Text search

Transcripts count: 47
  1. Granuaile

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Eamonn Murray

    double
    My Granuaile:
    Oh! If we would quit spending
    My Granuaile,
    Troth the times would be mending
    My Granuaile.

    My brave sons and brave daughters
    Says Granuaile,
    Have crossed o'er the water
    Says Granuaile,
    To seek for employment
    Says Granuaile,
    Troth it's not for enjoyment
    Says Granuaile.

  2. Granuaile

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Eamonn Murray

    Sure our Nations in danger
    Says Granuaile

    Mother! Don't be uneasy
    My Granuaile,
    You may make your mind easy
    My Granuaile;
    Why our sweet tongue's not dying
    My Granuaile,
    Sure to learn it were trying
    My Granuaile.
    And the dance that's the fashion
    Says Granuaile
    It puts me in a passion
    Says Granuaile:

  3. Granuaile

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Eamonn Murray

    We'll stop emigration,
    My Granuaile,
    We'll give work to the Nation,
    My Granuaile:
    And we'll each help our neighbour
    My Granuaile
    If we purchase home labour,
    My Granuaile.

    And my sweet tongue is dying
    Says Granuaile
    And it sets me a sighing
    Says Granuaile;
    If we speak like the stranger
    Says Granuaile,

  4. Granuaile

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Eamonn Murray

    Such whirling and skating
    Says Granuaile,
    It's a dance I am hating
    Says Granuaile.

    We'll revive the old dancing
    My Granuaile,
    And our sweet tongue entrancing
    My Granuaile:
    And with sound education
    My Granuaile,
    We'll build up the nation
    My Granuaile.

  5. Granuaile

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Eamonn Murray

    Oh! my heart's sore and heavy
    Says Granuaile,
    See the taxes they levy
    Says Granuaile:
    And my children are leaving
    Says Granuaile,
    And my poor heart is grieving
    Says Granuaile.

    There is one tax brings trouble,
    My Granuaile
    String drink and X

  6. The Ballycohy Eviction

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Jeremiah Coughlan

    II
    With ecstasy I went my way down by a limpid stream,
    Where bowers o'erhung the rivulet - most captivating scene!
    The pheasant song was borne along the partial evening gale,
    That faintly wafted to mine ear - the name of Granuaile.

    III
    With fawn-like steps I shyly crept beneath the verdant shade.
    Some persons there were speaking, when a female rose and said,
    "Your conduct bold I do behold; your courage did not fail,
    My gallant sons with pikes and guns, for I'm poor Granuaile!"
    IV
    'Midst the surges of the battle-blaze on that eventful day,
    Through fire and smoke the Celtic stroke made Scully's corps give way.
    Murrough and the bailiff fell victims to the hail
    That bursted from the rifles of the sons of Granuaile.
    V
    My progeny is true to me, except a few of those,
    Of reptiles' seed, or Cromwell's breed would aggravate my woes
    But now I swear, and do declare, to yon I will reveal,
    My gallant sons with Irish guns, for I'm poor Granuaile.

  7. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bréanainn Ó Grádaigh
    Informant
    Pádraig Ó Grádaigh
    Age
    53
    Occupation
    feirmeoir

    It was said that there was a lot of gold hidden at Granuaile's castle. The officer left the care of it to a soldier that the head was cut off. They say he is minding it without a head.

  8. Songs - Granuaile

    Her lovely hair hung down her neck,

    Language
    English
    Informant
    John Hussey
    Age
    52

    Songs
    Granuaile
    Obtained from:
    John Hussey
    Cloomahara
    Williamstown
    Co. Galway
    My dream to some comes true it comes with grief to more as it did to me my country thats dear old Erin's shore. I dreamt I was upon a hill bedside a lovely vale, its there I spied a comely maid, her name was Granuaile.
    Her lovely hair hung down her neck,
    As she was dressed in green,
    I thought she was the fairest sight
    That ever I had seen

    As I drew near
    I then could hear
    By the pleasant morning gale
    As she went along
    She sung a song
    Saying I'm poor old Granuaile
    I thought she had a splendid hasp

  9. The Songs Long Ago

    "The silvery tide"

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Celia Mulkeen
    Informant
    Tom Mulkeen
    Age
    82

    old oaken bucket," "Mother mo chroide," "Pat Molloy from Clare," "The lands of larganboy," "The low low land of Holland," "Candia I ó," "What will you do love when I am going," "Mannon mountains and Silver seas," "The foaming bowl of tea," "The lassy from Donegal," "Morrisy and the Russian," "Donnely and Cupar," "Jim Sulivan and Sam Warick," "The Bells of Shannon," "The constant farmer's song," "We are all jolly fellows," "The boys of '98," "The foggy dew," "The dolly vardon hat," "Pretty Maggie," "Pretty maid milking the cow," "Down by the dark orchards along the railway," "The soldier's song," "The Irish emigrants farewell," "The old bog road," "The old bog hole," "Molly Flynn," "Larry Mick Flynn," "The cow that ate the piper," "Down among the flowers small," "Danny Boy," "Eire in the tear," "Johnny Harte," "The pride of Ireland glory," "This little girl of mine," "The banks of red roses," "The pleasant waters of the river lea," "Tim Finnegans wake," " Of you lovely Anne of you," "Is there anyone here who will marry me now," "The boys of Ballysodare," "Patrick O Donnell," "Pat Sheehan," "Pat Mcguire" " The bishop of Ross," "The ship that never returned," "The bunch of seaweed," "The lads of Hibernia," "The girl I left behind," "Teddy O Neill," "The farmers boy," "Dear old Granuaile," "My love nell," "Dan McCann," "My Tipperary Mary," "My wild Irish rose," "The lovely woodlands of Avon dale,"

  10. Songs - Granuaile

    Her lovely hair hung down her neck,

    Language
    English
    Informant
    John Hussey
    Age
    52

    By her side she let it fall,
    She played the tune called Brian Boru
    Garryowen and Tara Hall

    God save Ireland was the next
    And the martyrs who died in jail
    So you need not fret
    Home rule we'll get
    Cried poor old Granuaile
    When I awake up from up my slumber
    Excited by my fright
    I thought it was the clear daylight
    But I found that it was night
    I looked all round and could not see
    But the walls of a lonely jail
    And that was the last sight I saw
    Of poor old Granuaile

  11. Granuaile

    Language
    English

    Dreams come true to very few
    and comes with grief to more
    As it did to my dear country
    That's poor old Erin's shore
    I dreamt I was upon a hill
    By the side of a lovely vale
    It was there I spied a charming girl
    They called her Granuaile

    Her golden hair hung down her back
    As she was dressed in green
    I thought she was the fairest girl
    That ever my eyes had seen
    I drew near I then could hear
    In the pleasant morning gale
    As she went along she sang a song
    Called poor old Granuaile
    I thought she had a splendid harp
    By her side she let it fall
    She played the tunes called Brian

  12. Granuaile

    Language
    English

    Boru
    Garryowne and Tara's hall

    God save Ireland was the next
    Out martyrs who died in jail
    But we need not fret
    We'll have Home Rule yet
    Said poor old Granuaile
    Since O'Connells time in '29
    We had no greater men
    They struggled hard both night and day
    To gain our rights again
    Still by coercion they were bown
    And our sons were sent to jail
    But we need not fret, we'll release them yet
    Said poor old Granuaile
    I woke up from my slumber
    Excited by my fright
    I thought it was the broad day light

  13. A Local Hero

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eibhlín Ní Connraoí, Eileen King
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    42

    The night he was arrested his first born baby was only two hours old. I imagine it was a tremendous sight to see him laid up in Mountjoy prison at that period of his life.
    These six heroes were true brave Irish men, and were far more truer Irishmen than the Irish of to-day. These six men were the chief of the brother hood. There chief intention was to send England's laws and tyranny out of the country, and her landlords and bailiffs from out sainted Irish soil. The day they stood their trial it was a splendid to see the sons of old Granuaile surrounded left and right. The jury men found them not guilty, but Judge Lawson said no.
    There was a great informer in this place for the swearing of his country men, and Coleman was his name. He was made a public show, but if my dear old grandfather lived to-day his heart would sink into dismay to see our Irish sons and daughters so divided as they are.

  14. Gráinne Ní Mháille

    Language
    Irish

    Mar sin chuaidh sí go Londomhn agus chaith sí a gúna Gaedhalach. Chuaidh sí isteach i gcúirt Eilíse. Bhíodar ar tí masla agus gáire a dhéanamh fúithi ach bhí Gráinne sáthach cliste dóibh. Bhí Eilís an-cáirdeamhail leithí agus ag fágáil na cúirte di, bhain sí geall as Eilís go ndéanfadh sí Iarla dá mac. Uaidh sin shíolraigh na h-Iarlaí Mhaigh Eo.Do chas sí abhaile agus thainig sí i dtír ag mBaile Átha Cliath. An fad is a bhí sí annsin chuaidh sí go Caisleán Beann Éadar. Ní raibh fhios ag muintir an chaisleáin go raibh Gráinne ag teacht agus mar sin bhí na geataí dúnta go daingean. Bhí fleadh is féasta ar siúl istigh agus chuir sin fearg mór ar Ghráinne nuair nach rabhadar ag cleachtadh nós muintire na h-Éireann sé sin: cead a bheith ag gach stráinséar dul isteach chuig féasta. Dubhairt sí leithí féin go mbainfeadh sí sásamh amach agus anonn leithí go dtí teachín beag ina raibh oighre an chaisleáin dhá oileamhaint. Do sgiob sí leithí féin é go dtí a caisleán ar bhruach loch ...sean. Do choinnigh sí annsin é go dtí gur chuir sí iachall ar thighearna Binn Éadiar roinnt mhaith airgid a íoc dí, agus go dtí gur gheall sí nach mbrisfeadh sí nós na nGaedhal arís. Tá a lán sgéalta eile le fágháil faoi Ghráinne ach níl fhios againn an fíor nó bréag iad. Seachas na tréithre eile a bhain lei deirter go raibh sí an- naomhtha agus go raibh meas agus urraim mhór aici don chreideamh agus ar gach a bhain leis. Tá sé ráidhte freisin gur thóg sí mainistear ar oileán an Cláir agus síltear gur annsin a cuireadh í. Bliadhnta in dhiaidh a báis thugadh a h-ainm Granuaile ar Éirinn agus beidh cuimhne cruinn go h-éag ag fearaibh agus mnáibh na h-Éireann uirthí.

  15. Granuaile

    Language
    English

    But finding it was night
    I looked around I could not see
    But the walls of a lonely jail.
    And that was the last time ever I seen.
    My poor old granuaile.

  16. Composition - Old Ruins

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Mc Greal
    Informant
    Mr Anthony Gavin
    Age
    78

    There are many ways by which we can find out what kind of people inhabited our district in former times. One of these ways is by old ruins such as ruined castles or monasteries or churches or round towers.
    There are not many ruins in this district. The most important is Granuailes Castle in Clare Island. This castle was built in fifteen hundred and fifty-eight. It is said that Granuaile lived in this castle and she had her boats anchored in the bay. This castle had no dungeon as many castles have but it had many apartments.
    There is also an old church in a place called Aughavale. This was the ancient church of the parish of Westport which was known as the parish of Aughavale at that time. There are some carvings on the walls but they cannot now be identified as the walls are entirely covered with ivy. A cemetery now surrounds the old ruin.
    The remains of a splendid round tower are still to be seen in Aughagower.

  17. The Ballycohy Eviction

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Jeremiah Coughlan

    VI
    But hark! what sound is that I hear; is it the rooster's crow?
    'Tis time for to be leaving, from Erin we must go;
    But when we get beyond the seas, with general John O'Neill,
    We'll come back and fight for Fatherland, and poor old Granuaile.

  18. The Green Cockade

    Language
    English

    I
    You gallant sons of Granuaile come raise your banners high
    And in the cause of liberty beneath them gain or die
    And tell the Saxon horde of them you're not afraid
    At home in "Mother Erin" to wear a green cockade.
    II
    And let their lordlings know, to them you'll not be slave

  19. A Fenian Song

    In brossmolina we were brought up,

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eileen King

    A Fenian Song

    5-4-38
    Eileen King
    (1)
    In Crossmolina we were brought up,
    Six heroes of great fame,
    True sons of Granuaile,
    Who did adore the name,
    Who joined the Fenian brotherhood,
    Bad landlords to destroy

  20. Pat O'Donnell's Vision (Fragment)

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Lafferty
    Informant
    Mary Doherty
    Age
    76

    One night as O'Donnell in prison lay sleeping,
    He had a grand vision which filled him with joy,
    A grave looking queen to his bedside came weeping,
    Saying, "cheer up O'Donnell, my brave Irish boy,
    For I'm Granuaile and I'll liberate you,
    I'll gain your release if there's blood in your veins,
    For the shooting of Carey I congratulate you,
    But I'm grieved for to see you in cold prison chains."
    O'Donnell arose in a great consternation,
    He eagerly gazed on that emblem-clad queen,
    Saying, "Madam, you give me such grand consolation,
    You must be a friend to old Erin the green."