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Transcripts count: 17
  1. These are name's of forths and lioces around the locality, Burke's forth on the top of Holywell hill, One in Hegearty's in Tullagha, Sweeney's forth in Docter's Hill, On the top of Doon Hill in Mc Machon's field, It is the biggest of them all, Another one in the back of O'Briens in Lickeen, There was one of the seven crosses on top of Burkes forth, In the forth on top of Doon in oldden times there was a door going in to it and little ponies used to come out grazing in the field, On Christmas morning long ago when the people used to coming to the early Mass, They used to hear music playing. Long ago when the Burke's used to have a servant this day he was sent out to cut the hay he went and cut the hay on top of the forth, That

  2. Áitainmneacha

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Pádraig Ó Maolchaoine
    Informant
    (name not given)

    Sgeuch. There is alot of bushes and trees growing in it. Cnoc Doon". It is a big hill and there is a fourth around it. Cnoc Uve. It means a lot of walls and ruins around it. Cnoc Mór means the big hill. These are some to the townland around our house. Ballycloonchill Leimneigh Ballycassion, Cragballyconole, Seise Mór.

  3. Áitainmneacha

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mícheál Ó h- Éilighe
    Informant
    (name not given)

    around Doon Hill. Tinkers Hill = It is called that name because the people there are always fighting. The Hairpin Hill = It is called that name because it is the shape of a Hairpin. There is a dangerous turn there..Bog Hill. It is called that name because all around it is a bog.

  4. Ráthanna agus Liosanna

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mícheal Ó Dubartaig
    Informant
    (name not given)

    There is a fort in Doon hill and long ago the people used to be afraid of their life to go near it or to go out side the door by night because it was supposed that there was fairies in the fort. One night a man used to

  5. Ráthanna agus Liosanna

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mícheal Ó Dubartaig
    Informant
    (name not given)

    be very lonesome by night and this night he said he would chance to go out. So he went out that night but he never knew anything about Doon. When he was crossing down the hill he thought he heard some bells and music. He said that he move on further that he night chance to get over it. So he went till he jumped into a big crowd of fairies. Then he started roaring and crying.

  6. A Mysterious Cow

    Language
    English
    Informant
    John Kelliher
    Occupation
    farmer

    Once upon a time a farmer lived in the downland of Doon about a mile from the village of Broadford. Every morning for a week a black cow came from the direction of the lake and remained there for a time. He searched for her owner but failed to find him. Then he began to milk the cow and one day when he had her milked he saw her going into the lake and then she disappeared. He told the priest and the priest said that when he had her milked on the following morning to throw the milk after her. He did as he was told and the cow was never seen again.

  7. Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mary Hayes
    Informant
    Mr Paddy Torpy
    Age
    42

    About four or five miles from here between Bradford and O'Callaghan's Mills there is a lake called Doon Lake. The old people who lived in that district believed that it was haunted. Around the shores of this lake a lady dressed in white was supposed to be seen at twelve o'clock in the night. This lady was supposed to attack anyone she saw at night and try to throw them into the lake. When the people used to be going to Limerick with potatoes and corn, the horses used to get frightened and try to turn around on the road. At another time, a priest was traveling to O'Callaghan's Mills to see another priest and the lady made an attack on him and snatched the umbrella out of his hand. When he reached O'Callaghan's Mills his friend wondered what had happened to him. He seemed so dazed and terrified. He related to him what happened so the two priests

  8. My Own Parish

    Language
    English

    There is a river flowing about a couple of hundreds of yards from my house, it is the aba ó gCearnaig and it flows into the Shannon at Bunratty There are several lakes
    Clonbrick lake Clonlea lake Hassells Pullough lake Doon lake Cullane lake
    The people of the parish are neighbourly kind and hospitalitable The majority of the people are farmers Others are labourers and live in cottages and others still are engaged in carpenty work
    There are not many outstanding things in my neighbourhood In my fathers farm there is the ruins of a court where maor Stacpool lived It seemed to be a very large building because the high walls & chimneys are still to be seen

  9. The Magic Lake

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kitty Fennessy
    Informant
    Mr John Joe Nihill

    Once upon a time there lived a man near Doon Lake who was employed by Major Going. As he was going home from work one evening he met a gipsy. They gave him a mare, that fell tired on them, - to leave it in the field near the lake until they would call for her.
    He thought they would call for her from day to day until two years passed away. One morning he saw some other animal with the mare. To his surprise it was a young foal. His skin was spotted with spots about the size of a penny on his skin. Time passed away and the gipseys took the mare and left him the foal. The foal was a year old and he started to ride the foal, to work. And then he went drawing turf with him. The foal spoke to the man and said "your master is running a horse in England and he will not win but tell him put silver shoes on me and I will win the race. The man only laughed at the idea. The master'shorse

  10. Local Tradition

    Language
    English
    Informant
    John Kelliher
    Occupation
    farmer

    A long time ago, a wicked woman lived in the townland of Violet Hill.
    When any one used to pass her house, she used to kill them by the power of the devil. On one occasion a priest sent a man on horseback with a knife to stick her. The man stuck the knife in her, and she told him to pull it and stick it again, but he would not. Then she went in a ball of fire to the island of Doon lake. She is there to the present day, and every seven years she comes out making ropes in the sand.

  11. Famous Men

    Language
    English
    Informant
    John Hickey
    Age
    72
    Occupation
    farmer

    One day a number of men were making a large drain. They were opening the drain until they came to a large rock.
    The rock was 26 stone weight. All the people tried to lift it but were not able. James Cooney was amongst the crowd and he betted that he would lift it. He caught the stone and lifted it.
    John Moloney of Glanndree broke a crowbar in two halfs. The same 12 stone a nice distance. Michael Canny of Ballinruan won races at Doon. The length of the race was five miles and he ran it in twenty minutes. It was said that his father could run after a hare and catch him.

  12. Parish of Broadford

    Language
    English

    Parish of Broadford

    I live in the village of Broadford in the barony of Lower Tulla and in the County of Clare. The population of this parish is about eleven hundred. The families most common are the Moloney, Moroney, and the McNamara families. It is a mountainous parish, the Siab Bearna mountains are at the north, running from east to west.
    This parish was more largely populated about sixty years before as they emigrated to America and other countries. At present there are only about six people living over seventy years.
    The river O'Garney flows through it and into Doon lake which is about one mile from the village. The parish of Broadford got its name from the broad ford at the entrance of the village.

  13. cemetery and the coffins are never left on this stone now. Another such stone, also called Cloch na h-Onóra may be seen on the road-side to Doon cemetery, which is three miles east of Crusheen.
    The usual name of a young pig is a banbh.
    A piece of cloth is often called a stiall, e.g. " a stiall of a blanket " and SOME liquid poured or spilled is called a steall, while a drink taken quickly is called a slog.
    A little chip or piece of timber is termed a sgeilp. Bodhran, bacachán, and balbhán are also common words in this locality. The usual name for a forked branch of tree is gabhlóg and the only name for a passage made across a drain or stream in a bog or marshy land is a ciseach. A beetle is always known as ciaróg.

  14. Historic - Plantations

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Gunning
    Collector
    Nancy Haugh
    Collector
    Kathleen Sweeney
    Collector
    Lizzie O' Halloran
    Collector
    William Shanahan
    Collector
    Lucy Ryan
    Informant
    Patrick O' Neill
    Age
    84
    Informant
    Pat Casey
    Age
    98
    Informant
    Michael Larkin
    Age
    60

    Historic -
    20. Plantations
    O'Shea's Acres
    An estate of 200 acres near Broadford.
    These lands were given to a Cromwellian soldier named Richard Shea for his part in the Cromwellian War.
    Hurdlestown - The ancient name of this townland was Ballinglee. The estate is now the property of the Bently family.
    Local tradition states that when Cromwell's soldiers were passing from Limerick (after the surrender of Limerick) to Galway, they rested or camped at the top of Fermoyle Hill. Bently was one of the commanding officers in Cromwell's army, and received as a reward for his services on behalf of the Parliamentary army, all of the country that he could see from the townland of Mongbwee where the camp was situated. This would include the districts of Hurdlestown, Kilseily, Doon, Ballykelly of which the Bentley family were the landlords

  15. Famous Men

    Language
    English
    Informant
    John Murphy
    Age
    64
    Occupation
    farmer

    168
    Famous Men.
    John Hunt of Crusheen, Doon, brought a plough and harrow through hedges and ditches up to Ballinruan forge. Jim Blake, Miltown was able to throw a half hundred hammer up to the top of a high pole. Willie Halpin of Cill Dubh, Tulla won a prize in throwing a stone. Pat Hehir of Derrymore used to to lift thirty stone of wheat and and put it up on a horse's back. John Meehan bóthar na ceárdhta used to throw a mearóg about ten yards away.
    Fast Runners:
    Michael Howard, Ballyblood, Tulla, used to run a half mile in five minutes. Michael Garvey of Caherlohan was champion of Co.Clare for a while. He went to England to a race and won it. He used to run a mile in two minutes.
    Great Walkers.
    Sp Stephen Malone of Ennis walked thirty miles in four hours. Dan Sweeney of Rathclooney used to walk three miles in twenty minutes. Mr Lamb a school -master that was in Clooney used to walk from Martin Nunan's of Derrymore to Clooney school in a half an hour.

  16. Weather Signs

    Language
    English

    If the sun is muddy or with clouds or the sky red in the rain is sure to come before evening.
    West wind brings rain S-West brings rain also.
    East wind blowing in March, April bring dry hard weather and often times colds turn into Pneumonia.
    North wind brings frosty weather.
    Fog might mean either frosty weather or rain. Boil in the Shannon a sign of rain.

    Stormy weather.
    Wild geese are a sign of bad wild weather of snow. These come from Scotland to N. Ireland and right down to Clare. An old farmer of 70 years of age told me (his name is Paddy Minogue, Ballconakano) that years ago the geese used always rest near his place in the middle of the mountain bog. But this waste bog has been divided within the last twenty years and tho the wild geese come to the very same spot every year - they never perch but fly on to Doon Lake. He said he often watched them alight - one watched for a time the others picked - when he was tired of acting sentry, he gave a peck to the next and he acted Sentry and So on till all the flock had fed.
    Sheep come down from the mountain.
    Goats if they see the day, will be weak, will not go out the mountain - this refers to mountain goats.

  17. Stories from the People

    Language
    English

    There is a bridge in Dromed called "Glory's bridge." A river runs under it and flows into a small lake 300 years away.
    The lake is full of fish and it is very deep.
    There are some big eels in it but the people are afraid to pull them up.
    The river runs thro Coulselsh and into Doon lake.

    Story
    There was a man one time whose name was Madden. He lived with his wife near Feakle.
    They used go to Limerick every week and in order to be in early they started in the middle of the night.
    They were ready to go one night when the cross was taken from the roost over the door and flung against the ground and the dog was struck against the yard. That was a warning which he did not like. He tackled his horse and car and went off and when he was near the old barrack, he was pulled off his car and beaten with his own whip but the person who beat him was invisible. The wife was pulled off and her arm was broken. They went to Biddy Early for a cure for man's battered hand. She said "Go back now. I have nothing to do for you. You were beaten by the "good people." He went home and was found dead next morning.