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Transcripts count: 32
  1. Cures

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Skelly

    'Warts II (Local Cure) "Wartie Well" about 1.5 mls. from Clonmellon on Oldcastle road on left as you approach Daly's public house, Killallon. Three small whitethorn bushes overhang the well. A prayer (any prayer) is first said. A piece of rag is tied to the bush and a pin thrown at the bottom of the ash tree which is about a yard from the hedge. The well water is next rubbed to the wart. The rag must be part of your clothing. [Mrs Skelly, The Glebe, Clonmellon.]' RJR 160516.

  2. Cnoc na Rí

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mícheál Ó Cléirigh
    Informant
    Jim Clarke

    Cnoc Na Ríogh is a hill beside Clonmellon village. It is circular and there are a lot of trees on top of it. It can be seen from Balls fort in Killallon. There used to be fairies in the fort but there are not any in it now


    (Mícheál Ó Cléirigh from Jim Clarke Clonmellon)

  3. Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Seumás Mach Cáthaigh
    Informant
    Mícheal Mach Cárthaigh

    There are two holy Wells in this parish. One is in Killua named St Lucys WEll. There is another one in Killallon named the Warty Well. St Lucy's well is in the townland of Clonmellon. The warty well is in the townland of Killalon. St Lucys well is in the castle yard Killua. The warty well is on the side of the road from Clonmellon to Killallon. There is no special day for visiting etiher wells. Warts are cured in the Warty well. Three our fathers, three hail marys and three glorys should be saif for three mornings in sucession. The cure is applied nu dipping the wart into the water. There is a bush at the well and relics are hung on it. There was a chapel in the field beside the warty well and the well is in front of the chapel.

  4. Old Crafts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Nora Mc Cormack
    Informant
    John Mc Cormack
    Age
    50

    How amazed our great-grandmothers would have been if they came back to the world and see us flooding the whole house with light by simply pressing a little button. How many more conveniences we have that great granny never knew anything about, Electric light, gas and electric cookers, gas fires, aladdin and petril lamps. Granny would tell us that her house was lighted by rush candles/ Many other household articles which we buy in the shops were also made at home.

    Some of these old industries are still carried on around the districts of Clonmellon and Killalon.
    Michael Smyth of Galboystown, Clonmellon, has kept up the old trade of making wild Sally baskets, he also makes calf baskets which he sells in the local shops of Clonmellon. One day while he was cutting turf in the bog he found some sort of wood from which he made a fiddle and a flute and he put the brass keys on it himself. People send their watches to him to be fixed. He is a gifted man (but unfortunately a cripple), of about fifty years of age. He is not the only man that has kept it up. John Casells of Rosmead, also

  5. Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Margaret Dunne
    Informant
    John Mc Cormach
    Age
    50

    As there were so many great saints in Ireland long ago, there are a good deal of holy wells around Clonmellon and Killallon.

    There is a well in Killallon called "The Warty Well". Several of the children of Clonmellon got warts cured at this well by first dipping their warts in the water and then saying three "Our Fathers" three "Hail Marys" and the Gloria three times for three mornings following and on the third morning the warts were gone.
    In Killua Clonmellon there is a well known by the name of "St Lucy's Well". It is said if a person drinks the water he can wish and it will come true.
    Where this well is situated is not where it used to be. The gardener wanted to make a pleasure-ground where the well was, and he put a flag stone over it. Afterwards the well moved and sprang up in a different spot.
    In Killua there is also a well known by the name of "The Spa Well". The water of this

  6. Old Crafts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Nora Mc Cormack
    Informant
    John Mc Cormack
    Age
    50

    makes baskets out of wild sallies. Next of all we must not forget the rush candles. Miss Mary Gillick of Newtown, dead about two years ago, made rush candles until the time of her death. Miss Ann Bennett of Kilrush, Clonmellon, used to make rush candles and has still a candlestick for holding them.
    Many useful instruments were also made.
    Patrick Dunne of Newtown, near Galboystown, made a fiddle out of bog ash, and Bob Lalor made a tambourine from the hide of a goat.
    Poteen was a very common trade long ago. There was a man named Cormick Smyth who was Michael Smyth's grandfather. This man uses to make poteen in his own home, the guards found him out, captured him and cast him into prison.
    McCarthys, victuallers, Clonmellon, always make soap from fat and casutic soda. They use this soap for washing and scrubbing. Olive brought some to school, we washed the towels with it aand they turned out very white.
    Ointment is also made in the district.
    Mrs. Daly of Clonmellon makes ointment from herbs which cures sores.
    Mrs. Crawford of Killalon also makes from carbolic soap and goat's milk this ointment

  7. Local Fairs

    Language
    English

    other fairs like :- Mullage, Kells, Clonmellon and Virginia, but they are still continued every month. I do not know of any fairs held at crossroads or on hills or at any special houses. Sometimes people sell their animals at their own house.

  8. Names of Fields

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Rose Daly
    Informant
    Mr M. Daly
    Age
    circa 44

    Caldry, the bush field, the armenia, the long field, the Clonmellon field, the flaxgarden, the brick field, the new grass field, the hanging field, the high field, the onion field, the ash park, the Cunning's field, the blackthorn field, the horse field, the bull park, the white field, the deer park. In the bloshga field, fairies used to kick football long ago. In the flax garden, fairies used to bury other fairies long ago. In the quarry field every night long ago you would see other fairies sitting on the bank playing music. In

  9. Ribbandism

    Language
    English

    There was also a Mr. Connell, Killskryne, a farmer. He sold oats to a boycotted man at a market in Clonmellon. One morning he was coming home from Mass with his mother and Sister on a sidecar, when they were met by four men

  10. Cnoc na Rí

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Teresa Smyth

    CRUIC NA Rí

    My uncle James Fox own Cruic na Rí in Clonmellon. It is a field with a big hill in it. The old kings used to live in it and Nill of the Hostages lived on it for a

  11. The Pooka

    Language
    English

    The Pooka is a weird looking creature, half-horse and half-pig that haunts the "Wild Farm" so called from its wild and barren aspect, having a plentiful supply of furze and briars. The "Wild Farm" is situated in the townland of Paristown Westmeath and is shunned by all and sundry after sun-down. A [path?] runs through this farm often availed of by people walking to and from Clonmellon. The path leads by the side of a dismal looking pool (said to be bottomless) known as the "Pooka's pool" as it is in the vicinity of this pool the Pooka shows himself. The pool is about twelve feet below the level of the path. Any person taking this short cut after night fall not being familiar with the story will get a very unpleasant shock, when, in a

  12. Stories of Locality - Spa Well

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Joe Comaskey
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    55

    Spa Well
    No one remembers in this generation when the Spa Well was found. The water is coming underground under the hills between two rocks. It runs into a river leaving from the cave. It cures sore eyes. An english lady visisted it some years ago anf took some bottle of the spa water with her as a cure for sore eyes. The lady was born in Killua (Clonmellon) She is 70 years of age.

  13. Local Cures

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Connell
    Informant
    James Connell

    John Leavey, Kilrush, Clonmellon has the cure of this disease, because he is a seventh son. Those suffering from it must go to him three days in succession.
    He rubs his hand on the affected

  14. Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mícheál Ó Cléirigh
    Informant
    Jim Clarke

    There are a few holy wells in this district. A well I called ''The Warty Well'' is on the roadside between Clonmellon and Killallon. It is called the ''Warty Well'' because it cures warts.

    Three Our Fathers and Three Hail Marys have to be said each night and each morning for three

  15. Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Margaret Dunne
    Informant
    John Mc Cormach
    Age
    50

    well is known to have cured sore eyes.

    In Killallon Co. Meath there was a well and when one of the Connaught men was going to Co Meath to cut the harvest, he washed his socks in it, and it moved in across the fields.
    It is said, this well has the cure of the head ache.

    Margaret Dunne
    Newtown
    Clonmellon

    Told by
    John McCormack
    Galboystown
    Clonmellon

  16. Feathermen and Ragmen

    Language
    English

    Dick O'Brien from Clonmellon used to go around buying feathers. he used to travel miles and miles plucking geese and buying young hides. He would pluck the geese alive. He was called "Dick the Plucker."
    These rag men used to go around this district long ago. They were from Kells and their names were Clifford Sheerins and Tom Limerick. Sometimes they would give delph or pins in exchange for old rags and they would usually give twopence or three-pence for a stone of rags.

  17. Gubbauns

    Language
    English

    GUBBAUNS for calves were made from thin green sallies worked in and out.

    The people around this district that were most famous for basket making were the Lenehans from Clonmellon and Nichalas Clinton from Newtown and John Castles from Rosmead the only one living now..

  18. Ribbandism

    Language
    English

    Ribbandism

    There was a Mr. Connell, Killskyre, a farmer. He sold oats to a boycotted man at a market in Clonmellon. One morning he was coming home from mass with his mother and sister on the side-car when they were met by four men with clubs. This car was the first car home. One of the men held the horse while the other pulled the son down of the car and beat him black with the clubs while his mother and sister tried to save him

  19. (no title)

    St Patrick was on his way to Clonarney in Delvin parish.

    Language
    English

    refused help in many places. When he reached Delvin he got food and shelter and he blessed the place and said sickness would never top the hill ( in the village ). There has never been any bad outbreak of disease in the place.


    In Moyleroe district in Delvin, there is a river called the Ruaile More which divides the parishes of Delvin and Clonmellon. At a certain part of this river there is a stick and beside the stick is miraculous water which cures a disease called the Rose. It is said that a certain saint whose name is forgotten cured a leper at that spot long ago.
    When a person wants to rise the water to cure a person with the disease, he or she is supposed to bring three little stones. When he is lifting it he must throw in one stone into the river and make the sign of the cross and put a little drop of the water in the bottle. Then he must throw in the other stone

  20. Stair na hÁite

    Language
    Irish
    Informant
    Mrs Gavagan

    ( ó Mrs Gavagan, meadon-aosta, a bfuil suim aice 'na léitheidh)

    Sna sean-laethe sul a dtainig na Chapmans, bhí seipéal an Paroisde ag Baile an Locha (Ballinlough, Clonmellon) áit a bfuil na ballógaí le feiceáil go fóill. Fá'n am sin bhí líon mór daoine in-a gcomhnuidhe i mBaile an Locha agus ag Kilrush. Tá sean-chaisleán ag Ballinlough ar ghabh Cromwell seilbh air. Ba d'arm Chromeul an chéad Chapman agus tugadh Killua dó in-eiric a chuid seirbhíse san arm. Chuaidh Robert Chapman go dtí an Astral agus cheannuigh talamh annsin. Thainig sé arais agus is iomha lán-luinge de mhuinntir Bhaile an Locha agus de mhuinntir Kilrush a chuir sé go hAstral. Thoiligh an dubh-sgaifte daoine a ghabháil leis, nó bhí cruadhtán an tsaoghail