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Transcripts count: 165
  1. (no title)

    Long ago the ball was kicked from one townland to another.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Anna Caplice
    Informant
    Mr John Caplice
    Age
    52

    The hurleys were made of very kind of wood.
    Michael Myers, Graigue, Thomas Caplice Cullenagh and John Coughlan Oldcastletown (all in Kildorrery, Co Cork) were famous on the local hurling field. Bowling casting and jumping were generally played at Graigue Cross (Kildorrery Co. Cork).
    About fifty years ago a football match was played between Kildorrery, Co. Cork and Labbam Molagga Kildorrery Co. Cork in a field belonging to Mr. Thomas Caplice Cullenagh, Kildorrery, Co. Cork. Thomas Drake Thomas Thornhill and John Coughlan were the most prominent players in the Kildorrery team.

  2. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Margaret Carroll
    Informant
    Mr John Carroll
    Age
    53

    The name of my townland is Ballynoulty parish of Kildorrery barony of Condons and Clongibbons. There are eleven families and fifty four people. Most of the houses are thatched with the exception of two houses which are slated. Two men over seventy live in this district. One of them is John Heffernan Ballynoulty Kildorrery Co Cork, and John Carroll Ballynoulty Kildorrery Co Cork. Houses were more numerous in former times they are now. About one third of the people went to America and other countries after the famine. The land is hilly. A small wood is situated in the lands of Mr Thomas Carroll Ballynoulty Kildorrery Co Cork. It is about four hundred yards long

  3. (no title)

    Young was the name of the landlord of Graigue (Kildorrery Co Cork)...

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Anna Caplice
    Informant
    Mr John Caplice
    Age
    52

    Young was the name of the landlord of Graigue (Kildorrery Co. Cork) Barry of Cullenagh (Kildorrery, Co. Cork) and Kingston of Oldcastletown and Ballysurdane (Kildorrery Co. Cork) Young was landlord from 1840 to 1908. Farms were sometimes sub-divided among members of families on marriage. The tenants were not punished for trivial acts.
    There were two evictions in Ballysurdane Kildorrery Co. Cork at Walsh's and Hennessy's A tree was felled across the road. At Walsh's the people were singing and

  4. The Local Forges

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick Durane
    Informant
    Mr James Durane
    Age
    54

    In the parish of Kildorrery there are three forges. The smiths are Mr. Richard Cross and Mr James O Dea of Kildorrery village, Co Cork and the Walsh family in Farrahy, Kildorrery Co. Cork. Those, in all cases are the descendants of blacksmiths. The roofs of the two forges in Kildorrery are of timber and felt. There is only one fireplace in each forge. The bellows are composed of two light pieces of timber kept together by leather with a pipe projecting on to the hob where the fire is.
    The following implements are used:- Af sledge and a big hammer to shape the iron, a small hammer to put on shoes on horses, an anvil, a rasp, pincers, tongs a punch and a knife. These smiths shoe horses and asses. The two smiths in Kildorrery Co Cork sometimes make ploughs, if they get an order. They also make scufflers, harrows, hoes, heaters, gates and tongs. They also repair ploughs, harrows and mowing machines. The binding of wheels is done in the open.
    The blacksmith, more than any

  5. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    William Fitzgibbon
    Informant
    Mr Michael Fitzgibbon
    Age
    43

    In the lands of Mrs Ellen Hennessy Ballyvisteen, Kildorrery, Co. Cork, there is a liss and one also in the lands of Mrs Helena Clanchy Springvale, Kildorrery, Co. Cork. In the lands of Jack Wallace Oldcastletown Kildorrery Co. Cork there is a liss while another stands on the of Mr Thomas Drake, Oldcastletown Kildorrery Co. Cork. Wallace's liss and Drake's liss could be seen from Hennessy's liss but you could not see Mrs Clanchy's liss from any of them. Drake's liss is round and there is an earth fence all around with a drain containing water outside it. Hennessy's liss is square and has a fence of whitethorn bushes around it. Wallace's liss is the same. Mrs. Clanchy's liss is round.
    The Danes are supposed to have built these lisses for protection. Fairy people were supposed to have lived in them. It is said that a black pig was seen in Wallace's liss. The owners of the land

  6. (no title)

    On Easter Sunday March 31st 1867 Peter Crowley was mortally wounded in Kilclooney Wood, Kildorrery Co. Cork.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Margaret Carroll
    Informant
    Mr John Walsh
    Age
    55

    On Easter Sunday March 31st 1867 Peter Crowley was mortally wounded in Kilclooney Wood, Kildorrery Co Cork. On March 29th Crowley and his comrades slept at Sheedy's of Darragh, Kilfinane, Co Limerick. On March 30th he slept at Patrick Hanley's Kilclooney Kildorrery Co. Cork. Crowley took shelter in the wood. The soldiers, hearing he was in the district surrounded the wood. Crowley was wounded and taken to Hanley's house where he got the priest at nine o'clock. McClure and Kelly were taken prisoners and sent to foreign lands.

    Written by: Margaret Carroll, Ballynoulty Kildorrery Co. Cork

    Information from: Mr John Walsh, Cullenagh Kildorrery Co. Cork. (Age- 55 years)

  7. (no title)

    There are five graveyards in the parish of Kildorrery, Co. Cork.

    Language
    Mixed
    Collector
    Patrick Durane
    Informant
    Mr James Durane
    Age
    54

    There were five graveyards in the parish of Kildorrery Co Cork - Molagga churchyard in the townland of Ahacross, one in the village of Kildorrery, one in Farrahy, one in Rockmills and the Teampuillín in Leaba Molagga. All these except Farrahy contain ruins of churchyards. The Teampuillín, Molagga and Kildorrery churchyards slope towards the south, while Rockmills and Farrahy are partly level.
    There is a graveyard in the townland of Knockanevin, Kildorrery Co Cork, not now used. It was formerly used as a burial ground and later on unbaptised children were buried there. This place is known as the "roilig"
    In the townland known as Killmacalla

  8. (no title)

    Kingston was the name of the landlord in the townland of Oldcastletown.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kitty Kelleher
    Informant
    Mr David O' Keefe
    Age
    73

    Kingston was the name of the landlord in the townland of Oldcastletown, Kildorrery Co. Cork. He was looked on as a very bad man. Evictions took place in some places Michael ORegan, Ballynoe Kildorrery Co. Cork was evicted but after some years (1922) he got back his farm. The evicted people lived in small houses in this locality. Some went to foreign lands and others got back their farms again.
    A battle was fought in Graigue Kildorrery Co. Cork between the tithe collectors and the people of the district.

  9. (no title)

    Long ago the ball was kicked from one townland to another.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Anna Caplice
    Informant
    Mr John Caplice
    Age
    52

    Long ago the ball was kicked from one townland to another. A football was kicked long ago from Graigue (Kildorrery, Co. Cork) townland to Cullenagh townland (Kildorrery, Co. Cork). The ball was the same as now only far bigger. The goal posts consisted of furze bushes.

  10. Local Graveyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Séamus Mac Cárthaig
    Age
    12
    Informant
    Mr Dennis Mac Carthy
    Age
    73

    There are five graveyards in the Kildorrery parish.

    Mologga in the townland of Ahacross and still in use.
    Rockmills in the village of Rockmills contains a church ruin.
    Kildorrery in the village of Kildorrery contains a ruined church.
    Carrigdounan in the townland of Carrigdounan also has a ruin.
    Farrahy graveyard in the townland of Farrahy is about one mile from the village of Kildorrery.
    Rockmills Graveyard
    Rockmills graveyard is at the Kildorrery side of Rockmills. The entrance to this graveyard is by an iron gate. The ruins is at the far left corner of the graveyard. Of the three walls of the nave less than a foot in height remains. There is a tower in good repair. It covers a square shaped piece of ground. There are three doorways in it. Not far above them four

  11. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Margaret Carroll
    Informant
    Mr John Walsh
    Age
    55

    Oldcastletown, Kildorrery, Co. Cork. Before the country got so covered with trees they could be seen from one another. There is another one in the lands of Mr Patrick Dwane, Oldcastletown, Kildorrery, Co. Cork. Another one lies in farm of Mr Michael O Regan Oldcastletown, Kildorrery, Co Cork. All these are surrounded by earth fences on some of which trees grow. The liss in Patrick Noonan's land is surrounded by a bare earth ditch. All these are within view of each other.
    These forts are supposed to be built by the Danes. The reason why they were built is that whenever they were in danger these forts served as a protection. The fences were a great deal than they are now and people were able to signal to each other. Just at the moment Patrick Noonan's fort

  12. A Local Hero

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Joan Lyons
    Informant
    Mr Michael Lyons

    About forty years ago a man lived near the borders of Co. Cork and Co. Limerick by the name of Padneen Fánac. He was a thin hardy fellow that a one would say there was'ent much strength in. He had about an acre of ground and kept a pig and a share of hens. One day Padneen struck out for Kildorrery with his donkey and car for a sack of meal When he went up he fell in a conversation with the shopkeeper about strong men and the heavy weights they lifted. "Be gor says Padneen I'll carry home the sack of meal under my arm"
    Of course the shopkeeper wandered to say that he could bring the meal under his arm so he said if he'd do it that he would give him the meal free and he'd give him three rests between Kildorrery and his own house. So Padneen sat out for the mountain with his sack of meal under his arm and he never rested till he cam to Droichead na [oGabar] about three miles from Kildorrery He rested there for about three minutes and then started off again and took the second rest at Tom Houlihans so he done it with two rests

  13. (no title)

    When a teacher named Mr Hegarty was teaching the people in this district a poor scholar came to get education.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Elizabeth Mc Carthy
    Informant
    Mr Thomas Mc Carthy
    Age
    50

    Mr Hegarty was teaching the people in the district a poor scholar came to get education. His name was John Murphy. He stayed for a week at Mrs Bennetts house Ballysurdane, Kildorrery, Co. Cork. Mr Hegarty was teaching there at the same time but about a week afterwards he left the district and went to some other place. It is said that the poor scholar afterwards became a priest.
    Written by Elizabeth McCarthy, Ballysurdane, KIldorrery, Co, Cork.
    Information obtained from Mr Thomas McCarthy, Ballysurdane, Kildorrery, Co Cork (Age 50 yrs)

  14. The Old Graveyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Anna Caplice
    Informant
    Mr John Caplice
    Age
    52

    There are six graveyards in this parish, (Kildorrery, Co Cork) namely, Farrahy, Molagga, Kildorerry, Carrigdownane and Rockmills and the childrens' burial ground in Carhue, Kildorerry Co Cork. All these graveyards except the latter are still in use. They are all square in shape. there are ruins of churches in all these graveyards except in Farrahy where there is a protestant church which was used up to lately. They are all level except Molagga and Farrahy which slope to the south and east respectively. There is a blessed well in Molagga. There are trees growing around all of them, and there are stone walls around Farrahy Rockmills and Kildorrery graveyards.
    There is a childrens' burial ground on the lands of Michael O'Regan Carhue Kildorrery Co. Cork. The ruins of this graveyard are still to be seen and there are a few headstones in it. In MOlagga there are crosses made of wood, iron marble and limestone. Many people are buried within the ruins in this churchyard. There is no disused graveyard in the parish except the childrens' burial

  15. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Elizabeth Mc Carthy
    Informant
    Thomas Mc Carthy
    Age
    50

    In the lands of Michael Walsh, Kilclooney, Kildorrery, Co. Cork there are two lisses (one in Kilclooney and one in Ballysurdane) which can be seen from one another. There is also one in the lands of James Walsh Ballysurdane which can be seen from either of Michael Walsh's forts A fort is situated in the lands of Patrick Meyers Ballysurdane Kildorrery Co. Cork and one also in the lands of John Hennessy Ballysurdane. These two are in view of each other. They are all round in shape. A fence of earth with trees growing on it surrounds each of the abovementoned forts. In Michael Walsh's liss there is an entrance hole. People say it was the Danes who built these forts. The built them to live in them. The faries were supposed

  16. Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    William Fitzgibbon
    Informant
    Mr Michael Fitzgibbon
    Age
    43

    The people used to cross the rivers over the fords before bridges were built. It is said that there was a woman killed at the cross-roads at the top of the Mountain road in Quitrent, Kildorrery Co. Cork and there is a heap of stones there to mark the spot. Another road leads from the Limerick road eastward to Carroll's Cross in Ballynoulty, Kildorrery Co. Cork. The first part of it from Fleming's house in Cúl a Bheithe Ballyorgan Co. Limerick to Howard's turn which is near Mary Maume's house is known as Billy Adam's boreen. Billy Adam was an old man who lived near Fleming's long ago. Another part near Patrick Donovan's house is called Seán a Tavags hill. The road which connects Carrolls Cross with the New Line

  17. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Elizabeth Mc Carthy
    Informant
    Mr Thomas Mc Carthy
    Age
    50

    The name of my home district is Ballysurdane parish of Kildorrery Co. Cork, and barony of Condon and Clon Gibbons. In this townland there are seven families numbering thirty three people. There are five thatched houses and two slate houses. Three people in this townland are over seventy years. Mrs. Walsh, Mrs Bennett, and Mrs. Kennedy, Ballysurdane Kildorrery, Co. Cork. There were more houses in this district in former times about forty being now in ruins. A lot of people went from this district to America and Australia. There is a song about it called Sweet Ballysurdane. In this district there is good land. The Abha na gCaora river divides Ballysurdane and Knockavevin.