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Transcripts count: 6
  1. Famine Times

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Una Lynch
    Informant
    Mrs P. MArtin

    Tonlagee. They brought food and left it near the shed, so that he would get it, and he got better of the fever. A woman named Mrs. Mcgovern who lived in Tonlagee died from fever. The potatoes decayed in the ground. There were good potatoes the following year. A man came to Pat Dolan's house, Tonlagee in the famine time and he brought the stalks of potatoes with him. He planted them and he had good potatoes the following year. During the famine time, there lived a woman named Mrs. Gott in the townland of Corratillon.
    She went out and begged food for herself and her family. A great number of people lived in this locality before the famine, but, they went

  2. The Local Landlord

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maureen Byrne
    Informant
    Mr M. Byrne

    A man called Thomas MacGovern (deceased) who lived in Tonlagee, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan, and a few other men were once working with a landlord.
    They got no food, and they were hungry.

    One man went to a shop for a loaf of bread for them to eat. When he came back he and the other men went into the house to eat it. While they were eating it, the landlord came in with a gun, and ordered them out, and if they refused, he would shoot them.
    Stories like this are common of landlords not giving food to their employees.

  3. Old Crafts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Roisin Byrne
    Informant
    Mr Michael Byrne
    Informant
    Mrs Michael Byrne

    Candle-Making: Candles were made in this district about forty years ago, but the craft is discontinued now. Candles were made in every house in the district and oil lamps or wax candles were not used at all.
    This is the method by which the candles were made. A number of tall strong rushes were procured and peeled by hand, then they were covered with melted fat, and they were left to dry. When they were throughly dry, they were used.
    They were put in an article called a sconce which was made of iron. Some of these sconces have been unearthed by men digging locally.

    Basket-Making: Several men in this district are famous as basket makers. Mr. John Kelly, of Tonlagee, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan, makes Lossets. Lossets were used very extensively in this

  4. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Roisin Byrne
    Informant
    Mr Michael Byrne
    Informant
    Mr James Mc Govern

    There are many fields, streams, hollows etc, in this district which have names.
    Some of them are named from their natural characteristics or from important incidents which took place in them. The following is a story common in this district. Long ago, when the early colonists came into this country, they had a big battle on the land now owned by Mr. Francis McGovern, Tonlagee, Corlough, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan. The field in which one army pitched their campaign is now called Cnocán na gCampa which means
    '' The little hill of the campus. ''
    It is a pretty field with grass much greener than that in the neighbouring fields.
    Beside it, is the field where the battle was fought.
    It is a grey field covered with large stones which are said to be monuments to the

  5. Crafts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Frank Maguire
    Informant
    Kathleen Kelly

    There was a tailor in the townland of Leitra, he went to the houses and he made the clothes, he had no machine, this man's name was Hugh Darcy.
    He lived about fifty years ago
    There was a shoemaker, he lived in Corraholia, he made very strong shoes, and the people liked his work well. His name was John McGovern he lived about twenty years ago.
    There lived a weaver in Tonlagee about fifty years ago, his name was Patrick Dolan.
    He wove linen and wool.


    Candles were made up to about fifty years ago. The candle was a dried rush dipped in grease or tallow. The candlestick was generally a wooden stick

  6. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Roisin Byrne
    Informant
    Mr Michael Byrne
    Informant
    Mr James Mc Govern

    Páirc, '' '
    ' The Little Meadow, ''
    '' The House Field, ''
    '' The Long Moss Field '' and
    '' The Big Field. ''

    Mr Peter McGovern, Knockmore, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan, owns a field called, '' The Malaidh Buidhe, ''
    which means '' The Yellow Brow. ''
    Mr. Peter McGovern, Teeboy, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan, owns a field called '' the Guirtín, which means,
    '' The little tillage field ''.
    Mr. Hugh Smith, Teeboy, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan has a field called
    '' The Currach '' which means
    boggy or soft ground.
    Mr. Pat Devine, Muineal, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan, has a field called
    '' The Crimay '' the meaning of which is not known.
    Mr. John Darcy, Teeboy, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan, owns a field in Muineal called '' Paratrairly '' the meaning of which is not known.
    A field which Mr. Hugh McGovern, Tonlagee, Bawnboy, owns, is called
    '' Comhgar an Bhóthair '' which means
    '' Near the Road. '' The