Emerald Isle,
When the glory of Summer all round flings a smile,
When soft Summer bells deck each upland and lawn,
To compete with the beauties of Meenogahane.
II
You'd travel our Island from strand into strand,
And ne'er find a spot in our darling Ireland
To match me the splendour of a soft Summer's dawn,
When it laughs o'er the green fields of Meenogahane.
III
The Causeway of Antrim is majestic and grand,
But simpler to me is your bright pebbly strand,
Killarney's weird beauties are bewitching and fair
But dearer to me are the blue hills of Clare.
IV
Come, follow me now to old Shellbourne hole,
And I'll read you a page from the book of my soul,
See our dear lordly Shannon rolling proudly below,
Does the weird song it sings set your heart all aglow.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 18:26
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11. What is it that has a face and two hands, and cannot talk after.
Answer. A clock.
12.My long leged father and my short bodied mother and my three little children like one another.
Answer. A pot.
13. Stretch out your hand before your face. And you may plainly see what never was, or what will never will be.
Answer. Equal length of your fingers.
14. My hard working father, my lazy old mother, and my twelve children.
Answer. A clock.
15. Long legs, short thies, small head, and no eyes. Answer. A tongs
16. As round as an apple, as deep as a cup. And all the men in Derry would not draw it up.
Answer. A well.
17 Round the house , and round the house, And stand in the corner at night.
Answer. A twig.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 18:16
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1. Under the fire and over the fire and never touches the fire? Answer. A cake in an oven.
2. Why does a hen pick a pot?
Answer. Because she cannot lick it.
3. Why does a cow look over a ditch?
Answer. Because she cannot look through it.
4. Black and white and read all over?
Answer. A newspaper.
5. Black and white and hops on the road like hailstones. A magpie.
6. Little red Nancy, sitting on a wall. the longer she sits the sooner she'll fall.
Answer. A candle.
7. I went up the boreen and down the boreen and carried the boreen on my back.
Answer. A ladder.
8. A little red man sitting by the wall. He eats all he gets and drinks nothing at all? Answer. A fire.
9. The man that made it never wore it. the man who wore it never saw it.
Answer. A coffin.
10. How many cow tails would reach the moon?
Answer. One if it was long enough.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 18:04
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There is one holy well in our Parish. the well is Cluan Patrick. It is in the townland of Cornapalis. It is in the field of Cluan Patrick. The people visit the well the first three Sundays in July. The people go around the statue of Saint Patrick fifteen times, and keep saying "One Our Father', one 'Hail Mary' and one 'Glory be to the Father.
There is a statue of Saint Patrick in the field. I never heard a story about the well and I never heard that anyone had been cured at it. People leave pennies at the well.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 17:58
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There is only one Holy Well in the Parish. It is in a field called Cluan Patrick in the townland of Cornapallis. The people visit the Well on the three first Sundays of July.
The people go around a statue fifteen times. A 'Hail Mary' and an 'Our Father' are said each time. It is said that Saint Patrick passed through Cluan Patrick and slept night there.
He came on a horse and the track of the horses hoof is still to be seen. Many of the people wash their feet in the well and say their prayers in their bare feet. The people drink a few drops of water from the well.
The well was never drained but it is said that some person tried to boil the water and it would not boil. Some people gave water to the cattle from the well but nothing happened. There are a few trees at the well.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 17:54
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"do not shoot me and I will give you my two young ones." Then they saw a lion and were going to shoot him but he said "do not shoot me and I will give you my two young ones". Then they had a hare a fox and a lion each. It was not long before they decided to depart. The stuck the knife into a tree and Pat went one road and Mike went the other. Pat was not long going until he came to a town and it was all in mourning. Pat inquired what was the reason of this and he was told
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 17:46
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money he got under their heads. He also gave them a knife so that when they would be departing they could stick it in a tree. When one of them would come to it again if one side of it was rusty his brother would be in trouble. They also got two guns. They were not far gone when they saw a hare and were going to shoot him but he said "do not shoot me and I will give you my two young ones" The hare gave them the two young ones. After a while they saw a fox and were going to shoot him but he said.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 17:39
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man used to hunt in the wood often. This day he saw the two boys and thought that they were the two nicest boys he ever seen. He brought them home and every day after that they used to hunt together. This day as they were hunting together. Pat said, " we are now up to the age of twenty one and it is time we should go in search of adventure" "No sooner said than done" said Mike. "I will speak to the boss to night about it." When the boss heard of this he was very sorry and gave them the two most beautifil horses he had and all the
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 17:29
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the square. Moran thought that this was a very cruel death and he would get rid of them in another way. Next day he got his donkey and and put his two sons riding on him and set out for a wood in the North of Ireland. He brought a cake of bread and a bottle of water with him. When he came to the wood he left them under a tree and left the bottle of water and the cake of bread beside them. Then he turned away home. When the goldsmith heard of this he was very glad and gave Moran a lot of money. A certain gentle
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 17:25
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149.
27.V1 .'38 occasion the wife was expecting a baby .As she was very ill the priest and doctor were sent for .When they arrived the doctor could do no good for her and when the priest anointed her and as he was going out the door Biddy Early said to him ."Ah Father why don't you do something for the poor woman and her houseful of little children .What will they do at all if she dies.So the priest turned back and putting his hand in his pocket ,he took out a bottle and giving it to Biddy ,said "Here is this for you and let you do some good for her".So Biddy took the bottle and said 'The blessing of God on you'Father all the days of your life .She then gave a few drops of the bottle to the poor sick woman .The baby was born immediately and the woman was as good as ever she was in a few days.The news spread like wild fire and Biddy and her bottle were the subject of conversation at every fireside throughout Munster.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 17:11
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27. V1 '38
How Biddy Early got the Magic Bottle.
Matty Hannon ,Knockpogur ,Quin says that Biddy ,when a young girl went with her mother through the country begging from house to house.Whenever they were in the Feakle district they used to put in a little house in Kilbarron where Biddy herself lived for years before her death.In this house lived a poor man with his wife and large family .On one
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 17:01
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12
30'4'38 Story told by Mr. Casey.Roulterer, Roche's Street,Limerick
Years ago a pattern used to be held I St John's Day near the Abbey of Quin.A huxter from Limerick City used to attend the Pattern every year.At that time there were no enclosing walls around they abbey grounds ,nor gates in the entrance to the abbey itself.This old man had a great fancy for ornamental stones or carved stones .he found one in Quin Abbey and took it away with him to Limerick City.
and deposited it in the backyard with a heap of other stones.Some years later Mr Casey was reconstructing his residence and required some stones .he heard that the huxter mentioned above had some stones for sale.he purchased them and brought them to his own place.Amongst them he found a stone about eighteen inches long and nine inches wide on which was beautifully carved a cat with two tails.When the old man was questioned about the remarkable stone he remembered having brought it from Quin Abbey Mr.Casey related that the story of the stone is as
follows :When dinner was laid one day in the refectory in Quin Abbey,one of the monks was ill and unable to leave the dormitory .The monk sitting next the absent monk not only partook of his own
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 16:55
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There are many signs regarding the weather in Ireland.
1. If Knockfierna is cloudy bad weather is coming.
2. When people of this locality see a foggy mist coming down over the Ballahoura mountains at morning they look out for a rainy day.
3. A circle around the moon denotes bad weather.
4. A rainbow at morning is the shepherd's warning. A rainbow at night is the shepherd's delight.
5. A red gold sunset foretells a fine day to follow.
6. When sea-gulls fly inland there is a storm at sea.
7. A side- ? denotes fine weather.
8. Wind from the east isn't good for man or beast.
2. West wind predicts rain.
3. North east wind denotes cold rough weather with unexpected showers.
1. When a hen pecks herself rain rain is coming
2. Swallows fly low when rain is at hand.
3. When midges abound rain is coming.
1. When haws abound in the bushes a very bad winter is approaching.
2. A great calm fortells a storm.
3. A green christmas means a fat church-yard.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 16:40
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30. 4'38.John Sammon, Quin, Co. Clare, says there is a large stone which was taken from Quin Abbey incorporated with the stonework over the fireplace in the kitchen in Ballykilty House ,Quin .This stone bears the date 1614 and the names John Macnamara and o Nora Clanchy .
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 16:37
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30'4 '38 Thomas Crowe, shoemaker, Quin, Co. Clare, remembers the later Michael Murray.,carpenter Quin having in his possession a fire'crane'and a large door or gate key which he found in the Abbey .He can't trace the present possessors of these articles.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 16:33
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About twenty years ago, a very old priest hired a man by the name of John Myers to clean some sewerages which were in a very bad state. When the work was nearly finished the priest brought him out a very small drop of whiskey in a glass saying "Drink that now John. That whiskey is a hundred years old."
John took the glass and stared at it looking very amazed. Then after a while he said very seriously "Begorr Father is'nt it very small for its age"?
Another day John was coming to Bruree and he met a friend of his and they were chatting for a while and John says. "They are a nice new pair of boots you have". "They are says the fellow and very dry". "They are not as dry as mine" says John "for every hole of water they meet in the road or a swamp in the field some one of the two of them is bound to take a drink".
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 16:29
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13. dinner ,but also helped himself to the other monk's portion.When the matter was reported by the prefect of the refectory to the Abbot .The punishment imposed upon the monk by the Abbot was that he should do something extraordinary thing while the other monks were at dinner.So he got a stone and "dressed"it, and on it he carved a' cat with two tails'and presented it to the Abbot as he was leaving the refectory.
Mr.Casey had a this stone put into the front wall of his home in Limerick where it can be seen to this day.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 16:09
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Marriages were were usually celebrated before Lent This season was called Seraft On the Thursday before Ash Wednesday, Thursday
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 16:07
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blue stone and lime In the end of October they are dug and put in a hole in the ground The hole is made made in the ground and the potatoes are covered first with rushes and then with clay. We set champions, dates, aran banners kerry pinks epicures The aran banners grow the best sciollan goggering spraying mallet. A food called boxty used to be made from rotten potatoes. Starch is not now made from potatoes but it used to be made 40 years ago. Potatoe cake is made by miking boiled potatoes salt and flour together The mixture is flattened out into the shape of a cake and baked in a uncovered pan.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 15:53
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cut and never eaten.
Answer: A pack of cards.
20. Long legs, crooked thighs, small head and no eyes.
Answer: A tongs
Patrick Davis, Leekfield, Skreen, Co. Sligo.
1. As I was going to London I saw a great wonder, ten pots boiling and no fire under.
Answer: Ten pumps of water
2. As I looked across London wall, I saw a man that had a call, his head was flesh, his mouth was horn and such a man was never born.
Answer: A cup.
3. What goes away under the ground and returns under it.
Answer: A man with sods on his head.
4. Twenty sick sheep went out a gap, one died, how many left.
Answer: Nineteen
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 15:49
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St. Imy was born in Molougha and she had three brothers all of whom were saints. She is the patron saint of this parish and was often seen praying near the place where Killimer church is built. When this church was being built she asked as a favour to have it named after her. Killimer means the church of Imy.
After her death she came floating on a tomb on the Shannon into Burrane because she always wished to be buried there. At first the people would not receive her body and the shoved it out again. But it came back a second time and then they took it and buried it. Her grave was marked by two pillars but they are now knocked.
She is said to have converted in Upper and Lower Burrane and also in Killimer.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 15:31
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Margaret Hogan, 27th October 1938
Weather Lore
The local people have great beliefs as regards the weather. A red sky is a sign of fine weather and a black one the sign of rain or storm. To hear the wind very high is a sure sign of a storm. The swallows and sea gulls fly low when we are going to have rain and when the cat sits with his back to the fire it it a bad sign.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 15:12
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green above the bank and it's fit for a lord or lady.
Answer: A grave
14. Twenty sheep went out a gap, twenty more along with that, a shepherd and his dog, how many feet went out the gap.
Answer: Two
15. The queen or Morocco built a ship an on the ship her daughter lived an I am ashamed to tell her name an I have it told three times.
Answer: Ann.
16. Forty-one white cattle tied to a stall, one red one came out and licked them all.
Answer: Tongue and teeth.
17. Humpty-dumpty sat on a wall, humpty-dumpty got a great fall, all the kings horses and all the kings men would not put humpty-dumpty together again.
Answer: A broken egg.
18. As I went out the boreen I met my Aunt Noreen, she had steel toes, a burned nose and on my word she would frighten the crows.
Answer: A shot gun.
19. What is bought to the table
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 15:01
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7. Under the fire and over the fire and never touches the fire.
Answer: A cake of bread baking
8. That is it that walks with its head on the ground?
Answer: A nail in your boot.
9. Middy-noddy round body three feet and a wooden hat.
Answer: A pot.
10. One half dead, the other half living and a tail wagging.
Answer: A dog with his head in a pot.
11. A I went over Westminster bridge I met a Westminster scholar, he took off his gloves and drew off his cap and tell me the name of the Westminster scholar.
Answer: Andrew
12. I have a good goose, she is worth a good price. The man that would buy her he would want to be wise. She swims on her belly and feet she had none and goes out on the wild ocean and seldom come home.
Answer: A ship
13. It's deep and it's damp and it's
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 13:36
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horses are shod outside. It is done in front of the forge. Smith were always looked upon as strong men because the are always using their muscles.
Eric Clarke
Ballinode
Monaghan
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 13:29
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Local Fair’s
There are fair’s held in the towns and villages. A fair is held in the town of Monaghan about three miles from Ballinode, in Clones about ten miles from Ballinode and in Scotstown, about three miles from Ballinode, and in the village of Tydavnet. In Tydavnet there used to be a fair in olden times and then it was discontinued and now it has been started for the last three months.
The fair’s are held in the fair green at the end of the town. There is much buying and selling done on the streets on the fair evenings. Sometimes buyers come to the farmers houses, when there are a number of cattle to be sold. There is no toll paid in any of the fairs around here.
When cattle are sold there is always a luck penny given and people are counted very mean if they do not give a good luck penny When there are many cattle sold a big luck penny is given perhaps as much as a pound would be given if there was only one small animal sold from a shilling up to half a crown would be given.

Eileen Maxwell
Kilnahalter
Brandrum P,O
Co Monaghan
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 13:23
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Riddles
1. What is full and can hold more?
Answer: A pot of potatoes (holds water).
2. Brown am I and much admired, many horses I have tired, tire a horse and worry a man and tell me that if you can.
Answer: A horse's saddle.
3. Patch upon patch without any stitches, riddle me that and I will buy you a pair of breeches.
Answer: A head of cabbage.
4. Head like a thimble, tail like a rat, riddle me that and I will say you are smart.
Answer: A pipe.
5. I have a little horse with his back to the wall. He would eat all the straw from here to Donegal and if I give him water he wouldn't live at all.
Answer: A fire.
6. I have a little horse with an iron throat, as quick as he gallops he swallows the rope and every time he goes out a gap, he leaves a piece of his tail after him.
Answer: A spinning wheel.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 13:09
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There is treasure supposed to be hidden in Mr. John Furey's field at Lara, Skeen, Co. Sligo. It is supposed to be part of a Danish treasure. A man named Gallagher tried to unearth it. He had to have it taken up between midnight and sunrise but as the sun reddened the east, Gallagher saw three red pigs coming towards him. They attacked him and hunted him away. The hidden treasure is supposed to be a crock of gold. The pigs never left him alone. They annoyed him so much that he had to leave the country and go to America.
Collected from,
Mr. John Furey,
Lara, Skeen,
Co. Sligo
Written by Frank Foley, Lara, Skeen, Co. Sligo
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 13:02
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There was once a man that dreamt two nights of a crock of gold hidden in a field near the Castle of Bawvin at Derk, in the parish of Screen. The man did not wait for the third night's dream, but went as far as the place and brought a black cat with him as there was another black ca guarding the crock of gold. The man dug for the crock and the big black cat came out and the two cats began fighting. The man kept on digging until he found the crock, but when he opened it, it was a crock of buttons. The man knew that it was a crock of gold but that it turned into buttons when he only dreamt two nights of it, and did not wait for the third night's dream.
Mary Jane James,
Skeem,
Co. Sligo
Obtained from Mr Edward McGovern, Grangebeg, Skeen, Co. Sligo.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-21 07:45
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Once upon a time there lived an old woman who was supposed to have a bag of gold. She never left her home because she was afraid some one would take the gold out of the chimney but one day she went out to gather sticks, when she was leaving the house she warned her servant not to look up the chimney but when the old woman left the house the servant looked up the chimney and saw the bag of gold. She got down the bag of gold and ran home, on her way she met a cow, the cow asked the servant to milk her because she was not milked for twenty years but she said she was in a hurry then she met a horse, he said he was fettered for twenty years and asked the servant to take off the fetters but she said she was in a hurry. . After some time the old woman returned and followed the servant. She met the cow and said to her, ocow, omy did you see that maid of mine with the wig with the wag with the big leather bag that stole all the money I ever had. The cow told her she was gone down the road. Then she met the horse and said to him ohorse omy did you see that maid of mine with the wig with the wag with the big leather bag that stole all the money I ever had. The horse told her she was gone down the road the old woman caught the servant and killed her and got the gold. Then she got a new servant and again she told her
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 23:02
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hay. In a certain field in our farm the flood took three stacks a distance of at least seventy yards and laid them intact on a more elevated part of the field. Many houses were flooded and the ground floors of the two public- houses at Cooldorrihy were flooded to a height of six feet, but the saddest episode of the flood in this district was the death of a fine hearty young man. He was coming from Macroom and braved the flood the whole road along until night overtook him within a mile or two of Cooldorrihy cross. He groped along safely as he thought in the dark until he came to a spot where the arch of the bridge was completely swept away and no one having taken the
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 22:58
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Exactly last September thirteen years there was a terrible heavy down-pour of rain in all the west Cork district especially around Macroom and Dunmanway. The previous day was a splendid harvest and many farmers were engaged carting in corn. The morn of the day on which the rain fell was calm and gloomy looking until about midday when the rain poured down without a breath of wind and continued so without people being in the least perturbed as regards its intensity until eventually all the low-lying districts were inundated.
It caused great destruction to corn and
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 21:11
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About thirty years ago, Mr Phil Leddy, Coraweelis, Poles P.O. Cavan was coming home from "a cayley" in a neighbour's house. In this district a visit paid to a neighbour's house at night is called a "cayley". Mr Leddy had only a short distance to travel. Having left the neighbour's house he went "astray" and travelled all night. At daybreak he found himself three miles from Butlersbridge, a distance of fifteen miles from his home.
N.B. It is believed by the old people in this district that if a person crosses the grave of an unbaptised person, he will go "astray". Another superstition is as follows:- When a person knows he is going "astray" he should turn his coat inside out. If he does so he will find his way home.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 20:55
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All footwear from the biggest to the smallest size can be procured at a moderate cost, this has been brought about by modern methods of mass production. Even though boots and shoes are procurable at moderate people try to econmise by bringing their boots and shoes to be repaired to a a shoemaker sometimes called a cobbler. In some county districts he is called by the old gaeroily name of gressure. In most cases this is a traditional occupation being handed down from father to son from generation. But in recent years due to the reduction in price in machine made footwear, the numbers of shoemakers have greatly decreased. Clogs too are a rare sight nowadays except in country districts where they are used in winter. It is essential to have good footwear, to have comfort in walking is in itself a great blessing.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 20:34
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35
5.'38 An Old House.
The house consisted of four walls built of rough stone ,put together without mortar.It had no chimney.a front door and a back door which was an arrangement for taking advantage of the wind.There was a hole in the wall for a window.which had no glass in it ,a dried sheepskin being used in place of glass.There were one or two stools made of wood ,an iron potato -pot ,a churn ,a shovel and a pipe in the cabin. The bed consisted of an old tick filled with heather or straw and little or no bed clothes.
This information was given to me by Mary Mc Mahon ,Corbally, Quin, County Clare.
Cormac Mc Namara.
Corbally,
Quin,
Co .Clare.
Unlucky Acts, Old Customs and Bird Lore collected by the teachers of Dangan School.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 20:08
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they on heights also to have good view of the whole country side.
They are round in shape, have fences of earth and great fir or pine trees usually swaying in the breeze in a rather fashion as if they had lost something they could never again find. In none of the three forts I visited could I see any entrance home although they may have been one which had long since being covered in.
It is said that these forts are the secret meeting place of the Tuatha deDanann an old Irish tribe who were master in the use of magic, and to this day that you can hear the tinkle of the fairy shoe maker at work below the fort or path and that you may find a little man in red coat and green hat who, if you catch him, will tell you where to find a crock of gold!!
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 20:00
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38
something else in exchange.
To meet or see a hen without a straw attached to her tail or wing.
To meet a red haired woman when starting out in the morning.
To leave a portion of a drill by accident without seed potatoes.
To open an umbrella over a person in a house.
To carry a spade into a house.
To meet a white haired horse on one's wedding day.
To put one's boots by mistake on the table.
To spill salt without throwing a pinch of the spilt salt over one's shoulder.
To fall coming down stairs but lucky to fall as one is going upstairs.
A crowing hen to come to the door is considered unlucky.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 19:52
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33.
5.38 Unlucky Acts.
To go into a house especially when someone is sick when going to a funeral.
To pick up anything especially a piece of iron on May morning.
To hang up a horseshoe with with the heels turned downwards on the wall of a kitchen.
To put the shoe taken off a dead horse on alive one.
To strike against a horseshoe with the heels turned away from you on the road.
To lend a 'dosing' bottle for dosing cattle.
A woman to lose her wedding ring.
To kill a weasel.
A lizard to come into the house.
A white cricket to come into the house.
To knit, sew or to work any kind of machines on St.Martin's Day.
A woman with child to fill pig's puddings.
To look into a mirror at night.
To give away hatching eggs without receiving a penny or
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 19:22
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to be near.
When the cat scratches the legs of tables or chairs rain or a storm is near.
When the smoke goes straight up out of the chimney it is a sign of fine weather.
Swallows flying high is a sign of fine weather.
When crickets come out and fly about the house it is a sign of fine weather.
When the cuckoo and swallow come to our country early it is a sign of a fine summer.
When the sun goes down red in the summer evenings it is a sign of a fine day on the morrow.
A fog visible on a summer morning is a sign of a fine day.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 19:19
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of rain.
When soot falls down the chimney rain is coming.
When rain is near the curlews are heard crying.
Sometimes when rain is near those suffering from corns feel them very painful and people suffering from rheumatic pains feel them getting more acute.
Spiders creeping around are a sign of rain.
When the white crows come inland and light in the field rain is near
When a new moon appears with the shadow of the old moon still visible people say "We shall have bad weather in is a very bad moon. The old one is in the young one's arms".
When dogs eat grass rain is supposed
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 19:15
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acre. The grower who had even two acres was considered a large grower indeed. The growers in these days did not completely derive their livelihood from the raspberry production, as most of them had the weaving as other means of support. It was about this time that the adjoining village of Julianstown, and Gormanstown went into raspberry production. But the area under raspberries in Duleek was greater than these two villages, as they went in more for apples, gooseberries and plums. The fruit garden in these old days were all situated in the north bank of the Nanny river and in most cases sloped slightly to the north. The soil is of a very freeable nature and has a good depth on a gravelly subsoil in limestone.
The soil and situation in and around Duleek, Julienstown and Stamullen are claimed by experts to be the most suited for raspberry cultivation in Ireland.
The method of cultivation was as follows:-
Preparation of the soil.
The holding intended for the planting of raspberries was tended up to a depth of 12 inches with a spade, in the months of October or November. It was left in this state until.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 19:14
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Weather Lore
The people of Ireland are very superstitious but apart from superstition they know a good deal from their study of signs, such as signs of weather.
For instance they have noticed that swallows flying low over the fields is a sign of rain.
The mountains or hills appearing to be near is a sign of rain.
When the cat sits at the fire rain is near.
Fishes jumping to the top of the water is a sign of rain.
When the wind blows from the west rain is brought with it.
If horses stand with their backs to the hedges rain is coming.
Brickets chirruping loudly is a sign
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 18:16
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32.
advised him to give it back to her when she would come again .he opened the window and threw it out to her when she came the next night .He saw her picking it up but he didn't see her going .he never saw her anymore .
This story was told by Michael Carmody ,
Creevagh More ,Quin,Co.Clare.
A Story.
Long ago a man was ordered to cut down a tree that was growing in Clooney graveyard in which there was a blessed well .before this several men had refused to cut it .This man cut the tree and when he had it cut his mouth went back to where his ear
was.It was then he realized his mistake and he was advised to go to a famous priest who lived in East Clare .
When the priest saw him coming he said Ha!ha! me man you have something done out of the way.
Hitting him a slap on the jaw his mouth returned to its proper place .he told him never to interfere with anything sacred again.
Told by Tom Mc Namara ,Hazelwood, Quin.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 18:01
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31.
5.38 A Mermaid.
There was a man who lived in Reynold's house and he used to go every night to the well in In Mick Lalor's place for water .He used to see the mermaid sitting on a stone near the well.This night when he went for the water he saw her sitting on the stone .He went up near her and when he got the chance he swept a green rack out of he poll.She followed him for it,and he ran home with it,and when he was going to bed he brought it into the room with him and left it up on the mantlepiece .He wasn't long in bed till he heard the crying at the window.She was looking for the rack,and he put it into his pocket when he was getting up in the morning the way she wouldn't come when he would be out and and take it,and he told the people round the place about it the next day and they told him to give it back and that it wouldn't be lucky for him to keep it that she would do something bad to him.She came the next night again but he did not give it to her .He told the people next day that he had her bested,that he didn't give her the rack when she came to the window that night again. They
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 17:42
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24
12.5.1938 Old Customs.
At the night on November Night the girls used to try to peel an apple without breaking the peel.Then they used to throw the peel over the head and whatever letters the peel formed on the floor were supposed to be the initials of their future husbands .
On November Night the girls used to melt lead and let it drop through a key into cold water and whatever letters were formed in the water were supposed to be the initials of their future husbands.
On November Eve a young girl took yarn with her to a limedkiln and the first young man who comes along to help her wind up her ball of yarn was supposed to be her future husband .
The afterbirth or cleanings of the first cow calved in the New Year was boiled in water and some of the water was kept in bottles .Three drops of this water were put in the churn when making the butter.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 16:35
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no a chuid sidheógaí i mucrois. Acht tá Tobar Cnapastun le feiceál ann go fóill. Róise Nic Néill.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 16:34
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cionn an dorais. Nuair a bhí Micheál ag dul amach bhuail sé an clog agus leag sé é. Sé an bhríg a bhí ins an chlog seo nuair a bhuailleadh é bheireadh sé cuireadh un féasta do na sloighte sidhe agus bheireadh sé fhios ua h-aca sluagh a rabh cuireadh do dul. Tugadh chuireadh un feasta do chnapastun, rí ridhe an Mhucrais agus an dream a bhí leis. Ní raibh fios ag an bholcan mór go raibh siad ag teacht agus ní raibh gach ar bith réidh aige. Sa deireadh tháinig siad. Nuair a chonnaic cnapastun mar bhí chuir sé troid ar an bholcan mhór. (nuair) Mhair sé trí oidhche agus nuair a bhí cuid fear bholcan marbh, theith sé suas an cnoc, lean cnapastún é agus nuair a fuair sé greim air bhuail sé é le slát draoidheachta agus rinne sé carnan de. Tá sé ann ón lá sin go dtí an lá indhuí. Bhí coill ag fás ar dhá thaoibh Ghleann Bholcain agus le h-olc ar bholcan, ghearr Cnapastún anuas gach Crann ann. Níor fhás aon chrann ann ó shoin. Ach níor bhuaidh Cnapastún i gcomhnuidhe. Bhí troid idir é féin agus sluagh ridhe Connacht ag beann Gulban. D’innis Cnapastún do dhaoine da gchailleadh sé an lá sin go bhfeicfidhe deora (fóill) fóla ag a thobar. Cúpla lá na dhiaidh, ón lá sin amach níor mothuigheadh Cnapastun
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 16:19
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ag cruinniughadh an fhear agus rinne sí dearmad don leanbh. D’amharc sí thart ins an deireadh agus chonnaic sí fear ag rith trasna an mhiodúin agus an leanbh leis faoi na asgal. Sgairt sí ar Mhicheál agus diarr air an páiste a bhaint don fhear. Léan Micheál é agus bhí ráca leis in a láimh. Rith sé suas gleann bholcain go dtí go dtáinig sé fhád le leabhaidh Dhiarmada agus Gráinne. Labhair an fear cúpla focail agus agus d’fhosgal an gréag agus léim an fear isteach. Choinnigh Micheál an poll fosgáilte leis an ráca go bhfuair sé féin isteach. Ag dul isteach do ní raibh aon nduine le feiceál acht sean-dhuine a rabh féasóg liath air na shuidhe ag an teinidh bá é an bholcan mór é. Dfiafruigh Micheal do cá raibh an fear a rabh an páiste leis. Bhí an ráca tóghtha ag Micheál. Diarr an t-seandhuine air an ráca a chur síos agus go bhfuigheadh sé an leanbh. Sgairt sé ar an fhear a bhí san tseomra an pháiste a thabhairt anuas. Tugadh anuas páiste cuige acht ní paiste Micheal a bhí ann. D’iarr Micheál ortá a leanbh fhéin a thabhairt chuige. Tugadh anuas an leanbh chuige annsin. D’iarr a bolcan air gan baint don clog a bhí os
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 16:09
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Tá sean roilg i gCnoc ua Sgeac agus Cill Éanach a tugtar air mar is ann a cuirtí na leanbhaí óga a fuair bás gan baisteadh. Deinteir amhlaidh fé lathair. Tá uaigheanna móra ann leis.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 16:05
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11. Neantoga do chimilt do ball duine go mbeadh dathacha air.
12. Súiricín d'fhághail chun an droch-fhola do shugadh as duine breoite.
13.Buimpeise stoca a bheadh ort i rith an lae do chur mor - thimcheall do mhuinéal dá mbeadh craos tinn agat.
14. Dá bhfuigheadh duine bás ó galar tógálach tréad caorach do thabhairt isteach sa tseomra in a bhfuair sé bás.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 16:02
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Sean Sgéal
Tá gleann cómhgarach do Chill Charthrach i dTír Chonaill, darbh ainm an Gleann bholcain. Tá sé astaigh i measg na sléibhte. Am amhain bhí lánamhain óg na gcomhnaidhe i gCruaich cómhgarach do Gleann bholcain. Mícheal Ó Cannain a bhí ar an fhear agus Nóra ar mhnaoi. Tháinig fóghmhair amhain olc agus ní thiocfadh leis na daoine an fhéar a shábháil. Tháinig lá amháin maith agus díarr Mícheál ar Nóra ar cliabhán agus an leanbh a thabhairt amach na mhiodhúin. Rinne sí seo agus dfhan sí cómhgarach don chliábhín ae eagla go dtiocfadh gach ar bith ar an páiste. Thoisigh sí féin agus Mícheall
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 15:52
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1. Eascú luachra do chimilt do duine nuair a dóghfaidhe é.
2. An duine a lighfeadh eascú luachra deirtear go mbeadh leigheas in a theangain - go mór mhór do faithne agus nioscoidí.
3. Dá gcimileóchadh duine eascú luachar d'á theangain d'fhéadfadh sé piosa iarainn dearg do choimeád i gcoinnibh a theangan gan é féin do dhóghadh.
4. Punann tuige do lasadh fé bó nuair a bheadh sé breoidhte.
5. Deirtear go bhfuil leigheas i dteangain madra nó i dteangain sionnaigh nuair cimiltear iad le creadh nó le créacht.
6. An t-uisge in a beirbhightear prátaí do chur le faithne chun iad do leigheas.
7. Líon ruadháin alla do chur ar créacht a beadh ag tabhairt fola chun stop do chur leis.
8. Dá mbeadh fáithne ar bó, ribe gruaige do thógaint ó'n a h-eirbeall agus é do ceangailt mór - timcheall na fáithna agus go mbainfeadh sé an fáithne di.
9. Eidhin do chimilt do ceann duine nuair a bhíonn tinneas cinn aige.
10. Leigheasann slánlus cuag leis an slánlus do mheascadh ar a chéile agus iad do chur ar an gcuag.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 15:45
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I know a house that a mouse could not fit in and all the men in Kerry could not count how many windows in it ?
Ans a thimble.
It's black and white and read all over ?
Ans. A newspaper.
What turns without moving?
Ans. milk.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 15:32
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gáiridhe. Cuir fáilte rompa agus ní leagfar an caisleán níos mó. Rinne Ó Domhnall seo agus níor leagadh an chaisleán ní bha mhó. Grainne Nic Ghloinn.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 15:30
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1.Tá lios ar cnoch na sgeach agus deirtí go bhfuil spridheanna le feiscinth ann fós ilár na h-oidhche. Clais mór iseadh é agus claidhe craidh in a thimceall cun daoine do cosaint ón namaidh. Nuair a bhíonn sé ag cur feartainne ní stadann uisce istigh ann pé áit na dtéigheann sé. Ní ceart clais a cur ionnta in aon cur ná aon baint a bheith ag aoinne leis.
2. Tá lios i nGort Sailleach. Ta trí cloca móra in a sheasamh i gcearcall 7 deirtear go mbíonn sidheoga ann i gcomnaide. Ní togfad aoinne as na ni bainfead siad leis an aon chor mar ní ceart é do deanam.
3. Tá lios eile ibpáirc le muinntir Arractain i gcurrac Dub. Ta cloca in a seasam an faid céadna ón a chéile agus crann ag fás in a dtimceall. Do bhris duine ceann de na cloca fadó agus do thug sé abhaile iad ac do lean an mí-ádh é comh dona san na raibh suimneas ar bit aige gur cur sé na cloce tar nais.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 15:29
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Sean Sgéal
Nuair a bhí Ó Domhnaill ag cur suas a chaisleán i nDún-na-nGall an mhéid a thógadh (sé) siad sa lá bhéadh sé leagtha ar maidín lá ar na bhárach. Bhí seisear saor aige. D’obair siad leó go dtí an Aoine. Rinne sé amach go gcuirfeadh sé trí saor eile in a gcuideachta Dia Sathairn siocair an Domhnach nó dar leis féin na mbainfeadh aon duine leis ar an Domhnach no go suidhfeadh sé féin a choimhéad go mbéadh an mheadhon-oídhche thart. Nuair a dimthigh na saoir cloiche tráthnóna Dia Sathairn d’fhan ó Domhnaill dá choimhead an Chaisleán. Thionnthuigh sé thart bhí bean ruadh in a seasamh ar a chúl “A Rí Uí Dhomhnaill” Tá tú ag teacht un tosuigh go maith le do chaisleán” arsa sise. Dubhairt an Rí nach raibh agus dinnis sé duithi mar bhí. Dubhairt an bhean is tú fhéin is cionntuigh nuair nach suidheann tú fhéin go bhfeicidh tú cé an bhunadh atá da leagadh. Fan ann do shuidhe anocht agus ar an h-aon a chlog móthóthaidh tú sgaifte ag teacht anall ar an chlochan agus iad ag
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 15:29
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A man named Johnson of Warrenstown, Drumree was very kind to the poor during Famine times.
A man called John McKeever was kept constantly cooking food and distributing it among the needy.
One day it would be soup, another day porridge. Johnson died and his daughter married Leonard, who is already mentioned in this book.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 15:28
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How the ass got his cross.

The local story of why the ass has a cross on his back is as follows:-
When Our Lord was being taken to Calvary to be crucified the heavy burden of the cross became too much for him. Then Herod's soldiers fearing that he should die on the way compelled Simon of Cyrene to help him to bear the heavy cross. After some time Simon fell from exhaustion and was unable to continue the journey. The soldiers then saw a white ass by the roadside and they led him out and laid the end of the cross on is back and led him along behind Our Lord. Every since then all asses have a black cross down the back and across the shoulders.
9/12/36
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 15:26
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Who is it? he killed his mother, buried his father, married his sister and committed no sin? A Priest He killed his mother in child birth, buried his father when he died, he was a priest so he married his sister to another man
Patch upon patch without any stiches riddle me that and I will buy you a new britches?
Answers A head of cabbage.
Did you ever hear of the empty jug?
Ans. There is nothing in it
Why is an island like the letter T ?
Ans. It is in the middle of water.
What is cut and never eaten?
Ans. A deck of cards.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 15:20
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How starch is made.
Some people in this district still make starch. My mother used to make it when she was young. This is how it is done. First a good pot of clean potatoes are got. They are grated and put into a bucket of clean water. They are left there for about three hours. Then the water is strained out of the bucket and fresh water put instead of it. Water is put in and taken out until after being left in the bucket for about three hours it is pure and clean. Then that water is thrown out and the grated potatoes put out on the grass to bleach. They are left there for about three days. Then the starch is ready for use. It is as good as the starch that people buy, but it takes too long to make it. Aornall Mac an Aircinnigh, Tingaree, An Scairb. puaikeous an sgealseoom macair.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 15:12
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Ghostly Noises
From Miss Redmond, Ballygarran, Kilmuckridge. Aged 53 yrs.
The old school house, situated down near the church at Litter is supposed to be troubled by weird noises heard at night.
Lights too have been seen at most unearthly hours, so Miss Redmond says.
She also states that there is a ghostly tale about the Parochial house at Litter beside the church.
An old priest is supposed to "walk" at night.
When a Canon O'Connor lived in this house 3 yrs ago, it is reported that a "tall priest" used to pay night visitations to the house.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 14:40
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closely together. This led to a dispute between the crowd - The people of each parish supporting their own parishioner. The result was that a fight broke out and the two opposing groups were led by the two runners. The fight lasted for about six hours and much blood was spilled. In the end the Shanagolden men, being the greater in number, won and routed the other out of Shanagolden Village. They followed them back to the boundary of the parish.
For a long time afterwards a spleen existed between the two parishes as a result of this dispute.
Eoin Curran got this story from :-
Michael Curran,
Shanagolden.
Age - 42 years.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 14:37
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A Local Hero
There once lived in the parish of Shanagolden a great runner and he exceeded all the other men in the parish during his time in this form of sport . His name was Patrick Flanagan and he lived 150 years ago.

Another great runner who lived in the next parish heard of him And you send him a challenge to race him from Foynes to Shanagolden.
On the day of the race a great crowd of people lined the roadside all the way from here to
Foynes. The race took place on a Sunday afternoon and for most of the course the pair were evenly matched but drawing near the end the Shanagolden man got in front and won the race by 30 yards.
When the race was finished the defeated runner made an allegation that the other fouled him by tripping him when they were running
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 14:36
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indications of a long spell of broken weather.
The following are signs of dry weather :- seagulls flying seaward, smoke rising straight up from the chimney, swallows flying high, a crimson red sky around the setting sun, a haze along the horizon in summer (a sign of warm weather), and the wind changing round in the same direction as the sun and following closely upon it. This latter is regarded as being an especially favourable sign in summer. In this locality a fog appearing over Shanid Castle and Knockgoura Hill is regarded as being a definine sign of a set of dry warm weather.
When wild geese fly southward or towards the seashore hard frosty weather is about to follow; and when they fly northward or inland soft milk weather is indicated.
Eoin Curran got this account from
Michael Meaney,
Main Street,
Shanagolden.
Age - 60 years.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 14:34
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“A leitheíd seo” ar sise ag innsint di cad a dubhairt bean an an fheirmeora leí agus mar sin de.
“Ó lean uirthe, an rógaire!” ar sise, “Driofúir domh- se í már dhein maith d’aoinne riamh”
Bhí griosach de theine aice ar an dteinteán. “Tá bluíre mine agam” arsan bhean bhocht. “Déanfadh sé preiseacht do na paístí da b’fhaighinn uait agus do dhéanamh”
“Geobhair agus mile fáilte” arsa bean a’tighe. Bhuail sí síos coreaínín uisce. Dheaneadar an leite eatorra. Bhuail bean a’tighe cúcha amach agus thug sí a ndóithin bainne gheír cúcha leis.
B’é an tslighe bheatha a bhí ag an mnaoi bhoicht, bhí dhá tuírne aice, túirne olna agus tuírne lín . Bhí inghean leí brioichte sa chúinne.
Faid a bhí sí ag deánamh na leitean thug sí ceann de na tuírní do’n mhnoghe eile agus niorbh fáds gur thug sí fe ndeara go raibh taithighe aire ar a leitheíd.
Nuair do chonnaic bean a’tighe a fheabhas a bhí sí ag an dtúirne , agus da thuírne aice.
B’fhuil fhios agat cad a dheanfaidh tú?” ar sise “ta’n tú cortha de’n ród , fan mar a bhfuil agat sa tig again. Gheobhaidh tú do dhoíthin oibre na paistí is tú féín do chothú”
Beidh san ro-mhór ort-sa, agus ba ghairid le dia agam sa an seans d’fhagháil.”
Mo thruagh go deo thú. Tá dia trócaireach agus cabhróchaidh sé linn. Ta’n tú corcha ó bheith ag imcheacht”
Nuair do chuala mná na h-áite go raibh bheirt ag obair as laímh a chéile thugadar liom agus olann dóibh agus bhí ag éirighe go breág leo.
Lá thaínig cailmh isteach ag lorg
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 14:32
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Bhí bean thiar in Duibhneach sa droch-shaoghal. Cailleadh a fear bhí fear sé mbó déag aire agus móirsheisear paístí aice. B-éigean di an talamh do chaitheamh uaite agus imtheacht I Feín agus na paístí. Bhí sí ag imthearth leí ó áith go h-áit , ní raibh an bradh Féin aice. Do shuibhluigh sí leí gur chuaidh sí sa Cho.Luimnigh
Casadh tráthnona fiadhain fluich uirthe. Chonnaic sí tigh feirmeóra agus chuaidh sí do’n doras. “An bhfaighinn a bheith istigh go maidin ?” ar sise.
“Bailigh leat” arsan bhean leí. “Ní thugam- se bheith istigh d-aoinne. Ach nuair a raghair síos iompuigh siar agus tá tigh mór annsan agus leigeann siad gac n-aon istigh”.
D’imtigh agus bhuail síos an bóithrín fé mar dubhairt bean an feirmeora. B’fhior di, bhí an tigh roimpe ann, tigh mór breágh. Chuaidh sí isteach agus ní raibh aon chriostuidhe istigh ach griosach. Bhain sí de, an créatuir agus thuig sí isteach na páistí. Anonn san oidhche thuit a choladh ar gach aoinne acu, Ar maidin nuair a ghluaiseadar ní raibh tigh ná triabh ann ach na páistí anuas ar uaigh.
“Dia le m’anam , is mór an sampla é” Ghabh sí amach agus gob aice. D’imthigh sí bóithrín caol cuimhng a bhí ann í féin is na paístí. Casad isteach í ar bhothaínín beag.
D’fáiligh bean a’tight roimpe.
“Dia le m’anam , cas a thug anso tú?” ar sise.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 14:32
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“Ta’s agam soaghal cá bhfaigheadh sí é?” arsa duine acu le n-a mhnaoi. “Dera naé Cuma dhuit” ar sise “ach í do shásamh “.
“Shiubhail sí go dtí na caírde go léir agus chuadar go léir na teannta. “Cheapadar gur rud éigin a bhí uirthe.
Nuair a chonneadar an bórd leagtha amach thaínig iongantas ortha féachaint ca bhfuaradar é . D’itheadar bricfást ‘na dteannta go compórdach.
Thóg sé mórán de’n áit agus bhí sé ‘na dhuine uasal
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 14:31
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annuas ar a chéile.
“Stadh anois” ar sise “Tá do dhóthain do seo agat”
“Tá mise an bhuidheach díot”
“Beidh saidhbhreas go deo agat” ar sise “tabhair leat abhaile é” dhein sí “shake hands” leis is d’fhág sí slán aige is d’imthigh leí go dtí na Flaithis os a comhair amach.
“Níl mála na mealbhóg agam” ar seisean “Chun mo chuid oír do breith abhaile liom. Cad a déanfaidh mé?”
Cad do dhein sé ach an trabhsar do chaitheamh de . Bhí córda amuigh air is íochtar an trabhrair . Bhuail sé anuas an trabhsar, chuir an t’ór isteach ann is bhuail anair ar a dhrom é agus bhí a dhothain d’ualach air go dtaínig sé abhaile . Nuair do thaínig sé bhí Siobhán agus gach aon bhéir aice. Cheap sí gurbh amhlaidh a mhairt an Sprid é .
“A Siobhaín , ní baoghál duit sprid na púca, eírigh agus oscail an doras”.
D’eírig Siobhán, leig isteach é . Chaith sé an thalaé amach ar an mbórd agus thaisbeaín sé an t-ór di.
“Dia le m’anam” ar sise “ Ca bhfuair tú é?”
“Déanam” ar seaisean “agus tabhair liom an tarna h-oighean”
Bíodar tagaithe abhaile sar ar éirigh aoinne timpheall na h-áite, Ní h-é a geodladh a chuadar. Bhí bácus ag fear an clochaín . Thug sé di Siobhaín . “Imthigh agus tabhair leat do dhóithin araín tae agus siúcre agus mo dhoíthin tobac chugam sé”
D’imthigh an bhean bocht agus thug sí leí a h-ualach
“Dein corcán breágh tae” ar sisean “agus glaoidh ar ár geaírde agus tabhair béile maith dóibh”. D’imthigh sí agus ghlaoidh sí ortha agus thángadar.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 14:30
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The old people in this locality believe many signs which are supposed to forecast good and bad weather.
They say that when we are approaching rain that smokes rises only a short distance from the chimney and then falls back towards the ground. A circle around the moon at night is considered a similar sign. If swallows fly very low in summer, if soot falls down the chimney or if the cat turns his back to the fire rainy weather is expected. Other signs of rain :- seagulls flying inland, insects, especially ants, flying about in clusters in the summer afternoon, a greenish-blue light appearing in the turf-fire, a dog eating blades of grass, southerly or southwesterly winds, and sunlight glittering on rocks or streams, and a dull brownish colour around the region of the setting sun. Fleecey clouds on the sky, a rainbow, and rain from the south-east are
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 13:59
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23.
A picture to fall from the nail when a person is sick.
To break a looking glass
To lose a tooth is to lose a friend.
A dog to cry when a person in the house is sick.
To kill your own cock.
To marry on Friday or the 13th of the month.
To throw out the water in which a person washes his feet.
To get a pain in the head while in the graveyard.
To mention a priest or fox while fishing.
To wear new clothes for the first time at a funeral.
To begin new work on a Saturday.
'Saturdays work is never finished'.
A woman with child to wipe her boots on the grass in a grave-yard.
A hare to cross the path of a woman in child.
A hare to be brought into a house where there is a woman in child.
To spend money on the first Monday or Tuesday of the New year.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 13:48
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22.
To interfere with a blessed well.
To praise a child without saying God bless it.
To throw out any rubbish on New Years Day.
To let out the cows before May Day.
To let anyone into the house On New Years Day before some member of the family came in first to wish the members a happy New Year.
To go into a house by the back door when a coffin is being brought in the front.
To praise a a new born baby without spitting on it.
To refuse a poor woman with a child for alms as she is said to represent the Blessed Virgin and Child.
Not to burn the holly and laurel ussed for Christmas decorations.
To give away milk or butter on May Day.
To throw out ashes on Monday.
To cut out the makings of a new suit on Thursday.
A bride to wear anything green on her wedding day
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 13:38
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21.
Unlucky Acts.
Meeting a woman with red hair when starting on a journey or for work or going to a fair or going match- making.
Belief in the 'evil eye 'of certain people or thing.
Accepting a bait when out fishing without paying for it with something else as a stone or some other object of little or no value.
Giving fire out of a house on May Day.
Taking stones out of an old Church.
Stumbling over a grave.
A woman in child to accompany a funeral into a grave-yard.
To dig a grave on a Monday.
To take a tobacco pipe off a grave.
To build an addition to the west side of a house.
To make any addition to a haunted house.
To meddle with an earthen fort.
To move into a new house except on Friday.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 11:25
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afterwards brought into the house was a cure for a headache or such thing.
If a baby was born when its father was dead the baby is supposed to have a cure for thrush. There is a cure for every kind of ailment at a well in Ballysimon, not far from Caherconlish. It is called Mary Magdalene's well. There is another well in Dromkeen said to be a cure for any ailment. The people used to boil a hay-mouse in new milk and give the milk to a nervous person. They used to get worms and cut them up.Then they used to put them into any kind of wine and give them to some-one who would have jaundice.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 11:22
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of a family have the same name their children can cure a good many diseases, one in particular is the whooping cough.
The well of St. Laurence in Inch-St.-Laurence, near Caherconlish, is a splendid well to cure the eyes. Crowds come from far and near to get relief.
The people around Caherconlish had many cures for Fever. If one did not comb his (or her) hair on Friday he (or she) would not get the sickness. Another cure was to eat the first egg a hen would every lay. Some of the old people used to say that that cure was no good unless the egg was layed on "Good Friday." That egg could be eaten either raw or cooked but the shell would have to be eaten also.
The people used to make butter long ago on St. Bridig's Eve and put no salt in it. They would take some of that butter on a small dish or on a plate, put a piece of red cloth over it, hang it on a wall outside the house and leave it there all night. They would take in in the morning. That cloth would be a cure for a headache and a bleeding nose. It is said that if a piece of ribbon was left out on St. Brigid's Eve and
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 11:13
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Long ago people believed that holy wells, weeds and other things would cute a person's ailments. It is said that if one had a chin cough he would ask a man with a red horse what to do. Whatever he would say that would do it.
The cure people had fore warts was a wart weed. They would rub the juice of it to the wart and after three days the warts would be cured.
There is a well in Tom Hannan's land which would cure a pain in one's stomach.
The cure people had for a burn was a dog leaf. This was used especially for a burn of a nettle.
When people got the whooping cough they walked in and out under a white horse's legs. Milk left after a ferret was another cure for it. Asthma can be cured by boiling the leaves of a horse chestnut tree and making wine of them. Rheumatism can be cured by dandelion that is boiled. Then make wine of it and take it fasting each morning. The seventh son of the seventh son can cure a good many diseases. If the father and mother
duine anaithnid
2020-03-20 02:43
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Bhi tri iascairi o Sraid na nIascairi thiar gairid do faillreaca an Mhothair aon oidhche fado ag iascaireacht agus bhi se timpeall do a clog san oidhche, agus gahbadhar isteach fan bhfaill cun a sgiat a leigint (tar eis).
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Tar eis tamaill dubhairt fear aca leis an beirt eile. "Is uaigneach an ait bheirt anso an t-am seo den oidhche."
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Ni raibh an focail ar eigin as a bheal nuair a connaiceadar ar soitheach seol is breaghtha la's gaoth na grian riamh uirthi, bhi si ag seoladh com gairid don bhfiall an ait na raibh cloca mora gur deineadar amac na feadfad aon soicheach seol beirt ann act soiceac sidheamail.
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Connaiceadar riamh riamh i go ndeagaid si amac siar cuaine na faille a glaoideann siad gubh fill an lua ar agus annsan d'imigh si as a radharc mar a bhuailfa do dha laimh le ceile.
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Bhiodar buailte le eagla ins an ait na rabhadar ina seasamh agus dubharadhar le ceile gurbh sin fogairth doibh dul abhaile.
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Ansan cureadar isteac san gchurach agus deineadar ar baile comh dian agus feidir leo gcoinne an gaoth soir cruaidh agus on oidhche sin amac nior gabhadar cuig na faillir eaca comh deireannac sin.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 23:33
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deirtear go mbíonn na dúine marbh mór tímhceall
9. Dá mbheadh an much ag g sin cómhartha básteach
10. Dá mbheadh an cat ag súidhe agus a dhrom cun an teine sin cómhartha básteach.
11. Dá cídhfeadh aoinne dha magfies. sin cómhartha mí rath.
12. Dá cídhfeadh bádóir ‘’albatross’’ ag eitilt os cionn an báid sin cómhartha go dtagfadh trioblóid ar a cloinn agus ar féin.
13. Dá mbheadh na fáinnleóige ag eitilt ós cíonn an talmhain sin cómhartha droc-aimsir acht dá mbheadh síad ag eitilt go h-árd, sin cómhartha aimsir-bréagh.
14. Dá mbheadh súbh trim ag tuitimh anúas sin cómhartha ar aimsir báisteach act dá mbheadh súbh fliuch ag tuitimh sin cómhartha aimsir maith.
15. Dá mbheadh ím, bainne, no áon rud eile go flúirseach lá bealtaine, beadh síad go flúirseach an cuid eile don mblíadhain, acht dá mbheadh sí go mí-flúirseach beadh síad mar san an cuid eile don mblíadhain.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 23:33
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Rudaí mí-ratha agus piseóga
1. Dá léimfeadh madra dub amach ar casán duine a bheadh ar suibhal san oidhche ní ceart do dul san slíghe san.
2. Dá rithfeadh síofra thar duine san oidhche ní ceart don duine d’íarraidh é a marbhúghadh
3. Ní ceart scáthán do bhriseadh no dá briseadh beadh seacht mblíadhna mí rath ag an duine a brifasí é.
4. Dá mbheadh an fíach-dubh ag eitilt agus ag scréach-aich sin cómhartha bás (duine éigin) beithéach.
5. Dá cífeadh frog an mbóthar sin cómhartha bás duine éigin.
6. Dá bhfagad duine bás amuich ní ceart a chorp a thógaint isteach san tig cómnuidhthe.
7. Dá mbheadh an coileach ag glaodhach go brónach sin cómhartha bás duine.
8. Dá mbheadh ann coileach ag glaodhach san oidhche
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 23:31
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Leighasanna
San gcaisreabháin.
Tá leigheas i gcaisreabháin don ‘’whooping cough’’ aicht caitear é a mheasca le phlúir agus é a beiriú annsan. Núair a bheadh sé beirighte é d’fhághadh go dtí go mbheadh sé fúar agus annsan é do cuir ar mhuineal an duine a bhead breoidhte
bainne bó bleacht.
Tá leigheas san bainne bó bleacht don ‘’Small Pox’’, act é do mheasca le fuil gabhain agus é do clúidig le éadach mála an feadh trí lá. Tar éis idan tríomhadh laé caifear an rud cendna a dheinamh airís.
San ‘’Dandelionn’’
Tá leigheas sa fíon an ‘’Dandilion‘‘ dp réim, acht b’éigin don duine gloine dhe a tógfaint gach maidin do naoí maidhne in dhiadh a céile.
San Nettle.
Tá leigheas san Nettle don ‘’Rash’’ act e do bheiriú agus sóid a mheascadh leis, agus é do cuir ar an ‘’Rash’’.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 20:45
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There was a widow one time who had a son named Jack. They were very poor. One day Jack shoved a carriage up a hill for a gentleman the man gave him a half crown. When Jack went home his mother told him to go to town for livers and lights. He was going along the road saying livers and lights to himself when he met a drunken man. The man thought that he was saying that his livers should come up. He beat Jack and told him to say "That they may stay down". Then he was passing by a field amd there were people sowing potatoes there. Jack shouted to them "That they may stay down". They beat him and told him to say "hundreds today and thousands tomorrow". Then he met a funeral. He said to the people "Hundreds today and thousands tomorrow". The people beat him and told him to say "The lord have mercy on the dead".Then he saw a man hanging a dog. Jack said to him "The lord have mercy on the dead". The man beat him and told him to say "hang the rogue". Then he met a woman taking home her husband, he said to the woman "hang the rogue". The man beat him and told him to say "That they may never part". Then he saw a man and a horse in a pond the man was just out jack said "That thay may never part". The man beat him and told him to say "One out and the other
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 20:23
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Mary he said come up to the graveyard gate until you hear God and the devil dividing the dead.When they came to the gate they heard (God) then saying ,this is your's and that's mine and that's mine and this is yours.
When they had finished dividing them one of them said what about the two at the gate and when Mary and the man heard that they set off and they are running yet.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 20:19
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The Bag of Apples
Some time ago two boys went into a garden to steal a bag of apples.When they got the apples they were thinking about where they would go to divide them.
They came along the road and they went in a graveyard to divide them because it was a very safe place.
As they were going in the gate two apples fell out of the bag and one of the boys said leave those two here, until we count the rest.
They went to the back of a headstone and began to divide them as they were dividing them one of the used to say this is yours and that's mine and this is yours.
There was a man coming along the road and he heard them and he got frightened and he ran home as fast as he could to tell his wife.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 20:15
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the back door and ate the heart and liver. Morans wife got very angry and went out and killed a hem and fried the heart. When he came he eat them and went to bed. Next morning when he woke he searched the bed but could not find anything. When Morans wife was dressing the beds of Pat and Mike she found a purse of gold under each of their head When the goldsmith heard of this he got very angry and told Moran to put tar and feathers on them and to light them an
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 20:00
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threw his coat over the nest. There were three eggs in the nest and there was something written on them but Pat or Mike could not read it because they had no education. They brought home the eggs and the bird and showed them to the goldsmith. What was written on them was who ever would eat the heart and liver of the bird would find a purse of gold under his head every morning. The goldsmith told Morans wife to kill the bird and to fry the heart and liver for him. While this was going on the goldsmith went out for a walk. Pat and Mike came
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 19:57
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He is always for-getting".
When is a ship sentimental?
When it hugs the shore.
What has a neck and body but nothing else?
A Bottle.
Which ship do we all like to avoid?
Hardship.
What is that which never asks questions yet requires many answers?
The doorbell.
Why should a hen be never untidy?
Because she carries a little comb with her.
How can you cure a slow horse?
Tie him to a post and make him fast.
Jenny under the ditch Jenny over the ditch don't touch Jenny or she will bite you. Who is she?
A nettle.
Which side do you get down off a ass?
There is no down on an ass.
On which side of an ass is the most hair?
The out side.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 19:52
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Moran was a man who lived in Shrule. He was a brushmaker. He had two sons Pat and Mike. He had an uncle, a goldsmith in Headford. He used to go to Dalgan every Friday pulling heath. One day as they were pulling heath they found a beautiful feather under a tree. They brought it home and showed it to the goldsmith and he said if they found the bird which had lost the feather Moran would be a rich man. Next day the two sons went to where they found the feather. They saw the nest on the tree. Mike climbed the tree and
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 19:49
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get a hat to fit it?
Bray.
If a man got sixpence for walking thirty miles what would he get for walking a hundred miles?
Sore feet.
Why is a drawn tooth like something you have forgotten?
Because it is gone out of you head.
What is it that gets smaller as it grows older?
A candle.
When is a penny line a hermit?
When it is "a-loan".
Why should Ireland soon be rich?
Because its capital is Dublin".
When should you lose your temper?
When it is a bad temper.
What are the most unsociable things in the world?
Milestones you never see two together.
Why is a miser like a man with a bad memory?
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 19:06
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11
.5.38 Stories told by John Sammon, Quin,Co Clare.
In the Penal Days when the Friars in Quin Abbey were persecuted ,they buried their valuables in the adjacent river Rine .In order that the large bell would sink into the bed of the river they filled it with lead.
They buried some gold vessels under a large flat stone in the river.This treasure was supposed to be protected by the monster eel.On one occasion, a native of the village of Quin haven dreamt several times of the hidden gold went in search of it.When about to turn over the flat stone concealing the the treasure the eel rushed down the river ,attacked the man and almost drowned him with a huge wave.
On one occasion a monk having made himself two large wings from the feathers of the fowl killed in the monastery ascended to the top of the tower in the Abbey .He attached the wings to his body and made an attempt to fly to the neighbouring castle in Danganbrack.he fell to the ground and broke his back.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 18:52
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Sgealta ar na Daoinibh Maithe
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10/11/'37
Bhi fear ag dul sios go dti an leacht (Leacht Ui Concubhair) agus d'fheach se isteach thar an gclaidhe agus cad a chifeadh se istigh acht dha fhicid fear agus da fhicid bhean.
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Bhiodar ag meadchaint ime agus iad ar fad ag roinnt ime ar a ceile agus cruac de deanta aca.
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Dubhairt an fear leo, "Caithigid ghreim de cugham-sa ar son De agus mhathar".
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Nior chuireadar suim ar bith ann ach leanadar de'n obair agus d'imthigh Sean ar a bothar. Nuair thainig se abhaile chuig a mhna an oidhche sin. Dubhairt si, "Ara, a Sheain, ta an fuinneog lan amach le h-im". "O i fiior sin, adubhairt Sean, bhi me ag cainnt leis na daoinibh maithe.
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Stiophan O Cillireain,
Sraid na n-Iasgairi,
Dubhlinn,
Co. an Chlair
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Fuairead an sgeal thuas o Tadhg O Cillreain, Sraid na n-Iascairi, Dubhlinn,
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 18:51
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29.5.'38 This story was told to Christina Hayes by her father, Pat Hayes, Creevagh ,Quin.
At one time there lived in Daganbrack Castle a family of the Clunes.One evening when the master of the Castle went out walking ,he saw a beautiful Maiden brushing her hair under a tree.He saluted her and asked her if she would come in if she only stopped for a week and a day.She went in and sat down by the fire but never spoke a word.and every time a pot would boil over she would laugh .One day the master fell and broke his leg and the Maiden laughed more heartily than ever.Then when the year and the day were spent they questioned the Maiden why she used to laugh and she explained to them that every time the pot boiled over her people had enough to eat and the reason she laughed when the Master broke his leg was that there was a pot of gold under that flat .Then the Maiden left them and they went to look for the gold but were prevented from by unknown persons from finding it.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 18:36
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Old Sayings.
We should't raise up old sores.
Let the dead rest.
let what you hear in one ear and out the other.
He is as honest as the priest himself
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 18:33
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4.
18.4'38.This story was told to John Lynch ,by his father ,John Lynch,Cullane, Kilkishen.
There was a man one time who lived on a mountain.He used to look after a herd of goats, Monday and Sunday ,and never went to Mass.One day the priest was going through the mountain and met the man.The priest asked him had he his prayers and the poor man answered "No, I know nothing about them".The priest said he would name the goats as his prayers,so that he would think of them .The man said "All right".So the priest named the goats "Our Father who art in Heaven"and "Holy Mary".The priest said he hoped he would remember them until he would come again.When he came back the man said that "Our Father pucked "who art in Heaven "into a trench,and that "Holy Mary "drowned herself.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 18:12
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A Fairy Story
There was a man in Killyrane who was sitting by his own fireside with some friends. He was told if he could catch a fairy he would get a crock of gold to let him off. They told him too for to not take his eyes off him. The man lived in a little cottage and behind the house there was a little round field. When then new moon came again the man went out into this little field where he thought this to be a likely place to find a fairy. He went round and round the field to see if he could find anything init, when he was about to leave the field he heard something tipping not much louder than the ticking of a watch. The man turned round and at the root of a tree sat a little fairy making shoes. The man slipped down making no noise and when he was just beside the little man stretched out his arms and grasped him. The little man
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 18:01
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Prayers
The people of ancient Ireland were very fond of prayer. One fo the prayers they said at night was
I lay my body down to sleep
I pray to God my soul to keep
And if I die before I wake
I pray to God my soul to (take) keep.
In Ireland long ago people used to say little prayers. One of them was
My God I hope in Thee
Another of them was
We thank Thee I Lord for all Thy goodness and kindness
The prayers that I learned at home were short prayers that people say going to bed. Some of them are
There are four four corners on my bed. There are four angels at my head. Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
God bless the bed that I lay on
Here I do lie down to sleep
I pray to God my soul to keep
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 18:00
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bhí sé leigheasta. Tá loch í Máimín agus deir na sean daoine go bhfuil leigheas le fhághail ins an loch sin mar tá trí abhainn ag rith isteach sa loch. Fadó bhíodh poitín ag na stráinséairi í Máimín agus bíodh dhá ndíol le muinntir na h-áite seo. Téigead na stráinséaraí ag lóistín í dtíghthe in a mbíodh daoine muinnteardha acú. Fághann na daoine airgead agus rudí beannuige ins an tobar.
Fuair mé an t-eolas seo ó
Maigréad Seóige Thomáis
Uillean Thiar
Srath Salach
Co. na Gaillimhe
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 17:57
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1. Capall donn i lár na h-abhann is féadfaidh aoinne dul ar a dhrom?
Eascú
2. Chuaidh biadh go triúr ar bharra locha léin
D'ith an biadh an triúr is tháinig abhaile é féin.
Fr. Thug fiolar cat go dtí barra locha léin mar biadh dá trí cearrcaigh. D'ith an cat na gearrcaigh agus do tháinig sé féin abhaile.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 17:55
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I live near the village of Dromad
In a place you all know well
There is a graveyard in it
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 17:45
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40. "Shut mouths catch no flies".
41. "Christmas comes but once a year, But when it comes it brings good cheer".
42. "Learn to unlearn what you have learned amiss".
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 17:32
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17. "Is maith í an fhoigidh acht is dona í an fhaillighe".
18. "Más cam díreach an ród sé an bóthar mór an aithgiorra".
19. "Ní bhunuigeann minic onóir".
20. "Gach duine ag iarraidh a' bheith ag tochras ar a cheirtlín féin".
21. "An rud is doilighe le duine b'fhéidir gurbh é a leas é".
22. "Céard a dhéanfad an cat acht luch a mharbhadh."
23. "Is fearr dreoilín sa dorn ná corr ar cáirde".
24. "Nuair is fearr an greann isead is fearr leigean dó".
25. "Níl aon biadh mar biadh na gcomhursan".
26. "Like father like son".
27. "All fair in love and war".
28. "Shoes in the cradle and feet in the gutter".
29. "One hours fun is worth ? hours beating".
30. "A stitch in time saves nine".
31. "Spare the rod and spoil the child".
32. "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy".
33. "The longest way round is the shortest way home".
34. "Make hay while the sun shines".
35. "A proverb is the wisdom of many and the wit of one".
36. "Money is the servant of some men and master of many".
37. "We know the worth of water when the well is dry".
38. "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush".
39. "After the storm comes the calm".
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 16:44
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Cuinneóg - Loinithe, clár, cláibín, báisín ime, agus an dhá spáid ime agus an cruga bainne.
Tá dhá phairt sa gcuinneóig - an cruga agus an cap.
Má thagann duine isteach agus tú a bheith ag dhéanamh maistre agus gan dreas a bhualadh air deirtear gur tógann sé an t-im leis.
Caithtear gráine salainn isteach sa gcuinneóig nuair tá siad ag dul a dheanamh maistre, mar deirtear nach féidir le aon duine an t-im a thógail leis annsin.
Deirtear nach ceart uisce ar bigh a caitheamh amach nuair atá maistre ghá dheanamh.
Cuireann daoine splainc faoi an gcuinnoóig sonnas nach d'imteócaidh an t-im.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 16:40
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155.
27 V1 .'38 Something and tied the purse again and put it into his pocket.He then laid what he took out of the third purse on the table.As he was facing the door Mrs Callaghan said "Would it be any harm asking you did you come far today. "Well no then" says he ,'do you see that clump of bushes up there on the hill in front of the door theres where i came from ".Mrs Callaghan went up to see what direction he went and tail nor light could she see of him,he disappeared as if the ground had swallowed him up. When Mrs Callaghan went to the table to see what the little man left onit.She saw it was a six pence.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 16:31
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Dá mbeadh cnap in do mhuineál agus fataí a chur leis tharnócahidh sé aon nimh a bheadh ann as.
Fataí bruithce an-te a chur le do dhruim tá sé an-mhaith le haghaidh tinnis droma.
Leighseóchaidh fata fuar brúighte niascód dá gcuirtheá leis é.
Dá mbeadh fáiriní ort agus fata fuar a chur leo san oidhce agus é talamh é roimh fáinne an lae d'imtheóchaidh na táiriní.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 16:31
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Is biadh maith iad fataí dúinn féin, na ba, na cearcaigh, na lacain, na muca, na madraí, agus itheann na hh-asail agus na capaill fataí fuara, agus deantar cáca de fataí freisin.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 16:22
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Créahtac Dearg - Baintear dath dearg aas Seileistream. Úsáidear é le h-aghaidh dín cruaice féir agus coirce gcois fairrge
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 15:40
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Is as adhmad atá sé déanta agus tá sé tuairim trí troighe ar aoirde. Déanann na mná dhá mhaistire sa tseachtain. Crnuigheann siad an bainne ar dtús agus annsin doirtear sa gcuinneog é agus cuirtear uisce te ann le na dhéanamh. Bítear dhá bhualadh tuairim agus leath uair nó go mbíonn sé déanta agus annsin doirtear uisce fuar air chun an t-im a thógáil as an gcuinneoig. Nuair a bhíonns sé réidh annsin coisrigheann bean an tighe é agus annsin bíonn an t-im le n-ithe againn leis an gcáca.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 15:38
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A dog was seen in the fort of Bawnbee.
A white man was seen in Knockeen.
None of these are within view of one another. They are not nice places to be at night.
There is a fairy fort about six miles from my home in Fedamore. There is a house not far away from it. There was a school teacher living in that house. The teacher used to pass the fort every evening. One day as he was passing the fort he heard some lovely music. The music was so nice that he began to dance. He did not leave the fort until half-past five. When he went home it was six o'clock. He told his mother about the music. He went to bed early that night and died. His mother was very lonely after him because he was the only one who lived with her. She said the fairies took him.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 15:35
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St. Laurence not very far from the school of Caherconlish. It is part of Thomas Looney's farm. There was light supposed to have been seen there at midnight. It is also said that a child was heard crying there.
There are a couple of forts in Tober, Malug. They are within vieew of each other. Each is surrounded by a dyke of water and a ring of bushes. There was a fort where a king lived in Dunvullen. From this the place got its name.
There are three fairy forts in the school district. They are in different townlands. One is in Pust. Another is in Bawnbee and the other in Knockeen. There is a road running through the one in Pust. The fort is circular in shape. It is surrounded by water. The Tuatha De Dannán turned themselves into fairies and lived under the forts. It is said they are still to be seen at 12 o'clock at night. A man named Ryan a light as he was passing. A man named Moore saw a white man there.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 15:32
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rectangular in shape. There is a high fence of earth around it. On top of the fence there is a thick growth of trees and ivy. It is said that this fort was a village belonging to the Danes long ago. It is said that when a man was ploughing outside a fort one day a little black man jumped up on the fence and told him not to come an inch nearer to the fence. The man was anxious to know what was there. He went in and a month after he died.
There are three fairy forts in the school district. There are two in Knockeen, one of them in Ryan's and the other one in Hogan's. There are three big rings of earth and stone around each of them. There are children supposed to have been seen in them.
These fairy forts were built by the Danes. There chiefs lived in them. The owners of these lands would never interfere with these forts by cutting the hay of them.
There is a fairy fort in Inch
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 15:29
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one is surrounded by trees and earth.
One day as a man was gathering sticks in Looney's Fort, he saw a white woman milking one of the cows that was grazing there.
The people in the district have not ever explored them because they say it is unlucky to interfere with them.
Nobody even interfered with them when ploughing because it is unlucky.
A fort is a place where fairies are supposed to inhabit.
There is a fort in Inch St. Laurence. It is built on a small hill. There are many big bushes in it. People never cut them down. People say it is unlucky to cut them.
There is a small fort about a mile from where I live. There is no fence around it. The bushes are growing very straight there. If one was passing by it they would hear many different sounds.
There is only one fort in the school district. It goes by the name of Looney's fort. It is in the townland of Inch St. Laurence. It is almost
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 15:25
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There are many fairy forts around the village of Caherconlish.
One of them, which is situated at the South side of Caherconlish is called Knockawn. There are "Fairies" said to dwell in that fort. They are seen there on the night of June 20th.
Another fort is called Martin Kennedy's fort. It is called that because a man maned Martin Kennedy owns it. The fort is situated about a mile west of Knockawn. It is said to be inhabited by "Fairies." If anyone slept there, he would be never seen again.
There is a fort called Quinlan's fort about one and a half miles from Caherconlish at the South side. It is on the farm of a man named Quinlan. There was never anything seen there.
There are many fairy forts in the school district ; namely Skehard, Kilcoolen and Pust. They are within view of one another and all are circular in shape. The townland's are Skehard, Kilcoolen, Pust. Each
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 15:20
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There is a treasure supposed to be hidden in Ballyneety. It was placed there by Sarsfield and his men. Attempts have been made to unearth it.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 15:19
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The Danes built stone caves in a place not far from Caherconlish. One man dreamt of the treasure for three nights and on the fourth night he got up at twelve o'clock and saw the treasure.
There is a hidden treasure in Castlehill. Castlehill is situated near the village of Caherconlish. This treasure was guarded by the good people in olden times.
Many people tried to find this treasure but failed to get it. They tried again and again but failed every time. There was a hidden treasure found long ago but it was not kown who found it.
Two of three men of Caherconlish dreamt of where the treasure was buried in Castlehill and they went one night at twelve o'clock to try and find it. After digging for some time they came to a flag which was supposed to cover the treasure. When they were lifting the flag a bull appeared and they had to go away. The supposed value of the treasure is ten thousand pounds.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 13:59
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lord, he also neglected sending, according to custom, his tribute to his master's coffers. The Sovereign happened at this time to be in Ireland and was staying at Waterford, and being on his way to Kilkenny he resolved to execute personally his vengeance and vowed that he should have Den's head served to him at table in the hall of Den's own Castle.
The King and his royal followers slept at Knocktopher the night before their arrival at Grennan. On starting the next morning the King was surprised to find every mile of the road marked with a butt of Spanish wine, placed purposely for himself and his followers by the lady of Grennan Castle. The day being extremely warm and the wine good, the King drank plentiously, and he relented having made his vow; but as it was now recorded in Heaven, it should be carried into execution. At his arrival at Grennan Den's lady met her Sovereign and ushered him into the hall of the Castle, where a banquet was prepared. On the centre of the table stood a large silver dish, which, as soon as the royal guest took seat, was uncovered and there to his dismay the King saw in the dish the head of Den all besmeared with blood. Th King was smitten with remorse at the readiness with which his wish had been carried out, and said he would give a dozen of his Knights if the bold outlaw
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 13:50
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Tá cuigeóg againn sa mbaile. Ní cuigeóg mór í mar níl ann ach thoigh ar leithead agus trí troighthe ar fhaid. Is féidir ceithre galúin bainne a chur ann. Bíonn sé púint ime ar líon na cuigeóige. Ceannuigh m'athair ó Mhícheál Mac an Bháirt é. Thóg sé púnt agus sé scilling uirrí. 'Siad an Iomithe, an láimhín agus an chlár gléasanna na meidre. 'Sí mo mháthair an dhéananns an cuigeann. Nuair a bhíos an chuigeann déanta baintear amach an loimithe agus tógtar amach an t-im le sórt cupán déanta as adhmad. Annsin cuirtear i mbóla é agus níghtear é. Nuair a mbíonn sé nighte cuirtear salann air.
Má thagann stróinséir isteach le linn na cuiginne buaileann sé greas uirrí ionnus nach dtógadh sé an t-im leis. Deirtear nach ceart
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 13:02
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MacNamara, went at night to "Aill an Phúca" and was soon attacked by the Pooka who got up on his back. MacNamara, at first, knocked him and drove the knife through his heart.
"Pull again". said the Pooka.
"'Tis allright where it is", said MacNamara.
MacNamara returned home and next morning, on going to the spot he found the knife stuck in a jelly mess. The Pooka was never seen since in locality.
(b)
Some time after the above happening, a man, with his horse, was passing near Aill an Phúca at night, and a little man jumped out from side of wall and called the horseman by name.
The Leipreachán, for such it was, kept near the horseman until they were just outside where the Pooka used to be. The Leipreachán then asked the man for a ride but the latter refused and galloped away. When he reached home his horse was nearly white with froth and the beast was dead next morning.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 11:07
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Is tú plúr na bhfear in Éirinn
Do Shamhail níor tháinic fós
Is tú cara an té atá i ngéibheann
Ceal mairig leitre is eolais.
II
Tá mo agathamh 'sa mbaile
Aith is faillightheach ó mo mhuinntir sgríobhadh
Aith is feárr an t-Éireannach 'chuile Shatharn
Ná aon pháipéar dá bhfaca mise ariamh
3.
Mar tá seanchus sa leitir aniar
Is biodán a thaitnigheas le mná
D'fhágas tú an Cheathramhadh Ruadh thiar
Go dtéighidh tú go Bóthar na Trágha
4.
Tá cur síos ann ar dhéantus an phoitín
Ar an ngárda ag déanamh a dhithchill
Le deis airgid a thabhairt dhon bhoicín
Atá go cúramach i mbun an dlighe
5.
Tá mairig ar fhata ann nuair atá sé dhá bhaint
An ceann fabhthach fada is an sgriocán
Is 'chuile nidh gur fiú faoi chainnt
Go dtí 'n céilire a bhí in Aill an Phréacháin
duine anaithnid
2020-03-19 10:54
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Carraig and Aifrinn
In the townland of Carrickabrennan there is a famous rock known as :-
"Carraig an Aifrinn".
Here priests used to celebrate Mass during the Penal days.
It is firmly believed that a Bishop was killed while celebrating Mass at this rock.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 21:43
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She told the old couple that at twelve midnight she would be able to speak to Pádraic and Seán. So she stayed in the house all (day) night until twelve midnight. Then she went out and stayed at the lios for a while and come in.
Brígio and Seán were nervously awaiting news from their boys.'' Óra, an bfaca tú mo buachaillí '' they said '' Connaic mé go deimin. Tá Pádraic in a lasbog agus, Seán in a Sagart '' arsa Máire. '' Gtón go Dia '' areir Brígio. ''Míle glón go Dia '' arier Seán.
Tá ocras mór oria. Ó Nac boci an sgéal é '' arsa (Máire) Brígio. Dubairt siad liomsa a ráib leatsa as caora is fearr atá agat a marbugat arsa Máire ''
Poor old Seán was delighted to think he was able to help his boys in any way. Máire told them that they would ever spend. But they could not touch any of the crocks of gold until they were in the lios one year.
Poor old Seán killed his best sheep. Old Máire told them to cook the mutton and she would come every night and take it to the lios for the
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 21:35
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There are certain places where treasures are supposed to be hidden. There is a castle in Dundonnell where a treausure is supposed to be hidden.
There is an old hill in Keogh's called 'Sliab Gearr' there is an entrance in at the bottom of the hill. There is supposed to be a treasure hidden in it. Once there was an attempt made to get the treasure. They dug around the hill and when they had the whole hill almost dug up they found three or four wooden mugs. Lights are seen very often.
There is a treasure supposed to be hidden under a hill in Racepark called 'Mí Lúan'. Lights are seen nearly every night and people are heard singing in it. They say there is a treasure in it but they are afraid to unearth it. There
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 20:42
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eight inches of clay are piled up about four or five feet high and the pit shaped at the top. The potatoes are left in this for two or three months and are them removed into a barn. The neighbours help each other when setting the potatoes. The words said are "Da mbeirimíd beó ar an ám seo arís" Satrch is made by boiling the potatoes in sour milk and mixing flour with them.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 20:38
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taken in selecting the most suitable potato for seed, medium size is best, then when cutting an "eye" must be left in each piece. The potatoes must be left about three days cut before setting them. Then they are alid on furrows about fourteen inches apart. Some people put the manure on the ground before setting the potatoes while others put it on them after setting. Then the drills are closed and rolled and are left until the stalks are about six inches over ground. Then the furrows are ploughed and then howed and the coarse lumps of clay are taken from drill to furrow. The potatoes are moulded and soon after sprayed and in a few months after the new potatoes are fit to be dug. The pits are amde by digging a furrow in the ground, the potatoes are piled into this until they are about eighteen inches above the level of the ground. Straw or ferns or sods are put over them first, after this about seven or
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 20:29
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There are potatoes sown every year in the farm near my house. The farmer ploughs and manures the land in Spring-time. Some people put farmyard manure on the potatoes and others use artificial amnure. With a plough the farmer makes the drills. Long ago wooden ploughs and homemade spades were used but bought ones are used now.
The people sow different varities of seed such as, Cahmpion, Kerr's pink, Arran Banner, British Queens and many others. When cutting the seed great care must be
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 20:28
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John Mulhern 9th November 1937.
Scéal Grinn agus Scéal Gearr fíor faoi na cistí óir i lios na h-óige ag bun na sléibe i mBoi Alla, in áir Tíge Measaig.
In the year of famine 1847 there lived a man in baile beag in Byhalla townland. He used to go by the name of Seán beag. His wife was called Brígio and she had two sons. The boys got the Galan breac and unhappily died.
They lived near a lios and they always believed the fairies were in it and had plenty of gold and treasure there. They also believed go raib a dá mac Pádraic and Seán tógta ag na Síoeóga agus go raib siad beó ins an lios.
It consoled them a lot to think they were so near them. They only feared they might be hungry. Déarfai Brígio le Máire a fios, go mbear ocras an a clann a bí ins an lios ag na síoe.
This old Máire a' fios was supposed to be on very friendly terms with the fairns fairies. She lived in the next village and naturally could give old Seán agus a céile all the information she could concerning their boys.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 20:21
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There lived once upon a time a man by the name of john and he had a son and his name was john also. This man worked with a king. He could not control the boy however and complained him to the king who said to send him to him. Jack came to the king. Jack was noted to be a great burglar. The king said that he would have him put to death if he had'nt a horse that was guarded in the kings stable at his door at seven o'clock in the mourning.
Off went Jack and bought two bottles of whiskey. He put one in each pocket of his overcoat and came to the stable at midnight where he saw two soldiers guarding the door. He pretended to be drunk and the soldiers let him in to lay down and the guards stole the whiskey.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 19:09
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a tháinigh an bhean isteach, Nuair a connaic sí an uachtar go léir doirtighthe agus an much marbh d'iarr sí ar an bhfear cad do dhein é. Níor dúbhairt seisean aon ní ach imeacht an dorus amach.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 19:04
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Do bhí fear ann fadó agus ní raibh aon mhach inaon- chor aige.
Bhí sé 'na í dtigh bheag é féin agus a mhnaoí. Lá samhraidh a bhí ann dúbhairt sr leis an mhnaoí go raibh sé ag dul go dtí an gort chun an féar do baint. Nuair a tháinigh se isteach ní raibh aon dínnéar ullamh ag a bean dó.
Dúbhairt an mhnaoí leis go raghadh sí féin amach chun an féir do bhaint agus é féin faineacht istigh chun obair an tighe do dhéanamh. Do thosnaig sé ag déanamh choigine. Nuair a bhí an choigin déanta aige do chuir sé an mheadar ar an úrlár.
Do chuaid sé chun bosca móna d'fághail igcóir na teine.
Nuair a tháinigh sé isteach do bhi an uachtar doirtighthe ag an mna mhuc. Níor dhein sé ach grafán a chaitheamh leí agus í do mharbhadh. Annsan chuir sé an bhó in áirde ar díon an tíghe agus ceangall sé tead leis an t-simné. Do thosnuig an bhó ag béich géimridh nuair
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 19:00
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New Years Day.
Anything done on this day will be done all the year. i e If late for mass on this day you will be late all the year +c.
A [interlined with carat: "lighted'] candle is placed in each window at night.
On New Year Eve people remain up until after midnight. they leave the door open to "let out the Old Year + to let in the New Year". Some people say — "The old year is going + let it go, the new year is coming + let it come.
People don't lend anything on New Years Day lest they would be lending all the Year.
Hansel Monday.
The first Monday of the year is called Hansel Monday. People don't spend or pay out any money on this day as it is considered unlucky They say they would have no luck during the year in anything they would buy.
Twelfth Night
Twelve candles or rush lights are lighted before the Rosary. Each person in the house claims one of the candles. The person who owns the candle that is first burned out is said to be the first to die. The candles are lighted in honour of the twelve Apostles.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 18:34
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Scabs .
The juice of raw potatoes .
To wash with Jeyes'Fluid diluted in water.
To eat young nettles in March.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 18:31
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66
31 -V -38 hot.
Locill -a plant found in springs.
Boiled lemons.
The white of an egg.
Put a few drops of turpentine in a lump of sugar and eat it.
The bark of an ash tree boiled in milk
A poultice of hot bran put around the neck .
A poultice of boiled turnip put around the neck.
Gargle with salt and water.
Drawn honey made by mixing a little water and honey.
St.Blaises blessing
Oil and baize blest on St.Blaises Day.
Black Currant wing for hoarseness or sore throat.
To wear a silk handkerchief.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 18:19
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Sore Throat.
Oat -meal boiled in milk and taken
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 18:17
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ag fanacht le cinneadh
A Wasp's Sting.
To apply washing blue to the part stung.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 18:04
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65.
31.v. 38 To apply a paste of stale lining and water .The person to write his or her name around the affected spot in ink.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 17:59
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Boils
A raw potato
Scoup of sugar.
Pig's lard.
Salt.
Sorrel
Cowdung placed between two pieces of cloth and applied to the boil
The knobs of fig wort chopped very small
and mixed with lard .
The roasted root of Meacan Táthú- but the person who has the boil should not stay in the house while the root is being roasted as they say the worm in the boil if he feels the smell would remove to
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 17:53
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53.
31-5-'38 To put two or three drops of turpentine and Tincture of Oidine in milk and drink the mixture .
Celery seed boiled in water to jelly and taken in small doses .
To eat raw celery .
Asparagrass as a table vegetable
A teaspooonful of dry sulphur in a glass of milk for three mornings fasting .
To keep a raw potato in each trousers pocket.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 17:01
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41.
26.5 38.The touch of a dead man's hand is said to remove a birthmark is said to remove a birthmark.
To rub the afterbirth of the child to the birthmark is also said to take it away.
The old people say it is not right to interfere with a birthmark,that it is a lucky thing to be born in a child.
They also say that a hares lip in a child is caused by a hare crossing the path of a woman in child.
It is not right for a woman in child to make jam especially currant or blackberry jam.
A woman in child to touch a gooseberry is said to be the cause of a birthmark the shape of a gooseberry on the child's head.
Mrs J .S - Quin Co. Clare ,says she was 'making pigs puddings carrying Madge who had a very large birthmark on her face .She blames the making of the puddings for the birthmark to this day.
Tole by Mrs Pat Kelly ,Quin. Co.Clare.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 16:02
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There is one Holy Well in this Parish situated in the townland of Liseumesbry in a field of Mr James Coyle’s and near Lattenelass N.S.
It is visited on Ascension Thursday and people take some of the water with them and believe there is a cure in it and that it is concealed with the Holy Mother of God; It is visited on the 8th December and other feasts of The Blessed Virgin
13th August 1938
Philomena Cunningham
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 15:59
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The cure for a burn was possessed by anyone who licked the belly of a mankeeper. This was an animal resembling a frog but differing from a frog in that it had a tail. To cure the burn the possesser of the cure licked it.
The cure of rupture was not possessed by anyone in the locality but it was known to be possessed by a man in the bonafean district of Cavan. The cure was wrought by splitting a young growing ash tree and passing the ruptured person through the cleft Certain prayers were said and the cleft was then closed and bound. When the tree knit again their rupture healed. The cure was wrought upon a man, once, but some ill disposed persons cut down the tree before the split portion had knit again and it is said that the cure in this instance was ineffective.
The cure for a pain in the back was possessed by any person who was born feet first. The afflicted person lay on the ground and the person possessing the cure walked across his back three times saying “in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost”
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 15:58
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A man named Mr. Owen Slowey who resides in Annakilly has the cure of a sprain. When he is curing the sprain he gets some hot water puts the sprained limb into it, he then takes it out of the water and pulls it. Then he gets an eel skin and rubs it on the sprained limb(s) and says a special prayer while he is doing it. Many people were cured in this way.
A cure for warts is to rub a snail to them (sayin) saying “in the name of the Father Son, and Holy Ghost.”
The cure for the toothache is to get a horse worm, put it in a jar of water and drink three drops out of the jar for nine mornings “in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.” A man who resides in Leonards Island, b lones was cured in this way. Another cure for the toothache is to make a promise and not to (m) break it for if this promise is broken the toothache will come back (imme) immediately. Many promises can be made such as, abstaining from flesh (s) meat on a certain day of the week and sometimes men who have the toothache make a promise not to shave on a Sunday. People believe that if a person takes a tooth out of a dead man’s mouth and (per) put it in his or her (moun) mouth for a few minutes that the toothache will never come back. Molly Mc Acree. 8-3-38
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 15:57
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There are several cures for the whooping cough, the mumps and the sprain. There is a young man (who) living in the townland of Annamkiff, Annalore Newbliss (who has the cure) who is called Mr. James Graham who is (cal) has the cure of the whooping cough. This young (you) man takes three hairs out of his own head ties them in a cloth and gives them to the patient and the patient ties them around his or her and wears them until the whooping goes away. He has this cure because his father died before he was born. Several people were cured in this way.
The cure for the mumps is to put donkey’s winkers on the person who has the mumps and lead him or or (ho) her around a pig – sty and the place where the pig rubs itself against the patient rubs his neck against the same place. A pupil out of the school which I attend is called Annakilly school was cured of the mumps in this way. Another cure for the mumps is to go to a south running stream between sunset and sunrise with donkey’s winkers on the patient also for (Im) three evenings in succession. Every evening the patient is to throw three pebbles into the stream in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. Nine pebbles are to be thrown in altogether. Another thing which is nessecary is that someone must lead the patient to this stream.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 15:34
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Bhí bean ann fadó agus bhí aon mac amháin aici. An lá a rugadh an mac cuiread crann óg. Nuair a bhí an mac seacht mbliana d'aois thus a máthair go dtí an crann óg é. "Tarraing an crann "ar sise".
rug sé ar an gcrann agus tarraing ar a dhíceall ach níor tháinig an crann leis. Nuair a bhí sé ceithre bliadna déag thug sí amach arís é ach thug aríst air. Nuair a bhí sé bliadain is ficead thug sí é go dtí an crann aríst agust duairt sí "bliadain is fiche atá mé
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 15:10
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Boxty is much used in the district. It is made in the following manner:-
Ingredients:-
12 raw potatoes,
6 cooked potatoes,,
1 teaspoonful salt,
1 cupful flour,
Method: Grate the raw potatoes into a basin, place the grated potatoes in a clean cloth, squeeze out all the water. To the grated raw potatoes add 6 pounded cooked potatoes, one teaspoonful salt, and one cupful flour. Mix all together. Make into cakes. Put into a pot of boiling water. Boil for an hour. Can then be eaten hot with butter or when cold the cakes can be fried in butter and served with butter.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 14:58
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Fairy Forts
There is a fairy fort in Eskraugh. It is a round fort. It is about forty feet by forty. The people say that it was the Danes that built the fort. In the fort there is a cave. There are a good many rooms in the cave. The cave is built of stone. From this fort another fort can be seen. It is said that there is an under-ground passage going from fort to fort. There is a fence around the fort. On the fence there are bushes growing. The people say that anyone that anyone that touches the bushes will have bad luck. Some of
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 14:49
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Old Craft in my district
The oldest craft in my district was spinning flax and wool. Most of the people did that work. The blankets and sheets that the old women made are still to be seen in the village. The also made stockings and gloves. The blankets and sheets that they made are very good ones. They are better than ones that are sold. First they used to card it and make it into little rolls. Then it would be ready for the spinning wheel. When the thread was made they used to bring big balls of it to the weaver. Then he would weave it into blankets and sheets.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 14:45
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30
districts that the maiden who is the first to hear the cuckoo will be married before Hallowe'en and furthermore if on hearing the cuckoo's call she examines the sole of her left shoe and discovers a hair there its colour will disclose the tint of her future husband's locks.
It is considered very unlucky to kill a swan and no person would dream of doing so .
Should a bird peck at the window at night it is considered unlucky.A cuckoo's call on a leafless tree is sad to foretell some trouble in the district.
It is unlucky for a mother to purchase the cradle ,cot or Christening robe for her first born baby .A coffin is always left on the ground after entering the grave- yard.The reason for this is to put the blood-hounds off the trail.It is unlucky for a person to come in the back door while a corpse is being coffined.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 14:28
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contains a pigeons feather.Pigeons are not molested as it is said they were St Brigid's favourite birds .
A lump is said to grow on the hand that robs a bird's nest.The robin is not interfered with because it is said he strove to peck out the nail from the Saviour's hand on the Cross.
The wren is hunted on St.Stephen's Day because it was said by pecking on the drum which the Danes had he aroused them and prevented them from being ambushed by the Irish.
A cock crowing at midnight is said to be a warning of some misfortune in the family.
Their feathers are never used in filling pillows as anyone lying on a pillow filled with such would suffer from headache.
Young maidens look forward to the cuckoo call
it is popular belief in some
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 14:16
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28
Young people will look at the soles of their shoes or boots on hearing the cuckoo's early call and if they find a grey hair it is a sigh that he or she will live to comb grey hairs.People also turn whatever coins they have in the pocket
twice on hearing the cuckoo call.By so doing they they believe they will never know the want of money during the year.
Bad luck will follow the touching of a swallow's nest or egg,a robin's egg or wren's egg
Woe betide those who kill a swallow
or robin or wren or rob their nests.
people do not like to see a pigeon ,wren or cormorant flying over the house if a person is sick as they say their presence is a sign of death.
The cry of the green plover is said to be a sign of coming trouble.
it is said no one can die easily on a bed or pillow that
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 14:05
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27
Bird Folklore.
For instance to stor an owl will bring seven years bad luck.
To kill a raven or scaldcrow will also bring bad luck.
There are many warnings as to the fate attached to meeting a magpie in certain numbers.
One for bad luck.
Two fro good luck.
Three for marriage.
Four for death.
Five for silver.
Six for gold.
Seven a secret that can't be told.
It is unlucky to hear the cuckoo in the left ear for the first time.It is lucky to hear her in the right ear for the first time.If persons sowing potatoes hear the cuckoo for the first time they say they will have cuckoo potatoes that year.The meaning was that the crops would prove a poor one.
A lamb born after the coming of the cuckoo is called a cuckoo lamb and its tail ins never cut off.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 13:58
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Old Prayers
Night:
I lay me down my night hand side I pray to god my soul to guide and if i die before i wake i pray to good my soul to take
Morning:
Oh! My God my only good! the other of my being and my last End! Clothe my soul with a nuptial robe of charity And grant that I may wear it pure and undefiled before thy judgment seat in heaven
Children's prayers when lying down in bed for the night:- There are four corners on my bed,There are four angels on their spread,Matthew,Mark Luke,John God bless me! and this bed that i lie on.
As I was going up holy Erin, I met the blessed Virgin- Seven Gospels in her hand
seven bells ringing Sevens Priests singing shut the gates of hell and open the gates of heaven and let the poor souls in for ever and for ever Amen!
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 13:51
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Flough Fiadha and the old people say that it gets its name from a flock of deer that used to come to quench their thirst.
On the 13th December St Finnian's cams feast day the people of the neighbourhood come to pay rounds at the well and long ago people used to come from far away to pay rounds there but as time goes on they are gradually dropping this custom. it is also said that there was a chapel at the other side of the fence from the well.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 13:45
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in the grave -yard and that the altar of the chapel stood where the tomb of the Moriartys of Clounts now stands. the passage into the graveyard was only a little bótharín, known as Bótharín na gCorp until the year 1860 but in that year there was a new road made into it and there was also an addition put to the graveyard the same year.
The stones of the Monastery and of the round tower are supposed to have been put making the road from Knocknagree to Rathmore. St. Finnian cam the head Monk of the Monastery found the blessed well at Novihal. This well is about half a mile to the North of the place where the Monastery stood. it is kbown as
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 13:35
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Nohival
In the olden tomes the parish of Nohoval Daly extended from Rathduane to the source of the Blackwater at Meenganine.
In a field adjoining the Nohival graveyard there was a round tower, a village and a Monastery. It is said that Cromwell scattered these from either Rathduane or Drishane,
Underground cellers were recently discovered where these buildings stood. It is also said that the chapel of the Monastery was inside
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 13:24
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They came down at Caherciveen
So pleasant was their journey
as the rode upon the gale.
Not one of them woke up I have often heard the tale.
In County Tipperary not far from galtimore
A man named Mac Nulty and his wife and children four
Were carried bag and baggage to the town of Patricks Well.
Near the banks of Ballygran I used to hear my father tell.
How he and another man were on their way home from a wake.
When men bóithrín and all were wafted high in the air and blown to Donegal.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 13:08
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May Day because they believe that the milk goes with it, or if it has to be given away salt is put in it. People believe if they make a [?] with a black hen's egg on May night that they will dream of them man whom they are to marry, but if they talk or laugh the [?] is broken. Some people leave a worm on a plate and if in the evening the worm has three lines made on the plate the people will have no bad luck for three years and they keep the plate. If a child brings in only one [?] on May Day his parents will have only one beast on their land on the next May Day. The people do not throw out ashes on May Day because they believe they would have no fire for the rest of the year. If there is a back door in the house no water is thrown out that door on May morning especially the water with which the people wash their faces. Eileen Keane Drumcreen
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 13:05
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64
Recipe for "Potato Cake."
Ge a dozen of nice sized potatoes. Wash clean and boil them till soft.
Drain off the water and peel them.
Mash them through a masher.
Then add some flour and a little salt.
Mix well and roll out on a bread board. Cut in squares and bake for about half an hour.
May Wilson,
Coromahon,
Kilbracken.
Material from Mrs. Wilson,
Coromahon,
Kilbracken.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 12:53
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2.
13-4-'38 A Story .
The following story was told to me by Thomas Mac Namara,mason, Creevagh, Quin .Co, Clare,to Eilish Macnamara, Hazelwood.
Two men named Jerry Connelly and "Gosh"Halloran were working in Dangan years ago .It was common talk among the neighbours that there was gold to be found in Dangan Castle .Nobody had the courage to go and look for it.Those two men made up their minds that they would be the first to look and so one moonlight night
they set out for the Castle with all their equipments.When they had a hole about five feet dug a woman suddenly appeared dressed in white and when they saw her they ran as fast as their legs could carry them.The same night the present Miss Creagh's grand- mother dreamt that there was gold to be found in the Castle and next morning she brought the steward to the castle and showed him the spot ,the exact spot where the two men had dug the night before .But after this no one ever had the courage to look for it.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 11:48
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Crotty was rendered useless, and remained so til the day of his death.

From facts supplied to me by
Patrick Horgan (Farmer)
Aged 38
who got particulars from his father and grandfather. He lives on a farm in Leades, Aghina, Co. Cork,and tells me that he is the fifth Patrick Horgan to hold the same farm in succession or alternate [succession?]
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 11:41
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it and made her tell him where the sheaf was buried the priest raised the sheaf and he brightened the pins and the man got better till the man got real better and the sheaf was on the altar in Delvin Chruch for year. There was a man named Conor Sheridan who lived in Gartloney and he did away with all the pisteoga in this part of the country. No matter where there was a sheaf buried he could find it nothing could be said or done but he would know he could called you by your name even if he never saw you before. People used to bring Conor Sheridan some whiskey and he would be able to tell them what shop they got it. Brides were often enchanted and he could cure them he would tell you that were walked on by fairies he did away with all sorts of things no milk or butter taken from cows.
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 11:14
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for the dinner and never would return till she would be married. It used to be called sweeping Tuesday where they would be runaway marriage the people around would bring whiskey and tea and sugar and they would have a dance and music then in later days there were cars to bring home the bride in theses cars were like tables with low wheels and they used to have a mat on it to sit on it, the wedding people used to have them before sidecars came out, they would have dancing and music on them often when there would be marriage on sprite with girls over boys they would bury a sheaf to kill him there is an old woman about four or five years dead who buried a sheaf and killed a man and there was a sheaf buried in Brownestown and the man had to come home from America with bad health. The girl bragged a little and the priest got on
duine anaithnid
2020-03-18 11:09
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