Text search

Transcripts count: 9
  1. St John's Day

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kittie Barry
    Informant
    Cornelius Barry

    Saint John's Day is the 24th June. The night before is called Bonfire night. Long ago every lit a Bonfire, and the farmers made the cows go out over it.
    Then the people had great fun, sometimes crowds would gather toghter and have a dance around the fire until it would be burned out.
    Now no one bothers about making the cows go over the fire, even if they do have a fire. Very few people have a fire they might light a bush but that is all. Tis the remains of a Pagan custom they say and that it would not be right to do it.

  2. Bonfire or Bone-Fire night. 24th June. Fire lit. Ashes sprinkled in each field. Cattle driven three times round fire. Jumping over it. Bone put into it. A weed called moguard was put into it. Then this was brought home and put into thatch.

  3. Saint John's Day

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Flynn
    Age
    54

    Saint John's Day
    Saint John's day falls on the twenty fourth of June. It is a customary thing on St John's eve for people to light a bonfire on some part of the land. It is nice to look up the hills at about ten o'clock and see

  4. Saint John's Day

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Flynn
    Age
    54

    the bonfires. In some places a crowd gathers and dance around the bonfire. As the fire goes down they go in to their homes and tell stories about St. John's Eve.
    Mrs. Flynn
    Glencourn
    Co. Waterford
    Age 58

  5. Old Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Nora Scanlan
    Informant
    Mr G Hodnett
    Age
    80

    had their animals and stock driven to the fire over which each animal was forced to jump. A spark of red fire was thrown on each animal's back as it jumped.
    A weed called bógairt was held over the smoke of the bonfire and afterwards hung in the barn. This was supposed to increase the grain for harvest. It was also used to cure sick beasts. Horses to be sold were beaten with an old slipper for luck.
    The owner of a mare with twin foals killed the mare immediately as it was considered an omen of ill luck.
    A cow with twin calves was considered very lucky and the calves were well cared.

  6. Local Roads - Ballyduff

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Margaret Murphy
    Informant
    Mrs Murphy
    Age
    circa 36

    There is one road leading from the village of Ballyduff to Tournageeha known as The Rocks and further up where it joins the main road it is called The Ropallac.
    The main road leads to Araglen and on to Mitchelstown and Ballyporeen.
    There is a very old road leading through the mountain from Ballysaggart down to the main road in Tournageeha. It is only used as a Mass path now as it is rough for horses.
    There is a cross road in Tournageeha known as The Cross and it was the custom to have a dance there in Summer time and to have a bonfire there on St. Johns Night.
    There the boys generally meet for a game of cards or a chat during the Summer evenings.

  7. Laethanta Áirithe

    Language
    Mixed
    Collector
    Eilís Ní Chadhla
    Informant
    Cáit Breathnach

    stealing our butter.
    It was during the month of May that people gave offerings for Masses to protect their crops and produce.
    In olden times it was a custom to light a bonfire on St. John's night and to make the cows jump over it. This was for good luck.
    It was very unlucky to cut your hair on Monday. It was said it would not grow again.
    Tuesday was said to be a very lucky day to get married.
    Some people would not care to cut a grave on Monday or to remove furniture into a new house.

  8. Piseoga

    Language
    English

    Long ago when people would be going playing cards, they would walk under a brier for luck
    Long ago when people would be going on a journey they would put a grain of salt in their pockets for a safe journey.
    The old people would never sweep the house on a Monday.
    The old people would never make a short cut on their way home from a journey at night.
    The first time the old people would bring a young horse to the forge the smith would never charge them but the people would give him a half glass of whiskey instead.
    The first pups a dog would have the old people would alays kill them.
    On St. John'snight long ago people used to light a bonfire at a gap anddrive cows through it.
    On St. Martin's night long agp people used to kill fowl in honour of him.

  9. Laethanta Áirithe

    Language
    English

    People do not move into a new house in May because they say that if they do someone will die out of the house.

    Lá crosta na bliadhna or St. John's day falls on the 24th of June. A custom with the old people on that day was to light a bonfire inside a gate or a gap going into a field and drive the cows through it on St. John's night. The was done to prevent sickness amongst the cows and especially to prevent Abortion, commonly "slinging".
    On the eve of the Ascension Thursday rushes were placed outside kitchen doors and on window sills to keep away plague and sickness for that year.
    Lady Day which falls on the 24th of March was considered a lucky day to remove from one house to another whilst May was supposed to be an unlucky month.
    Whitewashing, cutting, brooms, or starting repairs on a house would not be carried out in May as it also meant a death in the family.
    The first customer to enter a shop on Monday morning would not be let go without buying something as the shopkeeper would not have luck for the week if he let him go.
    Credit was never given to the first buyer on Monday morning.
    Ashes was never thrown out on a Monday and floors were swept from the door inwards so that the luck would not be thrown away for the week.