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  1. (no title)

    About twelve years a man called Patrick Mc Gonagle of Carndonagh, now living at Milbrae, beside the convent school, joined the Free State Army and was stationed in the Curragh of Kildare.

    Language
    English

    About twelve years a man called Patrick McGonagle of Carndonagh, now living in Millbrae, beside the Convent School, joined the Free State

  2. Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Andrew Taylor
    Informant
    Mrs Taylor
    Age
    56

    There is a fair in Carndonagh every three months. When a man buys a horse or a cow or a pig he gets back what is called a luck penny. I was at a fair in Carndonagh and I saw a man buying young pigs. When he bought them he took a pair of clippers and cut some hair off their ears, and the pigs were squealing. When a man sells a horse he gives the man he sells him to back half-a-crown or five shillings of a luck penny. Young pigs would cost anything from £1 to thirty shillings. When you sell about twenty pounds worth of pigs you would give back about ten shillings for luck. The cattle bought around this district are sent to the midlands of Ireland and fattened. When they are about two years old they are shipped to England and Scotland

  3. Another

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Nellie Doherty
    Informant
    Philip Diver
    Age
    88
    Occupation
    farmer

    Once upon a time there lived a man in Carndonagh called Patrick Doherty. He went to Derry to but a horse and there was

  4. Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Crumlish
    Informant
    Dan Sweeney
    Age
    73

    Every last Thursday of the month we have a fair in Moville. It is a big fair. The people of this district go there to sell their oats and vegetables, and stock. Every three months we have a fair in Culdaff. In Carndonagh there is a market every Monday, but an important market on the first Monday of every month. There is also a quarterly fair on the twenty first of each month - February, May, November and August. Markets here are always held in towns. The people of Glenagivney sell their horses and cattle in Carndonagh.
    Some dealers come around the district before fair days buying cattle. They expect to get it at a cheaper price and on this account the farmers do not like to sell to them. It is said that when buyers or jobbers, come around the place that the market is improving. Dealers on fair days also come out the roads meeting the cattle going to the fair and try to buy them there. There were never any fairs held at cross-roads here but there was a "cross road" fair held at Gleneely, six miles from here, in the road to Carndonagh. My uncle says that it is over fifty years since this fair was held.
    Long ago there was a fair held in Glenane Hill, between Glenagivney and Shrove, but only sheep

  5. Midnight Threshing

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Ann Long
    Informant
    Edward Doherty
    Age
    50

    Once upon a time there was a man coming home from Carndonagh at ten o'clock at night. He was passing a barn down at Claggin. The barn belonged to Samey Campbell. Now this man threw a stone at the house the night that Sam was going to his rest (dying). So, when he was coming from Carndonagh he heard a noise down in the barn. He wondered terribly what it was and he stood and lisened to see what it was. And what was it? the mill was working as if

  6. Folklore

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Honor Gibson
    Informant
    Mick Harkin

    Once upon a time a man from Carndonagh named Daniel Bovaird was going to Derry to sell a horse. On the way the horse died. He skinned the horse and went back to Carndonagh and sold the skin. He came over and told his people. He and all his people were very sorry about the horse. He went to bed and he wasn't long in bed till he heard a rap at the door. He got out of bed again put on his clothes and went to the door. He opened the door and what did he see but the horse.

  7. The Old Sod House

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Neil Gill
    Informant
    Ned Cavanagh
    Age
    circa 68

    About two hundred years ago there lived in Carroghill an old woman. This woman came first from Carndonagh. She lived in a small sod house and she was named Kuty Ban.
    When this old woman died after some years, the wee house went to loss. It is on the side of the Old Hill Road.
    The ruins can be seen as also the fireplace. It is on the edge of a drain
    Carroghill is situated west of the road leading to Carndonagh.

  8. Local Monuments

    There is a standing stone in a field of Philip O' Donnell's, Ballybig, Carndonagh.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maeve Doogan
    Informant
    Mrs Farron
    Age
    36

    There is a standing stone in a field of Philip O'Donnell's, Ballybig, Carndonagh. It is about ten feet in height and four feet in breadth. It is said that it was one of the Tuath De Denann that was buried there and that the stone was raised as a monument of him. This stone is standing up straight and is shaped thus.
    In the field between the Hospital, Carndonagh, and the Glentogher River, there is a large stone standing erectly. Some say that it marks a Giant's Grave, but others say that it was one of those erratics so common in Ireland.

  9. The High Jumpers

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Miss Sarah Nelson

    The best jumpers in Carndonagh are:- Patrick J. MacLaughlin, Chapel Street, Carndonagh.
    Conn MacLaughlin, Drumoville, Malin.
    Patrick MacLaughlin has won five cups, and held the championship of the College in Derry for three successive years. His record is 5ft 2inches.
    Conn MacLaughlin has won several prizes at local sports for the high jump.

  10. Ruins

    Language
    English

    Where the present District Hospital, Carndonagh stands, we are told there stood in penal times a convent. From this convent to the Monastery as far as can be traced there was an underground passage.

    As regards to the site of the monastery there is difference of opinion. Some hold the belief that it and the adjoining Church occupied the place where the present Protestant Church stands.
    John Kearney aged eighty five from Inishineill, Carndonagh, at present in the District Hospital informed the Sisters of Mercy that from what he could gather from his parents, the real site of Monastery was in the demesne

  11. (no title)

    One time there were people who lived near Aghaclay and they were very good to the fairies.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Sarah Callaghan
    Informant
    Roger Toland
    Age
    74

    One time there were people who lived near Aghaclay and they were very good to the fairies. Every night the last thing the lady of the house did was to take three oaten farls and leave them at the well. Then in the morning they were gone. One Monday morning their father and mother went to Carndonagh and the eldest girl was keeping house. The father and mother were kept late in Carndonagh.
    Son in walks a fairy woman wearing a red coat and said to the young girl "I hear that your father is going to build a new barn. So I want you to tell your father to look down behind the wee ditch

  12. Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Florence Wilson
    Informant
    Mrs Wilson
    Age
    50

    The local fairs are held in Carndonagh and Moville. There is one held in Moville on the last Thursday of every month. There is one held in Carndonagh every three months in the year. Long ago there was one in Redcastle and one in Muff.
    The cow market is held in a big field beside the town. The horses are just sold on the streets. The man that buys the horse always gets five shillings along with the horse. This is called luck penny. The man that buys the cattle always gets six pence per head.

  13. Stories of the Holy Family

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Susie Mac Cole
    Informant
    Barney Doherty
    Age
    65
    Occupation
    farmer

    Stories of the Holy Family

    The following story was told by Barney Doherty, Whin-hark, Glentogher, Carndonagh, Co Donegal. aged 65. Occupation- Farming. Brought up in Priestown. Carndonagh. Spent his life between Priestown and Glentogher. Name of person from whom he go the story. Barney Doherty.
    When the Holy Family were returning from Egypt they were going through a wood when they met a shepherd. Many asked him for a pin or a thorn to the cloak of her little Infant Jesus. He said he was too busy to look for one.

  14. The Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Rose Breslin
    Informant
    Patrick Mac Conway
    Age
    83

    The Local Fairs.
    The local fairs are held in Moville, Carndonagh and Culdaff. They are always held in these towns. In former times buyers used to come to the farmer's houses to buy and they still do so occasionally. There used to be fairs held in Gleneely, Cashel and Greencastle, but theses have been discontinued for about ninety years because they occurred within the same week and were held only a week after the Carndonagh fair. Therefore few people attended them. The fair in Greencastle used to be held near a fort and the fair in Gleneely near a graveyard.
    The Moville fair for cattle is held in a special fair-place called The Cowpark. The horses, ponies

  15. On Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Doherty

    On local fairs
    the usual fairs take place in the district of Carndonagh, Moville, and Derry. Fairs are always held in those towns, and in no other places. Fairs are not so big as they were some years ago. Dealers go round the farming houses and buy all the cattle they can get. So that saves the farmers trouble, of taking his cattle to the fair. In former years the local fair of this district was Muff. Derry being so near, the Muff fair soon died out. It used to be customary for the people, to go to some hill and hold a tourist there. On a hill near to this district, the people used to go and hold a tourist there. This fair was called the Billberry fair of Carrickmaquigley. Some people still attend this fair, but it is also dying out. In Carndonagh and Moville, there are special plots for the sale of cattle, but sheep and cattle are sold in the streets. It is customary for the man who sells an animal to give some money back. This money was called luck-penny, and the amount is given according to the price of the animal.

  16. The Monastery in Carrowmore

    Language
    English
    Informant
    James Doherty
    Age
    80

    St Patrick came from Derry to Carndonagh and on from Carndonagh to Moville through Carrowmore. At Carrowmore his nephew "Conais" built a hut to teach those St. Patrick converted here. This hut was called Both Chonais and name was retained until last generation.
    Between years 673 and 693 St. Congellus or Congal built a monastery near site of Both Chonais. This monastery was in existence for a time and stones crosses are still standing as evidence of the monastery's location. One of the crosses is situated in the graveyard connected with the monastery. The monks left Carrowmore and went to erect Church at Cill Maigh Ruaidh but owing to opposition were unable to have church erected and a fight took place hence name of place Cill Maigh Ruaidh. They finally built church at Claggan about one mile from Carrowmore. We are told that a great number of monks lived in Claggan so great that when walking

  17. The Cow

    Language
    English

    The cow is tied in the byre by the bórach - a rope with a "sweel" on it, to the "Revel tree that is a rib or plank running along wall of byre from gable to gable. Some of the cows are tied around horns if they are inclined to "prod" the others. Some are tied around neck. If a maol cow is included to "break" she is tied with brauk, which are two pieces of sticks and rope. The word borach and revel tree are still used. The cow is milked twice a day a tin pan is now used. A pigín was used twenty years ago. The milk is strained now into crockery crock, twenty years ago an oak tub was used. This tub was painted white on outside. It lasted for years. The milk is churned in an oak churn and butter lifted off by hand. It is difficult to give churn staff or dash revolving movement so as not to splash milk out of churn. The lip of churn was called the clum. There were many coopers who made churn and tubs of butter dishes. The son of the cooper in Carndonagh was the teacher in the Carndonagh school. He resigned 25 years ago. Thomas Doherty was his name but he always got "Tommie the Cooper". His nephew lives in his house but does not work at trade. Churns come from Derry. Fifty years ago the butter

  18. Brave Deeds

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Philip Brennan
    Age
    11
    Informant
    Hugh Brennan
    Age
    60

    There was a man named Bulley. He was an Irish man and he travelled all Ireland and he beat every man at mowing with the hook. Every town land he beat he got five pound.
    He came so far as Carndonagh and he said that he would challenge any man with the hook mowing and if he won he would have to get five pounds. There was a young Clonmany hired in Carndonagh with James Doherty. This young man's name was Patrick Collins and he was seventeen years old. He was almost six feet in size and he said that he would take him up. Before they started they got a few days rest. Five pounds was left down before they started. They people gathered in hundreds and it was like a fair day. Patrick had a brother and his name was Daniel and he was better than Patrick. Daniel said that he would challenge Bulley if he would beat Patrick.
    So they

  19. The Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Lyle
    Informant
    Neelie Mac Laughlin
    Age
    72

    In most cases luck-money is given when an animal is sold. It is known by no other name in this district but luck-penny. There is no special way of calculating it but if the seller is pleased with his bargain he is more apt to give a good luck-penny. When a bargain is made, the parties concerned show their agreement by the dealer accepting the animal and the seller accepting the money. Some times they strike their right hands together and sometimes when a seller gets a luck penny he spits on it to bring good luck. Some of the cattle when sold are marked with keel, some are rubbed with paint on the flank with a marking stick, and with others a little of the wool is cut off their backs. The halter or rope is usually kept when an animal is sold.
    The four quarterly fairs of Carndonagh are the great fairs of the year locally. They are held on the following dates, 21st February, 21st May, 21st August and 21st November. The Christmas market in Carndonagh which is held

  20. Story

    Once upon a time there was a Bishop and his parents came from the Isle of Doagh.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Rose Doherty
    Informant
    Paddy Doherty

    Once upon a time there was a Bishop and his parents came from the Isle of Doagh. The Bishop's name was Bishop O Colaghan. At the same time there was a man named McDaid in Cabby Duey a place near Coolcross. There was a Protestant man living in Carndonagh named William Campbell. (man) Now the English soldiers were stopping in Carndonagh and this William Campbell man was hiding the Bishop on them. If you would get a priest's head in that time you would get ten pounds from the English for it.
    This man named McDaid came to William Campbell and asked him