Text search

Transcripts count: 25
  1. An Old Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Ethna Mc Cabe
    Informant
    Patrick Mc Cabe

    that never told his dream on a Friday.

    There was a man living in Murmod called Mr. Clerkin, and he used to go to a ceilidhe to a house in the townland of Doon to tell stories. When he used to be telling about something that happened in Doon he used to start the story by saying, "There is not such a place under the sun or the moon as this famous townland of Doon.

  2. A Local Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Smyth
    Informant
    Margaret Smyth
    Age
    circa 50

    Once upon a time there was a man named Thomas Keating living in the townland of Doon, Virginia, Co. Cavan. This man dreamt one night about a crock of gold in Doon Fort. He was not a man who believed in his dreams but something persuaded him to go and look for the gold.
    This he did at the hour of midnight and he took with him a spade, and shovel, and also a grape. He started to dig for the gold with no light except the light of a candle. He was digging for a considerable length of time before he reached the flag that was supposed to cover the gold. No sooner did he touch the flag than a big black dog came direct from Doon lake with a long chain around his neck.
    The dog was making a dreadful noise, and he chased the man who got such a fright that he fled home, and would not think of searching for gold again. It is supposed that the treasure is still there for who ever may start the search again. According to this

  3. Local Heroes

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bernard Fitzsimons
    Informant
    Patrick Fitzsimons
    Age
    65

    Irish team at the Tailtean Games in 1924 and 1928.
    Mary Kiernan who lived in Stramaquerty was a great story-teller. She could tell stories both in Irish and in English and every night the neighbours came to the house to hear her stories. She died about eighteen years ago.
    Brigid Lynch Doon was a noted singer and competed at the "Feis Cheoil" in Dublin. She took second place.
    Michael Lynch Doon and John Carolan Kilmore were great step-dancers, and used to go to the Rock of Muff to dance.

  4. (no title)

    In the townland of Kilmore in the house where the O Reillys once lived...

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Bernard Fitzsimons
    Informant
    Patrick Fitzsimons
    Age
    65

    after that, and there is still the remains of a pass left in Kilmore bog leading to the townland of Doon, made by Micheál Mór for a near way from Enagh to Kilmore, (a part of this old pass remains to the present day).

  5. (no title)

    Thomas and James Monaghan dreamt three nights in succession that there was a crock of gold...

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick Gillick
    Age
    50

    Thomas and James Monaghan dreamt three nights in succession that there was a crock of gold under a lone bush in Doon Fort and that there was a fairy and two dogs watching it and they were told to start digging at twelve o'clock the following night and dig down till they came to a large flag of stone and so they did and when they turned it they saw a fairy woman standing beside the gold and many other fairies sitting on little stools making little shoes. The fairy that was in charge of the gold called the dogs and the men left. The landmark is there yet.

  6. Local Forts

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick Gillick
    Informant
    Patrick Gillick

    There are two forts in the townland of Doon. They are built on hills in view of each other. It is thought that these forts were built by the Danes long ago. They are surrounded by high hedges and inside there are three rings of earth built round in the shape of a circle. Inside the rings there are many black thorn bushes growing very thickly.

  7. Local Monuments

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Ethna Mc Cabe
    Informant
    Patrick Mc Cabe

    There are ancient crosses in the old church yards of Gallon and Raffoney and in Kelly's Church. Long ago when people were buried there were no cement or marble crosses put up to mark their grave. They used to get a large flag stone, and stick it in the ground at the head of the grave. Then they wrote the name of the person, his age and when he died on it, with a slate pencil.
    In the townland of Doon there is a large stone and on top of it there is a flat stone. On the flat stone there is a large cross cut out. It is said that Mass was here said during the Penal Times.
    There is a large flagstone stuck in the ground in a field in the townland of Doon where a man is said to have died suddenly. There is a date on it, and it is thought that it is the date on which the man died. This date is 4th April 1802.
    At St. Brigid's Well in Raffoney there is a stone with the track of a horse's hoof on it. It is said that during The Penal Times an English soldier

  8. Old Graveyards

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Joe Reilly

    Old Graveyards.
    There are two Catholic graveyards and one Protestant, graveyard. The oldest tombstone was erected in 1811. One of the Catholic graveyards is situated in Coraleenan and the other is in the townland of Kildallon. The Protestant graveyard is situated in the townland of Doon.

  9. Ghost Story

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick Lynch

    A woman lived in Doon named Clarke.She had two sons and one of them was a priest. When the woman died she was buried where she had wished to be buried. Every night the people could hear something rattling. They went and told the priest. He told them to stay up at night and talk to her but they were afraid, So they sent for her son, the priest. He came home and stayed up one night. When he heard the noise he asked is that mother. She answered him saying I am very unhappy. Next day she was moved and there was no word of her after.

  10. The Landlord

    Language
    English

    The estates adjoin in this district-the Beresford Estate from Altanure to Owen Doon near Bawnboy and the Tyrell Estate from Gubra-woolly to County Fermanagh. It included Commas Mountain on which there is 6,600 acres of bog. The mountain and bog was ''enclosed'' for ''hunting'' and ''gamekeepers'' appointed in the different areas. These game-keepers were generally disliked as they were often getting neighbours into trouble. A home called ''Glan Lodge'' along the road to Glan was occupied by a gamekeeper named ''Whiteside''. This family left this district about twenty years ago and the house and farm sold.

    The landlord did not reside in the district at all. Of late years the landlord was fairly just but

  11. Yeoman

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Pat Mc Govern

    The yoemen in this district were the terror of the people. If one of them met you on the road, he'd give you a blow with the butt of his gun, that would stiffen you if you did not jump into the watertable. An old man was going to the fair of Swad one morning wth a calf. He happened to meet one of theses boyos on the road. He struck the poor old fellow such a blow with the butt of his gun, that he tumbled him head over heels into the ditch, and he never done much good till he died.
    These Yoemen paraded the villages with the guns on their shoulders every day in the week, and every one had to keep far away from them, for people were in dread of their villany.
    One fair day in Ballyconnell, Big Terry Brady from Doon (about three miles from Tiercahan School) arranged with a gang of lads like himself, to line themselves up on each side of the street, & to let the yoemen

  12. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Frank O' Grady

    Page 314
    Fairy Forts
    There is a fairy fort in the townland of Doon. It is on Mr Blake's of Sleiverussell, land. There is a circle of trees round it. You can't see any other fort from it. The owner of it never interfered with it. No one knows who built it.

  13. In the Penal Times

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Eamonn Mc Cabe
    Informant
    Patrick Mc Cabe

    In The Penal Times

    There is a mass rock on a height called the 'Cairrig' in the town land of Doon. You can still see the stone that was used as the alter, There was also a hedge school in the same spot. There was the bones of a man found in the ditch beside the spot by my great grand-father.
    There is also a mass rock in the town land of Carratinure. It is a very secluded lonely spot between two hills. The Rev, Father Small when he was a curate in Killinkere used to have a procession during the Summer to this place each year. St. Ultan's Well is convenient to this Mass Rock. The parish church of Killinkere is called after St. Ultan.

  14. Fairy Forts

    Language
    English

    There is a fort on the farm of Bernard Allen, Doon, Virginia, It is called the fort. There are two other forts to be seen from it. It is circular in shape and there are blackthorn bushes growing around it. It is just like a circular field inside and there is grass growing in it.
    There is a gap going into it. There is a story connected with this fort. It is said that a horse was grazing in a field beside the fort and he went into it and started grazing there. In the evening when the owner of the horse came to bring him home he had a dog

  15. Local Roads

    Language
    English

    There is a road leading from Lisgrey cross down to a place called Harrison's bridge and it is called the New Line.
    It was made in the year eighteen hundred and ninty six. When it was made first it was only the breadth of a cart. There were no ditches on it and the people used to sit on the side of the road to keep the animals that were in the fields from coming out on the road.
    There is another road leading from the Murmod road to the upper chapel of Killinkere and it is called the Doon road.
    There was a man

  16. The Leprechaun

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Ethna Mc Cabe
    Informant
    Patrick Mc Cabe

    The lepreachan is also known as the "geanncanagh" and this name is given to human beings who are very small. It is said he is about two feet high. He wears green trousers and a red coat. He wears a red peaked hat and black shoes with silver buckles. He lives in a fort and under a white-thorn bush.
    His usual occupation is shoe making. He also makes hurley and camogie sticks. Once when a man was passing through a fort in the townland of Doon, he heard the noise of a saw cutting wood, he walked over to a white thorn bush and behind it he saw a little man making a camogie stick. He caught hold

  17. Local Heroes

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Kathleen Reilly

    There was a man named Mick Clarke Blackhills Teevurcher walked to Dublin in a day. Another man went to Malahide and he bought a couple of calves and when he was near his home he went into the bog where four men were making mud and he baked it all and then he went home and he was up early the next morning making mid again.
    Another man named Jack Reilly Doon Tervurcher walked to Cavan and bought a horse and when he came home he went to bed for a few hours. The next morning he went to the Dublin harvest and when he came home he did his work and he was'nt tired at all.
    There was a man named Jack Lynch. He lived in the townland of Corravelish. One time the police were after him and he hid in a neighbour's house. The man of the house let him out on the front door. When the other men were a good piece away he let out the police. They followed him to Moynalty and he jumped into a

  18. Story - Rantavan

    Language
    English
    Informant
    John Gibney
    Age
    circa 55

    He was accompanied by a catholic neighbour and when he was barely clear out of the town his voice rose to a roar in hurling curses on the Pope. His companion tried to persuade him to desist but to no avail. At last he tried to reason with him - as wishing evil to a man living so far out of hearing and finally he asked him what wrong the Pope did him or did he know him. "He did nothing to me", he replied, "all I know about him is that he has a "dom bod name in Port-a-doon".
    The other brother was of quiet manner, conversed freely with neighbours and farm hands, seldom became intoxicated and never offended his catholic acquaintances because of their religion.
    After some few years of indifferent health this younger brother became seriously ill and he intimated to his brother that before he died he wished to become a convert to the Catholic Church. The elder brother burst into a violent temper - swore all manner of threats to the Priest who dared some into the house, took the gun from its place, loaded it and had it ready to shoot him. The sick brother confided in the servant boy, asked him to convey his wishes to the Priest and warned him on no account to forget to tell the priest of his brother's hostility. The boy duly called on the priest, delivered his message, but cautioned him about the risk to his life in coming near the place. The priest told the messenger to return and

  19. Old Houses

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Gretta Lynch
    Informant
    Mrs Duffy

    gable wall. The chimneys were made of mortar and stones and sometimes of clay.
    There was an old house at the stone wall and there was a creamery can nailed on the top of it for a chimney, but at present there is a brick one on it.
    There was an old house made of mud and it was built on a turf bank in a bog in Doon and there was no chimney or window on it, and the fire used to be on the middle of the floor. The man who lived in it made a hole in the floor through the bank down to a bog hole and it is said that the man never put out the ashes that he used to throw it down into the hole.
    There are no accounts of houses which had no glass for the windows. In the old houses the kind of floors in them were clay floors.
    The fires that were in these houses were on the hearth, the people used to burn turf and sticks and any