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Transcripts count: 21
  1. A Fairy Rath

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maurice Donohue
    Informant
    Thomas Doran

    Long ago there was a boy living in Rathanna named Pat Ryan. There was a rath near his house, in Murphys field. The boy was in the field, and he saw a flock of geese rise out of the rath, and they flew across a couple of fields, and lighted in Nolans rath. A blaze of fire rose from Nolans rath, and flew to Murphs rath, and they were never heard of again, but it is said that there were bushes cut around the rath, and they were burned when the flame came to the rath.

  2. Local Heroes

    Language
    English
    Collector
    M. Roche
    Informant
    Mr Binney
    Age
    70

    Fifty years ago there lived in Tullow a man & his wife named Dick & Rose Foley. They earned their living by watering flowers which were at that time on the top windows of most of the houses in Tullow. They lived in the town hall. Late in life they left for England where they died. They were each 10' in height

  3. Severe Weather

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bridie Hayden
    Informant
    Mrs Scarff
    Age
    70
    Occupation
    farmer

    of corn on Patrick Hayden and there was only one sheaf of it got about a mile distant. The wind rose some where about Wexford. It came through Kilkenny. A man looked out of the window and saw a big black thing go through the street making an awful noise. The devil was supposed to be in the wind. It knocked a piece off the Black Castle in Carlow.

  4. (no title)

    Once upon a time there lived a man named Finn McCool.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Richard Dreelan
    Age
    13
    Occupation
    farmer
    Informant
    Richard Dreelan
    Age
    55

    Once upon a time there lived a man named Finn Mc Cool. One day he was hunting on the Blackstairs mountain. When he got to the top of it his dog rose a deer. And chased him. Everyplace the dog sprang to Finn put a brand. One brand is called Bran Mor, and the next is called Bran Beag, the next is called The Split Brand, and the next is called. These big brands are still to be seen on that mountain

  5. Herbs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Josie Fanning
    Informant
    Mrs Fanning

    dyeing linen.

    In the olden times the people made linen from flax and they dyed it with the dye they made from the ferns. A pain in the stomach was cured with the juce of a prime rose. The Calvary weed is called this because there is a drop of blood on each leaf.

  6. Cures

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Nan Kenny
    Informant
    Hal Kenny
    Age
    50

    Water that a blacksmith uses to cool irons cures Chilblains. Castor oil heated cures a pain in your ear. Black sulphur and lard cures ringworms. Bran and vinegar cures a sprain. Blue cures a sting of a wasp. Salt and water cures gum boils. Glycerine and rose water cures chapped hands. Flour and whiskey cures arraciplus (erysipelas). Sweet oil and wax candle cures scald. An ivy leaf cures corns. Onion water cures boils.

  7. A Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Annie Byrne
    Informant
    Peter Byrne
    Age
    50

    One night an old woman was sitting at the fire. Some men were after going in to talk to her. There was an old face of a clock hanging on the wall. This clock never had gone for years. It came on for one o'clock and at one o'clock all of a sudden the clock struck one. The old woman rose up and said Pat is dead. Pat was her grandson who lived in Dublin. She also said that she knew when the clock would strike one it was a sign that Pat was dead. The next day she got word that Pat had died the night before at one o'clock. One of the men that heard the clock still lives in Hacketstown.

  8. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary-Kate Doran

    I live in Coonogue. It is in the Parish of Borris and in the barony of St. Mullins. The population of Coonogue are 56 people in 14 houses. There is one thatched house in it. There is a place in it called "Knock-Na-Moile. There are two old people living in Coonogue, their names are Michael Dreelan and Mrs Redmond. Many people went to America and Australia. There is no name most common in it. The old people dont know Irish but they can tell English stories. There are many bogs in Coonogue. We are living near the mountain. There is a river flowing through Coonogue and Knockroe the name of it is the Aughnabrisky river. There is a place on the road called Roses twas a man named Rose owned that land. There is an old ruins in Coonogue, a woman named Ellen Gormly lived in it. Some people from Coonogue went to America and Austriala. There is a wood in Coonogue

  9. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Richard Gladney
    Informant
    Michael Carroll
    Age
    72

    In Mr Odlum's field in St Mullins there is an old rath. It is circular shaped and there is a big hollow in the middle. Bushes grow around it and there is a path leading through the bushes into the centre of the rath. There is a story connected with it. One night three boys were going to steal apples.
    As they were passing the rath a woman dressed in white rose up out of the rath and waved her hands. The three boys ran back and when one of them reached his own house he fainted. There is a rath in Drummond wood. One evening a woman named Mrs Connor was gathering sticks near the rath. She saw a lame hare which she followed but every time she would put down her hand to catch the hare he would run from her. The hare led her to the rath in Drummond wood and the fairies kept her there for three days.

  10. At Par

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Patrick Maher
    Age
    circa 80

    did you make all your money. It was a great achievemen" "No harm at all" say Walsh "you see I bought stock at less than par & afterwards sold at a big profit." "What's that"? says the master. "What's what"? says Walsh. "That thing par" says the Master. "Go on" says Walsh "do you mean to say you don't know what par is." "I don't" says the master, "what is it?" "Well, to tell you the truth" says Walsh "I don't know myself".
    That evening the master explained what Par was & how he had caught out the supposed learned Walsh. His prestige rose to even greater heights.

  11. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Carmel Graham
    Informant
    Mr Thomas Graham

    this district are Christmas Day, St. Stephens Day, New Years Day, St Patrick's Day, SS. Peter and Paul's Day, All Saints Day, Easter Sunday, Whit Sunday, Whit Monday and Shrove Tuesday.
    Christmas Day falls on the 25th of December each year. It is a very beautiful feast. It was on that day that Our Lord was born. St. Stephens Day is on the 26th of December. On that day boys dress up and go out following the wren. St. Patricks Day falls on the 17th of March. It was St. Patrick that brought the true faith to Ireland. All Saint's Day falls on the 1st of November. This is kept in honour of All Saints. It was on Easter Sunday that Our Lord rose from the dead.

  12. A Haunted House in Ratheen

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Lizzie Curran
    Age
    11
    Informant
    (name not given)

    About five years ago (when) my mother was working at Pollards of Ratheen. This place is about three miles from Tobinstown school. My mother and Mrs Pollard were sitting together sewing at the table. Mr Pollard was gone to bed. A big black dog appeared in the kitchen and went in under the table where they were sewing. Mrs Pollard stood up to put it out but it ran to the parlour.
    Mrs Pollard went to hit it with a stick but it rose up in the air in a blaze of fire and went out through the window which was closed.
    When she went up to bed she was telling her husband about it, and he said that he had often seen the same dog go in a blaze of fire before she came to live with him. My mother told me this story last night.

  13. Stories - T. Fitzpatrick's Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Molly King

    An old couple, Johnny and Biddy were seated at the fire one winter night when Johnny said "I wish we had a pot of puddings boiling on the fire". Biddy said "I wish we had".
    Just then a fairy popped out of the fire and said to the astonished pair "I shall grant you three wishes". "Oh" said Biddy "I wish there was a pot of puddings boiling on the fire". Immediately the pot filled with puddings appeared over the fire. Johnny disgusted with his wife when she did not ask for money or jewels, said irritabity: "I wish one of the puddings would stick to your nose".
    A pudding flew out of the pot and stuck on end to Biddy's nose.
    Then Biddy, vexed in turn, exclaimed "I wish the other end of the pudding would stick to your nose" and lo! the free end rose and stuck on Johnny's nose.
    Your three wishes are now granted" said the fairy and he

  14. Local Happenings - The Flood

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Máire Ní Coisgle
    Informant
    Mr Costello

    Local Happenings,

    The Flood.
    In the year 1933 there was a great flood in Leighlinbridge, owing to a heavy fall of snow which we had. When the snow melted away, the flood rose, and all Main Street was flooded. The shop-keepers had to take everything out of the shops, and go upstairs and take food and everything else with them.
    The flood lasted about a week and to our great delight we got a week from school. It then began to go back, and after a while there was no water to be seen at all.
    The people were then very glad

  15. An Old and True Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bridie Hayden
    Informant
    Miss Katie Mc Donald
    Age
    60
    Occupation
    farmer

    An Old and True Story

    A woman by the name of Peg Croke lived in a place called the Yellow Lough between Goresbridge and Gowran. She used to sell milk but always put an over-dose of water in it.
    When she died her ghost was constantly seen at a stile holding a pail. If any person passed by at night she would strike them with the pail saying "what will I do or where will I go?" so few people would venture after night fall.
    One night a man named Paddy Magee was down in Goresbridge visiting and it was far into the night when he rose to go. His friends, on thinking of the haunted stile, pressed him to remain for the night. "Begonies" said Paddy, "the woman will do me no harm, neither will I harm her"
    He bade his friends good bye and set out on his journey. When he came to the place the

  16. Potato Crop

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Sarah Jane Tutty
    Informant
    Mrs Lawrence

    Preparation of the ground.
    The ground is first ploughed the length of the (ground) field. It is then left for abut a fortnight to let the sod decay. After that it is harrowed. Immediately after that it is cross ploughed and it is harrowed again.
    Then the weeds and sods are gathered off and put in a heap and burned. After that the ground is grubbed with a grubbed. Then the stones are gathered and put into carts and drawn away. After that it is harrowed and cross harrowed. If the soil is fine enough the drills are opened.
    The preparation of the seed.
    The people sow Kerr's Pinks, Aran Banners, Aran Victors, Champions,Champion Success, Early rose, Skerry Blues, Epicures. The potatoes are cut with a knife into two or three parts. There has to be an eye in every part. The seed potatoes are cut in the month of March. They are (pull) put into heaps, and dry earth is sprinkled over them. Some people potatoes are used for seed, they are not cut the same as the big ones. They are planted

  17. Games We Play

    Language
    English

    All out but you.

    5. Hickety Pickety ice a lickety
    Bum sa larey jig.
    Every man that has no hair.
    Generally wears a wig
    Out goes hickety pickety ice a lickety
    Bumsa larey jig.
    6. Hobbina bobbin a baby's knee
    Holsum polsum sacred tee.
    Potatoe rose and single toes.
    And out goes she.

  18. The Games We Play

    Language
    English
    Informant
    schoolchildren

    Generally wears a wig
    But goes hickety pickety ice a lickety
    Bumsa Care jig

    6.) Holina bobin a baby's knee
    Holsum polsum sacred tea
    Potato rose and single toes
    And out goes she
    The foregoing rhymes are used to find out who is to be "after" - the pursuer - in running games.
    We have other rhymes for different games:
    1) Ring a ring a rosey
    Pocket full of posey
    Ha, ha, ha, ha,
    All fall down

  19. A Song

    It being in the blooming Summer time when meadows they were in their prime

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patricia Flynn
    Informant
    Mrs M. O' Leary
    Age
    76

    Could he a moment but caress,
    And through life's journey still possess.
    The blooming flower of Grange.

    III
    Her amber locks in ringlets thick
    Flowed freely round her snow-white neck
    The rose that bloomed upon her cheeks.
    No Winter winds could change.
    In sudden raptures of delight,
    I did approach this beauty bright.
    My heart was caught by the first sight,
    Of the blooming flower of Grange.
    IV
    Said I, my blooming celestial fair,
    Of your affections with me you'll share,
    I solemnly now do declare,
    your state I wish to change
    While life shall animate this breast,
    I'll love respect & do my best,
    To keep your gent;e mind at rest.
    Sweet blooming flower of Grange.