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Transcripts count: 118
  1. (no title)

    This man used to go out every night and he used to meet this certain woman every place he used go.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Shiela Browne
    Informant
    Mrs Doyle

    This man of the story was Peter Connel's from Templenoe, Kenmare,

  2. (no title)

    Lord Lansdowne was the "absolute landlord" of the lands of Tuosist.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen O Sullivan
    Informant
    Mrs Palmer

    French made all kinds of threats against suspected materialists & the spirit of the people was being stirred and with all the landlord's power and threats P.J.Boland was returned by and overwhelming majority & did his best for South Kerry in House of Commons, London.
    T French himself was deprived of the chairmanship of Kenmare Board of Guards. D. J. O'Sullivan, Main Street, Kenmare, himself the son of a father Fenian, T. J O'Sullivan Coornagillagh nephew of thr well known school Master Fenian Dan O'Sullivan Ardgroom who taught then in Dromanassy school, Bonane, Kenmare adn John Gaine Kenmare (the three were Poor Law Guardians at the time) voted against

  3. Ladhar belonged to Morgan Mac Sweeney and about 70 years ago it passed to Lord Kenmare.


    Cultaman Cronin was landlord of Screathan an Mhill and Mín na g-Ciseach. He died in the Union. Before his death Lord Kenmare bought all his land at a " ceaint " in Tralee bidding against an Englishman who wanted it for grazing purposes. Canon Walsh got Lord Kenmare to do this. There were bonfires that night. Lord Kenmare bought out Malachy Moynihan's interest also.

    During the famine people from this station emigrated in large numbers to America.

    The two Healys who were (-) for Bereton's death. The two were born in Diarmuid Ó Scannails field. Ó Suileabháin Breoite the informer was a beggarman. He came into Mrs Scannell's next doro to Healy's. The Healys were both mamed and bad children. Their children laughed and pelted the beggarman who had gone aside. "Ye'll pay for that he remarked. Their fathers were arrested next day for Brereton's death. Both were innocent having been to Tralee to sell potatoes the day of the tragedy. When they were tried in Tralee Diarmuid Ó Scannail who was on the road with them and those to whom they sold the potatoes swore to this effect but in vain.

  4. James Grady

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Máire Ní Bhuachalla
    Age
    13
    Informant
    Seán Ó Buachalla
    Age
    60

    When the "soup" was giving out in Kenmare, the OMahony's of Dromore were at the head of it. One day when O'Mahony was giving a speech at the Square, a young man, named James Grady jumped on the platform & caught Mahony by the collar of the coat, and pulled him off the platform, and then fled.
    Father John O'Sullivan was then Parish Priest of Kenmare so James Grady went to his house to hide from the police who were in search of him. Father John gave him permission to stay with him as long as he liked.

  5. The Banshee

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs J. O' Shea

    More than fifty years ago a young girl named Margaret O'Sullivan was "minding the house" in her father's farm at Rusheen a few miles from Kenmare, in the Tuosist Parish. Her father and mother were at Kenmare as it was a fair day. During the day she was startled by hearing the loud heart-broken cry of a woman, which seemed to come from a field which was situated at the back of the house. She went to the field but could see no one and returned to the house in great fear. For the remainder of the day she waited in great anxiety for the arrival home of her parents, more than half convinced that some terrible accident would overtake them on their journey. To her relief they arrived

  6. The Ardea Post of Long Ago

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James O Shea
    Informant
    Jeremiah Shea
    Age
    59

    Long ago when the post came here there were no motor cars to run the post. The train used come to Headford with the letters. Then Bob Hanley used go to Headford with a sitecare for the letters and bring them to Kenmare. Then Patsy Glass used go to Kenmare walking for the letter. He used walk it home again and leave them at Ardea Post Office. There was a man up there whose name is Dan the Post he was living in Laraugh. He used bring the letters up to Laraugh. The people around here used go to the Post Office for the letters. There was no Post-man

  7. Dinnseanchas - Loch Brainn (Lough Brin)

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Thade Morley
    Age
    circa 55
    Occupation
    carpenter

    There is an old story told about Lough Brin. One day the Fianna were hunting near Killarney and they started a fairy deer. The deer ran towards Kenmare. The hounds turned her along Kenmare Bay. All the hounds gave up but Bran. He ran after her to Lough Brin. She sprang into the lake. Bran jumped into the lake after her and was drowned. Finn called the lake Lough Brin which means Bran's Lake.

  8. (no title)

    Bolg an Uachra: Name of rack between Sherky Island and Mainland...

    Language
    Mixed

    Bolg an Uachra: Name of Rock between Sherky Island and Mainland (Sneem) north side of Kenmare Bay.

  9. A Story of the Penal Days

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Con Horgan

    A Story of the Penal Days

    About a mile and a half outside Kenmare on the Kenmare -Kilgarvan road there is a house where there was a priest killed. The name of the people who lived there was Palmer. During the Penal Days there was a priest hiding around this place, and a price was to be given to any person who would get him. Soldiers were in search for him.
    One cold night the priest went to the house of the Palmers who were Protestant and asked if they would keep him for the night. They said they would and they gave him a room to sleep in. While he was sleeping one of the Palmers went out and informed the soldiers of his presence in the house. The

  10. Miss Ellen M. Breen, daughter of Mr J Breen High St Killarney and sister of the late Miss Kate Breen was appointed. She married Mr Padraig Fleming. Clashnagrane N.S. Killarney and on her death in 1905, Miss A,O'Reilly was appointed. Miss O'Reilly (afterwards Mrs Courtney) retired on pension in 1931 when Miss E.Clifford was appointed.
    The school was built by the Earl of Kenmare and about seven or eight years ago became the property of the Bishop of Kerry. The date of the opening of the school which is recorded on a limestone slate on front wall of the school is also the date of birth of the present Earl of Kenmare.

  11. At Limerick, on their way down, they met a Wedding party, who stopped them, but the Fianna fought their way, and and arrived at Kilgarvan, where they encamped. They make inquiries of the inhabitants, as to where the Giant lived. They were told that he traversed the fields at night killing & seizing cattle, & that he slept all day in a plíus near Kenmare. The cave where he lived was called "neso Ein."
    Early next morning the party set out for Kenmare. As they approached the giant's den Finn Mac Coul ordered his men to halt & volunteered to meet his man in single combat. When the Giant heard him coming, he jumped out of bed; and made a dash at him with his sword intending to cut off his head. Finn guarded the blow, & the fight started. It lasted a whole day; they made the soft ground hard, and the hard ground soft, & in the end Finn succeeded in cutting off one of the Giant's hands.
    " Don't kill me," said the giant. "And I will give you gold and silver, enough

  12. The Banshee

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs J. O' Shea

    home safe at last, after what seemed to her an interminable delay, and she put the cry out of her mind. It happened however that either on the following day or a few days later, a tree was being cut down in the field behind the house, (and some neighbours were assisting). Through some accident the tree in falling stuck and killed one poor man, whose name I think was (O'Shea) Dwyer*. His family were informed of the tragedy, and his widow came in great grief to the (field) house* where her husband lay dead. Her heart-broken crying rang out over the fields, and instantly the strange cry of the evening before came forcibly before the mind of the young girl Margaret O'Sullivan, for, to her amazement, the cry of the widow was an exact reproduction of the cry which she had heard on the previous day, in that very field in which the man met his death.

    *Correction- I have since been informed that it was the landlord's agent who sent men to cut down the tree. The tenants were not allowed to touch the trees. After this incident no more trees were cot on that farm. The man who was killed was named Dwyer, probably father of the late Michael Dwyer, Kenmare who has a daughter living in Kenmare

  13. How a Man Got a Nickname

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Jeremiah Sullivan
    Informant
    (name not given)
    Age
    57

    A man lived in Kenmare long ago, whose name was Jim Shea. He was a shoemaker by trade. He was very fond of birds. He kept a gold-finch in a cage on hid workshop. It was a very nice to hear the bird singing in his workshop. One day a large ship landed at Kenmare and one of the sailors had two canaries in a cage. Jim Shea asked him for one of the birds, but he refused. But as the sailor saw him anxious for the birds, he said he would give him three eggs that the bird had laid, and he said that his own finch would hatch them. He went home with the three eggs very pleased.
    But when he looked at the cage he saw the bird killed by a strange cat.

  14. Tiarna Talún

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bríghid Ní Fhlainn
    Informant
    Seán Ua Seaghdha

    men with him he fought a fierce battle but he was defeated. Where the men were killed now stands a place called "Turnin na Muc". The man who was in command of the English named Brown was given the title of Lord Kenmare.

  15. went aboard the vessel. "After mutual greetings the warmer for the sufferings all had endured, he spoke to the monks of his efforts to find a suitable establishment in Ireland and of his indifferent success told them they must be prepared to suffer in Ráth Mhór hardships beyond anything they had yet experienced and concluded by announcing in the name of Abbot Antony that who so felt unequal to the sacrifice was at liberty to return to his relatives. Only one, an Englishman availed himself of this dispensation.
    "The accomodation at their new home they found altogether inadequate. Not only was the house too small for monastic purposes but the farm itself was not at all large enough to give employment to so numerous a community or even to promise their support. However they resolved to make the best of a bad situation until something more satisfactory should offer. Meantime regular observance was introduced as far as circumstances permitted. The brethren began to wear once again the religious habit; the various community exercises succeeded each other in due order, and the Divine Office was chanted at the accustomed hours"
    "Dom Vincents next step was to petition the landlord Earl Kenmare for an extension of the lease and the reduction of the rent. The noble Earl referred him to a gentleman named Mr Cronyn in whose lands the property then was; Mr. Cronyn referred him to the trustees of the estate and the trustees refused him even the favour of a reply. Justice requires us to acknowledge with gratitude a grant of some trees given by Earl Kenmare for the repairs of the dilapidated building in which the monks were to lodge. This was the sum total of the help contributed by the local gentry. But what the rich out

  16. Cloch Rock

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary O' Callaghan

    About six miles from Kenmare there is a rock called Cloch Rock. Long ago a farmer wanted some stones to build a house. He came to the rock, and began to break stones from it. When nightfall drew near he put the stones into his cart and brought

  17. Hidden Gold

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary O' Callaghan

    Long ago when the Redcoats were in Ireland there lived a boy at Kilpatrick a few miles from Kenmare. He used to carry a big bag of gold on his back from place to place. One day the Red-coats saw him and they followed him from Dromdown as far a[s] Cleady bridge. They captured him but could not find the gold, and it is supposed that it is hidden between the boundary of Gortalassa and Kilpatrick.

  18. Local Sea Disaster

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bergie O' Sullivan
    Informant
    (name not given)

    into Kilmakillogue harbour for safety, but the Captain said they would be in Kenmare. They were up outside Blackwater east of the Maiden rock when she sank. There was no one drowned because they had a lifeboat and they went into it. The boat was seen going down from Lehud school.

  19. (no title)

    One night my father was coming home from the fair of Kenmare and he had a pig in the car and as fast as the pig would be put into the car she would be out again and as fast as the chains would be tied to the car they would be ripped.

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Shiela Browne
    Informant
    James Browne

    One night my father was coming home from the fair of Kenmare and he had a pig in the car and as fast as the pig would be put into the car she would be out again and as fast as the chains would be tied to the car they would be ripped. And as fast as the Father himself would be into the

  20. Local Landlords

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Harold Donoghue
    Informant
    Patrick Donoghue

    Local Landlords
    The landlord's name that owned Clounmellane was Parson Day. He was a very good landlord and his tenants were very thankful to him. But, he was strict about plantations. He loved trees and he would not let any of his tenants cut them. His grandson was elected Protestant Primate of Ireland a short time ago. He lived in the mid-lands.
    Parson Chute was what they called a middle landlord to Lord Kenmare. He owned Roxboro. He lived in Roxboro House. He got a portion of the Kenmare Estate for a fixed sum of money. He made money out of his tenants by doubling their rents, or rather the tenants doubled it for him they had so much mind for the land. A farmer had no claim to his land at that time. He only owned it for eleven months of the year ans when that term was up his neighbour would offer double the price of it. There were no big evictions until the eighties.
    The landlord that owned Batterfield was Mahony. He also was very strict about