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Transcripts count: 176
  1. Old Customs

    Language
    English

    1. When a cow calves the hair is burned off the udder with a blessed candle.
    2. It is unlucky to bring in the flowers of blackthorn to a house.
    3. When a family kill a pig they should always divide the meat with the neighbour who should never refuse it.

  2. The Blessed Well in Kilshenane

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eileen Hannon
    Age
    14
    Informant
    Mrs Bridget Flaherty
    Age
    74

    come from far and near to pray rounds there. We may pray rounds there any day, but there are four special days for doing so - Saint Senan's day, the 8th March, the Saturday before the 1st of May the Saturday before Saint John's day, and the 24th June, and the Saturday before Michalemas the 29th of September. Saint Senan's well is surrounded by an iron railing.
    There are three statues over the well placed there by one who may yet be canonized - the late Miss O'Connell, Principal teacher of Dromclough Girls' National School. One of these is of the Blessed Virgin Mary, one of the Sacred Heart, another of the Mary of the Gael Saint Brigid. It is thought that the well sprang up

  3. Hidden Treasures

    Language
    English
    Collector
    William O' Brien
    Age
    14
    Informant
    John Costello
    Age
    65
    Occupation
    farmer

    About a century ago there lived at the foot of Beenanaspuig hill, a man named John O'Sullivan. One night he dreamt of gold hidden in the fairy fort at Bunaraha, a short distance away. One night he came about twelve o'clock to dig for it. When he was digging for a while he looked around and saw a man standing behind him. He lost his courage and went home that night, and went to bed. When he was in bed he could not sleep but dreaming of the gold. He dreamt of it three nights in succession and then the fourth night he could not sleep at all. He got up resolved to find it. So he came along to the fort and began to dig. He heard a roar and looking behind him he saw a bull. He lost his courage again, and ran home. So for three after he dreamt of it again. He went to a priest in Duagh, and told him his story. The priest blessed a little bottle of holy water and gave it to him, and told him to make

  4. Saint Senan

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Ellen Foley
    Age
    74

    Long long ago when England's cruel laws sent out soldiers to kill the priests and tie them up to a tree for the wild fowl to pick their flesh poor Saint Senan was hunted by them for days and nights. This night he ran through bogs and rivers poor and hungry until he landed where our Blessed Well is to-day. There was a big cover of sloe bushes as thick as the hair of your head, and he "pumpled" around with his hand till he found a little smooth green little flag, and he made his pillow of it, and left the print of his cheek on it.
    He spent a long dreary hungry winter there, and had nothing to eat only sloes and haws. The winter was then passing away

  5. (no title)

    Long ago there lived a young man named Jack.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Máirín Ní Síthig
    Informant
    Eamonn Ó Síthig
    Age
    over 50

    Throughout the year Jack had plenty money for gambling and drinking. He attended all the sports and "patterns" for miles around him. Towards the end of the year Jack thought of his promise to the devil, and got afraid. He was so much afraid that he went to the Dean in Tralee and told him his story. The Dean told him to go away, that he himself could do nothing for him. Jack was very downhearted and he asked the curate to help him. He also told him that he could do nothing. As the fateful day was drawing near Jack was so desperate that he could neither sleep nor eat. He chanced the priests again. The Dean and two curates were walking in the Church grounds. Jack walked up to them and asked the Dean and the old curate to help him. They told him as before that they could do nothing for him, that he should suffer for his evil-doings. The young curate heard the talk between them and he felt very sorry fro Jack. He was at the gate going home when the young curate called him back. He asked the Dean to let him do something for the man and he said he would.
    The curate told Jack to make a good Confession and to take the pledge. Jack gladly did this. The curate then blessed three separate vessels of Holywater, and filled one bottle from each vessel.

  6. Bad Luck

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mrs Eileen Stack
    Occupation
    principal
    Informant
    Thomas Daly
    Age
    55
    Occupation
    farmer

    wife 'down' for it- the piseog. This woman one day met the above farmer's daughter on the road; she gave her a dead bonhamh inside in a paper sugar bag, with instructions to throw the parcel into the canal on her way home. This canal was bounding both their farmers.
    When the little girl left the woman she opened the parcel, and found the dead bonhamh. Being innocent of the the woman's wiles she threw the parcel into the canal.
    She told the story on arriving home, and the farmer told the priest. The priest gave the farmer medals to in Rovers field, and to put in the outhouses. He also blessed the outhouses and better luck came to the farmer.

  7. soldiers were coming. He made his escape from the cave and proceeded towards Knockanare. When he was half way up the hill he was overtaken by the soldiers and killed, and when his body was removed from the place a blessed well broke up where he was killed, and miraculous cures were worked at it. During a battle fought there, the wounded had only to dip the wound in the well and they were cured.
    After a time several wells broke out, about the same place, and people are making rounds at all the wells but they do not know which is the right one.

  8. A Story

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Michael Madigan
    Age
    59

    There is a hill in Duagh called the Hill of Gold or Piper's hole Hill.
    It is said that there was a horse skin of gold hidden there.
    There was a man living near by, and when going rambling to his neighbours house every night had to cross this hill. One night as he was coming home he thought he saw a man standing where the gold was hidden. He went rambling again the second night and he saw the man standing in the same place and he told the priest. The priest blessed a special bottle of holy water and gave it to the man. The priest told him to sprinkle a ring of holy water around himself when he would come near the man and to ask him in God's Name what did he want or could he do

  9. Religious Stories

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Nora Daly

    dear land with its old chapels and convents. This night was very dark and suddenly they saw a light in an old ruin on the top of a cliff. So they decided on going there. When they reached the door they found it to be a ruin of an old church and they went inside from the rain and cold. The whole place was flooded with a bright light. Just at midnight the shadow of a figure of an old priest appeared on the altar steps. He turned around and asked "Will one of you serve Mass?" One of the party bowed before the priest and said "I will serve Father". The Mass went on and they were spellbound with the piety of the Mass. When it was over the priest blessed his little flock and gave each one of his people his Xmas Gift. The young man from India received the gift of Faith. Years after he came back and had the old church re-built and spent the last of his life amongst the poor of the Country parish.

  10. Hidden Treasures

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Joan Hartnett

    Hidden Treasures

    Many old people say that there is a treasure hidden in Ballinageragh. It was placed under a mound of earth near the Blessed Well by the Friars. It is supposed to be a large crock of gold. The Friars hid it there because they were afraid that the Danes would came and take it from them.
    Tradition says that a hound of enormous size guards the treasure at night. Many attempts were made to dig up the gold but the treasure seekers were driven away by a hound. Of late no one has exerted himself.

  11. Herbs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maureen D. O' Connor
    Informant
    William Egan
    Age
    67

    Couch grass is the most harmful weeds growing on my farm. Ciarta, chickenweed and the dock-leaf. These weeds are injurious to the crop because the smother it up and take the food that the crop lives on. Those herbs only grow on poor land. The dandelion and horehound have used in medicinal properties. The dandelion is a cure for the liver. Mach an Tathú is a cure for boils. Horse-ares are a cure for the janduice.
    Story
    There was a woman and her name was Allah. She had three daughters and two were dead with consumption and the third one got sick with it and her mother prayed so hard to the Blessed Virgin that a well of water sprung up at the end of the bed and a little plant inside in it. The plant cured the girl. This plant is called Allah complaint.

  12. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John O' Brien
    Informant
    Maurice Whelan

    his farm was bought by Patrick Sullivan, Finuge, who again sold it to my uncle, Thomas O'Brien, Liscullane, Lixnaw. There is a ditch near my house and there is a gap in it and the people call it "Caitineen's Gap." It is said that an old woman lived here some years ago whose name was Kate Flaherty. There is also a Blessed Well in the townland of Ballinageragh which is dedicated to Saint Michael.
    The land of Ballinageragh is generally good and fertile. There is some boggy land in the north of the townland and there is a large marsh near the railway. There is no river nor stream in it but there is a spring well very near my own house and this supplies water to the people of the townland.

  13. Traditional Prayers

    Language
    Mixed
    Collector
    Eddie Murphy
    Age
    14

    The sacramental veils in thy love thou never sleepest thou art never weary of thy vigil for poor sinner. O Loving Jesus, O lonely Jesus may my heart be a lamp of light of which shall burn and beem for thee alone watch Sacramental sentinel. Watch for the weary world for thy erring soul for thy poor and lonely child". is said to wish good night to our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament.
    "God love you" is said to a young person who does something for an old person.
    "Snuachan maith chugat" is also said to a young person who does something for an old person.

  14. Traditional Prayers

    Language
    Mixed
    Collector
    Eddie Murphy
    Age
    14

    "Hail and blessed be thy hour and moment in which the Son of God was born of the most pure Virgin Mary at midnight in the piercing cold in the stable of Bethlehem. At that same moment and hour vouchsafe my God to hear my prayer and grant my request through the merits of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ". This prayer is said fifteen times every night from the 30th. of November to Christmas Eve.
    "I wish you a happy Christmas" is said to a person on Christmas morning.
    "God grant you all happiness in the New Year" is said to -

  15. Our Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Simon Heffernan
    Informant
    John Mc Auliffe

    Our Holy Wells.
    There is one blessed well in the parish of Lixnaw. It is called Saint Michael's well and it is in the townland of Ballinageragh. It is in Mr. Thomas O'Brien's land and it is about a hundred yards from the public road. The important day for visiting this well is the 29th of September which is Saint Michael's feast day. In years gone by there was a Church near this well but it is no longer there. This old Church was dedicated to Saint Michael. People pay rounds at this well on the 29th September which is Saint Michael's day. They say a number of Rosaries when going around the well and pray for whatever favour they require. They leave some relics after them at the well such as a penny, a piece of cloth or a statue.
    There is a beautiful statue of Saint Michael near the well. It was placed there by Mrs. Dan Quilter, Gortinore, Lixnaw, in the year 1923 in return for a favour received by

  16. Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eibhlís Ní Chorradáin

    Holy Wells

    There was a parson living in Bedford about eighty years ago. There was a blessed well in his field about one hundred yards away from his house, near the bank of the river. One day his maid washed clothes in it and it removed across the river over to a filed of Nolans in Drombeg. It was a well for sore eyes and one day a very old man came from Knockanure to wash his eyes in the water, because he was blind. He thought that they would not get better: he only chanced it, but to his surprise his sight was restored next morning. It was called Saint Agnes's well. This is how it got its name: One day a very holy woman named Agnes came to the well to wash her eyes, because they were very sore. When she was paying her round she

  17. St Batt's Well

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eibhlín Ní Loingsigh

    St Batt's Well

    There is a blessed well in the district of Coolard. The name of it is St Batt's Well. Every year people who have any disease go to that well to do the rounds for the disease. There is a trout inside in the well and anyone who sees the trout when he is doing the rounds is sure to be cured. They go there twice a year to do the rounds, the Saturday before the 1st of May and the Saturday before St. John's day. They say a rosary for every three rounds and they do nine rounds.
    One day a woman went to the well for a gallon of water. By mistake she brought in the trout in the gallon. She put down the water to boil, but when she went to it again to see if it was boiled it was as cold as when she put it down. She saw the trout

  18. Our Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Shanahan
    Informant
    Thomas Lawlor

    Our Holy Wells
    There is a blessed well situated about half a mile from Lisnaw in the townland of Ballinageragh. It is in Mr. Thomas O’Brien’s field which formerly belonged to Patrick Lynch. The field where the well is situated is called the “chapel field.” It is called this because it is said that the Old church of Lisnaw stood there in former days. The ruins of the church and altar may be still seen at the present day. Visits are made to this well on the 29th September each year. People make rounds at it and say certain prayers. A round usually consists of three Rosaries. It is not known if any particular disease is cured by praying at this well. The people who go there do not bathe in it but wash the diseased parts of their body with the water. There is a big bush near the well on which relics and pious objects are left by the visitors. The well is known as Saint Michael’s well, as the church which was near

  19. Our Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Shanahan
    Informant
    Thomas Lawlor

    the well was dedicated to Saint Michael. I do not know any person who ever took water from the well but I heard an old man saying that a woman once took water from it and that it would not boil for her.
    Near this blessed well is a statue of Saint Michael enclosed in a case made of cement and glass. This statue was erected by Mrs. Dan Quilter, Gortinare, Lisnaw. This woman was cured of a bad form of nervousness. She could not go out or work around the farm, thinking that something would happen to her. One evening, as she was looking out the back-door of her house, she saw a bird of uncommon shape leave the field and alight on a tree near the well.
    Just then the thought struck her that she would pay a visit to the well and do rounds at it. Soon after she visited the well and paid the usual rounds at it. Before a week was finished she was cured of her disease and she was able to do her work around

  20. Our Holy Wells

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bernadette O' Sullivan
    Informant
    Gerald O Sullivan
    Age
    60

    of each decade they throw one pebble away. Then when the seventh round is paid they kneel down and finish the Rosary. Then they take three drinks out of the well and wash their faces at the stream. Then they usually tie a piece of string on an overhanging bush. It is said that according as the cloth wears away the disease wears off the patient.
    It is called St. Senan's well because it was St. Senan who blessed its waters. From the well you can see the ruins of seven churches and round tower in Scattery built by St. Senan.
    There are no fish in the well and the water is not used for household purposes.