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Transcripts count: 23
  1. (no title)

    Across the lake, opposite the Lake Hill grows a hawthorn bush.

    Language
    English

    Across the lake, opposite the lake hill grows a hawthorn bush. In spring and summer it is just an ordinary hawthorn bush but in the autumn when other trees are preparing for the year's rest and their leaves are turning brown and withering and in winter when the other bushes are bare and leafless, then this hawthorn is certainly remarkable, but its leaves are still as green and plentiful as they were in the month of June.

    All the year round it preserves its leaves green and fresh and the local people say it marks the burial place of fairy gold. On this account it is guarded by the fairies and so must not be touched anymore than trees or bushes growing in a fort.
    Several stories are told locally of the people who interfered with this tree and were punished for it. Those who did so unwittingly got such slight warnings as sore hands or legs caused by scratches from the tree and these got all right again. But others who injured the tree through bravado were more seriously punished - by broken limbs caused by falling on the way home, some of which resulted in permanent injuries

  2. The Mass Rock at Ardvarna

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bridie Richardson
    Informant
    Mr Richardson

    There is a large Mass rock in the land of Ardvarna. There is a hawthorn bush growing up through the joining of the rock. It was called the blessed tree. The mass rock is down in a hallow and all the people used to go there to hear mass. If the Priest was seen saying mass he would be beheaded. The Priests used to say mass there in the penals days. It was said that the hawthorn bush that was growing through the rock used to cure pains in the teeth and the people used to give rounds there.

  3. Bird-Lore

    Language
    English

    Bird Lore
    for the ordinary wild birds, hawthorn blackthorn and blackberry bushes grow all along the roadsides and along the boundaries of fields. Naturally most birds choose the quiet of the fields and when walking along the roads one is greeted by a flood of melody from some quiet fields where hawthorn hedges abound. There is such a field quite close to the school also an orchard in front and here in early spring and late autumn the air is filled with the songs of the thrush, blackbird, wren and robin. Quite close to the school are old disused barns were year after year the swallows take up their summer residence. They appear about the end of April or beginning of May and leave in September. They build their nests under the eaves of the barns. I have seen bats in the district also. They fly in through open windows at night. The crows build nests on the tree-tops in the local woods. Pigeons also nest here. The cuckoo comes in April or May but probably owing to the abundance of woods and hedges he is seldom seen.

  4. Tree

    Language
    English

    At Ballycullane Cross, Bulgaden, there grows a hawthorn tree which bears, instead of white thorn during May, beautiful rich red-thorn flowers. An old resident told me a Bishop was hung there in penal times, and that no matter what colour the white-thorn trees round it are, it will always be red, when in full bloom.

  5. Local Lisses

    Language
    English

    side and the liss at Keane's. The ground inside the fort, is raised and several white thorn bushes are growing on the raised ground. Those trees must be hundreds of years old, as the trunks of some of them are of huge dimensions. I climbed one and found a seat, as comfortable as a chair on an outstretched branch. There is also a number of elder trees there, which must be also very old, as the trunks are very large and knotted. There is no trace what-so-ever of any place where there could have been a habitation, unless perhaps there might have been wooden huts, between the trees. There is only hawthorn, ivy, and elder growing there. The cattle graze the liss, but it has never been disturbed.

  6. May Eve

    Language
    English

    May Eve
    May-eve heralds the coming of summer and old time customs are still preserved.
    Childen gather May flowers and strew them at the entrance of every shed and on the paths leading to their homes, to keep away Ill-luck and bring good fortunes.
    May water is blessed and sprinkled on cattle to keep away the Puca, for it is said, that the Puca comes on everything on that night.
    It is another unusual custom to wash one’s hands in dew under a hawthorn tree to enable them to open any knot in thread.
    “The fair young maid, on the first of May,
    Who goes to the fields at break of day,
    And washes in dew by the hawthorn tree,
    Will always gay and happy be”

  7. A Fairy Tree

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Teresa Curtis
    Informant
    Mrs Twomey

    A Fairy Tree
    A short distance out side the town of Clogheen there stands a hawthorn tree--not an ordinary one, though, but of a very peculiar shape. For generations past this tree has been known as the "Fairy Tree". How it came by this name is still a mystery, but it is the firm belief that on Mid Summer's eve the fairies dance around this tree, and therefore, it is very much venerated. So much indeed, that nobody would dare to puck a

  8. (no title)

    One evening a young girl of this locality took a walk down towards the river...

    Language
    English

    One evening a young girl of this locality took a walk down towards the river Funcheon. Under the shade of a hawthorn bush in a quiet corner she saw a little man with a red cap. Not realising that it was probably a leprocaun she spoke to him and as soon as she did so he disappeared.
    This happened about 45 years ago.

  9. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Betty Mc Eniry
    Informant
    Mr J. Mc Eniry

    supposed to be inhabited long ago, and it is said that the old people used to see fairy men with red caps, at night. It is also said that when the old people used to stay up all night minding a sick cow, they heard the cry of the hounds and the music of the horn hunting, but they never saw the hunt. It is supposed that a lame goose inhabits one of the moats, and she appears if any one attempts to interfere with the moat.
    It was said that long ago Mr. P. Connell, the owner of Glenbane moat was rooting up hawthorn bushes that were in his way around the moat. He was at work for some time, when he raised his eyes off his work to take a rest. he looked towards his farmhouse and was shocked to see it on fire. He left

  10. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Betty Mc Eniry
    Informant
    Mr J. Mc Eniry

    There are five forts in my district. They are called by many names, the name most commonly used is "moat." There is one in the townland of Duncummin, there is another in the townland of Clashdrumsmith, both in Glenbane and Ballinacree and another in the parish of Lattin in what district I do not know. A moat is a mound surrounded usually by hawthorn bushes. The moats in my district are situated at a distance from each other.
    Some are fat but round others are eggshaped and high. Within the memory of the old , nobody has ever gone down to explore.
    It is supposed that it was the Danes who built them, for what purpose I do not know. They were

  11. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mrs Hayes
    Occupation
    teacher

    Blood is always spilled on St. Martin's Day, because St. Martin was killed in a mill. Ribbons are tied to the doors on St. Brigit's Eve.
    It is supposed to cure any complaint, particulary a headache. On Chalk Sunday, people go around putting stripes of chalk on other people's backs They do this to mark the people that are not married. On May Eve, a Hawthorn is supposed to bring bad luck to the inhabitants if brought into the house. People tie a green bush to the door on May Eve to welcome the Summer. On Shrove Tuesday pancakes are eaten. Rings are put into the pancakes and whoever gets the ring will be married within the year.

  12. Fort

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Pauline Mc Carthy
    Informant
    Kate Houlihan
    Age
    93

    Fort.

    There are not a great many forts in Adare. The one I hear most about is situated in the cricket field. It is not a large one. There is a mound of earth around it and it is hidden from view by hawthorn bushes. In the days of the Danish invasion the Danes made those to use as a strong-hold against the enemy.
    This fort has no special name but there are numerous tales told about it. It is said that a man out of curiosity visited the fort and when he entered

  13. Weather Guides

    Language
    English

    Roads:- If springs showing through a road suddenly dry up then we can be prepared for floods. If the roads dry slowly we are at the beginning of a prolonged period of drought. If they dry suddenly changeable weather is expected. Should the dust in the road rise in whirls then there are going to be heavy showers coming frequently.
    Fruit: If apple blossoms appear before May day we are going to have a wet cold June. The appearance of apple blossoms on the trees in Autumn is regarded as a sign of the approach of a very severe Winter and a great scarcity of hay during the following Spring. A scarcity of haws (on the hawthorn) or crabs (wild apples) in Autumn is looked on as an indication that the coming winter is going to be a mild one. A plentiful supply of haws crabs and wild berries is looked on as provision by the Almighty for the birds of the air during a very severe and prolonged winter.

  14. The Moat

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Tony Gleeson
    Age
    13
    Informant
    Patrick Howard
    Age
    74

    I heard the following from an old person one night about a place in Kilmallock very near where I live.

    This old man told me that long ago in this place it was supposed to be a place where the "Good People" resorted. In this place there are two hawthorn bushes and right under them are two stones shaped like two seats and in olden days the "Good People" held their meetings and parties at midnight and God held anyone that passed by at that hour they got what was called a "Faireen," also if anybody interfered with the bushes it would mean bad luck to them.
    Many years ago it was known that a man cut down some of the bushes knowing the result of it and that night he got a pain in his arm and lost the use of it. The bushes can be seen to day and the seats but I doubt if people are afraid at the present day to cut down the bushes. The real name of this place where the moat is, goes by the name of "Propeens"

  15. Old Schools

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Sheila Mc Cormack

    used, slates and slate pencils being the method of writing. The teachers were natives of Castleconnell; but did not lodge in the farmhouses probably because they could not feel safe with a price of five pounds on their heads.
    Another school was in a place called the "Hawthorn." This school was run the same as "Round Plump" and taught by Martin Casey.
    A third school was on the banks of the Shannon near the Falls of Doonass. It was taught by Thomas Burke.
    Authority: P. Rea Woodlands.
    In Ahane another hedge school existed. The teacher's name was Thomas Moloney, who taught the older pupils during the night and the young children during

  16. Transport in Early Days

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Meskell

    from 1912 to 1930 would be about 30 tons, and during war times these eels sold at 2/6 per pound.

    An old inn called the Hawthorn near the Spa Castleconnell was used as a final stop for the stage coach from Dublin to Limerick. The old inn supplied the final relay of horses to Limerick City. The stage coach road was not the present main Dublin to Limerick road.
    In 1890 and later the jarvey with his horse brought sufficient people to Castleconnell to drink the Spa water there that a thriving town sprung up and one thousand families lived by accommodating the visitors. A German scientist pronounced the waters as the most famous in Europe but it was afterwards condemned as undrinkable when Lisdoonvarna became popular.
    Oars cannot be used in boats in the Shannon at Castleconnell becaue of the rapids. For generations the men have used along pole to propel their boats

  17. to work by. On New Year's eve a "sweet cake ", currant cake, is flung at the door, to keep out the hunger for the coming year. The cake breaks of course and the children of the house each pick up a piece - the largest piece possible, enjoying the scramble for the big bits.


    On St Brigid's night crosses are made of rushes, called St. Brigid's cross, and put into the thatch of the roof.
    On St. John's night bonfires are light in honour of St. John. Some farmers take a burning branch from the St. John's fire and walking amongst the cows, drop a little ash from the branch on each cow, or tip each cow with the branch. This ensures that the cows will not miss having calves that year. When the cow calves the "cleaning" should be thrown on a hawthorn bush and left there to wither.
    November eve is a great night for finding out the person to whom you will be married. By "burning" a pair together with beans you can find whether they will stay together, or part, by peeling an apple completely in one piece without breaking the peel from the time you start until you finish, then throwing the peel over your shoulder and watching the letter it

  18. Care of Farm Animals

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Thomas Begley
    Age
    13

    Pigs. Pigs are kept in a small house with a run in front of it. The pigs are let run around for about a half hour. Pigs are fed on cabbage and boiled potatoes and cumfrey. their house is called a pig-stie
    Horses. The horse is kept in a stable during the winter. He is giving hay and oats. He is left out in the field during the summer. The hourse's stable is cleaned out every day.
    Cows. In the winter nights the cows are kept in a cow-house or byre. In the mornings they are let out in the field. They are tied up with ropes or in bales. They are fed every morning and night with turnips and mangolds.
    The goat. The goat feeds on hawthorn leaves. He eats everything he gets in bushes and ditches. Some people like goats milk and more people don't like it at all.
    Sheep. It is not necessary to put sheep in a house in the winter but it is necessary to give them turnips. The sheep are washed twice a year. The wool is cut of the sheep after they been washed. The work of cutting the wool is called shearing.

  19. Fairy Forts

    Language
    Mixed
    Informant
    Seán Mac Gearailt
    Age
    47

    Fairy Forts.

    There are six forts in the townland of Ballyfolin. Each can be viewed from the other. These forts are generally named after the land owners. Such as Power's fort, Fitzgerald's fort and Ahern's fort.
    They are all circular in shape having a stone and hawthorn fence. Inside each is a deep trench guarded by a mound of earth. The Danes are supposed to have built them as fortifications.
    There are fairy tales connected to them and the owners of the land saw that they were not interfered with.
    Flax was sown at one time in Fitzgerald's fort, according to the story. At a time when flax was largely sown in this part of the country. It grew to be a fine crop. When the time came to pull it, the men pulled it and bound it into sheaves and had this done before dinner. After dinner they meant to gather it up and make stooks of it, but when they were coming

  20. Folklore - Pishogues

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Pupils and teachers

    house, when returning from a funeral.

    114. Hawthorn, apple blossoms, or drooping laburnum, used as decorations, bring bad luck in their trail.
    115. If you notice a friend wearing something new. You should always say "Well wear". Go mairir, go gcaithir e (no iad).
    116. New shoes should not be put upon a table, before they are worn. Such action brings ill-luck.
    117. Lady's hat should not be decorated with a peacock's feather, for this is inviting misfortune.
    118. If you sell anything, you should always give a "Luck-penny", and similarly if you buy anything, you should demand a "luck penny", from the seller.
    119. To get out at the wrong or unusual side of the bed, means that you will be moody, grumpy and out of sorts for that day.
    120. If you bring a headache out of bed in the morning, you must bear with it until you bring it back to the bed again next night.
    121. Kitchen must be tidy and hearth