Text search

Filter results

Transcripts count: 207
Back
/ 11 Forward
  1. Fairy Stories

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Monica Cavanagh
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Cavanagh
    Age
    55

    About the year 1930 three men went to the bog to cut turf. When they were returning in the evening they found on the side of the hill of Crucknooskey in Glenagannon a wooden barrel about two feet in height and one foot broad full of Danish butter. It weighed about forty lbs. These men were William Mc Elhinney og Glack, Carndonagh, Neil Mc Keague of Foxhole, Carndonagh, and Joseph Porter, Effishmore, Carndonagh.

  2. Great Men

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Miss Mary B Mc Donough

    composing poetry and plays. He performs in all the plays produced in the Colgan Hall. He also sings at all the concerts. He has a special facility for composing as he sings. Mr. Doherty resides in The Diamond, Carndonagh.
    Mr. Patrick Lynch resides in Pound Street, Carndonagh.
    Mr. William Crampsey, Diamond, Carndonagh, ranks third as a comic actor. His natural manner of acquitting himself of his part makes him most popular with the audience. He is also gifted with rare musical talent and can play several musical instruments.

  3. Severe Weather

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Eliza Hartin
    Informant
    John Gillespie
    Age
    78

    Severe Weather
    One August fair day in Carndonagh about six or seven years ago. It turned out a very stormy day and it rained so heavy that all the rivers and streams were flooded and also the roads. It got dark very early this day and lots of people had to stop in Carndonagh all that night and lots of people found it very hard to get home. There was a man and his wife from the Illies at this fair. They left Carndonagh about three o'clock with their horse and cart to go home. They made their way home as far as the Illies Riveer. It was awful dark and this (ro) river was overflooded across the whole road. It is said that the horse walked into the river and the man and the woman must have been thrown into the river and they must have been drowned. The horse he went home himself. All the people of the Illies were out looking for the man and his woman that night. The next morning the two peoples bodies were found about two miles or two miles and a half away from the place that they were drowned. There was a great thunder and lightning storm about the year (nin) nineteen hundred

  4. There is a local story told about a place in this district. It is said to be the bed of Diarmuid and Grainne. It is situated in the town-land of Carrowmore. It lies about halfway between the village of Carrowkeel and Carndonagh. It is situated between the parish of Carndonagh and Iskaheen. It consists of a round mound with a bed like shape in it and near to this place is a rock with bones under it which is said to be the bones of Diarmuid and Grainne. Diarmaid who was one of the Fianna of long ago. He was an out-law, and is believed to have often been seeking refuge in the mountains, and lonely places, and Grainne was his wife. The land on which this bed is situated, belongs to a farmer named Philip O'Donnell. It is also situated between the parish of Iskaheen and Buncrana. This mound lies to the left hand side of the Carndonagh road. It lies above P Philip O'Donnell's house out in the hill.

  5. Local Industries

    Language
    English
    Informant
    James Greene
    Age
    65

    There was a tannery in Goorey Gleneely belonging to a family called Crampsey. The exact spot called the "tannyard" is still marked. The skins were bought in Carndonagh and other towns of Inishowen. The work ceased in this place fifty years ago. A son of one of the last workers lives in Carndonagh. His name is William Crampsey. The family to whom it belonged had a tanner from Derry curing the hides and the Crampseys paid him off as they thought they could manage the concern themselves but the first "lot" of hides they put down rotted and they lost heavily and had to give up the business. It is said that the flood came in on the hides. The "tannyard" is close to the river.
    Leather cutting also was a trade connected with the tannery and a family called Mc Conalogue of Listallaghan cut the leather and sold "makings of shoes" and other leather in Carndonagh. This

  6. Funny Stories

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Patrick Kearney

    About fifty years ago Willie Kearney who lived in Mullins, Carndonagh was drunk. John Porter took him in and gave him a cup of

  7. Old Graveyards

    Language
    English

    There is a standing stone in a field of Philip O'Donnell's Ballybig, Carndonagh, and the people say it was one of the Tuadth De Danann who was buried under it, and he was supposed to be shot.

    There are four graves in a field of John Nelson's Ballybig, Carndonagh, and they call it the "fort". There was a man named Micky Nelson, ploughing in that field and he heard a violin playing in it.

  8. Fairy Stories

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Monica Cavanagh
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Cavanagh
    Age
    55

    There is a district in Glenagannon, Carndonagh called 'Sheese' and there is a green mound called the 'Stirrel' in it. This mound is supposed to be where the fairies lived long ago, but no trace of them can be found now.
    One evening about thirty years ago Maggie Ní Elhinney, formerly of Glack, Carndonagh

  9. Fairy Stories

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Monica Cavanagh
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Cavanagh
    Age
    55

    Over one hundred and twenty years ago an old man named Dorby Callaghan lived in Craigtown, Carndonagh. He said he saw a number of fairies and heard beautiful music around the 'Stirrel' in Sheese.
    Another man having the same name lived in Buildings, Carndonagh about the same time. He saw a little woman in the Oldtown and he went down every day with bread to her. He left it at a certain spot and immediately after his leaving the bread was lifted.

  10. (no title)

    About twelve years a man called Patrick Mc Gonagle of Carndonagh, now living at Milbrae, beside the convent school, joined the Free State Army and was stationed in the Curragh of Kildare.

    Language
    English

    About twelve years a man called Patrick McGonagle of Carndonagh, now living in Millbrae, beside the Convent School, joined the Free State

  11. Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Andrew Taylor
    Informant
    Mrs Taylor
    Age
    56

    There is a fair in Carndonagh every three months. When a man buys a horse or a cow or a pig he gets back what is called a luck penny. I was at a fair in Carndonagh and I saw a man buying young pigs. When he bought them he took a pair of clippers and cut some hair off their ears, and the pigs were squealing. When a man sells a horse he gives the man he sells him to back half-a-crown or five shillings of a luck penny. Young pigs would cost anything from £1 to thirty shillings. When you sell about twenty pounds worth of pigs you would give back about ten shillings for luck. The cattle bought around this district are sent to the midlands of Ireland and fattened. When they are about two years old they are shipped to England and Scotland

  12. Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Crumlish
    Informant
    Dan Sweeney
    Age
    73

    Every last Thursday of the month we have a fair in Moville. It is a big fair. The people of this district go there to sell their oats and vegetables, and stock. Every three months we have a fair in Culdaff. In Carndonagh there is a market every Monday, but an important market on the first Monday of every month. There is also a quarterly fair on the twenty first of each month - February, May, November and August. Markets here are always held in towns. The people of Glenagivney sell their horses and cattle in Carndonagh.
    Some dealers come around the district before fair days buying cattle. They expect to get it at a cheaper price and on this account the farmers do not like to sell to them. It is said that when buyers or jobbers, come around the place that the market is improving. Dealers on fair days also come out the roads meeting the cattle going to the fair and try to buy them there. There were never any fairs held at cross-roads here but there was a "cross road" fair held at Gleneely, six miles from here, in the road to Carndonagh. My uncle says that it is over fifty years since this fair was held.
    Long ago there was a fair held in Glenane Hill, between Glenagivney and Shrove, but only sheep

  13. Midnight Threshing

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Ann Long
    Informant
    Edward Doherty
    Age
    50

    Once upon a time there was a man coming home from Carndonagh at ten o'clock at night. He was passing a barn down at Claggin. The barn belonged to Samey Campbell. Now this man threw a stone at the house the night that Sam was going to his rest (dying). So, when he was coming from Carndonagh he heard a noise down in the barn. He wondered terribly what it was and he stood and lisened to see what it was. And what was it? the mill was working as if

  14. Folklore

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Honor Gibson
    Informant
    Mick Harkin

    Once upon a time a man from Carndonagh named Daniel Bovaird was going to Derry to sell a horse. On the way the horse died. He skinned the horse and went back to Carndonagh and sold the skin. He came over and told his people. He and all his people were very sorry about the horse. He went to bed and he wasn't long in bed till he heard a rap at the door. He got out of bed again put on his clothes and went to the door. He opened the door and what did he see but the horse.

  15. The Old Sod House

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Neil Gill
    Informant
    Ned Cavanagh
    Age
    circa 68

    About two hundred years ago there lived in Carroghill an old woman. This woman came first from Carndonagh. She lived in a small sod house and she was named Kuty Ban.
    When this old woman died after some years, the wee house went to loss. It is on the side of the Old Hill Road.
    The ruins can be seen as also the fireplace. It is on the edge of a drain
    Carroghill is situated west of the road leading to Carndonagh.

  16. Local Monuments

    There is a standing stone in a field of Philip O' Donnell's, Ballybig, Carndonagh.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maeve Doogan
    Informant
    Mrs Farron
    Age
    36

    There is a standing stone in a field of Philip O'Donnell's, Ballybig, Carndonagh. It is about ten feet in height and four feet in breadth. It is said that it was one of the Tuath De Denann that was buried there and that the stone was raised as a monument of him. This stone is standing up straight and is shaped thus.
    In the field between the Hospital, Carndonagh, and the Glentogher River, there is a large stone standing erectly. Some say that it marks a Giant's Grave, but others say that it was one of those erratics so common in Ireland.

  17. Local Fairs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Florence Wilson
    Informant
    Mrs Wilson
    Age
    50

    The local fairs are held in Carndonagh and Moville. There is one held in Moville on the last Thursday of every month. There is one held in Carndonagh every three months in the year. Long ago there was one in Redcastle and one in Muff.
    The cow market is held in a big field beside the town. The horses are just sold on the streets. The man that buys the horse always gets five shillings along with the horse. This is called luck penny. The man that buys the cattle always gets six pence per head.