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Transcripts count: 17
  1. Bush of Balgaddy

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Josie Passmore

    The "Bush of Balgaddy" stands in the centre of two roads. One called the "Back Road" and the other road leads to Lucan and Clondalkin. The back road leads to the canal. It is a plain hawthorn bush standing on a three cornered patch of grass. In front of it is a house in which the man who planted it - Patrick Galvin lived. The one which stands at present is only what we would call a young one. It was planted in 1904. This is the second bush. There was one before this, it fell the night of the big wind 1903. Patrick Galvin cleared the old one away and planted this one, which is now commonly called "The Bush of Balgaddy". It stands at the Cross Roads and is part of the Southern Boundary of the district of Lucan.

  2. Daddy Teeling's Well

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick Martin
    Age
    14

    On the north side of Lucan there is a field belonging to Mr. Hill. The people long ago gave it the name of the Hunt Field. In the same field there is a hanging stone, which was used by the forces of Lord Carhampton. This well is called after Colonel Teeling, the commander of Lord Carhampton's forces. Over this hanging stone is growing a hawthorn bush. Opposite the stone is a stream. The well has three walls, one on each side, and one at the back. There is a stone slab on top of the two walls. There

  3. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Anthony Grogan
    Informant
    (name not given)

    On the route to Dublin at Coolock Bridge on the right hand side of the road is a little hill in a field. It can be seen from the road quite plainly. There are several trees and hawthorn bushes around it. It is said to be a fairy moat and a crock of gold was buried there about eighty years ago. Up to seventy years ago no one ever meddled with it until four young men who were pals made up their minds one day to dig for it. They went one moonlight night and one of them brought his pet dog as there was a

  4. Penal Times

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Phyllis Kerrigan
    Informant
    James Kerrigan

    Situated near the moat at Knocksheedan there is a lone hawthorn bush, called the Mass Bush.

    In Penal Times the poor hunted priests said Mass here for the sake of the tormented people.
    Holy Banks which is situated on the Broadmeadow river, is another of these noted places, where the priests said mass. When soldiers or any other harmful people were seen aproaching the priests and all the people escaped down the river in boats.
    in a place called Black Bridge on the Broad -

  5. Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Peggy Nolan
    Informant
    (name not given)

    There is one holy well in Clondalkin which is situated about six miles from Dublin. The name of it is St. Brigid's because long ago it is said St. Brigid appeared at this spot.

    The well is situated on a plot of grass on the side of a lane. There is a stream there and people bathe in it. The well is built like a cave and there is a wall surrounding it, and there is a hole in the wall with a statue of St. Brigid. There is a large flag-stone on which people leave relics. There is a hawthorn-tree beside the well and a crucifix on it.
    Some people who are suffering from diseases visit it very often. Most of them are cured because they have great belief in it. There is no fish in the well. It is said that the people who drain the well die of some punishment laid down for them. The well never runs dry. Some people use it for house-hold purposes.

  6. A Story of the Good People

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick Fox
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    42

    A Story of the 'Good People'.
    About forty years ago where St Patricks Square now stands, there were a few fields with only four houses. In one particular house with a hawthorn tree growing in the garden the fairies used to play. The tree used to block the sun from shining into the house so she cut it down. The 'Good people' did not like her to do that so in order to punish her they put bad luck on her. The neighbours told her that she would have bad luck and so she had. The branches of the tree would not light and one morning she told the neighbours that one night when she was going home an old woman appeared to her and followed her to the house. The old woman disappeared at the door and a priest came the next day to bless

  7. Objects of Value

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Mc Ardle

    branches of hawthorn and put it all over the May-Queen. This is a very old custom.

    People get palm on Palm Sunday. They keep it until the next Palm Sunday or in case of any person dying to sprinkle holy water over the dead person with it. Palms are in honour of "Our Lord" going into Jerusalem when the people placed branches under "Our Lord's feet saying - "Hosanna to the son of David."
    On the Eve of Saint Brigid's day people with relics of her cloak wave the relic in the air and the relic will cure sick people. Holy water is used to keep evil spirits away such as the devil.

  8. Old Graveyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Clarke
    Informant
    (name not given)

    In the parish of Rush there are three churchyards; Kenure, Whitestown and Baldungan Churchyards. Kenure is the most ancient as there are headstones dating back to the middle of the 15th century in it. There are ruins of old Catholic Churches in the first two, and in the last there are the famous Balbungan tower and monastery ruins. All three are still used.

    Whitestown Churchyard which was once called Knightstown is the least ancient of the three. It consists of an elevated plot some 50 yds square and very high in the centre and sloping mostly to the south and east. A whitewashed stone wall borders the north and east while a thick hawthorn hedge borders south and

  9. Heart picture. Whenever holy water is being sprinkled it is sprinkled with the blessed Palm. On Ash Wednesday the blessed Palm which is left over is burned, and in this way the ashes are obtained which are used in the churches on that morning.

    On May day a spray with blossoms on it are brought in off the hawthorn bush. It is unlucky to bring it in to the house on any other day but May day. It is considered unlucky to bring the elder tree into the house and if a person is hit with an elder branch it is said he will not grow any more.

  10. Bird-Lore

    Language
    English

    kingfisher, willie wagtail, sand martin, sky lark, starling, stare, yellowhammer, owl, sparrow, wren, chaffinch, curlew, canery, linnet, bullfinch, stonechatter, bat, snipe, pheasant, corncracke. The birds migrate are the swallow and corncrake and cuckoo. It can be noticed that before the swallows migrate they cluster together on the wires. The crow builds his nest on the tops of high trees. The seagull builds his nest in cliffs beside the sea. The magpie builds on the top of the hawthorn tree. The jackdaw on the chimney tops, the pigeons on the tops of the trees in woods. The partridge makes a hole in the soft ground in corn-fields. The wood quest builds its nest in a hole in a tree in the wood. The thrush in the hedge or thorn bush. The blackbird in the hedge or thorn bush. The plover in mountain land and marshy ground. The crane has its nest in the rushes. The

  11. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Máire Ní hAmmon

    On May Day the children go around and they get a branch off the hawthorn tree, and they decorated it with ribbons and coloured paper. Some people put them down in the ground as they did in days gone by. They put big stones around it, and leave it there until it withers away.


    On the Feast of St Peter and St Paul the people make bonfires on the cross roads, and have a great dance in front of the fires, and when they are finished they throw the burned stumps into a potato plot. They also burn all the furzes.

    On the 25th of July all the people of Co Carlow make up a féte for themselves, and they hold it in St Mullin's after doing the Stations at St Mullin's well.

    On the 15th of August

  12. Churchyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Cecilia Loughlin
    Informant
    Mrs Finn

    ones, but the inscription on them is blotted out. A tombstone placed over a grave with the name O'Toole on it dates from the 17th century, the English on it is very old, the word lie is spelt "lye".

    There is also an old baptism font in the grounds. It is made of granite stone with a hole in the middle of it. The font is about a yard in diameter.
    Unbaptised children were buried at Saint Brigid's Well.
    Saint Brigid's Well is in a laneway off the Convent Road. It is said that Saint Brigid converted and baptised people at this well.
    The well is built in a kind of a cave or vault. Many people have been cured at this well.
    When they are cured they tie a piece of cloth on a hawthorn tree which is growing over the well.
    Many people use this water in the well for drinking.

  13. Balrothery

    Language
    English
    Collector
    S. Mag Fhionnbhairr
    Occupation
    múinteoir

    11
    Duke of York, and which were forfeited to his attainder.
    There are in the Consistorial Courts of Dublin two terriers of 1753 and 1783 endowment of the vicage of Balrothery.

    In 1811 the Board of First Fruits, granted £250, and lent £550 more towards building the Glebe house here, and in 1813 the same body lent £1,000 towards building the Protestant Church.
    In shady places about Balrothery the botanist will find lathraea squamaria, greater toothwort flowering early in May. In the adjacent drains and bog pits alisma natans, floating water, plantain, a scarce curious plant; stretching its ovate leaves over the water; hydrocharis miorsus ranal, frogbit, while between this and Balbriggan chara flenilis, smooth clara, and march mallow, are singularly abundant.
    Proceeding amidst the perfume of hawthorn blossoms, towards Balbriggan, Hampton Hall, the residence of Mr George Alexander Hamilton, and Prospect, formerly a seat of the Earl of Bective, appear the right between the road and the sea, while on the left are

  14. to gather a bunch, and branches of the hawthorn, and laburnum bush, which is yellow, and dress a person up in it, and then have a procession.

    Good Friday. Generally for the tea that evening we have hot cross buns - buns with a cross on the top of them.
    Hallow Eve. This feast falls on the 31st of October, when it was supposed that the souls and spirits of the dead roamed about at night.
    It is held as a Christian feast now in preparation for All Saints' Day the 1st of November. Many games are enjoyed by the children on that night, and the majority of them dress up, and go out around the houses of the district. In parts they get money, but more than all they get nuts. For tea that night, there is a brack, in which there is always a ring.
    There is always a superstition said, that whoever gets the ring in the family, will be the first to be married out of the house.
    Christmas Day. Apart from the religious part of this great feast there is rejoicing everywhere. The custom that has come down for many years is that of hanging up the stocking before going

  15. Goats decend to lower levels and seek the shelter of the houses.

    Blue flames appear in the fire.
    Swallows fly very low.
    The cat sits up near the fire
    Cows in a field turn in the same direction and sit down.
    A ring appears round the moon.
    If it is near the bad weather is near. If it is far out the bad weather is far away.
    Distant hills look near.
    If the hawthorn grows in profusion a hard winter is coming.
    The sea looks clearer.
    Sounds in the distance seem near.

  16. Local Song

    The Hawthorn grows, the brook runs by

    Language
    English
    Collector
    J. Walsh

    Commemorating certain characters, to wit, a schoolmaster, a well-to-do farmer, and a step-dancer. These people lived in the Ballymackney district, Parish of Killany Co. Monaghan. The Period is not definitely fixed, the author one Callan was a local reporter for the "United Irishman". The song was the joint product of two rhymes, the other being a man named Ford whose brother was a curate in Doneghmoyne Parish somewhere around the ? of the last century:-

    The song was known by old residents in my native townland, Taplagh some twenty years ago.
    "The Hawthorn grows, the brook runs by where stands the rustic College,
    Where I from poor Ned Smith received my scanty store of knowledge.
    But now Ford rest his guiltless soul
    Tis long that I'm to mourn,
    He lies beyond in Inishkeen
    Not far from Ballinavourn
    Ned Fagan was a fine young man
    A lady might admire
    And many a jig I have (I've) seen dance