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Transcripts count: 149
  1. Custom-Lore

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Sadie Irwin
    Age
    12
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    circa 40
    Occupation
    farmer's wife

    People used to make crosses of green ribbon long ago for St Patricks These crosses were pinned on the right shoulder, and every girl used to make and wear them. It was a custom to go out on May Eve, and draw a sheet along the field of a neighbour and gather up the dew, and then squeeze it into a bucket.
    By this they carried their neighbours crops for the year. Another custom on May Eve is to go around and shake holy water on everything A stone brought St Benjamins well in Tullyease is said to cure anything If it was thrown against the storm, it would calm the storm

  2. May Day

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Walsh
    Informant
    Mrs P. Walsh
    Age
    circa 55

    There is a lot of customs connected with May Day and May Eve. In many parts of the country there is a May Day procession when all the children go around the villages with flowers. While in other parts of the country no child is allowed to pluck anything green on that day. In Co Limerick there is a custom of going around with holy water blessing the crops and cattle on May Eve. While in Co Cork there is a custom of going to the nearest spring well early to be first to take the water so that everything would be lucky for the year.

  3. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eibhlís Ní Umfraidh

    The youths of the country go round gathering eggs for Easter which is an old custom. People, as an old custom eat a surplus amount of eggs on Easter Sunday morning, owing to an argument of who should eat the most.
    There is a custom on May Eve, people generally put salt in the wells so that their neighbours cannot gain anything by pishouges (piseóga) during the year. People refuse to either let their neighbours take water from their pumps or wells, or lend them anything on May Eve. They also sprinkle holy water on the cows. People work pishouges (piseóga) on May Eve.
    On St John's night, bonfires are lit. On St. Martin's Day, people kill a chicken and spill the blood on the door-step.
    On Hallow Eve, people have lots of customs. People hang an apple off the ceiling and try to bite it. They get three plates and put water in one, a beads in another and ashes in the third. And then blind-fold one person, and which ever one he puts his hands on, if he puts his hand on the water he will cross the sea, and if he puts his hand on the beads he will be a priest, and if he puts hand on the ashes, he will die first in the house. Get a basin full of water and put an apple in it and try to get it up without touching it with your

  4. May Day

    Language
    English

    May Day.
    May Eve is chiefly connected with pishogues about milk, butter and farm produce. It is on May Eve your butter can be taken by milking a hair spaned across the rafter, or all the milk of a neighbour's cows can be taken by the water from his pump or well being taken first thing on May morning. In other ways too harm can be done a

  5. A Pishogue

    Language
    English
    Informant
    William Mitchell
    Age
    65

    reasons, it is impossible here to mention the name of the person concerned, as her descendants do not deserve it. On May Eve she used "make pishogues" and take all the good of her neighbours' farms into her own. These deeds made many enemies for her, with the result that as the years went on, the neighbours began to watch her every May Eve to prevent her making pishogues on this land.
    One May Eve, a farmer named Murphy was walking through his fields aimlessly mar o' ead but he kept a keen look-out for this woman whose farm bounded his.
    Suddenly a hare rose up before him from a tor of rushes. He gave his two hounds the "hula hut", thinking he would have a good hunt. The hare twisted this way and that way, and eventually she cleared the boundary fence and headed towards this old woman's house. Murphy had a clear view of the hunt from the top of the fence, and he saw the hare go straight for the old woman's bedroom window. The window, he noticed, was open. The hare sprung for the window and went through into the room, but the foremost hound just managed to make a snap at the hare and take a bite of her hindmost part. Murphy just then heard the old woman's terrible scream, and he just thought that the hare coming through the window had scared her. Picture his surprise, when he heard a few days later that the old woman was suffering from a very sore cut on the back of her thigh!!!!!

  6. Festival Customs - May Day

    Language
    Mixed
    Collector
    Clarrie Alfred
    Age
    14

    May Day.

    May day falls on the first of May and it is said to be the first day of summer.
    The day before May day is called May eve and on that day in Adare no Roman Catholic would dare to pick flowers because they say it is unlucky and that the fairies would come that night and revenge it on anybody that picked flowers on that day.
    On May eve the priest has always a large amount of holy water put in the chapel and each household brings a bottle of it home and sprinkles it all around the house so that no harms will come to them. This water is known as the May water.
    There are some Roman Catholics in Adare who would not stay out late on May eve night afraid the fairies would catch them.
    May day is not kept as a special day in Irleand at present but long ago people kept that day as a great day of enjoyment, because it is supposed to be the first day of summer and not so

  7. Customs of Long Ago

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Nóra Ní Madagain
    Informant
    Mrs P. Madigan
    Age
    66

    Long ago it was the custom among the Ancient people on May Eve in some places to put branches off the trees and Primrose outside the doorstep to keep away the fairies.
    The farmer used to throw holy water over his cattle to keep away danger.
    Thers is an old superstision that anyone cannot pick flowers or sticks on May Eve.

  8. May Eve and May Day Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Ita Kenrick
    Informant
    Mrs Michael Kenrick
    Age
    89

    Holy water, or the May-water as it is called, is sprinkled by people, on May-eve and May-day on their homes, their cattle, gardens and pasture fields to invoke a blessing from God on themselves and their stock and crops. People shake salt in new milk as a preventive of any pisheogs being worked and having effect by the evil-minded on those two days. Salt is also shaken in wells at the same time for the same reason, as salt is believed to act as a safeguard against charms.
    Farmers remain up and keep vigil over their stock on those nights fearing that their enemies might come and milk their cows, and by the agency of the devil take the produce of the milk.
    Children are told not to lie on the grass and not to pick flowers on May-day or May-eve, fearing that the fairies might gain power over them.

  9. Festival Customs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mrs Hayes
    Occupation
    teacher

    Blood is always spilled on St. Martin's Day, because St. Martin was killed in a mill. Ribbons are tied to the doors on St. Brigit's Eve.
    It is supposed to cure any complaint, particulary a headache. On Chalk Sunday, people go around putting stripes of chalk on other people's backs They do this to mark the people that are not married. On May Eve, a Hawthorn is supposed to bring bad luck to the inhabitants if brought into the house. People tie a green bush to the door on May Eve to welcome the Summer. On Shrove Tuesday pancakes are eaten. Rings are put into the pancakes and whoever gets the ring will be married within the year.

  10. Pishogues

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Tom Fitzgerald
    Age
    13

    About 17 years ago my father John Fitzgerald, was after buying a pig at the market, two days before May Eve.
    The day after May Eve, on the 1st of May the pig died. My father was surprised when he died, because he was a fine health pig.
    A few days after my father was down at the end of the field, and he got two young dead pigs in the dike. Thinking of nothing he threw them out over the ditch.
    When he came back he told my mother what he had seen. She said it should be piseogs.

  11. Farm Animals

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maud Linane
    Informant
    Mrs Burke
    Age
    84
    Occupation
    farmer's wife

    There are many different sorts of farm animals, and fowl relating to the farm yard. For instance the cows are the most useful of all animals. In Winter we keep these in a house called a stall, and they are tied by the neck, between two timber poles called a "bale". Long ago the cows were never left out on May Eve night, as it was said that all the fairies would come and milk them and curse them. Nobody should lie in the grass or pull it on May Eve. When putting them in, in the winter they hang holly in the rafter over each cow, so that they would be lucky and calve all right.
    Long ago a puck goat was always

  12. Taking the Milk Away

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Pilib O Conaill

    from a stream where three parishes joined.
    This particular condition obtains in the townland of Ballyvodane, where the parishes of Ardpatrick, Effin & Kilmallock meet & tis said that superstitious farmers in the old days set a watch on this place on May Eve.
    My informant also saw when a boy people taking out a 'blessed candle' & running the flame around the udders of the cows singing some of the hair in the process. This was done on May Eve & was supposed to protect the cattle from charms etc.

  13. Emblems and Objects of Value

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Thomas Begley
    Age
    13

    In some houses in this district Saint Brigid's crosses are made and placed in the ceiling. The crosses are made from sallies. The crosses are made about 4 inches by 2 inches. In some houses you would see fifty and sixty crosses on the ceiling. This would tell how long that family is in that house.
    Holly at Christmas. Holly and ivy is placed round pictures and on dressers at Christmas. Holly is placed on the Christmas candle and on the plum pudding. The holly is put up on Christmas Eve and taken down after little Christmas day. Laurel is also used at Christmas time.
    Palm Sunday. On palm Sunday palm is worn by every person on their coats. The palm is left around pictures and often in out-houses such as the cow house or stable.
    When the people put palm on the out-houses they say that it brings a blessing on the animals.
    Easter Water. Persons get Easter water at the Chapel on Easter Saturday. On Easter Sunday the people shake the easter water on the crops and on the animals.
    St Patricks Day. On St. Patricks day everybody wears shamrock on their coats and caps.
    May Eve. On May Eve some people put a piece of quick-beam in the garden. First an ordinary stick is placed standing up in the garden. The quick beam is stuck into the slot. Some people would not give you a drop of milk on May Eve.

  14. (no title)

    In a field near Ballyguiltenane school is a deep hole. On May eve fairies are seen there...

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Sheehan
    Informant
    Mortimer Sheehan
    Age
    50

    In a field near Ballyguiltenane school is a deep hole. On May Eve fairies are seen there .A man was passing this hole May night about twelve o'clock. He heard beautiful music and the fairies asked him to come into the hole. They asked him stay with them until morning. When morning came they let him go and told him not to be out later then twelve o'clock, and especially when he had no business.

  15. Pishogues

    Language
    English
    Collector
    William Curtin

    and their Cattle and Horsos for the "Holy Water" can prevent any person from doing Pishogues on them on May eve. It is not right to give away Eggs or milk on may day.

  16. Pishogues

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Edward O' Connor

    that when eggs were found anywhere in your farm. the result was bound to be disastrous amongst your cattle. People say it is not right to sit on grass May Eve. or May Day. and also in starting new work on Monday it would bring misfortune on people.

  17. Bread

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bríd Ní Chonchubair
    Informant
    Seán Ó Chaoimh
    Age
    69

    the potatoes are boiled. Both stampy and potato cake took over an hour to bake.

    III Bread has to be baked at least every second day as it would crumple into crumbs if it were too old. A cross was usually cut on the bread but on certain events such as May Eve or November Night a sword was cut, for the people believed that anybody such as fairies could not face fighting implements.
    IV At special gatherings like the christening of a child certain bread was served. About a half pound of butter was rolled in flour and placed on a spit over the fire and as the butter melted more flour was sprinkled on it in this way a very palatable dish was prepared.
    V On May Eve it was a general custom to bake a cake and to mix a little forge water with the flour. This cake with a jug of the best milk was left on the window sill during the night lest somebody being hungry should come and take away the peoples good luck.

  18. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Madigan
    Informant
    Patrick Hogan

    size of him, and said he was as big as an old sheep and he looked very fierce. They passed him by and he disappeared into the fort again. At certain times of the year lights are seen in the fort. The time of the year lights are seen in the fort is May Eve, November Eve and St John's Eve.

  19. (no title)

    About six years ago in the parish of Monegay, a man went to a farmer's house on May Eve for a rope to tie straw.

    Language
    English

    About six years ago in the parish of Monegay, a man went to a farmer's house on May Eve for a rope to tie straw. The farmer gave him the rope, but he found out later that the man had no straw to tie. In a few weeks from that night two sows with their bonhams owned by the farmer, died.

  20. Pishogues

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Chris Humphreys
    Age
    12

    May Eve falls on the last day of April, and on that evening some people make piseogs. Other people go around to all the wells and streams on their farms and shake salt in them, because they say that anyone coundn't do any harm to you