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  1. A Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Gallagher
    Informant
    Miss Honour Gallagher
    Age
    72

    At this castle there was a grand flower garden when he saw the roses he [?] thought of the rose that his daughter Beauty told him to bring to her. When he pulled the rose a great wild beast attacked him for pulling the rose. Then he explained to him how his daughter Beauty told him to bring her a rose. The beast then told him to bring the rose and he gave him a horse to bring him home and he told himself and Beauty and to come back again that day week and that the horse would land at the door for them. When his daughters saw him coming they were overjoyed because they were afraid he would go astray. Well he said poor Beauty you put me to great trouble for the rose and she screamed o why father and he said when I had the rose

  2. Cures

    Language
    Mixed
    Collector
    P. Mac Giolla Choinnigh

    goes through certain rites with it. This then brought home and rubbed to the effected part on the above mentioned days. While rubbing you must say " In honour of St Rose that cures t
    he rose" The red swelling or blind boil is called "The Rose" and therefore the disease is called the Rose. The suffering person must be told to get the cure made, otherwise it will not work. For example, If a man thinks he has the Rose he cannot go to get the cure until someone tells him that the swelling is like the Rose and that he should get the cure made. People should be very careful about calling ordinary swelling or boils the Rose, in fact the word should be used very sparingly, and the disease and its cure should seldom be spoken of, The cure is transferred from man to woman or woman to man eg. The cure cannot be given from man to man or woman to woman.
    Cure
    A Rú, a Rú, a ratha rua, bíodach cruadha, cruadha a rua Colm Culle fisis slán. Make groups of the butter and say this prayer over it 3 times without drawing your breath. Then say 9 Our Father's. 9 Hail Mary's and the apolles Creed over, and this glona once in honour of the sts. that left the cure after them.

  3. Sir Samuel O’Malley

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Ena Ní Cheallaigh
    Informant
    Martin Mannion

    school, of about one hundred and eighty acres. On this estate he built a mansion, on the top of Gob-Ruadh. he called the place Rose Hill, why we don't know except it sounded nince and smelled as sweet, but certainly there are no Roses growing on Rose Hill now, except the dog roses. The House he called Rose-Hill Court. He wished to build he Court on the hill so that he could view blew Bay and Clare Island, every day of his life. He went to live there but on the first night a great storm arose and swept the roof away. It is said that the spirits of Grainne and all the cleann O Malley. Who had lived, and worked, and fought, and died for old Ireland, rose up from their graves in Clare Island in anger at the evil deeds of Sir Samuel, and swept across blew Bay in fury and left Rose Hill Court with out a slate.
    This did not daunt Sir Samuel

  4. Cures - The Cure for Mumps

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Rose Boland
    Informant
    Mrs Doherty

    When a man and woman bearing the same name marry, every child of that couple can cure mumps. This Rose Boland's grannie is Mrs Rose Doherty of Meenglass. Mrs Dohertys maiden name was Rose Tonner, and both of her parents were Tonner i.e. Rose Boland's great grandmother's maiden name was Tonner even before she married her husband John Tonner. On that account Rose Boland's grannie cures mumps.
    The curer puts a halter on the sick persons head and then leads him across a burn ( a steam) separating two town lands and then leads him back. This is done once a day for three days in succession. The curer prays - Mrs Doherty is now very still but she cures people still. Instead of leading the patient she holds on to the reins and the person walks over and back alone.

  5. Fairies

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eibhlín Ní Ailledéa
    Occupation
    múinteoir
    Informant
    John Robinson
    Age
    68
    Occupation
    múinteoir

    There is a fort near Killimor called lis-a-Rose of Rose's fort. The tradition concerning the fort is the territory round belonged to the O'Madden and Miss Rose O'Madden was walking near the fort one day, accompanied by her favourite little dog. The dog strayed into the fort and disappeared, Rose, in her search for the dog, went in also, fell into the hands of the fairies and was never seen afterwards.
    The shadowy form of Rose O'Madden is still seen near the fort, but she disappears when anyone approaches.
    Long ago close to the Loughrea Road, near the village, there lived a woman named Dillon. One night she was up late attending whet household duties, the rest of the family having retired, Suddenly a large party of fairies came in took the spinning whul and spun a large web of flannel.

  6. A Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maura Flynn

    magic forest. Rose said to the cat "I suppose you are hungry I wish I had some milk for you." Now whether the lucky black cat brough the magic with him or wither it had always been a magic forest, Rose did not know and looking down she seen a large saucer of milk beside her, then she said I wish I had a glass of milk and meat for myself two. At that moment the old step mother came to the she said in an angry voice who are you taking to and she looked down and she seen the meat and the milk. She said to Rose where did all the come from and she made a grab at it. But before she could touch it, it vanished. Then she seen the little cat she took her broom to drive it away. But Rose seeing that her other wishes came through she wish very quickly and the door closed with a bang and the old woman could not move. The little Kitten said I wish I could get as big as a pony and I would carry you away. At that moment he grew, and they set of for the palace When they were at the end of the forest Rose fell on to the

  7. The King that Couldn't Smile

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Mc Queeney
    Informant
    Joe Mc Queeney

    come back with something, but he did not smile. There was great welcome for the boy and when he showed the red rose he had brought back the queen was disappointed. But still she said that she would show it to the king. but he did not laugh, and after a while the queen let the red rose fell it turned into a lovely maiden and when the king saw her he started to smile.The maiden walked over to the king and she said that she was turned in the rose by a witch who met her while she was walking and whoever found the rose would have to marry her. The boy was presented with bags of gold and the old

  8. Cures - The Rose

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary A. Gallagher
    Informant
    Pat Gallagher
    Age
    53

    An inflamation of the skin or sore swelling having a very red appearance is said to be the Rose. There are many cures but the traditional cure is never made until some one "evens" Rose to it. A man named John Flynn makes the cure on Mondays and Thursdays. It must be made before twelve noon. It is said that the Rose will not be

  9. Flowers

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Sweeney
    Age
    13
    Informant
    Mrs P. Jordan

    There are some old people in this district who say that the rose brings happiness with its perfume because the B.V.M. hung the little frocks of Jesus to dry on the rose bushes. It is also believed that wherever the B.V.M. walked a rose sprang up.

  10. Local Cures

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Freddie Finlay

    The "Rose" is cured by the rose water. The rose water is found very often in boggy land. It is called the rose because it swells up like a red rose. A boy and a girl must got for the water, between five and six o'clock in the morning. Once they go into field, where the well is, they must not speak. The boy must hold the girl's hand while she stoops to lift the water. When the water is lifted, they kneel down and say prayers for the person infected. The poultice is made boiling the water and putting it on the place infected.
    The goose-seam is the cure of the sprain. It is rubbed on for about (fire) five minutes, and then bandaged with a cloth.
    When rashes come on people's faces, they put fasting spits on them for nine mornings in succession and on the ninth morning the rashes are cured.

  11. Legends

    Language
    English

    spring rose again.

  12. Funny Stories

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Rose Murphy

    Long ago there lived in Corr a woman named Rose Cunningham. There lived on the other side of the road an old man named Johnny McGrath. He was a very rough sort of a man. One day when Johnny went up to the "High Garden" as he called it, he found some of Rose Cunningham's hens in his oats. He drove the hens down to Rose and he said "Keep your old hens out of my High Garden or I will have you in Glasson next Wednesday." Rose was at the door with a bucket in her hand and she ran out after Johnny and shouted "how dare you interfere with my hens you old seabest," and she flung the bucket at him. So there was poor Johnny with the bucket on his head and he could not get it off. A lot of people who were going to the market laughed and shouted at poor Johnny.

  13. Ailments

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Tomás Ó Tónra

    Wildfire The cure for that is to nte your name before it and after it or to rub gold of it.
    Rose
    The cure for the Rose is there is a plant that growes called rose noble. There are certain people that can cure the Rose. They do get the root of the plant and boil it and when it is boiled they do strain the juice out of it and they put tobacco and unsalted butter along with it and make it into an ointment and this ointment will cure the rose.

  14. Old Song

    Make a shirt without a seam,-every noise grows in time

    Language
    English

    Old Song
    Make a shirt without a seam, eery rose grows merry in time. That neer was stitched by the hands of a dame - and it's then you'll be a true lover of mine.
    Get for me an acre of land, every rose grows merry in time. Between the salt water and the sea sand, and it's then you'll be a true lover of mine.
    Plough it all over with a ram's horn, every rose grows merry in time. And sow it again with one grain of corn - and it's then you'll be a true lover of mine.
    Reap it all over with one strap of leather, every rose grows merry in time. And bind it into a peacock's feather, and it's then you'll be a true lover of mine.
    Thrash it again in a mouse hole, every rose grows merry in time. And winnow it in an eggshell, then you'll be a true lover of mine.
    Pick it all up with a cobblers awl - every rose grows merry in time. And bring it to the market where nobody sells - and it's then you'll be a true lover of mine.
    And when you have done and finished your work - every rose grows merry in time. Come back to me and I'll finish your shirt - and it's then you'll be a true lover of mine