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Transcripts count: 9
  1. A Local Story about Fairies

    Language
    English

    My grandfather told me that about sixty or seventy years ago there was a man in Aughamore named Glavey an uncle of the late Pat Glavey of Scrigg who used to have to go with the fairies. He used to have to leave home at about ten
    o'clock every night and go to hills of Ballhine and down to the hills of Arderry and be there all night with us them. My grandfather says that he often saw lights around these hills at all hours of the night. At that, there was a young man named Andrew Tahy in Baile na doice that died. It was known that the fairies had taken him. When the fairies of Arderry and Ballyhine brought Andy they found that they were not able to hold him as he was so strong. Andy often thrashed them so the fairies

  2. Hidden Treasures

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kate Devine
    Informant
    Mr Pat Devine
    Occupation
    farmer

    In the townland of Arderry there is a fort, and in it there is hidden a treasure. The treasure consists of a pot of gold, a battle axe, and a spear, and it was put there by Tuatha Dé Danann.
    From this fort can be seen Darraugh fort, and at one time there was a race called the Formorians living in it and one time they had a fight, and the leader Tuatha Dé Dananna was killed in Arderry fort.
    He was buried in the middle of it, and at his head was placed a pot of gold, and by his side was placed his battle axe, and his spear. To this day can be seen the grave and there are whitehorn bushes growing over it. There were never any attempts made to discover it, and there were never any hidden treasures found in this locality.

    Another treasure is hidden in the townland of Tír na brana? in an old sand-bank near Brackley lough. It contains a crock of gold,

  3. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Alice Kate Devine
    Informant
    Mr Pat Devine
    Informant
    Mrs P. Devine
    Age
    58

    There is a fairy fort in this district and it is called by the name '' fort ''. It is situated in the townland of Arderry. There is another fort in view of it called Darraugh Fort. It is round in shape, and there is a fence round it. No one has ever seen lights at it, or there was never any music heard in it. One night about 12 o' clock there was a band heard coming to it. They were heard laughing and singing and when they came to the fort all of a sudden all stopped.

    Mr. Thomas McGovern, Teeboy, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan used to tell a story that his father told him. One day he was sitting by the fire when a little man came in, dressed in red. He had a cake under his arm and two books,

  4. The Local Roads

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Róisín Byrne
    Informant
    Mr Michael Byrne

    There are some very old roads in this locality. The by-roads are known by the names of the townlands through which they pass.

    The oldest by-road in this locality is Arderry lane. It was made in the Famine period in Ireland, 1846-47 as relief work. Another old by-road is one that leads through the townland of Teeboy. Long ago it was only a foot path, and a cart or side car could not travel on it. In this district there are several short cuts or near ways. They lead through fields to the R.C. Church and from one main road to another. There are two main roads in this district, one leads from the town of Swanlinbar to Ballinamore and the other leads from, Corlough to Glengevlin. Long

  5. Stories of Leipreachans and Mermaids

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maureen Byrne
    Informant
    Mr M. Byrne

    2nd Story.

    Once, Mr John Dolan (deceased) Teeboy, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan was passing Arderry Fort, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan, late at night, and a live coal rolled down the fort to him, and he lit his pipe with it.
    The local name for the Leipreachan in this district is a '' geanncanach. ''
    He lives in a fort and is usually dressed in

  6. Historical Tradition

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mollie Mc Govern
    Informant
    Mrs James Mc Govern

    assembled round the Church, and defied the protestants.
    There is a pitchfork at Mr. Pat Devines. Arderry, Bawnboy. Co. Cavan, that his father had at the (Curnino) time the chapel was to be burned.
    After the battle of Ballinamuck, pikes were hidden on O' Reillys hill, Cronera, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan.

    Crom Cruach the chief Idol of all Ireland , was situated on Darragh Fort, Kilnivart, Co. Cavan.
    It was a big (a big) monster of stone covered with gold.
    There were twelve smaller idols round him covered with silver. St Patrick hit him with his staff and he (Crom Cruach.) vanished.

  7. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Alice Kate Devine
    Informant
    Mr Pat Devine
    Informant
    Mrs P. Devine
    Age
    58

    He asked for a mug of water and he got it. He then sat down at the table and began eating the cake while he was doing so, he was reading.
    When he was finished he told the man if anyman came in after him to tell them there was no one in.
    He then left, and the man watched him and when he was going up at the fort all of a sudden he disappeared.

    Long ago children used to be taken away by the fairies, especially a red haired child.
    They used to be taken away and another child left in its place. This child was very cross and always sick, and it was not long till it died. To protect the children people used to put tongs over the cradle.
    Please see '' Hidden Treasures '' regarding Arderry fort.
    In the townland of Killycluggan there is a fort called

  8. Stories of Leipreachans and Mermaids

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maureen Byrne
    Informant
    Mr M. Byrne

    There are not many stories of leipreachans and mermaids in this district, as it is not a seaside district.

    Mr Patrick MacGovern, Swanlinbar, Co. Cavan once saw two fairies in Arderry Fort, Bawnboy, Co. Cavan.
    For a story connected with a bean-Sí (fairy woman), please see '' Local Happenings. ''
    When people O' or Mac before their surname, are dead or approaching their death a bean-Sí cries.
    Stories of leipreachans are very rare in this district.
    1st Story.
    Mr Patrick Reilly, Culliagh, Bawnboy Co. Cavan saw a little man or leipreachan, not many years ago.
    The man was going through the fields, and he

  9. Local Place Names

    Language
    Mixed

    Aghamore = Áth-Mór

    Means: the great ford.

    Skeghard = Sceach Árd
    Means: the high whitethorn bush.

    Arderry = Árd-Doire
    Means: the high oak grove

    LECARROW properly spelt LECARROWANTEAN =
    LEATH-CEATHRAMH an t-SIDHEAN
    Means: the half quarter of the fairy mount.

    Annagh = Eanach
    Means: a marsh or a wet meadow

    Raith = Rath
    Means: a rath or a fairy fort

    Knocknacat = Cnoc na gCat
    Means: the hill of the cats

    Larganboy
    Means: the yellow hillside