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Transcripts count: 5
  1. Caladh na hAnghaile

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Séamus Ó Loingsigh

    In olden times this Parish was called Caladh-na-h-Anghaile which means the Callows of Annaly or the County Longford. It belonged together with the adjoining parish of Rathclyne to the Ó'Quinns who were styled Lords of Rathclyne and who had their castle at Rathclyne. The ruins of this castle are still to be seen near "Elfeet" Lanesboro. The place in which dwelt the Lords of Caladh-na-h-Anghaile is now represented by the ruins of Elfeet Castle on the shores of Lough Ree.

    The old castle consists of a very high tower, and was built in such a way as to command a view of the whole lake. The walls are of very thick and solid proportions the spaces between the rough and unmeasured stones being filled up with a cement like mortar which was called grout, and was used in old times in the erection of buildings. It is recorded that in the latter end of the fifteenth century there seven castles erected in Annaly and that Elfeet Castle in the Callows was one of them.

  2. (no title)

    In Bridge Street there is a castle it is not in ruins yet, because there is an old lady living in it.

    Language
    English

    In Bridge Street, there is a castle it is not in ruins yet, because there is an old lady living in it. It is built outside the old military barracks.
    Long ago it was owned by the O'Farrells of Annaly. Under the castle there is a dungeon and it was once attacked and people were killed in it. Afterwards Lord Longford lived in it, but through time he left it too, now there is an old lady living in it

  3. Local Ruins

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bernard Kane

    There is a ruined castle within sight of the school. It is called Castleragh or Caisleán Riabhach. It is situated in the townsland of of Castlereagh Parish of Ardagh Barony of Moydow. It is supposed to be built by the O Farrells of Annaly and was beseiged on several occasions. I do not know any particulars about these seiges. There are two ruins of churches in Ardagh. One was built by St Patrick. It is called St Patrick's Cathedral. The relics of St Mel nephew of St Patrick and first Bishop of Ardagh are supposed to be buried in it. It is only 4 feet in height and it was said that the work suddenly stopped because St Patrick was building it one night when a man asked him. "What the devil are you doing"?" Owing to the fact that the devil's name was mentioned in conjunction with it St Patrick stopped the work. It is built with huge stones. I do not know anything about the other ruins which are situated on the grounds of Ardagh House. The Fetherstons of Ardagh House former landlords are buried inside in this church. There is the ruins of a monastery in Bawn Moydow called Bawn Abbey. Friar's lived here. It is now almost gone into decay. There was a church and graveyard in Aughintemple Parish of Ardagh but both are now gone. About 10 years ago the present owner John McCord removed the boundary walls of the graveyard. There was a child buried

  4. 210

    Ancient Granard
    Once a seat of Government
    After the time of St. Patrick the Kingdom of Annaly was divided into two sections, each ruled by an O'Farrell. Ancient Granard was the chief town in the northern division and was also the seat of Government. The House of Parliament or, as it was then called, "the Convention Hall", stood where Granardkille Chapel now is, and O'Farrell, the ruler had his castle on the Moat of Granard.
    The Moat is of very ancient structure, indeed it may be concluded as certain that its erection goes a long way before the Danish era. It bears some resemblance to the great Moat of Kilfinnane in Co. Limerick, but it is much smaller. It was very strongly fortified except on the southern side, which seems to have been guarded solely by the deep trench on the summit, out of which the defender fired arms and hurled stone missles at the approaching enemy. After the Norman invasion (1172 - 1266) it was occupied by Sir Richard Tuite, Baron of Moyashell, who entertained King John of England within its walls on August 12, 1210, just then that monarch was concluding his sixty days' visit to Ireland. In King John's Itinerence, complained by Thomas Duffus Hardy, F.S.A., reference is made to the Royal visit. A short time after this Sir Richard was killed in Athlone while holding a court there, and the castellanship passed over to his son, who,