Text search

Filter results

Transcripts count: 14
  1. Old Trades - Flax

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Dómhnall Ua Donnchadha
    Occupation
    múinteoir

    The flax was pulled through these spikes which cleaned the tow out of it. Until cotton became common a quantity of tow was kept in every house and it was used by the priest when rubbing off the oils after annointing a person.
    As a boy I remember very many people coming to our house for a piece of tow.
    My mother was two years older than her sister Mrs Cronin. They were of the family of Lucy and were born and reared at Cúm a'loch [?] in the parish of Glenflesk near the Count Bounds between Glenflesk in County Kerry and Ballyveourney in County Cork. Though they married at the age of twenty-three they were then as were all the young women of their time, skilled in the use of the spinning wheel and the flax wheel. Flax was last grown on my father's farm at [?] Glenflesk about the year I was born (1894). It was cloved and hackled and ready for use but was not spun until about the year 1908. It spent about fourteen years in a wooden box and when taken out was in perfect condition. I saw it being spun that time.
    There were professional hacklers

  2. Why the Turn o' the Castle is so called

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Dómhnall Ua Donnchadha
    Occupation
    múinteoir

    Travelling from Headfort to Glenflesk by road one comes to a turn on the New Line called "The Turn o' the Castle" between Draumcarbin and Burreal in the parish of Glenflesk. On the left is Curreal Mountain and on the right are Draumcarbin and Curreal Bogs. Standing between the road and the mountain is a lump of rock about 40 feet high. In the days of princesses and wands the lump of rock was a castle owned by a princess and the bogs were a beautiful demesne.
    She had two sons and when she was getting old she called her two sons and said she was about to divide her property between them. The sons quarrelled over the suggested division and she settled the dispute by taking her magic wand and striking the place changing the castle into a rock and the demesne into a bog.

  3. Áitainmneacha

    Language
    Mixed

    in 1601 when proceeding from Killarney to join Carew, then besieging Dunboy. The passes from Killarney at Derrycunnihy and Glenflesk were closely guarded by O Neill's troops under Captain Tyrrell so Wilmot chose this intermediate route travelling it dead of night over Mangerton (2756 ft.) and thence to Kilgarvan and on to Dunboy.

  4. Monster Eel

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Dómhnall Ua Donnchadha
    Occupation
    múinteoir

    I hear my Uncle Connie O Donoghue Ruisin Beag Glenflesk Co Kerry relate often that when he was a young fellow about 1860 he was fishing for trout along a little stream which ran through part of his father's farm. The stream ran under a little gullet and Connie lifted one of the flags which covered it. There he saw an eel with a head as large as a calf's. He dropped the flag quickly and ran home for a pike but

  5. 1. Old roads in the Lissivigeen School District (3 - 4 mls. east of Killarney) Killarney Parish, Barony of Magunihy.
    The "Old Road" A wide but rough road leading from Clash - Lissivigeen Cross through Clasheens, Minish and Clohane. Lendth 3 - 4 miles. Direction S.E. to Glenflesk and thence on to Cork. Wide and well made for most of the way was evidently the chief channel of traffic from Killarney to Glenflesk and thence to Macroom in pre-coach. Magnificent views of the Reeks and of the Lakes of Killarney from the highest parts of this road. Locally known for many years as "The Old Road"
    2. "An Bóithrín Glas":- This road connects the main road to Cork from the Pike Hill (1½ miles west of Lissivigeen Sch.) with the Mallow Road. Length 1½ miles approx. Formed a short cut from the East to Killarney for this length of road.
    3. Road leading from Scart, quite close to Loretto Convent through grounds of old Franciscan Friary on the banks of the Flesk, thence across the river, past Catairín na Leanbh the burial place according to tradition of members of the Franciscan community of Faugh and subsequently used for burial of still-born children or of unbaptized children.
    4. Road through Áth na gCorp at Minish 3½ mls. from Killarney S.E. thence across the G.S. Railway to Minish Cross where it meets the main road to Cork, thence to Upper Minish where it joined the "Old Road" referred to above.

  6. (no title)

    In the townland of Artigallivan in the parish of Glenfleak in the Co Kerry in the year 1887, there lived a man named Tangney...

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Dan Joe Mullane

    In the townland of Artigallivan in the parish of Glenflesk in the Co. Kerry in the year 1887, there lived a man named Tangney who was one of the Landlords agents and by all accounts he was a bad boy. The moonlighters were after calling on him couple of times before and were after giving him bad frights but all were of little use. On a certain night a number of moonlighters came when the Tangney family were going to bed, a knock came to the door, and who should come to open the door but Tangney himself and their and then the moonlighters rushed in and made him go down on his knees and made him say an act of Contrition. While he was saying it one of the moonlighters

  7. Hare Hunting

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Dómhnall Ua Donnchadha
    Occupation
    múinteoir

    from the knees down are covered with white "wool". Those hares are known to turn many times until the dogs are exhausted and then run straight out of sight.
    There was a great huntsman in Glenflesk Co Kerry. His name was Jack Sweeney. People used call him Séan Óg. When at the age of eighty he died about twenty years ago. He always kept great hounds and his sons too were keen huntsmen. His experiences as related by himself sounded so unlikely that people did not believe him. At the present time if a person is telling a story which does not sound true it is usual for somebody to whisper "Seán Og". Or if one is relating what he heard from another and which he does not believe he winds up with "Old Seán Óg for all the world."
    Many stories are told about Séan Og. He was a stone mason. He had a brother named Mike who was a mason also. Seán og never made a wet wall. One time they were building a house and Mike was on the outside with Seán inside. Mike was very particular about the placing of a certain stone and Seán remarked to him

  8. Cillín

    Language
    English

    In the townland of Inch, in the parish of Glenflesk there is a graveyard or Cillín as it is called where unbaptised babies were buried. This practice has discontinued as the owner of the farm objected. There is a mound of earth around the little graveyard. In the centre of which stands a large flat stone. It is about 10 feet long and 3 feet broad.There is a beautiful Celtic Cross on one side of the stone and Ogham writing on the other which no person has been able to decipher as it is covered with lichens and mosses. The district to the north east of it is called Killeen in which there are three farms.
    One of the farmers was building a new house and he took the stone from the centre of the graveyard and used it as a lintel in his home. The following night when he went to bed he was awakened by the galloping of horses and ringing of bells. He fell frightened and worried.
    When he awoke the following morning he inspected the mason work and did not miss lintel till the mason came. The latter asked the owner of the house who interfered with the mason work. The owner then explained to the mason the occurences of the night previous. They visited the graveyard

  9. Cillín

    Language
    English
    Informant
    John Cronin
    Age
    76
    Occupation
    farmer

    In the Parish of Glenflesk six miles to the East of Killarney is the townland of the above name, and on the lands of John O'Donoghue farmer in this townland is a graveyard where small babies were buried. The owner objected lately and so the practice is discontinued.
    Around the little graves there is a high mound of earth in the centre of which stands a slat of stone 10 feet long and 3 broad. Engraved on one side of this stone is a celtic cross and on the other ogham writing, Many have tried to read this writing but so far nobody has succeeded.
    A farmer from the townland was building a new home and he took the (lintel) large slat of stone from the little graveyard and used it as a lintel in his new house.
    Next night shortly before midnight he was awakened by galloping of horses, ringing of bells and unnatural noises that worried him.
    Next day the mason arrived as usual

  10. Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Leo O' Hegarty
    Informant
    Mrs Hegarty
    Age
    circa 75

    Some years ago there lived a man in the parish of Glenflesk in the county of Kerry who used to deal in cattle. He had some heifers grazing in a place called Cappaigín. He intended taking them to Killarney fair so he left his home at an unusual hour as there was no clock in the house.
    He had not gone far when he met a pig on the road which is supposed to be a bad omen especially at night. The animal made some motion to put him back but he forced his way through and continued his journey till he reached Cappaigín and that would have been about two o'clock in the night. That was about eight miles journey on foot. He drove the animals to the fair and sold them. Then he met some men from his own town-land and they had a few drinks which is a customary thing. But after a while he got unwell in the town and a Doctor was sent for but the Doctor could not discover anything wrong so the man was taken home and put to bed.
    At the time there was a particular woman in the neighbourhood who was supposed to be in the fairies and the sick man was advised to go to her and see what she had to say. So a messenger was sent to her but she gave him no information. Afterwards they met her

  11. a ruin; it is situated on a farm belonging to Mr. Michael Crowley; most of the walls were taken down about the year 1868 when the school-house of Minte Oga was being built". He was educated at Faha academy in the parish of Glenflesk. Eoghan acquired a good knowledge of English and the Classics, and also of Irish History.

    When he left school he started teaching himself at Gníomh-go-Leith. But he often made excursions into the neighbouring counties of Cork and Limerick, especially in the harvest when he went as a spailpín and remained away till Christmas. After some time an incident occurred, nothing to his credit, which led to the break up of the Gníomh-go-Leith establishment.
    A few years after this event Eoghan seems to have been compelled to leave his native place, and this time settled down in the neighbourhood of Fermoy with a Mr. Nagle of Aghnakissa, whose children he was appointed to instruct. After no very long sojourn in Nagle's house by his misconduct he incurred the wrath of the family. Eoghan fled, pursued by Nagle with a gun. The terrified poet took refuge in Fermoy Barracks, and in despair joined the British navy, and on the following day was sent to Cork, and thence without delay set sail for the West Indies, whither a transport vessel was bound with troops. The ship in which he sailed joined the English fleet under Rodney, then vice-admiral of Great Britain somewhere before the West Indies were reached. On April 12th 1782 the English under Rodney fought the French Fleet under De Grosse and took five vessels and sunk another. Eoghan Ruadh who took part in the battle wrote an English ode in honour of hte occasion called "Rodney's Glory". The following year Eoghan returned to England where he

  12. The classical school attracted students "poor scholars" from the surrounding counties, who were hospitably entertained free of charge in the farmhouses of the neigbourhood. The whole district on both sides of the river was permeated with the spirit of learning and the spirit of song. The O'Rahilly's, the O'Scannells, the O'Sullivans and other families included men of conspicuous ability and no mean poetical talents. Between the people on either side of the river, a rivalry reminding one of the supposed derivation of that word sprang up in hurling and in poetry. The people grew critical; each new poem or song was subjected to a severe examination, and if approved of was inserted in a book specially kept for the purpose called Bolg an tSoláthair. In the winter evenings, the neighbours assembled to see what new piece was added to the Bolg, and thus a constant stimulus to poetic effort was maintained.

    Native music, too, was fostered with native song, and an Irish piper was an institution at Faha which the surrounding rent-crushed villages could not afford. A series of hurling matches took place at Faha between the married and unmarried men. The contest excited great interest and the married men came off victorious. This led to a poetical rivalry between them, and here too the superiority of the married men was established. But the young men were not disposed to bear their defeat tamely. By a judicious use of uisce beathadh they managed to gain on their side Tadhg Crionna O'Scannell, who, though old, composed some verses of scathing satire on old men. He was answered by Matthew Hegarty of Glenflesk, who accused him of being a traitor to his class, and unworthy of being admitted to the meetings of the bards. This poetical contest had reached an acute and an exciting

  13. Ráithín

    Language
    Mixed
    Informant
    Con Warren
    Age
    65
    Occupation
    feirmeoir

    though most of the stones were used up in building Meentogues National School - about 1868.

    The Abha ní Chriadha here divides the townlands of Eannac-Coille-Móire in the parish of Glenflesk from Meentogues in the parish of Ráth-Mhór and farther down is called the "Quagmire".
    At the source of this river - Carn-dul-Cinn - the great bog-slide occurred on 28th December 1899 when a family (Donnellys) of eight were lost and their home at the Quarry Cross swept away. One member - a girl who was on a visit - to some friends escaped and built a new house on the site of the old one.

    The townlands of Ráithín, Eannac Mór and Eannac Beag produced men of remarkable talents for poetry and literature. The O'Rahillys of the family of the great Aodhgán the Scannells and the Murphys were undoubtedly poets by inheritance.
    Eannac, Liosbáibe and Barr Dubh were fortunate - their inhabitants being tenants of McCarthy while those on the other bank were of the Kenmare Estate and were crushed by middlemen - Cronins of Park near Killarney, Curtins and McSweeneys. The McCarties never pressed their tenants for rent

  14. Local Happenings - The Moving Bog

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Dómhnall Ua Donnchadha
    Occupation
    múinteoir
    Informant
    Pat Lyne

    coming down the valley. They ran for the road which was elevated and the sheep ran after them. They had barely reached the road when the bog tore by carrying fences and trees before it.
    Engineers who visited the place soon after and who took measurements calculated that the bog was one hundred feet high over the bed of the river and was a mile wide across the [?] valley.
    The surface of [?] fell thirty three feet. There is nothing now where the bog [?] only a little stream you could walk across if you had sound boots.
    The bog followed the course of [?] and knocked down all the bridges it met past Barraduv and Headfort until it spread out over the lands of Old Bridge, Rossacroo Bunacumar and Droumcarbin, and Curreal all of which are in the parish of Glenflesk. Some of the bog was deposited all along the Flesk and into Killarney Lakes which must be over twenty five miles from where it broke.
    Every farmer along where it ran suffered and some were ruined. Between Headfort and Arsumcarlin the whole farms were covered with eight ten and twelve feet of bog