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Transcripts count: 137
  1. (no title)

    On May Eve all the old people pulled branches off the rowan tree and hung it over each cows head before sunset, and the old people believed that no butter could be taken from them when that was done.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Miceál Ó Uiginn
    Informant
    (name not given)

    On May Eve all the old people pulled branches off the rowan tree and hung it

  2. An Old Story - Local Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Jennie Mayclim

    One night a man was going by the Rowan tree at Currac Finne (Silverstream) when he heard something growling. He went over to the Rowan tree and a voice said "Gurr, Gurr". He went closer. Now there was a stream at the other side of the Rowan tree, but the man did not know this. The fairy crossed to the other side of the stream and the man ran after it. He fell into the deep stream and he could hear something saying "Take that! Take that!". He saved himself from getting drowned. He thought the voice must belong to a fairy but he said nothing. The fairy said "Speak" and the man said "Why?" and caught hold of it. It said "Don't drown me" and the man got so scared that he dropped the fairy into the stream and it got drowned, but the man died before he got home because there was "Bad Luck" in the Fairy.

  3. Herbs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Peter Pryal
    Informant
    Michael Pryal
    Age
    30

    used for dyeing clothes. The berries that grow on a Rowan tree are poison

  4. (no title)

    One time when Bernard Doherty, a native of Glack, was a boy his father had a field up in the Sheese.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Tighe
    Informant
    Phillip Kearney
    Age
    60

    One time when Bernard Doherty, a native of Glack, was a boy his father had a field up in the Sheese. One year a man named Duggan, a native of Glenagannon bought this field for hay. There was a rowan tree growing in this field. Duggan cut the hay and left it lying there. The people of the Buildings were short of fodder. So Duggan told them to take some the hay. One day they all went into the field to where the rowan tree was growing. They lifted a fistful of hay and as they lifted a fistful of stones began to fall from the tree and stoned them till it left them out of

  5. The Rowan Tree

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr John Kee
    Age
    circa 50
    Occupation
    farmer

    It is unlucky to make a cow's stake out of the rowan tree. She would be hanged in the morning.
    Long ago when a cow would calve the people used to get the tops of the rowan tree and mix them in her first drink and give it to her in the name of the Trinity.

    (Told by Mr John Kee (Farmer) of Meenagrave, Welchtown. Age 50 (?))
    ____________
    It is wrong to bury an horse with the shoes on.

  6. Fairy Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Brigid Logue
    Informant
    Mr John Logue

    Long long ago a man was coming from visiting his neighbour. Just as he was coming by a rock at the side of a large field he heard a very loud noise near this rock. When he came towards it there was crowds of fairies dancing round this rock. When this man was passing the rock he was much afraid but he passed on without the fairies doing him any harm. A few months after this he was coming by the same rock with his little son. The fairies were dancing just as they were the other night. They passed by without being the least afraid. Just when they were a few yards by the rock two sly fairies went after them and took the little boy from his father. The father was so much afraid that he ran home very quickly. He came back the next day to see if he could find the little boy, but he could not find them. It was said that the fairies killed the little boy and buried him just beside this rock and upon his grave there grew a rowan tree. This tree is called "Little Neds Rowan Tree", because Ned was the name of the little boy who was buried there.

  7. Superstitions - Trees

    Language
    English

    Rowan Tree is one of the many trees which is unlucky to cut. Nobody would cut-a Rowan Tree, because it is a very gentle tree.
    It is also very unlucky to pull hawthorns-sign of a death. The Black Thorn bush is a very gentle bush too and it is very unlucky for the person who cuts it.
    The person who cuts a Hazel Tree is supposed to become bald during the night.

  8. (no title)

    On the shore of Lough_I_Ae there is a rowan tree growing and there's a por of gold anunther it.

    Language
    English

    On the shore of Lough-I-Ac there is a rowan tree growing and there's a pot of gold anuther it. A man from this quarter land went to the ould Friary to Mass. He was late for the first Mass and sat down to wait for the next. There wasn't any wan there but himself. Then a tall man walked up to him and asked him would he like to get money "Of course I would", says he.
    "Very well," says the stranger. "Next Sunday dont come to Mass at all but go up the mountain to Louggh-I-Ac. Take a hatchet on your shoulder and wehn its time for the Consecration of the Mass cut the rowan tree, then turn and run down the mountain without looking back. If you're lucky enough to reach home without being overtaken by a strange man you can go back and lift the gold"
    The following Sunday the man did as he was advised but on reaching the tree his courage failed and he instead of wating to

  9. The Care of Our Farm Animals

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mamie Kierans
    Informant
    Mrs Began

    The farm animals are, cows, calves, sheep, goats, asses. Some men had horses as there were no trains. Horses had to take their places. The usual names for the cows were "Moilie, Mast dubh, Mast buidhe, Mast bán." When driving in or out some people would say "How" but the commonest was "te". Others would think they were not in right till they would say "how up there". People would say to the calves "sucky" when calling them to their drink. The cow house was a small house, and the cow lay on a clay floor. It was called the byre. They were tied to a stake and a ring of woodbine and bound round the neck by a tow - rope or hay - rope or straw - rope but very seldom a chain. These ropes were made at home by the old women. The various names for tying the cows were spanchel side langle, and tether. A branch of the rowan tree was often hung in the byre to bring luck to the stock. Some people would sew a branch of the rowan - tree, a red rag, and a nail out of a horses shoe, in the cows tail to keep anyone from overlooking the cow. The old people never sang when milking the cows

  10. Feasts

    Language
    English

    On New Years day the people of Our District keep up the old custom of not throwing out water on that day, and of not putting out the ashes, and of not sweeping out the floor.

    On the night before the first of May, the children gather May-flowers and put them at the wells the door of the stable the barn the byre the the hayshed and the hen-house and at every door in the dwelling house. You are not to go into the house when you are throwing it at the doors. Also they put rowan-tree at every door, and whatever is left of the rowan tree they put it up the chimney and the fire is lit with it in the morning.

  11. Local Place Names

    Language
    Mixed
    Collector
    Tessie Bonner
    Informant
    Neil Browne

    the orchard. Páirc Crann Casran, the field of the rowan tree. Léana na gcasrach, the sheep's lee. Cliabaide, a Gharrags. the short ridges. Beinn gorm, the blue bing Páirc Bán, the lee field.

  12. (no title)

    About five years ago a man named Neil Doherty who lived in Glack, in the parish of Carndonagh had some land in the "Buildings" and a man named Mr Doogen bought it with the intention of growing hay.

    Language
    English

    told them to take some out of the field. One day they went down for a burden of hay but as they were about to lift it, something began to throw stones from a "rowan" tree which was growing nearby. They ran home as fast as they could, and the people said that it must have been the fairies that threw them and it is said that the tree was gentle.

  13. A Fairy Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Catherine Logue
    Informant
    Mr J. Logue

    Once upon a time a man went out to quarry stones never thinking that anything would happen to him. There was a rowan tree growing beside the quarry. He did not know it belonged to the fairies. He quarried the stones and cut down the bush. He was safe enough until next morning and when he arose out of his bed he was very much troubled when he saw there was no hair on his head.

  14. Animals of the Farm

    Language
    English
    Informant
    John Burke

    On May day also the people pulled nine branches of a "cioran" tree or rowan tree and throw one of them away and put the other ones up in the rafters of the cow-house. The people did that because it was said that there would be luck on their cows and calves for the next twelve months.

  15. Festivals

    Language
    English

    There are many festival customs with regards to May day.
    It is said if you rise early on May morning you will be fit to rise early all the the rest of the year round. Some people put May flowers outside their dwelling house door on May eve to keep the fairies away.
    Other people tie a branch of a rowan tree to a cow's tail on May eve and they also put a branch of a rowan tree in the byre.
    If you was your face in the dew on May morning you are supposed to have a good complexion that year.
    Who ever goes to a spring well first on a May morning with a milking vessel brings luck to their stock. If the wind is South on May eve and on May morning it is supposed to be a good grass

  16. A Story

    Fairy tales are common in this district but nearly every person has them in different ways.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Annie Mc Laughlin
    Informant
    Mrs Brigid Duffy
    Age
    86

    A Story.
    Fairy tales are common in this district, but nearly every person has them in different ways.
    For instance the fairy tree in Croagh is the principal one which is talked about in this district.
    In the face of Croagh near to the giant's grave stands a rowan tree.
    It is about fifteen feet in height, and about ninety years of age. It is crooked for about twelve feet and the remaining three are straight, and it also hangs down over a rock called the "Rowan tree rock".
    This tree is supposed to be frequented by fairies.

  17. (no title)

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Frainc de Paor
    Informant
    Patrick Cusack
    Age
    69

    A child who never saw his father would have a cure for a sore mouth. He should blow nine times on the sore place.
    Rub leaf of rowan tree in a hurt and leave it there. When the leaf withered the hurt will be cured.

  18. Fairy Stories

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Monica Cavanagh
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Cavanagh
    Age
    55

    in Buildings, Carndonagh. A man named Mr. Doogan bought it to grow hay. When the hay was saved there came a great snow storm and the people of the Buildings had not any turnips or hay in for heir cattle. Their own fields of turnips were far away and they asked Mr. Doogan for the loan of some hay until the snow would melt. He told them to take some out of the field. One day they went down for a burden of hay but as soon as they began to lift it something began throwing stones from a 'rowan tree' which was growing near by. They became very much frightened and ran home as fast as they could. They said it must have been the fairies who threw them as they always heard that tree was 'gentle'.

  19. (no title)

    In a place called Drim in the parish of Culdaff, County Donegal, there was a rowan tree growing about fourty years ago.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Susan Farren
    Informant
    John Farren
    Age
    74

    In a place called Drim, in the parish of Culdaff, County Donegal, there as a rowan-tree growing about forty years ago, and it was supposed to be unlucky to interfere with it. A man named Charles Hegarty wanted to cut it, and he got a hatchet from a man named William Doherty. He cut down the tree, but William Doherty would not take back the hatchet again, and so he buried it. The next morning, when Charles awoke, he put up his hand to rub his head, as he was in the habit of doing, and he found that the top of his head was bare. He looked beside him on the pillow and there, he saw all his hair lying.