Text search

Transcripts count: 1,745
Back
/ 88 Forward
  1. Fairy Holly

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Barr
    Informant
    Miss Mary O' Donnell

    holly from these trees. The old man told him not to take the holly because it was fairy holly. The boy did not listen, and he gathered the holly, and off he went home. About a month after this occurrence, the boy had to be taken to a lunatic asylum. The people said that the fairies punished him for taking the holly.

  2. Emblems

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary O' Sullivan
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Moynihan
    Age
    75

    Holly + Ivy It is the custom for all people in this locality to decorate the walls of the house with holly and ivy at Christmas This is done in honour of the Birth of Our Lord as an ivy and holly tree were growing outside the stable in which Our Lord was born. The people endeavour to get holly with berries on it but if that is not to be had, holly without berries is used instead. It is said that wherever ivy grew it should not be interfered with because if a person pulls ivy with the intention of destroying it at any time other than Christmas he will get a sore hand. The holly and ivy are

  3. Rudaí go mBíonn Meas Orthu

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Richard Allen
    Informant
    Simon Allen

    All the people put up holly and ivy on Christmas Eve. The put a little branch of holly and ivy at the sides of every picture. Sometimes people get leaves of holly and ivy and put a twine through them all Then they nail the twine to the window in the form of a cross. The reason for putting up holly and ivy is, on the walls of the stable in which Our Lord was born there were holly and ivy growing. So when people see holly and ivy on the walls, it reminds them of the birth of Our Lord. On Christmas Eve and Christmas

  4. Gentle Tree

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Joe Mc Grory
    Informant
    Manus Harkin
    Age
    56

    About a quarter of a mile east side of Aughaclay Chapel, there is a field with a holly tree growing in the middle of it. The owner of this field who did not believe in fairies employed a man to subsoil the land and remove this holly tree. On the night before he was to remove this holly tree he was preparing for bed when a small woman with a red hood came into the house, although the door was closed. She told him not to interfere with this holly tree but to tell his employer to put a high wall to the west side of it. Then he turned to question the woman she was gone; the door was closed all the time. He went next morning and told his employer what he saw and heard and said he would not interfere with this holly-tree no matter what he gave him for doing it, as he was afraid. His employer said he would have to remove the tree next

  5. The custom of decorating our houses dates back to the birth of Our Saviour. When the first day of winter began to get long, the people celebrated the birthday of the sun. It was also the custom at that time for the people to burn big logs of wood on the hearths, and there was a special log called yule log at that time. The word yule itself meant the feast of the Sun. The people also at that time imagined that every greens had a special blessing attached to them and for that reason they were very fond of taking them indoors, and furthermore the plants that had fruit would bless them still more they thought, and for this reason they decorated their houses with holly, ivy, and mistletoe. The Druids used mistletoe at their religious ceremonies every Christmas and used to cut it up in sprigs and divide it among the people, who believed it kept away harm. Nowadays we observe this old custom. There is scarcely any family who does not decorate their houses. Holly is generally used for the purpose of decorating the house. It has a very nice polish and it looks very nice under the chirstmas lights. Ivy is nice mingled with holly at christmas. It does not stand erect like the holly, but droops and is a direct contrast to the holly. The holly or mistletoe it put up on christmas Eve and are not taken down until after the twelve days

  6. Pagan Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Tomás Ó Féicin

    There are many feasts celebrated by the Irish throughout the year. Of these, the one which is considered the greatest is Christmas. There was a pagan custom practised by Druids, hundreds of years before Our Lord was born. The feast they celebrated was called. "The birthday of our sun," and it fell on the 23rd of Dec. They held it on this day, because it was the day after the shortest day in the year, and they knew that the long dark days of winter were over: In olden times, people decorated their houses on the birthday of the sun, as we do now at Christmas. There is scarcely a family that does not decorate the house. Holly is generally used for this purpose, but ivy, laurel, and mistletoe, are also used. Holly containing berries is very much fancied, because it looks very attractive. The Greeks liked holly and ivy, but they preferred holly and mistletoe. They did not like ivy because it had no berries. When there is a very severe Winter it is very difficult to get holly with berries as the birds eat them for food. Holly contains thorny leaves, but sometimes it is to be found without any thorns. In ancient times a great log of wood

  7. (no title)

    If there are dark rays about the sun it is a sign of coming rain.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Frainc de Paor
    Informant
    Owen Kane
    Age
    60

    If you hit a bullock with a holly stick he will take the murrain.

  8. (no title)

    Once there was a man called Pat McKinney living out in Fallask.

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs J. Mc Loughlin

    Once there was a man called Pat McKinney living out in Fallask near Kinnego. One evening he went out to cut a walking stick or two for himself. He looked about for a while but he could not find any that were suitable. At last he came to a holly bush and on this holly bush were growing some nice straight sticks. Pat Knew that the fairies were supposed to live in the spot on which this holly bush was growing

  9. Holly at Christmas

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Noonan
    Occupation
    múinteoir

    Holly with white leaves is in great demand at Christmas. Red-berry holly is liked also. The holly is taken down after January 6th.

  10. The Holly Tree

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Julia Cloonan
    Age
    13
    Informant
    Honoria Cloonan

    Julia Cloonan got this story from her grantmother Honoria Cloonan Clough, Colemanstown, Ballinasloe, Co Galway.
    The Holly Tree
    The old people of this district have an old legend about the holly. It is thought that one evening as St Joseph was returning from work the Blessed Virgin and Our Lord went out to meet him. As he was coming near them a pack of robbers attacked St Joseph but a holly tree that was growing by the waside came forth and stood between St Joseph and the robbers. The robbers knew then that St Joseph was different from other men and so they went their way but as they were passing Our Lord one of them pushed him and he fell in the holly tree. His had when pricked by the thorns of the bush began to bleed and everywhere a drop of his blood fell a red berry appeared. Ever since that time anyone who puts up holly at xmas will never have ill luck in

  11. Folklore

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Michael King
    Informant
    Mr Michael Donlan

    behind and in his hurry he jumped into a bush of holly. The cruel thorns tore his woolly coat and left little spots of blood which on the branches. That was the origin of the red berries that are to be seen in the holly nowadays. Ever since holly is used in connection with Christmas decorations, and the more red berries the better we like it.

  12. Holly

    Language
    English

    The houses are decorated with holly at Xmas. This is a very old custom and it is considered very unlucky for the person who fails to do so. The general belief around here is that he who fails to do so arouses the anger of evil spirits. On Xmas morning it is considered very lucky to bring in a branch of holly to the house and on hanging it on the crook to recite:-
    "Holly, blessed holly ever so green