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Transcripts count: 35
  1. St Patrick's Cross

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bridie Flaherty
    Informant
    Mary Kirby
    Age
    72

    St. Patrick's cross was worn on the left shoulder of the garment. It was made from ribbons and worn on St. Patrick's day and left on the garment until Lady day. Then it was burned. All the children wore them.

  2. (no title)

    Long ago the men, women and children wore the shoes which were made from leather and made by the local shoemakers...

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Brigid Mc Loughlin
    Informant
    Patrick Mc Loughlin
    Age
    55

    Long ago the men, women and children wore the shoes which were made from leather and made by the local shoemakers. The shoes were all made by hand as there were no sewing machines in those days. John Travers, Derrinwillen was a very good shoemaker and from Dowra and from across the Shannon from Ballinglera people used

  3. St Patrick's Crosses

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mrs Norah Costello
    Occupation
    assistant teacher
    Informant
    Michael Costello
    Age
    78

    Silk and velvet little ribbons were sewn on to a cardboard cross covered with ribbon. A nice like bunch of ribbons were sewn on to each end of the cross and the nicest bunch was kept for the centre of the cross. On St Patrick's day the children wore these crosses on their shoulders. They were very fond of these brightly coloured crosses. The old people saved up pieces of ribbon from hats and bonnets and kept them for favourite children coming to the house, for the purpose of making these crosses.

  4. The Care of the Feet

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bridget Tuohy

    The children wore no boots or stockings in the summer. The people had no corns or sore feet then. They washed their feet in hot water every night. When they had them washed they would throw out the water. If they did not someone would come knocking at the door. The door would be opened but nobody would come in. They would say that it was the good people that wanted it.

  5. The Care of the Feet

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Butterly
    Informant
    Mr A. Green
    Age
    49

    At the age of three years the children wore boots long ago. Now very few children go bare footed in the Summer.

    The boots are both repaired and made locally. The shoemakers were not very good in the olden times. There were four shoemakers in the district in olden times an now there are only two. If the people were very big people used to say "you have big understanding meaning you are all underfeet.

  6. The Care of the Feet

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Anna Lynch

    time. There are a number of men in the district that repair boots. These men are called cobblers.
    About thirty years ago the school-children wore all clogs. They are not so common at the present time. There is only one clog-maker in this district at present time. The uppers of the clog are made of leather and the soles are made of wood. There are different kinds of foot-wear such as boots, shoes, clogs and wellingtons.

  7. The Care of the Feet

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick Thompson
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    60

    In old times most of the people did not wear boots until they were up to 20 years of age. Very few children wore boots until they were 10 or 12 years of age. Some people never wore boots, unless on very rare occasions,- if they were going to Mass the carried their boots and put them on when coming near the church; or if going to town to a fair or market they carried them under their arm and put them on outside the town. Children at the present time go bare barefoot in the summer and are delighted when summer comes so that they can do so. The children of poor people go barefoot all the year unless they get old boots or shoes from some person for charity. Water used for washing feet is thrown out at once as it is said that disease would be taken from it.

  8. The Care of the Feet

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Seán T. Ó Murchadha

    Long ago the children wore no shoes either in summer or winter. My Father repairs the shoes according as we need them. The dirty water is brought in the house until the clean water is brought in. Clogs were worn long ago by people in the district. There is a man in Dromerin and he wears no shoes. His name is Jack Keane. He is about sixty years of age. There were shoes there long ago and there was rubber at the bottom for soles and leather in the top. The shoe was closed cross-ways with a lace to keep them together.

  9. Cúram na gCos

    Language
    Mixed
    Collector
    Kathleen Lavan

    when going to town. Then they went barefooted till they came to a certain resting spot where they put on their shoes. They carried their shoes across their shoulders. When they came out from the town they used to take off their shoes and walk home barefooted.
    Once the children wore no shoes the whole year through, and some of them

  10. Emblems and Objects of Value

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Kenny
    Collector
    Rita Glynn
    Collector
    James Brennan
    Collector
    Martin Kenny
    Informant
    Thomas Kenny
    Informant
    Peter Glynn
    Informant
    Mrs Brennan
    Informant
    Thomas Kenny

    3. Saint Brigid crosses are made on Saint Brigid's Eve. They are made of straw and put up on the rafters. It was supposed that you would have a good crop that year. Long ago children wore a cross made of green ribbons on Saint Patrick's Day in his honour.

    4. When people go to knock at Croagh Patrick as a pilgrimage they bring back stones and clay and keep them in their houses for luck. After Palm Sunday people put some of the blessed Palm in the outhouses and especially in the cow-house.

  11. Connelly's School in Glann

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Mc Gagh
    Informant
    Mary Healy
    Age
    72

    -writing of the teacher and the well worked sums in simple addition and multiplication which were plentifully pasted all around the room. Some of the sentences used to be like this-:"Command your hand and guide your arm, a very good whipping would do you no harm," and "a man without learning and wearing good clothes is like a gold ring on a dirty pig's nose"
    The scholars were great at cutting their initials into the wood of the forms. Some of them even managed to cut their initials into the wood of the master's own desk. At that time Irish was the language most spoken at home in the houses, and their parents usually sent their children to school to learn to write and to read and above all "to learn to talk the English language the right way" The people were forbidden by the law at this time to speak the Irish language and some of the children wore a ring of a special design on their fingers or an ornament of the same design around their necks to remind them that they must speak the English language always and never speak the English language at all.
    All subjects were taught through the

  12. The Care of the Feet

    Language
    English

    Long ago some people got no shoes until they were fifteen years of age and some never wore them. One pair of shoes had to do the whole family. Some children wore them at school. When they became too small for themselves they gave them to the smaller members of the family. The children go barefoot in summer time. Each night they wash their feet. The water that washes them is thrown out.
    Shoes are repaired locally. Patrick Lyons is the shoemaker in the district. His father and uncle were also shoemakers. Long ago there were four of those in the district, Tom Smith, Patrick Gilmore, John Lyons and Ped Lyons. Those were very slow and a person had to wait a year for a

  13. Old Schools

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Margaret Gibbons
    Informant
    Mrs Gibbons
    Age
    58

    The old school in Mohereevogue was a small building made of stone and scraws. It had two small windows of two small panes. The doors were made of straw mats. The table was a flat piece of oak about four feet in height. It was placed under the window. The master had a Blackboard placed up against the wall. It also was made of oak and painted black. The children did not learn from books as there were no books then. The teacher wrote down all they had to learn. on the board - with chalk. He then brought each child to the board to learn what he had written. Later, they were taught to write on slates with pencil made from "free stone". The scholars sat along the walls on seats made from stones and oak blocks. In the winter they had a fire made of scraws and small pieces of oak which they got in the bogs. During the winter the children wore small shoes made of wood. They rolled pieces of sack cloth round their legs to keep them warm. The teachers wrote with pointers: the children with quill pens which were made from the wings of wild fowl. Each child in the school brought a small coin to the teacher in payment

  14. St Patrick's Cross

    Language
    English

    St Patricks cross was worn by the children long ago on St Patricks Day. They were made in the schools the day before. Each child brought an egg to the school which was used for colouring the cross, the yoke of the egg was used for colouring the part, and the green part was coloured with the juice of some plant.
    When the badges were made any egg which was left over were sold, and sweets bought for the children.
    Along with the badges the children wore shamrock, men also wore shamrock in their caps from St. Patricks Day till Palm Sunday then they wore Palm instead.

  15. Clothes

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Agnes Kerrane
    Informant
    Mrs O' Toole
    Age
    85

    There is a tailor in Lissycasey. His name is Michael Mc.Mahon. Sometime ago there was a tailor in Frure by the name of John Murphy. There is a tailor in Kilmihill. His name is Mc.Mahon. These people make clothes for the people from serge. They scarcely ever sell clothes. The people about seventy years made all their own clothes from flannel. When the sheep were shorn the wool was washed combed and carded. It was sent to the weaver to be woven. When it was woven it was washed and coloured. The women of the house made clothes from the cloth which was called frieze. The men wore frieze coats and waiscoats. They had Corduroy trousers sometimes knee-breeches long stockings and shoes. The women wore flannel skirts and dresses. The children wore white flannel. There is a vast difference in dressing at present. The people wear no flannel only cloth bought in shops. Long ago the people had many verses about the making of clothes. The following is a verse.

    The wool is shuttled very soon woven in

  16. Emblems and Objects of Value

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Josie Gallagher

    country and after her death the people started to make crosses, the same as she made, in her honour. This was kept up from generation to generation and even still every year some people make a cross in honour of St Brigid which they call "The St Bigid Cross".
    Long ago the children out of the district wore badges in honour of St Patrick. A badge was made thus :- First of all, a piece of paper was got and another piece of green paper was pasted to the other paper and then on St Patricks Day the children wore these crosses on their shoulders in honour of St. Patrick.
    An old custom connected with May Day is the making of the May Bush. On My Day is the local children choose a nice little bush which they decorated with wild flowers of every kind and coloured papers. Next they light candles on the bush and dance around it.

  17. Old Crafts

    Language
    English

    Old Crafts
    Mrs Randewich remembers when he mother grew her own flax and make her own lined Mrs Randolph has some of the linen yet. Mrs Hall makes her own soap she lived in the town land of skeagh. Patrick Stevens makes baskets and brings them to the fair of Bailieboro to sell them. My grandfathers) grandfather Mr. Henry Gibsom who lives in Lisball remembers the time when they made their own rush candles and burnt them. It was quite a common thing a number of years ago for the people the clogs that their children wore Old lime kilns are to be met with in many places in Ireland and it was in these that the people burnt their own lime. My Grandmother used to weave her own wool (linens) and knit the socks that my father wore.

  18. The Care of the Feet

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Annie Magorry

    factories are sold to the merchants and the merchants retail them to the people. In former years when a person wanted a pair of boots it was the custom to leave his or her measure with a shoemaker. Then the shoemaker would make the boots and the person who wanted then would pay the shoemaker for making them.
    Boots are repaired locally in this district. The man who repairs the boots is called a cobbler. In former years clogs were worn by the people. In olden times children wore clogs to school but at present they wear boots. The (of) uppers of the clogs are made of leather and the soles are made of wood.

    The man who makes the clogs is called a clog - maker. At present there is only

  19. The Care of the Feet

    Language
    English
    Collector
    George Bass
    Age
    14
    Informant
    Miss M. Gordon

    In olden times a lot of people wore clogs, and they were made out of Bog Elder, and leather. They were very warm and comfortable to wear, and they were made in this district.

    In the old days all the poor children wore no boots nor clogs, and tinkers children wear no boots still. In the very olden days everyone here went in their bare feet except when going to prayers. They used to throw the water out over their left shoulder after washing their feet,
    Sometimes a man in the locality repairs boots or shoes, but he never makes any. Clogs are wore but not very often. Men often put wooden soles on their boots if the leather ones, wore out very quickly.

  20. Care of the Feet

    Language
    English
    Informant
    James Daniels

    Ketty Traynor of Lisnagoan dead about forty years ago, never wore boots. She was a traveller who went begging about. Children wore boots long ago as soon as they were able to walk but my mother did not wear them until she was ten years old.
    The people would not throw water out at night after washing the feet because they say it would be unlucky.
    Patrick McEnroe of Cashel repairs boots and also Thomas McCabe of Baugh used to make boots. Long ago there were more boot makers and John and James