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Transcripts count: 75
  1. St Colmcille

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Theresa Higgins
    Age
    13
    Informant
    Annie Higgins
    Age
    44
    Informant
    Paddy Campbell
    Age
    80

    The following stories were told by Annie Higgins aged 44 years who lives in Tullymore, Ardara, who heard them from her father Paddy Campbell, Hilltown, Ardara, 80 years.

    Ont time there were four men going to the Doon Well and each man had on a double rider. My Grandfather was one of the men and he had on his wife. On their way they passed an old woman. She asked him to take her along and they all refused because they had on double riders but they told her they would take her bottles. They then proceeded on their journey and the woman kept up to them walking and she was at the well as soon as those who were riding. When they had the station travelled they filled their bottles. Then they tried to fill the woman's bottle but they could not get any of the water into them. They then started for home.

  2. Cures

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Nora Ní Dhomhnaill
    Informant
    Seamús O Domhnaill
    Age
    50

    There was a man living in Owey one time who had a cancer.
    This man used to go to a lot of places where there were cures trying to get cured. He also used to go to Doon Well but it was no good.

    On this way coming home he went into the Cruit Graveyard and made the stations and when he was coming out of the curragh after landing the cancer fell out and dropped to the bottom of the sea and it was in Cruit Graveyard this man was cured.

  3. Cures

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mrs Katie Mc Cafferty

    Cures.
    Long ago people used to go out and gather chicken weed, and then they heated it, and put it on swellings as a potice. They pulled dandy-lion root and stewed it and strained it, and bottled it, and it was a good cure for indigestion.
    Some people go out on crutches to Doon well, and when they rub the water on their sores, they can leave their crutches at the well, and go home cured.
    There is an old woman who can cure sprains, and her name and

  4. Local Cures

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Annie Mc Kinney
    Informant
    Mrs S. Mc Kinney
    Age
    48

    In olden times the people had a lot of cures for ailments. If they had sore eyes they used to rub "hooselick" on them or use snuff and it was a great remedy.
    It is said that if anyone had toothache and if he either chewed tobacco or smoked a pipe he would get better again.
    It is believed that if a cripple went to Doon Well and used some of the water, and left his crutches behind him he would be cured.
    Chicken-weed is used as a poultice for healing swellings.

  5. My Home District

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Margaret Mc Glynn

    My Home District.
    Doon is the of the district in which I live. It is situated in the parish of Conwall and in the Barony of Kilmacrennan. There are eleven families in the townland and the total population is about thirty five. There are three slated houses in the townland and the rest is thatched. There is one old man over seventy living in it. I do not think that he has any knowledge of Irish but he can tell some interesting stories. There were more houses ong age than there is now, There is one old house in ruins. There were a few emigrated some years ago. The land is very hilly. There are no rivers or lakes but there are some streams. There are stories connected with them

  6. Branches and Herbs

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Greer
    Age
    13

    Certain branches are used on feast-days. Holly is put up in the house at Christmas. A Maypole of flowers on May Eve is put up outside. A harvest knot is made by plaiting two stalks of corn together for about two inches. Then it is made into a round knot. This is worn in the cap or coat.

    Pieces of cloth out of a saint's or a monk's garments, or Holy water from Doon Well is greatly appreciated for cures. Sometimes when a Priest or a Bishop dies, a cure of clay is left at the head of their graves.
    When you go to the Holy Wells to do the Turas you are supposed to tie a little piece of cloth on the branch at the rock.

  7. Mo Cheantar Féin

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John C. Mullen
    Informant
    E. Mulllen
    Age
    66

    The place got its name from a well. The people over seventy are, Mr and Mrs Johnstone, Bay View, Port-na-Blagh. and Mrs Diver, Port-na-Blagh. The people used to go to America but now they go to England and Scotland. The land is rocky. There is part of Sessiagh Lake in it. The bay beside Port-na-Blagh is called Sheephaven and there is a song made about it by Andrew Mc Intyre called Deep Sheephaven Bay. There is a holy well in Massinass called St. Colmcille's Well. They visit it at any time. The people leave prayer books and beads behind them when they visit it.
    There is also a well at Doon and Derryreel.

  8. Toibreacha Beannaithe

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Sarah Sweeney
    Informant
    Dan Sweeney
    Age
    42

    which is in a field belonging to Frank Kelly. This well is said to have been blessed by St Columcille, and most people take a bottle of water out of it at a certain time of the year. In Errowrooey there is a waterfall which comes down of a rock called "St Fenian's Waterfall", and a lot of people go to it on the 15th August to make "the turas". In Termon there is a holy well called "Doon Well" which was founded by a man named Gallagher, and another man put shelter round it, and a priest named Father Friel blessed it.
    People visit this well on any day of the year to make the "turas". Any people that go there take a bottle of the water home with them, and before they leave the well, they always leave something behind them. Long ago people that were living near the well, took some water out of it to boil the potatoes and when they were boiled there was nothing in the pot but worms.

  9. Ghost Stories

    Language
    English

    Not far from this there were old wallsteads and the stones of it were carted away. From the first day the men started to cart away the stones. There was a Ghost seen leaving the wallsteads and coming up as far as the black gates.
    2. It is said that the time the railroad was being made, that a dead man's body was found down at the Cabra gates. After it was found there used to be a light leaving the gates and coming up as far as Paddy Sam's bridge.

    There is a white stone down at Doon, near the new Mills. This is the stone on which Bishop McMahon's head was cut off, and the blood is still to be seen on it.

  10. Local Cures

    Language
    English

    of the second finger, marking the length on the tape with a pin. She then bends the arm from the elbow down to the fingers once for every letter in the first christian name. When this is done she again measures as before and the increase in length from the pin is the amount of heart fever. She then gives an herb called "Canopy Hussock" and the patient must boil it home and drink the juice of it every morning before breakfast for a week. This cure was give to her by her husband, who is dead six years ago. She charges one shilling for the cure; if you get the herb yourself: and two shillings if she supplies the plant.
    8 Cure for kidney trouble belongs to James French Cacan Lifford. She procures a certain thistle which he boils and you have to eat if after it is boiled.
    9. The people of this district go to a well at Doon Kilmacrennan to

  11. Emblems and Objects of Value

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Hegarty

    Nearly every house in this part keeps some Doon Well water. This water is brought from a well about a mile out of Letterkenny. Near where Saint Colm Cille was born. There are often excursions each year from Derry and Buncrana to it and many people take advantage of the cheap fair.
    This water is effacasious and cures all ailments besides banishing rats and mice from about a house if it is shaked round the house.
    Many houses possess some Gartan clay. This clay is

  12. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English

    Cahir O'Doherty fought a battle near Derry against the English and won. Yet the English had plenty of soldiers and the Irish leader knew it. He knew that they were after his wealth. He had an iron chest of gold and silver and spears and shields.
    Very late one night he and a few of his soldiers buried it. Some days after that he went to Doon-Well and (and) fought the English but was defeated and Cahair was killed and those who helped him to bury the treasure were killed. Nobody knew about the treasure but a young girl named Una McLaughlin. She was imprisoned and went crazy and died.
    Some people say it was buried under the castle bridge and others say that there was a tunnel leading into the old Keep and it was there that the treasure was hidden.

  13. St Ultan's Holy Well

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Seosaimhín Ní Ceallaigh
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Kelly
    Age
    84
    Occupation
    farmer's wife

    a distance.

    Many cures are mentioned owing to the power of this well's water. Two children from Drung who were crippled were as fast as hares in a week. A hysterical child who seemed to be mentally ill suddenly became alright after touching a bottle that contained the well's water. The sore can be bathed in the water, or the water can be poured on the sore or the water can be "taken". Used water should never be thrown away but always in the fire.
    Visiting priests say that the well is as good as the famous "Doon Well" near Kilmacrenan. After filling the bottle it is usually corked with moss gathered from around the well. It is customary to leave a "wee strip" of anything tied to the bushes around the well. The water is never used for

  14. The Old Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Anthony Houten
    Informant
    Patrick Houten
    Age
    over 60

    He said "which eye do you see me with" She told him and he put his thumb on that eye and she never saw him since. This is a true story that happened in Doon Culdaff and that castle stands in Dunmore still and is seen once in a while by different people.

    Collected by Anthony Houten Shantallow Malin
    From Patrick Houten Shantallow Coolkenny Malin
    He is over 60 years of age and heard it when a boy

  15. A Fairy Tale

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Johny Mc Hugh
    Age
    66
    Occupation
    farmer

    Fairies are supposed to be desendants of a Tribe of people known as the De Danans. Centuries ago Ireland was uninhabited. A tribe of soldiers sailed to Ireland and took possession of the country. They had not been long in the country when another tribe landed and made war on the De Danans. The De Danans were magicians and being afraid of the enemy changed themselves into fairies, They were to be seen in the glens, the forests and lonely parts of the country some years ago but recently they have not been seen.
    There are many places in this district where fairies are supposed to be living in, at present. In Narin there are a few places haunted by fairies, one of which is known as the Nook. In Ballestrion a house is also haunted by fairies. There are many interesting storys associated with these places one of which is as follows.
    Long ago a tribe of noble men dwelt in a castle in Lough-a-Doon. They owned a great stock of cattle, one night their cattle were stolen. In the morning when they discovered their cattle stolen they set off in pursuit of the stolen cattle but by no means could they catch up to their cattle. They made inquiries about their cattle of people along the road and they hearing of the raid also made in pursuit of the cattle. When they came to Mass the met a man who saw their cattle passing by early in the morning. Every person in his house joined with the others, they left behind them their house-maid. Before leaving the man of the house was making creels in the kitchen and being in a hurry leaving he did not lift the rods and the creels he had made. The house-maid who was occupied in the household duties took little heed of the creels lying on the floor as she thought her master should return to his work soon.

  16. Local History

    Language
    English

    The labourer sold it to a gentleman for £5 who presented it to the Dublin museum where it is preserved to this day.
    In the townland of Kilclooney there is a dolmen which stand on three upright stones. The top stone which weighs 32 tons is triangular in shape.
    In the town land of Drumboughill there is a lake by the name of ‘Lough a doon’. This lake derives its name from an old fort which is situated on one of its many islands. This fort is surrounded by a high wall and is only about 20 feet off the main land.
    This fort, it is said belonged to King O’ Boyle who had his residence

  17. Local Names

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Susan Mary Irwin

    Beleek, the ford mouth of the flagstone.
    Bundoran the mouth of Doran or Dobhar (little water) supposed to be the ancient name of the Bradoge.
    Corlea gray round hill.
    Crockacapple the hill of the horses.
    Doon is the name of a hill and lake in the townland of Dunmuckrum [?]. It is another form of dun, a fort or rath and owes its origin to some such structure having been erected there

  18. Doon Well

    Language
    English

    beside the well.
    A priest whose name was Father Friel found the well, and this is how it came to be there. There was a great number of people cured at Doon well, but these people had good belief in the well. Prayers must be said for the founder of the well, and for the Priest who blessed the well, and also for the people who take care of the well. They must the pray earnestly when lifting the water that they will be cured of whatever ailment they may have.
    The prayers that are said at the well are one Our Father and three Hail Mary's five times. People lift the water from the well in bottles, and they take it home and use it as a cure for sick people, but they never use it to cook meals, and people can drink the water.
    When people lift the water, they put a cork in the bottle, which is made from the grass that grows round the well, and they can rub

  19. Local Cures

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Molly Mc Galligly
    Informant
    Mr James Mc Galligly
    Age
    45

    To go out and in between a donkey's legs is a well known cure for hooping cough.
    A cure for mumps is to be led to water between two landlords with a horse's bridle on you, three nights, one after the other, and to take three sups of the water each night.
    There is a man in this district named Hugh Mc Gettigan and he rubs for "evil".
    Once upon a time my father and another man named Pat Russell went to Doon Well to see an excursion that was coming on the train to this well. The excursion was from Dublin. There was a girl amongst the excursionists who walked from the station to the well on two crutches, and when she was some time at the well she threw the crutches from her and said she was cured. Then she walked to the road and from that to the station. This happened about 22 years ago.

  20. Doon Well

    Language
    English

    Doon Well is a holy well and is world famous. It is about three miles to the north west of Kilmacrennan.
    St. Columcill lived at Gartan about five miles west of Kilmacrennan, When he went in exile to Iona, the people of the district lamented that this great man had not left an undying remembrance with them. When approached about the man he said that later through a descendant of his he would leave an everlasting and world famous gift to the people of his native parish.
    Some years later, a relative of the saint's O'Friel by name, was visiting the Pople. When he was approaching the palace, he saw the Pope walking in the grounds with an angel. Not this angel was none other than the devil in disguise and when O'Friel saw him he was so enraged that he threw his walking stick at the Pope's companion.
    The angel and stick vanished, but the Pope chastised O'Friel for his conduct. of course he gave a proper explanation for his action but the Pope was displeased. He returned to Gartan and some time later he was