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  1. Peter Flattery

    Language
    English

    Much of the information in the following pages comes from Peter Flattery ("Old Peter"). He is 82 yrs "going on 83" (1937). He lives in Frederick Str. Clara otherwise known as "The Back Road. This house is low and has an iron roof. It used to be thatched but Peter found thatch too expensive (See P.21) so has it roofed with galvanise "in the war". His house has a wattle chimney + two hawthorn sticks go from the front beam through the wattled part to the back + another hawthorn stick crossed them to hold the crook. Those sticks have been there since Peter remembers, The old rafters were hawthorn also but were changed when new roof was put on. There are three rooms in this house. Its end is to the road and it faces South East. This house did not belong to the Flatterys. Peter's mother owned it, His grandmother Mary Byrne had the lease of it and the little farm rolled round a stick and a piece of cloth sewed round it. It was 300 years old and he remembers it stuck in the roof but it got lost when he was getting the new roof on. He doesn't know at all what happened it. Peter's father + uncles were all shoe makers, proper shoe makers not just cobblers. Peter's father served his time to Joe Geoghagan's father where Joe still lives (See P. 12, also P. 113) Peter worked for years in the Starch House in the factory.

    Peter's nephew, Tommy Flattery, local postman, is a serious student of Local History + is a mine of information on the Subject but I have not consulted him for this book as he is writing a book himself.

  2. (no title)

    There were two men near Tinnerath building a ditch one day. They removed a white Hawthorn that grew in the corner of the field.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Nicholas French
    Informant
    John Doyle
    Age
    72

    There were two men near Tinnerath building a ditch one day. They removed a white hawthorn that grew in the corner of the field. That night one of the men had a thorn in his hand he thought. The farmers wife could see no thorn. They left the ditch alone for a fortnight. The man's hand was very sore all the time. The farmers wife made them go this day and put back the hawthorn and in the morning his hand was as well as ever.

  3. Piseoga

    Language
    Irish
    Collector
    Máirín Ní Ruiseáil
    Informant
    Mrs Mac Sweeny
    Age
    38

    she saw the hawthorn blossom caught ot and threw it out through the window. two days later there was an examination in the school at which her son attended. The son who was a twister always pretended to be sick on examination days but got really ill on the day of this examination. In the evening he was feeling better but at ten o'clock that night he got bad again. Next morning when his mother went up to his room she found him unconscious. A specialist was sent for but he could so nothing for the boy. He died the following morning at eight o'clock. The hawthorn blossom was supposed to have brought ill luck to the house.

  4. Names of Fields and Place Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Ned Kelly
    Informant
    Denis Kelly
    Age
    47

    (1) There is a field called "Ceapóg" in Roveagh. "Ceapóg" means a space that belongs to nobody. It is used for fowl and any cattle that passes by can stay there as long as they like, because one person has as much claim to it as one another.
    (2) There is a field near Roveagh Church called "Paírc beag". It is a long narrow tilled field.
    (3) One of the largest fields in this area is called "Castle rock". There was a Church there one time but only the ruins of it is there now.
    Kate Garvey, Roveagh, Kilcolgan, Co. Galway.
    Told by: Pat Garvey, Roveagh Kilcolgan, Co. Galway. Aged 48 years.
    (4) On the Rhynn river there is a pool called "Poll na seice". Beside the pool there is a white hawthorn bush. A long time ago there came a big flood on the Rhynn river. At a certain point in the river the banks were low and the ground on both banks was low also. On one bank there were three or four black hawthorn busthes. When the flood came it swept away the bushes and flooded the land about the bushes and a pool was made. About a week afterwards a white hawthorn bush was seen growing beside the pool, and then the pool was called "Poll na Seice". The bush is to be seen there yet.

  5. Local Place Names - Slatt

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Teresa Ryan
    Informant
    Thomas Ryan

    of Leix.
    The Monument Bush.
    There is a hawthorn tree near where I live, and it is called the Monument Bush. The old people say that there were three of the Wexfordmen buried under the tree and that the old hawthorn tree is a monument to them. There is another hawthorn tree also called The Monument Bush on the Old Road. A local person wanted to make a real monument out of it. He cut off the branches and the night after he got sick and he is in bed since then.
    Keeffe's Hill.
    There was a battle fought on the hill in seventeen ninty eight. O' Keeffe is the name of the family who own the field.
    Gáirdín na Sídhéog.

  6. One time a man dreamt that at a certain bridge on a certain road there was a pot of gold. The bridge was the bridge of Athlone and the man was a Mayo man. He dreamt of it three nights and he set out for the bridge of Athlone the fourth day. When he came to the bridge he did not know what to do. He was walking back and forward on the bridge and at last he met a man - the man asked him what he was doing and he told him. God help your sense said the man it is often I dreamt that there was a pot of gold in County Mayo behind a certain man's house under a hawthorn bush. He told the Mayo man the house it was and it was his own house. He went home and went out with the spade and started to dig, and he heard the voice saying "you will lose by it" but he did not heed it. He kept digging until he came to the flag that was over the pot of gold and he lifted it and seen the pot full of gold. He went into his dinner without lifting the pot and when he came out the hawthorn bush was fell against the

  7. Bird-Lore

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Owen Diver

    The most common wild birds in our district are the seagull, crow, robin, thrush, wren, blackbird, the hedge-sparrow, magpie, pigeon and the swallow. None of these birds migrate except the swallow.
    The seagull builds its nest along the seashore. It spends most of its time along the sea unless in the winter time when the weather is wet. The crow builds its nest on top of high trees. The robin builds its nest in a hawthorn bush or along the side of a bank. The thrush builds its nest in a hawthorn bush or in a palm bush. The wren builds its nest in a whinbush or on the side of a ditch. The magpie builds its nest on top of a high tree. It usually builds in a wood or in a glen. The swallow builds its nest in the eves of houses.

    The weather can be judged by the behaviour of certain birds such as

  8. Old Forts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Martin Warde

    there are five forts. Some one of those are accountable for giving the village its name. It is believed that the fort on the forge road is the one. Some people say that the fort at the bridge of Woodfield is the one.

    In nearly every fort there grows some hawthorn bushes people are afraid to cut them because they believe that something bad would happen to them.
    It is said that some men were working on the road in the village of Lissyconner. There was a hawthorn bush growing by the side of the road and there was a fort inside the fence. The foreman ordered the men to cut the bush as it hung out over the road. They began to cut it then and when they had it half cut a stranger came and told them not ot proceed any farther with the work or they would be sorry. They did not stop and after a while a messenger came and told the foreman that his son was dying. Then he ordered the men to stop

  9. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English

    There is a fort in Bohey Dromahair in the same small form belonging to Jimmy Darcy. It is a round shape, with trees hawthorns growing in it. One day Big Micky Darcy (Jimmy's brother) who is almost 70 years of age cut a bush (a hawthorn) in it. Blood came out of the tree, and the split made by the hatchet is still to be seen. Since that day he has a running sore in one of his legs, and he never could get it cured.

    There is another fort behind the present Wm Templeton's house also in Bohey, not far from Darcy's fort. Black Richard Templeton Wm Templeton's grandfather, went out one day and cut a hawthorn, blood came out of it. When he came into the house, one of his little boys was not able to move. Black Richard had heard about a wizard named McCauley who lived somewhere in Co. Sligo, who had charms to cure children smitten by fairies. When he saw the child, he got ready, and started

  10. Fairy Reel

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Joan Savage
    Informant
    John Kerins
    Age
    62

    A piper named Seán Murnane lived with his grandmother in Tralee. Every evening he sat under an old hawthorn tree and played his bagpipes. Among the lonely hills to the west of Seán's cottage was the fairy fort of Clune, surrounded by hawthorn bushes. One night as Seán was coming home he heard beautiful music coming from this fort. He got near the fort and listened. He looked in and saw three pipers dressed in green, playing the fairy reel. He soon had the tune.
    Suddenly his name was called from the inside. A voice told him that he was not to make that tune known to anyone. Seán returned home and told his grandmother what had happened. She warned him to do as the fairies had said.

  11. Killenure Mountrath

    Language
    English

    In Killenure are the remains of a rath, and also a burial ground which is said to be the first consecrated cemetry in Leix. Regarding this place there is a very strange tradition. Many years ago a corpse was interred in it, and when night came the earth cast up the body. It was again interred, and again ejected. On the third time of its interment an old, strange, and venerable man appeared, and ordered those who were interring the corpse to plant a hawthorn over the grave. Instantly he disappeared. The party obeyed, and the remains like beneath the hawthorn. In 1853 a woman of 70 years of age hung herself on this tree.
    The remains of the graveyard and rath have disappeared, but the remains of a square pavement measuring about 20 yards each way, surrounded by (see next page)

  12. A True Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Philip Duffy

    About one hundred years ago there was a large hawthorn bush in the townland of Killigally Magheracloone. It was said to be the largest in the United Kingdom. It grew partly on the bare limestone rocks on a high hill It was there for generations and local people would not dare touch it. It was a landmark which could be seen from many counties around and was known a "Killigally Beg Lone Bush". It was the custom at that time to have a large May bush around which boys and girls danced. They usually vied with each other to see who would have the largest hawthorn May bush being the kind always chosen. A number of young men from Carrickmacross wishing to have the largest came and cut off the main branch and pulled it with ropes into Carrickmacross and erected it close to the old Church year in Magherosa. To their astonishment they did not enjoy themselves dancing and merrymaking around the bush as they usually did as many of them broke their arms and legs while taking it in. During the year many sudden deaths occured among those who had taken part in the cutting of tree. Old people in the district begged them

  13. The Leipreachán

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Kennedy
    Informant
    Mr James Kennedy
    Age
    75

    Once a man was driving home his cows when he saw a Leipreachán. He picked up a stone and threw it at the Leipreachán. The Leipreachán said nothing. About a week after the cows would give no milk only in the evening. The people said the Leipreachán milked before they were brought in in the morning.
    Another man caught the Leipreachán making shoes. He said to the Leipreachán, "hand me out the gold, or I'll squeeze the head off you". The Leipreachán said, "talk civil or I'll give none." The man said he would. The Leipreachán said, "go home and get a spade, and root under the hawthorn bush." The the Leipreachán disappeared. The man got the spade and rooted under the hawthorn bush.

  14. Bird-Lore

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Leonard Hayden

    Swallows come here in summer. Cuckoo's also come here in summer. Swallows build their nest in barns or houses. Cuckoo's lay their eggs in other birds nest. Goldfinches build their nests in a hawthorn. The wren builds her nest in a bank or in a stump of a tree. Robins and the thrush build in a hawthorn. Hedge sparrows build in hedges. Pigeon's lay white eggs. Woodcocks come her in Winter and go away in Summer. All the birds hatch about three weeks. The swallows lay blue eggs. The cuckoo lay dotted eggs. Goldfinche's lay eggs dotted brown. Wren's lay about ten eggs dotted with brown spots. Robin's lay dotted brown eggs. Lark's lay their eggs on the ground, in a meadow. Titlark's lay eggs in the side of ditches and lay about eight eggs. Snipe lay about four eggs dotted with brown spots. Crow's lay four eggs and build their nests in a tall tree.
    Jackdaw's lay about four eggs in chimneys of houses. Pheasant's lay on the ground and lay about five eggs. Wild duck lay

  15. The Blessed Bush in Urra

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Sara Hogan

    On top of Urra Hill is a big rough looking rock on which Mass was frequently celebrated in the Penal Days. The rock is sheltered by an old hawthorn bush which is remarkable because of its very aged appeaance and again because it is the first hawthorn in this district to burst into blossom each spring. People say that this bush was blessed by God and hence is referred to as the Blessed Bush.
    The record of the priests who celebrated Mass in Urra is difficult to obtain. According to local tradition a Fr. Kelly & Fr. Cleary used the Urra Mass Rock for their altars. Fr. Kelly celebrated Mass in Urra as often as he possibly could. When Fr. Kelly died he

  16. Bird-Lore

    Language
    English

    Bird Lore
    for the ordinary wild birds, hawthorn blackthorn and blackberry bushes grow all along the roadsides and along the boundaries of fields. Naturally most birds choose the quiet of the fields and when walking along the roads one is greeted by a flood of melody from some quiet fields where hawthorn hedges abound. There is such a field quite close to the school also an orchard in front and here in early spring and late autumn the air is filled with the songs of the thrush, blackbird, wren and robin. Quite close to the school are old disused barns were year after year the swallows take up their summer residence. They appear about the end of April or beginning of May and leave in September. They build their nests under the eaves of the barns. I have seen bats in the district also. They fly in through open windows at night. The crows build nests on the tree-tops in the local woods. Pigeons also nest here. The cuckoo comes in April or May but probably owing to the abundance of woods and hedges he is seldom seen.

  17. Bird-Lore

    Language
    English

    build on very high trees. The Water-hen builds on the banks of rivers and sometimes if she can find a branch in the middle of a pond.
    The pigeon builds in a tree thickly covered with ivy. The Stone-chatter builds in a little hole in aa wall, usually a bridge. The Sparrow builds under the eve of thatched houses, or in the ivy which grows in the walls of dwelling houses.
    The Magpie builds in very thick hawthorn trees. The hawk builds in hawthorn trees or crab trees, but they must be very far away from houses. The Jack-daw builds in the chimneys of out-houses. Stares build in holes in trees. The Swallow builds its nest under the eves of houses, and on the rafters or cross-bars of out houses and hay-barns. The Snipe builds in

  18. (no title)

    On the main Dublin-Limerick road about eighteen miles from Thurles and five from Newport stands a large circular fort.

    Language
    English

    about eighteen miles from Thurles and five from Newport stands a large circular fort. In the centre of the fort is a mound seven feet long by seven feet wide. Legend has it that one of the giants (which our Country was famous for in the long ago times) is buried there, no doubt it is a remarkable mound. There is a thick belt of hawthorn bushes growing round the fort, and one night a local resident of the place a man named Nolan, went to cut a hawthorn stake to tie his one and only cow to. He cut and trimmed the stake and then placed it on his shoulder to bring it away with him. Immediately he did so, it was dragged voilently off his shouldier and thrown on the ground. When he turned round lo, and behold, a man was sitting on one end of it. Nothing daunted, Nolan sat on the other end, and so they both sat in silence during the dreary watches of the night, until the first streak of dawn appeared. Then the stranger disappeared. Nolan arose and brought the stick home with him. He put down the stick that

  19. Bird-Lore

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Joe Keegan
    Informant
    Joe Gray
    Age
    40

    Bird Lore
    The following is a lost of wild birds commonly found in the district- the brown Jackdown Thrush, Blackbird, Robin, Yellow Hammer, Sparrow, the cuckoo, the corncrakes, the starlings, the plovers, and the wild-ducks. The swallow comes to this country in April and leaves for Africa in the end of October. We usually find these bird's nests in the following places:- The crow's nesting the Sycamore, the Jackdaw makes her nest in the chimney on fire and the flames will burn their nests. The magpie builds her nest in the lofty branches of the hawthorn. The thrush conceals it's nest like the blackbird in the hawthorn on blackthorn. The pigeon builds in the ivy and a carless nest he builds. It is made up of a few sticks

  20. May Day Customs

    Language
    English

    into the fields and gather all sorts of wild flowers. Those when put outside the door are supposed to keep away the evil spirits for the rest of the year. Around the month of May the hawthorn bushes are usually in full bloom and some people put those outside their houses. It is said to be unlucky to bring hawthorn into the house.

    In former years people took interest in those customs and they carried them out, but now most of them have forgotten and they are not carried on at all.
    On the night of April 30th a big bonfire is lighted on the highest hill in the neighbourhood, and the young catch hands and dance round the fire until it is almost out at about twelve o'clock, then they jump through the fire. They say that by doing this they are better able to face the dangers and evils that lie before them during the coming year.