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  1. The Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Róisín Byrne
    Informant
    Mr Michael Byrne

    ago there were stepping stones instead of bridges at shallow places on the rivers. There was a pass through the townlands of Teeboy and Drumlougher, (Bawnboy Co. Cavan) called '' The Danes Pass. ''
    It was so-called because the Danes marched by that route when they were in Ireland. The pass itself is not visible now - but some old people can point out the places that it passed through.

  2. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Roisin Byrne
    Informant
    Mr Michael Byrne
    Informant
    Mr James Mc Govern

    Páirc, '' '
    ' The Little Meadow, ''
    '' The House Field, ''
    '' The Long Moss Field '' and
    '' The Big Field. ''

    Mr Peter McGovern, Knockmore, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan, owns a field called, '' The Malaidh Buidhe, ''
    which means '' The Yellow Brow. ''
    Mr. Peter McGovern, Teeboy, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan, owns a field called '' the Guirtín, which means,
    '' The little tillage field ''.
    Mr. Hugh Smith, Teeboy, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan has a field called
    '' The Currach '' which means
    boggy or soft ground.
    Mr. Pat Devine, Muineal, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan, has a field called
    '' The Crimay '' the meaning of which is not known.
    Mr. John Darcy, Teeboy, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan, owns a field in Muineal called '' Paratrairly '' the meaning of which is not known.
    A field which Mr. Hugh McGovern, Tonlagee, Bawnboy, owns, is called
    '' Comhgar an Bhóthair '' which means
    '' Near the Road. '' The

  3. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Róisín Byrne
    Informant
    Mr Michael Byrne

    My home is situated in the townland of Muineal, Parish of Corlough, and Barony of Tullyhaw. There are six families in the townland, and thirty one people living in it, that is an average of five in each family. The family names are; Devine, Byrne, McGovern and Prior. McGovern is the most common family name. Three of the houses in the townland are thatched and three are slated. The townland's name Muinéal is an Irish word which means a neck. When looked at on a map, it seems like a neck, of the townland of Teeboy. That is how it got it's name. Mr. and Mrs. Pat Devine are probably the oldest inhabitants of the townland. Mr. Pat Devine is over seventy years of age, and is in receipt of an Old Age Pension

  4. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Roisin Byrne
    Informant
    Mr Michael Byrne
    Informant
    Mr James Mc Govern

    The soldier built a big house and used yellow sand in it construction, and the local people who were Irish, then called the townland, ''Tigh Buidhe ''
    The townland was previously called,
    ''Achadh Dhruim-Dheirg '' which meant;
    '' The field of the red back. ''
    There is a field in the townland which has a red appearance, and that is the reason the townland was so called. The field is now owned by Mr. Hugh Smith, Teeboy, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan.

    Mr. Francis Byrne, Teeboy, Bawnboy owns fields which are called;
    '' The Móinín Ruadh, '' and
    ''Achadh Deas '' which mean respectively;
    '' The little red bog '' and
    '' The Pretty Field. ''
    He owns fields which are called
    '' The béitín, and ''the
    '' Cúl Gearr, '' which mean;
    '' The dry or burnt ground '' and
    '' The Short Back ''. He also owns fields which are called;
    '' The Wheat

  5. Hedge-Schools

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Frances Martin
    Informant
    Mrs Martin

    In the townland of Teeboy near the place where Hugh Smith's house is now there was an old hedge-school. The teacher was called Thomas Smith.

    The children paid him by bringing him his food, tobacco, and other necessaries. Each child on his turn, brought the teacher home with him for his night's lodging. The school was held in a sheltered place behind a ditch. The ditch served as a back wall, and a mud wall was built on each side of that. The pupils probably sat on the floor.
    In Leitra a school was (built) held in much the same kind of a place, but a man who lived near the place gave the teacher an old barn built of mud, and he and his pupils studied there for years. The name of the teacher is not known now-a-days.

  6. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Roisin Byrne
    Informant
    Mr Michael Byrne
    Informant
    Mr James Mc Govern

    men who fell in the battle and are buried under them. It is said that if the field was dug up, the bones of the dead would be found in it. A stream runs by the battle fields, and touches it on the two sides. The stream is almost choked up by big stones, and there are two stones among them, with old Irish writing on them.
    This is all the information that is available, about the battle in this district. It is not known exactly, what tribes had the battle, but it is known that it took place thousands of years ago. The fields are along the main road from Swanlinbar to Ballinamore.

    There is a townland in this district called Teeboy, '' Tigh Buidhe, '' which means '' yellow house. '' When Cromwell was in Ireland he gave the townland as pay, to a soldier who had served in his army.

  7. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Alice Kate Devine
    Informant
    Mr Pat Devine
    Informant
    Mrs P. Devine
    Age
    58

    There is a fairy fort in this district and it is called by the name '' fort ''. It is situated in the townland of Arderry. There is another fort in view of it called Darraugh Fort. It is round in shape, and there is a fence round it. No one has ever seen lights at it, or there was never any music heard in it. One night about 12 o' clock there was a band heard coming to it. They were heard laughing and singing and when they came to the fort all of a sudden all stopped.

    Mr. Thomas McGovern, Teeboy, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan used to tell a story that his father told him. One day he was sitting by the fire when a little man came in, dressed in red. He had a cake under his arm and two books,

  8. Local Poets and Songs

    The Tossing of Swanlinbar Chapel. You brilliant muse I pray excuse for my intrusion on learnings wing

    Language
    English

    John Dolan, Culliagh, was a good poet. His uncle was also a poet. He made a song called '' The eviction in Ballyleenan.'' He composed in, English and he was a farmer. He could read and write. Some of his songs were sung locally. Pat Plunkett , Cronera, was a good poet.
    He made a song called '' The cots of Teeboy.'' He was also a farmer. Hugh McAveety, Altcrock, was also a poet.
    There were airs put to these songs and they were sung by the local people.

  9. The Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Róisín Byrne
    Informant
    Mr Michael Byrne

    There are some very old roads in this locality. The by-roads are known by the names of the townlands through which they pass.

    The oldest by-road in this locality is Arderry lane. It was made in the Famine period in Ireland, 1846-47 as relief work. Another old by-road is one that leads through the townland of Teeboy. Long ago it was only a foot path, and a cart or side car could not travel on it. In this district there are several short cuts or near ways. They lead through fields to the R.C. Church and from one main road to another. There are two main roads in this district, one leads from the town of Swanlinbar to Ballinamore and the other leads from, Corlough to Glengevlin. Long

  10. Stories of Leipreachans and Mermaids

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maureen Byrne
    Informant
    Mr M. Byrne

    2nd Story.

    Once, Mr John Dolan (deceased) Teeboy, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan was passing Arderry Fort, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan, late at night, and a live coal rolled down the fort to him, and he lit his pipe with it.
    The local name for the Leipreachan in this district is a '' geanncanach. ''
    He lives in a fort and is usually dressed in

  11. Local Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Roisin Byrne
    Informant
    Mr Michael Byrne
    Informant
    Mr James Mc Govern

    name suits it, because it is along the main road.

    Mr. Francis Reilly, Culliagh, Bawnboy, owns a field called, '' The Kiln Park, ''
    which probably means, a field in which a lime kiln was situated.
    Mr. Pat Byrne, Teeboy, Bawnboy, has a field called '' The Bleach Yard, ''
    because linen was formerly bleached there-it is beside Lough Bunerky.

  12. Historical Tradition

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mollie Mc Govern
    Informant
    Mrs James Mc Govern

    a fair in Swanlinbar, at night. He sat down on a ditch near Crocán na gCampa to rest. He began to sing aloud and he heard a crowd of people clapping their hands, when he finished.
    There is a pass through Teeboy and Drumlougher, Bawnboy Co. Cavan called
    '' The Danes Pass. ''
    It is thought that the Danes marched that way.
    There are Ogham stones at Crocán na gCampa.
    Once the protestants were going to burn Swanlinbar .R. C. Church.
    The people came from miles around on the day that the Church was to be burned. They were armed with pitchforks, grapes and big sticks. Then they

  13. Clothes Made Locally

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Róisín Byrne
    Informant
    Mr Michael Byrne

    preserved in the parish yet.

    There is a field in this parish (Corlough) owned by Mr.Pat Byrne,
    Teeboy, called '' The Bleach Yard, ''
    because linen (made from flax) was formerly bleached there. Socks and stockings are knit locally, from wool bought in shops. In the mountainous district of this parish, wool is spun and dyed and knitted into socks, stockings, scarves, and gloves.
    The dyes that are used are home made vegetable dyes. Some people use '' moss '' that grows on old stones, for dyeing wool also.
    Some people sell socks and stockings which they have knit.
    There are some spinning wheels in old houses in the parish still. At the death of a relative people usually wear black clothes at a wedding they wear their best clothes.