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Transcripts count: 11
  1. Ghost Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Dick Warren
    Informant
    Mrs G. Warren

    John Gannon worked for Mr. Crawford of Croghan, Kildallon, about thirty years ago. Mr. Crawford shot himself. Afterwards, every time when John Gannon was driving the horses over Croghan bridge Mr. Crawford's ghost would meet him and lead him into the stable then he would disappear.

  2. Arva

    Language
    Mixed

    Kildallon, Killeshandra and Scrabby. The McKiernans were chieftains up to the time of the Confiscations in the reign of James I. It is said they held sway here for seven centuries previous to that time. The surnames of the Clan assumed the form of MacKernon, MacTiarnan, and the anglicised form of it is Masterson. Both names - McKiernan and Masterson are plentiful still in the locality. Tradition says the residence of the chiefs was at Croghan near Killeshandra, and that they crowned the Rourkes at Croghan as Kings of West Breffni. It is said they held their military reviews on Bruce Hill, about three miles from Arva, and that they assembled there at Finn McCool's Finger Stone. (this is referred to in the chilldren's copybooks) to condemn the Statute of Kilkenny. When Ulster was being planted in the reign of James 1 their lands were given over to settlers from England and Scotland. These included Sir Claud Hamilton, Sir James Craig, Archibald Acheson and others.

  3. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Dick Warren
    Informant
    Mr G. Warren

    84
    HIdden Treasure
    There was a lone bush in Mr. Whitsitt's garden on the bank of Croghan river. Mr Crawford who lived in Croghan House dreamed three times that there was a treasure hidden under it. He never dug for it. It is supposed to be left there by the Danes.
    Dick Warren,
    Killeshandra.

    Material from Mr. G. Warren,
    Killeshandra.

  4. Kildallan

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mrs A. Montgomery
    Occupation
    teacher

    Kildallon
    Page 338
    This district derives its name from St. Dallon, its Patron Saint. It forms part of the Barony of Tullyhunco or Tullaghonoho. The land of the Mac Tighearnain - McKiernan. For 7 centuries or more these chiefs held sway in Kildallon and still maintain their title in local History. The anglicised name is Masterson. In bygone days the chief market village which served this district was the now extinct village of Croghan. Many a skirmish was fought here between the McKiernans and O'Rourkes, and O'Reillys.
    In the beginning of the sixteenth century a daughter of the Prince of Breffni married a chieftain of Kildallon - May O'Reilly and Bryan McKiernan- a part of her dowry was a book of Gaelic Poems worth 6 milk cows. Probably this chieftain was the son of Gillaisa Oge whose name still survives in Kildallon in the localism: "You're as honest as Gillaisa".
    In 1412 when the fortified town of Croghan was burned to the ground during a bitter feud between Maguires countrymen and the McKiernans, Kildallon turned out to a man in support of the McKiernans

  5. Troopers' Lane

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Dick Warren
    Collector
    Eric Hastie
    Informant
    James Sweeney
    Informant
    Ned Cosgrave
    Informant
    Robert Woods

    85
    Troopers' Lane
    Troopers' lane is in the townland of Croghan. It is near Croghan river which is a tributary of the River Erne. There was a ford across the river beside the bridge. There was a battle fought on the river in 1641. The river is supposed to have run red with blood. There were two regiments of horse soldiers fighting, led by "Miles the Slasher."

    Material collected by Dick Warren, Portaliffe,
    Killeshandra,
    and Eric Hastie,
    Killeshandra.
    Material from, James Sweeney, Portaliffe,
    Killeshandra.
    Ned Cosgrave, Drumully, Killeshandra.
    Robert Woods, Portaliffe, Killeshandra.

  6. The Old Woman's Bush

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Philomena Smith
    Informant
    Mr Bernard Smith

    Once upon a time there lived an old woman in a house in Croghan rocks.
    In those times people were forbidden by the English to wear green.This day the old woman was wearing a green handkerchief on her head and she met the English soldiers who pursued her through the rocks and heather and she fell in a particular spot at the foot of the mountain and broke her neck. Some neighbours found her and buried her and planted a bush to mark her grave. The bush grew up large and lonely looking and some people say her ghost is seen at this bush and people are afraid to pass by it after midnight.

  7. Local Heroes

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Smith

    78
    Jonny Devlin of Croghan. Killeshandra who can carry four cwt. of potatoes without any trouble.
    Told by,
    Mrs. Smith,
    Killeshandra,
    Co. Cavan.

  8. Short Stories

    Language
    English

    A giant lived on the top of Croghan and another on Knockaroe over four miles apart. They very often exchanged pipes!

    Saint Patrick came from Co. Tyrone into Mulrine's Bridge (about half a mile west of Lifford) and turned back when he heard of St. Colmcille being in Co. Donegal.
    The Danes made beer out of heather.
    The "Wee-Folk" were fallen angels. Those that fell on the earth were "wee-folk". Those that fell into the sea were mermaids. They were supposed to get back to heaven after a certain time and that is the reason they are not to be seen anymore. They need the top pickle of the corn to make meal.

  9. (no title)

    Fredrick Heygate owned the lands from Cavanweary to Tyrone border.

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Patrick Mc Mennamin

    Fredrick Heygate owned the lands from Cavanweary to Tyrone border.

    If people in this district were caught stealing sheep (which was fairly common) they were hanged at the Gallows Lane near Lifford. A tree was used as a gallows.
    There were two giants Finn Mc Cool and Gull MacMorna. One day Finn was in Glenfin and Morna on Croghan Hill. The two fell out and Mc Morna lifted a stone to fire at McCool in Glenfin. The stone shifted out of his hand and fell into a field in Drumdoit near the old school. This stone is huge and lies in the centre of a level field along the main road.
    Cavanaweary got its name from Mary's Cabin. It was called in olden times - "Cabin of Mary"

  10. Old Vault

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Richard Warren
    Collector
    Eric Hastie

    In the orchard of Croghan House, Kildallon Parish there is an old circular vault, nine feet high and seven feet in diameter. The wall is two feet broad on top and about three feet broad on the bottom. There is one door, facing north, about four feet from the ground. The top seems to be broken off. The door is four feet high and two feet wide. There are four windows in the vault-two east, one west and one south. There is a stone on the outside with the following words cut in it-
    "Here lies the body of the Rev. George Carson,
    wishing for the Resurrection of the just.
    Who when living was
    *suenuous afsection of Christian liberty and to whom Christ Jesus was both
    Vici Vuci & Veilicis
    as also Mary Carson his wife.

    *This is the spelling on the stone as far as we can make out.

  11. My Home District - A Song

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Philomena Smith
    Informant
    Mr Bernard Smith

    My home district is situated in Lappanbane on Croghan mountain where the battle was fought between the Black-an-Tans and the I.R.A. in 1921.
    To communicate this battle a song was made by Michael Gaffney Lisgannon. The following are the words of the song.

    I
    Attend you sons of Granuale
    And listen for a while
    ' Till I relate the praises of
    The sons of Erin's Isle
    Concerning a great battle that
    Was fought as day did dawn
    By our noble Irish heroes in the rocks of Lappanbawn