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Transcripts count: 16
  1. The Devil's Mill

    Language
    English

    There is an old mill two miles from Lucan and along the lower road. It is on the left bank of the river Liffey beside the Wren's Nest, a public house owned by a man named Ennis. The mill was built by a man named Annaly. There is story about it. When Lord Annaly wanted to build a mill he hired labourers to do the work. They started work one day, but when evening came they had little done. When the workmen had gone home, a man came to lord Annaly and told him that he was a mason, and was out of work. Lord Annaly gave him a job, and the asked for

  2. The Devil's Mill

    Language
    English

    permission to work during the night and he gave him permission. The man started to work and when Annaly woke in the morning the mill was built except for one window. Lord Annaly was talking to the man, when his pipe dropped from his mouth,he stooped to pick it up, and (he) caught sight of a cloven foot; then he knew who the man was; it was the devil. Lord Annaly told him to begone, and the devil vanished.
    Ever since that the mill has been called the "the Devil's Mill."

  3. (no title)

    This story seems to supply teh best introduction to the legend of The Devil's Mill.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Christopher Baker
    Age
    12
    Informant
    (name not given)

    He got this story from his mother who got it from his grandfather then living at Mt. Joseph beside Lord Annaly's place at Luttnellstown near Lucan. His grandfather, a wonderfully healthy old man, when long over eighty years of age walked to and from his work over a mile each way until the week before he died.

    This story seems to supply the best introduction to the legend of "The Devil's Mill"
    Longago there lived near Lucan a Lord (by the ) named Annaly. One day he was fishing, and said to himself if the Devil himself were here he would not catch one, with that a man came down the road,"and passed him the time of day" and then asked for a few casts. The Lord gave him a few, and every time he took out the line he had a fish. Then the lord said in great (s) surprise. "Are you the Devil himself" and he said "yes". So Lord Annaly told him if he was that powerful, to have a mill built and working in the morning. When he looked out next morning the first thing he saw, was the mill built up and working.

  4. The Devil's Mill - Another Version

    Language
    English
    Collector
    George Coleman
    Age
    14

    About three-quarters of a mile from Lucan on the lower road, there is an old mill known as The Devil's Mill. Lord Annaly arranged for this mill to be built, and he engaged five or six men to build it. Next morning the men began to build the mill, and their day's work was done they got ready to go home. During the time a man came to the mill. He was a mason and when he came to the mill he was met by Lord Annaly. He asked for work and then to be allowed to work on after the other men had gone home. When the men went home he started to work, and next morning they found the mill

  5. Caladh na hAnghaile

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Séamus Ó Loingsigh

    In olden times this Parish was called Caladh-na-h-Anghaile which means the Callows of Annaly or the County Longford. It belonged together with the adjoining parish of Rathclyne to the Ó'Quinns who were styled Lords of Rathclyne and who had their castle at Rathclyne. The ruins of this castle are still to be seen near "Elfeet" Lanesboro. The place in which dwelt the Lords of Caladh-na-h-Anghaile is now represented by the ruins of Elfeet Castle on the shores of Lough Ree.

    The old castle consists of a very high tower, and was built in such a way as to command a view of the whole lake. The walls are of very thick and solid proportions the spaces between the rough and unmeasured stones being filled up with a cement like mortar which was called grout, and was used in old times in the erection of buildings. It is recorded that in the latter end of the fifteenth century there seven castles erected in Annaly and that Elfeet Castle in the Callows was one of them.

  6. The Devil's Mill - Another Version

    Language
    English
    Collector
    George Coleman
    Age
    14

    finished all but one window. At this time Lord Annaly was talking to the man who was after finishing the mill. He was smoking a pipe at the time, then he put his hand into his pocket and took out his handkerchief, and when he unrolled it a shilling dropped from it, at that minute he stooped down to pick it up, and he caught sight of the cloven hoof of the mason and he knew who the man was. Ever since that, the mill is called. "The Devil's Mill"

  7. James Auylward had Shankill and lived in Shankill Castle. His descendants still occupy the house. Singleton had the Caisleáns and milebush, Greenwood had Fenniocourt Lady Annaly had Gouran

  8. Ballyleague

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Delia Scally

    Brookfield, Contractors."
    The construction extended over a period of four years. A resident in Lanesborough - a reliable authority - informed the present writer that:- "The labourers who worked at the cutting of the ford and the erection of the bridge received in wages 4 Shillings per week. They lived on potatoes and milk: They paid one shilling per week for three meals a day. They were a fine, strong, healthy body of men."
    In. - 1000. A causeway was constructed across the ford. 1140. A bridge of hurdles was constructed. 1572. The ford is referred to as the "Ferry of Annaly, hence we may infer the 1140 bridge had disappeared. 1620. Sir Patrick Barnwall had a ferry crossing the ford. 1690 Colonel O'Reilly broke down the bridge when retiring from the eastern to the western side of the river

  9. (no title)

    In Bridge Street there is a castle it is not in ruins yet, because there is an old lady living in it.

    Language
    English

    In Bridge Street, there is a castle it is not in ruins yet, because there is an old lady living in it. It is built outside the old military barracks.
    Long ago it was owned by the O'Farrells of Annaly. Under the castle there is a dungeon and it was once attacked and people were killed in it. Afterwards Lord Longford lived in it, but through time he left it too, now there is an old lady living in it

  10. Local Landlords

    Language
    English

    The first landlords of the property of this place were the Hunts. They lived in Waterloo so called after the battle of Waterloo in which one of the Hunts fought. They sold the property to a company called the Irish Land Company. This company sold it to Colonel White of the English army.Later on it passed into the hands of Lord Annaly who was a friend of Colonel White's He was the last landlord before it was taken over by the Irish Land Commission. There were other small estates in the neighbourhood, owned by Langley Hemphill and Stephney who were all Cromwellian planters
    Langley lived in a place called Lickfin and the people used to call him "Yellow Seán." He was very cruel to his tenants and it is said that there were twenty families one evening evicted by him on Neagle's Road. Lickfin, where he lived, is situated near the Slieveardagh Hills and when he was dying he gave orders that all the colliers that would come to his

  11. Local Ruins

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bernard Kane

    There is a ruined castle within sight of the school. It is called Castleragh or Caisleán Riabhach. It is situated in the townsland of of Castlereagh Parish of Ardagh Barony of Moydow. It is supposed to be built by the O Farrells of Annaly and was beseiged on several occasions. I do not know any particulars about these seiges. There are two ruins of churches in Ardagh. One was built by St Patrick. It is called St Patrick's Cathedral. The relics of St Mel nephew of St Patrick and first Bishop of Ardagh are supposed to be buried in it. It is only 4 feet in height and it was said that the work suddenly stopped because St Patrick was building it one night when a man asked him. "What the devil are you doing"?" Owing to the fact that the devil's name was mentioned in conjunction with it St Patrick stopped the work. It is built with huge stones. I do not know anything about the other ruins which are situated on the grounds of Ardagh House. The Fetherstons of Ardagh House former landlords are buried inside in this church. There is the ruins of a monastery in Bawn Moydow called Bawn Abbey. Friar's lived here. It is now almost gone into decay. There was a church and graveyard in Aughintemple Parish of Ardagh but both are now gone. About 10 years ago the present owner John McCord removed the boundary walls of the graveyard. There was a child buried

  12. Places of Interest

    Language
    Mixed

    Stone (still plain to be standing erect) with cross visibly cut thereon. Where mass was said in Penal Days.


    CORNAMUCKLA
    Hill of the piggeries - supposed to get its name from the famous "Black Pig" which spent a fabulous length of time here rooting up a boundary between Annaly and Breffny.
    This "Valley of the Black Pig" travels on in a South Westerly direction towards Ballinamuck (name also derived from same pig I suppose) where some say he was supposed to be killed while others claim he continued his course in same valley on to Rooskey Bridge where he got drowned. In my own time I remember the old people saying that anyone living within the boundary of that "valley" would be safe from "Orange Insurrection" which according to Columbcille's prophecies is supposed to ravage the countryside at some particular time.

    TULLY - Tulach townland where I live name supposed to be got from conical shaped hill as certainly the shape of the townland resembles one.

  13. (Chapter XII)

    (1)
    (1430) Mullingar and the country from Milltown to Mullingar were many times burned and wasted during the 15th and 16th centuries. In 1430 Owen O'Neill with other Irish chiefs, encamped in Frewin Hill. To the Hill came several Irish chiefs from South W Meath and Offaly to pay him respect and tribute . They included the O'Conna of Offaly The O'Meelaghans The O'Molloys and The McGeoghegans. They plundered Kilbixy after which the Plunketts, Nugents Deleamers and the English barons, came to O'Neill and made him great presents forgranting peace to them. O'Neill then returned home victoriously and triumphantly and took with him the son of "O'Farrell Buidhe" as a hostage for O'Farrell's lordship.
    (II)
    (1475) In 1475 Hugh Rue O'Donnell marched into Annally to aid the son of Neal O'Farrell. He turned the entire of "Annaly" except the portion that belonged

  14. Local Heroes

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Peter Kilkenny

    In the year 1902 there died in the townland of Drumguinea a man named Michael O'Farrell aged 102. He was born and reared in the next townland Diffin, Aughavas, Carrigallen, Co Leitrim. He claimed to be a direct descendant of the Great O'Farell's of Annaly. His mother was one of the O'Rouke's of Breffni.

    He was a man over six feet in height of powerful frame, and in his old age you could see by his gait that he was once an athlete.
    By trade he was a shoemaker and went from house to house with his tools, and worked at his trade. He never married.
    One time when was about thirty years of age he was working in a house in the townland of Aughavas near the chapel.
    On a Sunday morning the priest called Father Dunne better known as Friar Dunne came to the house where Michael O'Farrell was staying and called him out and said "Michael I'm in an awful predicament. It is now 10.30. I have no altar wine. No Catholic neighbour has a horse or knows how to ride one. Mohill the nearest place where it can be got is nine miles away. I must alert

  15. 210

    Ancient Granard
    Once a seat of Government
    After the time of St. Patrick the Kingdom of Annaly was divided into two sections, each ruled by an O'Farrell. Ancient Granard was the chief town in the northern division and was also the seat of Government. The House of Parliament or, as it was then called, "the Convention Hall", stood where Granardkille Chapel now is, and O'Farrell, the ruler had his castle on the Moat of Granard.
    The Moat is of very ancient structure, indeed it may be concluded as certain that its erection goes a long way before the Danish era. It bears some resemblance to the great Moat of Kilfinnane in Co. Limerick, but it is much smaller. It was very strongly fortified except on the southern side, which seems to have been guarded solely by the deep trench on the summit, out of which the defender fired arms and hurled stone missles at the approaching enemy. After the Norman invasion (1172 - 1266) it was occupied by Sir Richard Tuite, Baron of Moyashell, who entertained King John of England within its walls on August 12, 1210, just then that monarch was concluding his sixty days' visit to Ireland. In King John's Itinerence, complained by Thomas Duffus Hardy, F.S.A., reference is made to the Royal visit. A short time after this Sir Richard was killed in Athlone while holding a court there, and the castellanship passed over to his son, who,