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Transcripts count: 23
  1. A Bonfire

    Language
    English

    Some years ago the people used to have a bonfire in honour of a Saint. This custom has died out in this part of the country. The fire was lighted on the twenty-fourth of June.
    For a few days before bonfire night the young people gathered bushes and some brought turf for the fire. The bonfire was put on a hill and there was one in every townland. A hundred or two went to the fire and some one brought oil. When the fire was lighted the people flocked round it and stayed there all night.
    The young people went for sport and the old people went for a religious purpose. Some of the people brought home a burned stick because they thought a blessing was attached to it. The stick was kept in the house until the next bonfire night.
    The protestants had a bonfire in a week or two after that in honour of King William. The farmers did not like this because the protestants pulled down gaps. Some of them did not do this

  2. A Fairy Story

    Language
    English
    Informant
    J.J. Lynch

    A Fairy Story.
    About two miles on the western side of Roslea there is a hill. One day a man whose name is unknown went up the hill to burn the whins. On reaching the bottom of the hill he saw a nice big bonfire on top of it and nice music around it. He stood and listened to it. he thought he heard something walking behind him and onlooking round saw nothing. The next thing he remembered was sitting on top of the hill beside the great big bonfire

  3. Marriage Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary F. Mackin
    Occupation
    teacher

    Marriages in district average about one a year. The local customs survive with the exception of the lighting of a bonfire before the home of the newly married pair by the young boys of the district. They sometimes gather round the house with musical instruments in the hope of being invited in.

  4. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English
    Collector
    E. Kelleghan
    Informant
    Pat Mc Gough

    In the locality in a remote part of Co Monaghan there is a place called Formil Fort. It is situated in the village of Ballytoarin which is about fourteen miles from Monaghan town.
    Old people say that a crock of gold is buried there in the Fort. A man called Tom McCabe with other men was lighting a bonfire. One of the men went to get firewood near the fort. He fell into the bushes. As he lay in the

  5. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maggie Marron

    they have dumplings over broth made of vegetables. The 1st April is called "All Fools Day." On this day many people are made fools of by telling them something which is not true. Anything that is born on Whit Sunday is called a Cingíseach and it is said it will kill someone. On the eve of St John's feast a bonfire is held. Many people gather around this fire. When it is all burned out a sprig of it is thrown in every field to bring good luck. On Hallow Eve there are a great number of tricks played by the played by the children. It is said that if person walks round a lone bush three times he would see the person he is to be married to. On New Years Day long ago water was never thrown out on the door or nothing was ever given away.

  6. Bonfires

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Brighid Ní Leannáin
    Informant
    Michael Lennon

    Bonfires.


    St. John the Baptist suffered a martyr's death for his faith on the 23rd June. Since then a bon fire is lighted on the anniversary to commemorate the event. Another bonfire is lighted on the 28th June to commemorate the martyrdom of Sts. Peter and Paul.

  7. (no title)

    Nearly all the tenants in Derrygoony and Corravaccan were yeomanry.

    Language
    English

    Near all the tenants in Derrygoony & Corravacan were yeomanry. They went regularly to be drilled by Colonel Carr.
    One St John's Eve there was a bonfire at the Five Crosses. The Yeomen surrounded the place. They 'lathered' the men with burning turf from the fire and then 'shaved' them with their bayonets.

  8. A Funny Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Una Mc Caffrey
    Informant
    Mr Mc Caffrey

    In olden days there was a fort in our townland and there are still old remains. In this fort the fairies used to live and there are some stories told. One of the stories is this. There was a bonfire lighted on this hill to celebrate the return of a member of Parliament. There were all kinds of amusements dancing, singing, and shooting. Just about mid night my grand father darted for home and as he was passing by the fort a little fairy about a foot high stepped out beside him. He wore a red jacket and my grandfather called on another neighbour to come home with him.

  9. Local Marriage Customs

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr J. Smyth

    The customs of weddings are lighting a bonfire in front of the door and putting tar on it to keep it lit. Sometimes men dress up in straw and come to the house. Their faces, legs, and body would be covered with straw so that nobody would know them. The people give them sweets and pieces of cake if they take them.
    When some people are away getting married, the neighbors put hay and straw in bags and stuff them down the chimney. Then when the bride and groom come home and light the fire, the smoke would fill the home till they got the straw out of the chimney.
    Collected from Mr. J. Smyth Newbliss

  10. Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Gillen
    Informant
    Edward Gorman

    and took down the child, a healthy little boy about three months old. He was baptised Willy Eagle owing to where he was found.

    Anne nursed him carefully and when he grew up took him to school. They loved each other and when Willy was sixteen years of age he became engaged to be married. Anne's mother was opposed to the marriage and consulted an old hag how to stop it. The hag told her to have a bonfire blazing at the school next evening and whilst the children were playing around it to shove Willy into it and burn him to death.
    Old Mrs Glue did as the "hag" told her and just before Willy was quite dead Anne

  11. Historic - Fincarn

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Thomas Flanagan
    Occupation
    teacher

    Fianna, a military force called into being by Cormac, for the protection of his kingdom. While the principal residence of Fionn was in the Hill of Allen he also had a residence in Fincarn and he and his warriors often sauntered along its sides disported over the plains or pursued deer and wild boar with their famous wold hounds.
    Very little of the cairn on the hill now remains but a circular range of upright stones marks in the spot where the cairn was. And even some of these were misplaced and deposited in the slough nearby. Or they may be something of the nature of the ring at Emania, near Armagh. Anyway they are of historic interest and excite the curiosity of the antiquarian. Nearby is a large flat stone a Dorna Fionn, which Fionn threw from Slieve Gullion to Fincarn and in which the impression of his hand remained. Some years ago a bonfire was lighted in

  12. Severe Weather

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Margaret Shankey
    Informant
    Bernard Shankey
    Age
    50

    The harvest of 1816 was known as the "malty harvest". There was no rain from the crops were set until the bonfire night. When the bonfires were lit it began to rain and the sun never shone for the rest of the year and the crops were lost. The people suffered greatly during the Winter and Spring The following Spring seed oats was £2 per barrel - an enormous price in those days and people were unable to procure seed oats

    Droughts
    During the Summer of 1826 there was a great drought. The oats crop was a very poor one and it had to be pulled during the night when it was moist with the dew because if pulled during the day it would break

  13. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maggie Clerkin

    114
    and dancing round the fire.This night is called "bonfire night".
    On the Eve of "All Saints"many tricks are played by boys and girls of this district such as hiding gates,moving carts,ploughs or traps.Sometimes these hidden articles do not be found for a long time.This night is called Hallow E'en and it is eagerly watched for by children.

  14. Marriage Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    W. Blackwood
    Informant
    Mr G. Blackwood
    Age
    59

    Marriages in this district usually take place in the Summertime. May is supposed to be an unlucky month for marriages. Money is given as a dowry. Sometimes presents are given.

    There are many customs on the wedding day. People throw con-fetty on the bride and groom and the wedding cards are decorated with ribbons and sometimes an old boot is tied to the back of the car for luck. A wedding feast or party is held that night at which there is dancing and games. Sometimes neighbours light a bonfire at the house.

  15. Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Marcella Loughran
    Age
    12
    Informant
    Patrick Loughran
    Age
    81

    As the Loanin is supposed to have existed over three hundred years ago. In ancient times where the Loanin crosses the Cavanaguilla river there was no bridge and the people crossed it by means of a ford which generally consisted of large stones to step upon. If people had asses with them they asses wither waded through the water or jumped it. Along the Loanin in former years there were heaps of stones for resting bags.
    In olden times the crossroads was a gathering place for the young people. There were dances, singing, pitching marbles and jumping and throwing weights at the crossroads. A fire was always lit long ago at the crossroads on bonfire night.

  16. The Listinney Bonfire

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Rose Kelly
    Informant
    (name not given)

    About forty years ago Tom McGuigan of Anasera was home from America.

    St John's night came round and he decided to hold a bonfire. He brought coal and tar and turf. He brought five or six barrels of stout. There was a deck erected. Then the drinking and dancing began. St Marys band played and drinking and dancing carried on until morning. Anyone who was there said it was the best night that ever was in Clontibret. Neal Doran the poet was there and made a song about Listinney Hill.
    These are a few of the verses of it.

    (I)
    Ye sons of bold Clontibret

  17. Composition - On Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Pól Ó Carrathar
    Informant
    Miss C. Mc Ginnity
    Age
    40

    now the Main Trunk Road from Carrickmacross to Castleblayney. At that time a man and horse could only go by it as it was so narrow.
    Long ago it was a great custom for the young people of the country to gather to the cross-roads and have a dance. They sang and they used to stay till near morning. Some nights they lighted a bonfire, and they had big drums with them. They marched along and carried torch lights. Sometimes they used to toss halfpence and play cards.
    Along the Annyalla Road there is a cross cut out on the grass to mark the place where a man was killed. He was killed coming from a football match by a brake.
    There is a Mass path along the top of Corderryduff

  18. Composition - On Churchyards

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eibhlín Ní Dhiarmada
    Informant
    Mr J. Carrville
    Age
    30

    There is one churchyard in the parish in which I live. The only name given to this churchyard:- is "Finnegan's graveyard". It is situated in the townland of Mullabrack.
    This graveyard is never used except for grazing cattle. The churchyard is still in shape and there is a circular ditch round it.
    There are three tomb-stones in the graveyard. They are made in the form of a cross.
    There was a number of people buried there. There are no un baptised children buried in this old graveyard.
    There is a kern in the townland of Oghill, on Ardle Connolly's land, where great warriors used to be buried. Up till recently people used to come to the kern and light fires on a bonfire night and sing and dance. This is not carried on now.

  19. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Joseph Boylan

    111
    Festival Customs
    On the Eve of St. John's Day,a bonfire is lighted in this district.The fire is usually lighted on Sherry's Hill in Annacalkill.The people gather money and buy turf,sticks and oil.They light the fire about nine o'clock.When the fire is blazing they all start to sing and dance.Sometimes the people spend all night singing and dancing around the fire.

    On May Eve the children gather May flowers because it is said when the May flowers are put at the door the fairies will not come.
    On Shrove Tuesday the people have a custom of making pancakes.They usually make fools of the children

  20. The Folklore of Our District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Caitlín Nich Cionnaith
    Age
    13

    Drumboat Drumbaid the meaning of it is the ridge of the boat. The reason why it is called that is the town land is the shape of a boat. It is in the Parish of Inniskeen and the County of Monaghan.
    Drumboat is bordering the six counties. There are a few fairy bushes. There is one in Pat Mc Kenna`s field there is a fairy fort near it.
    There are old customs which the old Irish people had. At Christmas there are mummers. And they have some rhyme of their own which no one knows only themselves. On the 29th June there is a bonfire lit and all the youths of the country side play games around it to cheer and shout.
    On St Stephens day a crowd of boys go around and there rhyme is:
    The wren the wren
    The king of all birds and we call it St Stephens day although hes proud his familes great so rise up Biddy and give us a treat
    Once the Catholics and the Protestants were fighting in Drumboat. The Catholics won the battle and they threw the Protestants into it. After that the lake became a swamp. The people tried to clean it but bones came with the water so the stopped cleaning it. From that day to this the lake is to be seen a swamp