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Transcripts count: 23
  1. Mo Cheantar Féin

    Language
    English

    Castle is situated in a very nice place and the land around it is fertile and green. There is also a wood at the foot of Doon Hill south west of the castle.
    Loch an Dúrn is situated north of Doon Hill. Bunowen is situated between Aillebrack and Ballyconneely. Ballyconneely took it from the family of Conneely's that lived in it long ago.

  2. The local tradition is that Patrick Sarsfield passed up through Kilbrickle village on his way to Limerick from the battle of Aughrim. He got the horses' shoes changed backwards in Cooliney so that the English soldiers would think that he was gone the opposite direction.
    Some of the soldiers that fought at the battle are buried in Doon. There are also two graves in Ballydonelan. It is also said that there are six or seven people buried in each grave.
    The graves in Doon and the graves in Ballydonelan are about 10 feet long and 6 feet broad.

  3. The Castle of Doon

    Language
    English

    The Castle of Doon, in Irish it is known as "Caisleán an Dúna-" was situated on the shore at the left of the road on a journey from Clifden to Claddaghduff. It is about three miles from the town, and represents an old stronghold by the edge of the Atlantic. Its site is now occupied by the ruins of an old house, but the outer walls of the original old building are still traceable. The district is in the "parish of Omey, and Ballindoon" taking its name from these historic ruins.
    Opposite the ruins of the castle on the south side of the Streamstown Bay, was the Chapel of Kill. It is said to be built by one Couroif[?] who according to tradition was put to death by the OFlaherty who lived in Doon Castle. The Church of Átha Dearg is near the ruins of the Castle and tradition says that in ancient times it was the parish church of the parish; but that later a church was built in Omey Island. This island may be reached without boats when the tide is out. At the present time

  4. Local Ruins

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Betty Carthy

    ruins in this district.

    There is an old castle in the townland of Doon about two miles from Kilconnell. "Doon" means an old castle, and it is said that that is what gave it the name. People of the name of Connolly lived in it.
    It has been derelict for about fifty years. It is said that one time the people of the house went some place for a holiday. They remained about a week away, and when they came back the roof was burned. They got a new, small house beside the Castle, and the remains of the house can be seen yet.
    There is nothing but the four walls of the castle to be seen, and old ivy growing up the walls on the outside. There

  5. (no title)

    When the O'Flathertys were living in Doon Castle, they invited the people from the castle in Baile Chonnraoi ...

    Language
    English

    When the O Flahertys were living in Doon Castle, they invited the people from the castle in Baile Connraoi and when they were sitting down to eat their supper, one of the servants said to the other "tá nimh ins an cupán sin a marbhóchadh na céadta ("that cup contains poison that has killed hundreds"). When the people from Baile Connraoi heard this they got up and

  6. An Old Story

    Language
    Mixed
    Collector
    Festy Conneely

    Long ago it was said that people were herding cattle west of Doon Hill. It was not long until they heard crying at a place called Faulboile which is beside the hill. They got afraid and ran to the nearest house they saw. There was an old man in the house and when they told him about the fairies, he said "ná bac leo. Cath atá idir iad féin agus na daoine atábuailte; tá siad ag caoineadh agus na daoine a fuair an buadh tá siad ag gáiridh'

  7. Mo Cheantar Féin

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Sheila O' Malley
    Informant
    (name not given)

    Part of the land is very rich and the rest of it is boggy. There are no woods in it only the plantation at the east side of Doon Hill.

  8. Mo Cheantar Féin

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John O' Neill

    The name of our village is Aillebrack. It got its name from the brecked spots thats on Doon Hill. There are over thirty houses in it

  9. (no title)

    There is an old fort in Doon

    Language
    English

    There is an old fort in Doon, near Kilrickle and it is said that there was a man passing by, one night and he met a very small man. He told him that if he dug for a pot of gold he would surely get it. That very same night the man did as he was commanded. He remained digging until day light. When morning came he at last saw a big flag. He laughed to himself and said it is under this flag surely as the little man had told him. He thrust his spade in the ground near where he was digging and went home. The following night he came to the same place and discovered that the field was covered with spades. He did not recognise his

  10. Ballindoon

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John O Neill
    Informant
    Mr Quinn
    Age
    76

    There was once a village at the foot of Doon Hill, called Ballindoon. There was no one living there but Conneelys. When the ferocious O'Flahertys came to Bunowen they slaughtered all the people in Ballindoon and burned their houses. One woman escaped and fled to the North of Ireland. She was not long there until a son was born to her whom she called Martin. When Martin grew up he saw that he had no friend there, so he asked his mother why was it that he had no friends. Then she told him about the burning of Ballindoon. When he heard that news he said he would have satisfaction so he

  11. Local Ruins

    Language
    English
    Collector
    John Kenny
    Collector
    Bridie Sweeney
    Collector
    Stephen Cahill
    Collector
    Patrick Sweeney
    Collector
    Jack Mc Loughlin

    1. There is the ruins of a Fransciscan Abbey beside the village of Kilconnell. It was built in the year 1353 by William O'Kelly It was burned by the English Soldiers around the time of the Battle of Aughrim. The friars who were in it abandoned it and went a bog nearby, now called Monabrathar. It consisted of three acres of land. In the year 1596 a soldier named Clifford made a barrack for his soldiers after he had been beaten by O'Neill and O'Donnell. There were seven altars which can be seen today in it and there are a lot of carvings on them. There is also a lot of writing on stones there. Once a soldier put hay and straw for his horse in front of St Francis' altar for a night. Next morning when he went to it, he found the horse dead. Another time the soldiers broke open the tombs thinking they would find treasure. They did not stop till one of them had his legs broken by a falling stone.
    2. There is a ruin from old castle in Doon. There is said to be an underground passage leading to Fohena where people used hide in Penal Times. There is a ruin of an old house in Dunagh called the Sidheán. It is supposed to be haunted by fairies. They followed a man in his carriage once until he arrived at his destination, the they disappeared.

  12. (no title)

    It is believed that there is an old cat minding a pot of gold

    Language
    English

    It is believed that there is an old cat minding a pot of gold in Wallscourt Castle which is situated in the parish village of Kilrickle and it is said that if anybody happens to get the pot of gold it will immediately turn into a pot of withered leaves.
    There is an old fort in Doon, near Kilrickle and it is said that there was a man passing by, one night and he met a very small man. He told him that if he dug for a pot of gold he would surely get it. That very same night the man did as he was commanded. He remained digging until day light. When morning came he at last saw a big flag. He laughed to himself and said it is under this flag surely as the little man had told him. He thrust his spade in the ground near where he was digging and went home. The following night he came to the same place and discovered that the field was covered with spades. He did not recognise his

  13. running after him. Looking for the [??] they are said Diarmuid to himself but they'll never get it if I can help it. He remembered then that a fairy cannot cross water at night. Luckily he saw away in front of him a river and it was about two hundred yards away. He ran faster. The fairies ran faster. They were overtaking him. He feared now that he'd never reach the river until they'd catch him. Catch him, catch him, the King used to shout. They were at his heels almost when he reached the brink of the river at Brandy Bridge. He made one last mighty effort and just managed to leap across the river where it was over 20 feet wide. Ha ha said the King you are in luck this time but if ever we catch you you'll pay dearly for the two tricks you have played on us. The fairies returned to their home in the hill of Doon very sad. Diarmuid went home with his heart full of joy and gladness. When he reached the house he rapped at the door and was let in. He ran to where the young lady was asleep on the sofa. God Bless and save you o princess said he. Didn't I perform a brave deed in taking you from

  14. Castle and Manor of Bunowen

    Language
    English

    day, and the day following, with a court of Piepowder and the usual tolls."
    Morogh na Moyre died A.D. 1626. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Sir Morogh na Mart, who died A.D. 1666, in a state of poverty, his vast possessions having been all confiscated by the Crown.
    On the 15th May 1678 his principal residence, the castle of Bunowen, and the adjoining lands, were granted to Giles and Edmond Geoghegan, the widow and second son of Art Geoghegan of Castletown, in the county of Meath, Esq; in lieu of their forfeited estates in Leinster. In this castle the Mageoghegan family resided unti lthe early part of the last century about which time the occupiers of the old Irish castles began to erect more commodious habitations. The then proprietor of Bunowen built a handsome residence near the foot of the hill of Doon, Cnoc an Dúin, mentioned above, and the castle, thus abandoned, speedily went to ruin, but its massive walls remained in tolerable preservation till a few years since, when they were altogether pulled down by the present proprietor John Augustus O'Neill, Esq, to obtain materials for enlarging the mansion house of Bunowen. This respectable gentleman is the present head of the Mageoghegans of Ireland.

  15. St Flannan

    Language
    Mixed

    Patron of this parish of Ballindoon, Baile an Dúin, the townland of the dun or fort.

    The well of the seven daughters is still to be seen on the west side of the hill of Doon. It is called in Irish, Tobar na Seacht n-Ingean, no na seacht mBan Naomh; the well of the seven daughters, or the seven female saints.

    Sline Head is universally called Ceann Léime by the natives of Iar. Connaught.

  16. Hidden Treasure

    Language
    English

    4. bout 1932 John McLoughlin found a bronze battle-axe and two bronze rings* on his land in Doon. He was raising a rock + found the articles underneath. The rock stood between two castles about a mile apart, and about two miles from Kilconnell Abbey. The Wards are supposed to have lived in one of the castles.Nobody can tell who lived in the other. It is unlikely the articles came from Kilconnell.
    The bronzes were taken away to the Museum -no account as to their age was given to McLaughlin.
    * One is an ordinary ring 1/4@ thick (wide) The other is almost a bangle 1/4@ wide with a raised knob of metal
    (below is a drawing of the bangle described above)

  17. Ruin on Doon Hill

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Máire Ní Chongaile
    Age
    14

    Many stories are told about the Hill of Doon and the ruin on its summit.
    Long ago, the hill was the haunt of fairies. People used to see and hear them playing on pipes and dancing. Butchers, with white aprons, could be seen coming out and taking with them lambs and sheep.
    On top of the hill is an old ruined building. It is said that it was a summer house built by Geoghegan, first owner of the castle. It was supposed to have a glass roof.

    Note:- The ruin was built to commemorate the Repeal of the Corn Laws by Mr Geoghegan, according to the late Martin Blake, Esq. Bunowen Castle.

  18. A Story about Cnoc an Dúin

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Lavery

    Once there was a boy herding sheep on Blakes farm. His name was Hannraoí. One night Hannraoí heard music of back-pipes playing on the side of Doon Hill. He listened carefully and said to himself, "I wish I could play back-pipes as good as this fairy I hear playing."
    Next morning when Hannraoí was driving his flock of sheep and cattle out a gap he found the most wonderful set of back pipes he had ever seen beside the gap. He put on the back pipes and began to play. He had never any experience and to his great surprise he was able to play any tune he had ever heard before.
    The pipes were fairy pipes. At length his master heard of him and came to hear him. His master and all the people of Errismore praised Hannraoí and his name spread far and near.
    The following summer Hannraoí's master went on a visit to England and he met another gentleman who like himself had also a boy a great piper and had got them in the same way as Hannraoí.
    The two men started to argue about the pipers and at length they started to bet on the pipers. The Irish gentleman bet 10, 000000 on his own piper and the Englishman bet the same on his

  19. The Well of the Seven Daughters is situated in a valley in a field called "Pairc Geal" in Aillebrack, almost at the foot of Doon Hill. There is a white-thorn bush growing close to the well and there is a spring-well also very close to it. A little wall partly encloses the well.

    The well is frequented for the cure of diseases, particularly headaches, sore eyes, sore hands, etc.
    The prayers said are:- seven Our Fathers, seven Hail Marys and seven Glory be to the Fathers on each round of seven. There are seven stones used to count the rounds. If the Station is being performed for oneself, three sups of water are taken by the person. The water is also applied to the affected part and it is also brought home.
    On completion of the Station, something is left beside the well, such as coins, medals, statues, buttons, hair pins, crosses, flowers, pieces of cloth tied on the bush +c.
    Tradition has it that the Patrons of the well were the Seven sisters of St. Cailín, who were drowned while bathing in Lough Fada (Ballinaboy).
    It is said that the water of the well "boils up" and that a water-spider is seen when a request is granted.

  20. Mo Cheantar Féin

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Sheila O' Malley
    Informant
    (name not given)

    Mo Cheanntar Féin.
    Aillebrack is the name of the village in which I live. Some say the reason why it was called that name was because of Doon Hill which has a greyish colour from the rocks and stones that are on it.
    Others say it was called after the cliff that's on the Aillebrack beach which they call "Cnocán na h Aille brice".
    There are thirty one houses in Aillebrack and about one hundred and thirty people in it. There were about three times as many people living in it long ago.
    There are about twenty or more ruins of houses in it yet and there were a few more that there is no trace of now.
    There were many surnames then that are not around now such as, Sarsfield, Monyon, Higans, Hannue and Naughtan.
    There are about fifteen people over seventy in the village. Some of them have a lot of Irish. They have plenty stories both in Irish and English, they are - Stephen O'Neill and his sister Bridget O'Neill.