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Transcripts count: 28
  1. Local Monuments

    Language
    English

    The history of ruins in this locality have been well written-up. I will remark only on what has not been written. In the Church-yard at Crooke are tombstones inscribed to Officers or soldiers or members of their families who died during the occupation of Geneva Barracks by the military (North Cork Militia) in 798.
    Outside the walls is a field named "The Castle Field" containing the ruins of what is supposed to have been a Knight Templars' Castle. Beside this is the pattern Holy Well of the Parish of Crooke - the well of St. John the Baptist. The water cures head-aches. When digging around the old castle, the owner, Garrett Meade, Crooke, Passage East, Water Ford, tells he found a large area under sunken walls and foundations etc.
    On the next farm across the road (owned by David Walsh, Crooke) is a rock roughly shaped like and arm-chair. This is locally known as "The Priest's Rock". On one of the windows of the house the words "Father Hearne" are written. Fr. Hearne was the priest here during the '98 rebellion

  2. The Stolen Corpse

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Julia Walsh
    Informant
    Miss Margaret Carey
    Age
    circa 82

    About one hundred years ago a strange happening occurred in Crooke parish. When the Parish Priest Rev. Fr. Hearne died, the people of Killea and Crooke vied with each other as to where the body should be buried, in Killea or Crooke.

    The corpse was brought to Crooke for burial there and some men from the village of Passage and surrounding country volunteered to keep watch over the body. Among these were two men from Passage Pierce Carey and Thomas Brown.
    On the night they were keeping watch in the Church all seemed well and it appeared that there would be no surprise visit from the people of Killea. So one man volunteered to stay with the corpse while others went to the village for something to eat.
    They had not gone long when the bell of the Church tolled. Knowing something was wrong they hurried back, but they came too late - the people of Killea had taken away the body. They must be watching for a chance to do so, and the

  3. The Stolen Corpse

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Julia Walsh
    Informant
    Miss Margaret Carey
    Age
    circa 82

    opportunity came when only one man was left with body, and he was powerless to resist them, all he could do was to toll the bell for help.

    When help arrived the corpse was already as far gone as Meade's House. The Killea people came armed with sticks and cudgels and every kind of weapon they could lay hands on. The next day the people of Crooke went to the curate and stated their case, but he advised them to leave things as they were, as the people of Killea were much stronger in numbers than the people of Crooke, so that is how Killea has the body of Rev. Fr. Hearne, P.P. although it was his wish to be buried in Crooke.

  4. Relics of the Penal Times

    Language
    English

    At Crooke, Passage East, there is still to be seen a very old relic of the Penal Times

  5. Halley's Gap

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Patrick Quigley
    Informant
    P. Quigley
    Occupation
    garda

    Crooke Road beside Passage East was at one time haunted. One night at twelve o'clock two men were going home from the village of Passage East. When they arrived at a place called Halley's Gap close to the school on looking over the ditch they saw four men digging up the ground. They had a hole made about four feet deep. They had come to search for gold which they had dreamt about. they heard the most awful screaming with the result that they ran away. The two men kept looking on all the time. When the four men ran away the two men jumped over the ditch and started digging. They soon found the crock of money and just as they had it uncovered a large bull ran around them tearing up the ground and they also had to run. In the morning they went to look at the place and to their surprise saw the crock there full of cockle shells. For nights after, that bull was seen on Crooke Road until

  6. The Lost Child

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Ellen Gunning
    Informant
    Mrs Willie

    Up to a few years ago the people in Cheekpoint used to bring the children to Crooke to be christened. Cheekpoint is about five miles from Crooke. One day Nurse Purcell went to Cheekpoint to bring a baby to Crooke Church to be christened.

    It was a very cold day so that the child had to be wrapped up in a number of heavy rugs. The godparents and the nurse went to the Church with the child on a sidecar. They got the child christened.
    When they were comming back the car was jolting because the road was very bad.
    When they reached home they discovered that the child was missing. They turned back to look for the child.
    On the Green Road they found the child lying on the grass. She was not killed because she fell on the grass. They brought the baby home safely at last.

  7. Our Local Saint

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Francis C. Aherne
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Meade
    Age
    82
    Informant
    Mr Patrick Hearne
    Age
    86

    The local Patron Saint of the Parish of Crooke is St. John the Baptist. The present Church is named after him. A more ancient Church, now in ruins, is situated in the local graveyard some 300 yards distant at Crooke. This was also known as St John's Church.

    In the field adjoining the graveyard is a Holy Well still known as "St. John's Well." Formerly a "Pattern" was held annually on the Saint's Feast Day, 29th August, at this well. The field in which the well is situated is known as "the Castle Field", as about 30 yards from the well is a very ancient ruin of a Knights' Templar Castle. The well is large with a good runlet from it. It is protected by a few large stones which partially cover the well. The entrance is flagged by large stones similar to those in the castle ruin. The water is particularly noted for its freshness, which it is definitely stated to retain no matter how long it has been taken from the well. The water is retained in the houses of some of the local residents throughout the year. It is considered efficacious for the relief

  8. A Hedge-Schoolmaster

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Seumas Pepper
    Informant
    William Baston
    Age
    45

    of his day to read and write in the caves and in the hedges. That is why he was called a hedge-school master.

    He used to teach the boys and girls in the parish of Crooke. His remains lie buried in Crooke Church Yard.
    Government, Government, churchyard

  9. (no title)

    The following story was told to me a few years ago by my aunt...

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mrs Clare Aherne
    Occupation
    teacher
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Meade
    Age
    circa 82

    from the hidden Croppy as he worked. Soon the field swarmed with Red-Coats. "Did you see a man running this way?" demanded the officer. "Yes, sir" answered Pottle, "he ran towards the glen". The Yoes ran in full chase to the glen and returned at nightfall thoroughly baffled.
    That night when all was quiet, two silent figures stole from the cornfield - the Croppy and Robin Pottle. Pottle brought him across the road to the shore where he had a boat waiting and so he escaped across to Co. Wexford.

    (We found an Old Parish register in Crooke Parish Church lately kept by Fr. Greene and others. In it is recorded the marriage of Robin Pottle's daughter, Brigid, to Andrew Meade of Crooke).

  10. (about three miles from Passage East)
    He was buried in Crooke Churchyard. (The burial-ground for Passage East.) Dr. Long of Arthurstown wished to secure the body and for that purpose employed the body-snatcher. He went into Hendrick's public-house in Arthurstown for drink before he crossed the river to Crooke.

    Here two Arthurstown men got on his track and guessing that he was going on some under-hand business they determined to follow him. The body-snatcher crossed in a boat to the Blynd Quay in Passage. (The only Quay there at the time) He had a few hours start of the others as they had a delay in getting a boat and in crossing over. They arrived at the Blynd Quay about 1 o'clock at night and saw the body-snatcher's boat tied there. They took the short cut to the grave-yard up the Wet Hill. At the top of the wet hill one can meet the main road.
    Here there is a bridge over a stream which flows under the road. On both sides of the bridge is a stone wall. As the two men approached this bridge

  11. A Hedge-Schoolmaster

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Seumas Pepper
    Informant
    William Baston
    Age
    45

    About a mile from Passage East on the Crooke road is situated a nice little thatched cottage over-looking Waterford Harbour. It is now owned by Mrs. Ryan. Long ago it was owned by Mr. John Brown who was a great Irish nationalist and ardent supporter of Daniel O'Connell. This man held a certificate of membership of the Catholic Emancipation Society signed by the great Dan.

    This certificate adorned the walls of his daughter's house in Passage East. It is now in the possession of a Mrs. O'Conor Parade Street Waterford who claims to be a great grand-daughter of Michael O'Dwyer that great insurgent leader of Wicklow fame who defeated the Red Coats in battle on many occasions.
    The British Governement had a price on the head of every Irish School-master. They were hunted from hiding-place to hiding-place by the much-mouthed champions of small nations. John Brown taught the boys

  12. A Fairy Tale

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Pepper
    Informant
    Mrs Ellie Murphy
    Age
    circa 62

    Once upon a time four men whose names were Martin Cullen, Peter Shannon, Mickey Gunnip and Michael Murphy all belonging to Passage East were fishing the weir of Dunmore. They got a lot of fish one night which they sold and got some money for it. As they were coming home they went into a public-house and got drunk. Coming home Martin Cullen was cursing and swearing. After a while he was taken away by the fairies unknown to the other three. But the three others did not miss him until they got to the chapel at Crooke. One of them asked where was Martin and the other said "Aint he there along-side of you. But he said "No." They searched up and down the road and they could not see him. The they thought he was gone ahead of them and so they walked on. When they to "Hollys Gap" near the Passage East schools he rushed out in front of them and told them that the fairies were after bringing him to that spot and that they were after slashing him. One of them answered and said "It

  13. A Multitude of Fish

    Language
    English
    Collector
    James Barry
    Informant
    Michael Mason
    Age
    circa 50
    Occupation
    sailor

    About thirty-five years ago the fishermen in Passage and the other villages on the banks of the River Suir had a very bad fishing-season. Days and nights were spent on the River Suir but the fish were not to be got. In the month of October a mission was held at Crooke Chapel and the missioners blessed the river, and prayers were offered up for the success of the herring fishing season.

    About a week later the fishermen set their nets in the weirs at the Spit Lighthouse. The nets were only set for half an hour when fish were so numerous that they carried away nets, weirs and all.
    The next day the steam ship "Dunbrody" came to an anchor at Passage. When picking up the anchor the sailor found that herrings were stuck in every link of the chains. Fishermen came

  14. Our Local Saint

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Patrick Hearne
    Age
    86
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Meade
    Age
    82

    The particular efficacy accorded to the water is the curing of head-aches and of other ailments of the head. (Information given by Mrs Mary Meade, of Crooke, aged about 82 years, and on whose land the well is situated). It is also used in cases of sick cattle. There were never offerings made. The pattern was held annually up to about 40 or 50 years ago. The attendance gradually diminished and finally dwindled away, though people in the immediate neighbourhood still drink the water and take away bottles of it on the 29th August.

    The well is situated in a field known as the "The Castle Field". About 30 yds from the well is a very ancient ruin of a Knights' Templars Castle. The well is large and deep and a small but steady stream runs from it. It is built in by large square stones similar to those in the ruin, and is covered in by those stones. The entrance is flagged by large flat stones. It is well-preserved and kept clean by the owner of the land on which it is situated. However long the water is in bottles it still retains its fresh flavour.

  15. Our Local Saint

    Language
    English
    Informant
    Mr Patrick Hearne
    Age
    86
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Meade
    Age
    82

    The local patron Saint of the Parish of Crooke is St. John the Baptist. The present Church is named after him. A more ancient Church and church yard are situated about 300 yds inland from the present Church. These also are named after him. In the field adjoining the Churchyard is a Holy Well named St. John's Well. Formerly a pattern was held hereon the 29th August - The Feast of St. John the Baptist. People came from all over the parish and from adjoining parishes to the pattern. Of later years no particular stations prayers or visits were made to the well. The pilgrims merely drank the water and took away some in bottles. Mr. Patrick Hearne of Kil St Nicholas (about 86 years old) tells us that he himself never made the actual stations - though he attended the patterns - but his father and other aged people to his knowledge kept up the custom of making the pilgrimage and the station. The station consisted of making a round of the old churchyard by the wall on the inside on bare knees, while saying the Rosary. (This does not appear to be generally known now). The pilgrim then visited the well and drank the water.

  16. they could see some figures in the dim light. On coming nearer they were horrified to discover two corpses one handing on either side of the wall, - one that of the recently buried Mr. Williams and the other that of the body-snatcher.

    What had happened was this: The bod snatcher proceeded to Crooke Churchyard with a large potatoe 'kish' for the body. He had the kish fixed on a across his forehead with a rope so that none would suspect his load to be anything suspicious. He secured the body and deposited it in the kish, carried the kish on his back - in the usual fashion - suspended from a rope balanced across his forhead.
    Apparently he stopped with his back to the bridge to rest his load on the low stone wall. With a sudden jerk the rope slipped from his forehead to his neck - the heavy kish hung over the wall of the bridge and tightened the rope across the throat of the unfortunate man and hanged him. In this position the two men found him. Horrified at the dreadful sight the men were

  17. About a hundred years ago the terrible practice of "body snatching" was carried on in this locality and in Crooke Churchyard. The local body-snatcher was a disreputable character who lived across the river in Arthurstown, Co. Wexford. This man was a notorious bad character and was on one occasion denounced publicly by the Curate in Duncannon Church. This he resented fiercely but as the Curate was of remarkably giant stature he contented himself with scoffing openly at the Curate's reproaches. Thereupon the Curate declared that before long this creature would meet with a sudden and horrible death.

    Events proved the Priest a true prophet, and the manner in which the body-snatcher met his death gave rise to the expression "The dead man who hanged the live man."
    A man named Williams died in Dromina House, Woodstown

  18. The Donkey in the Kitchen

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Maud Walsh
    Informant
    William Walsh

    An old shoemaker named Connors lived up by Crooke Chapel. He was very fond of drink and the boys from the village used to play tricks on him. One day he went to Waterford for leather to mend shoes. When evening came the boys went up to see if he had come home but the door was closed. They waited until they heard him coming down by the Cross road in the donkey and cart. They went up to meet him and there he was fast asleep in the cart. They went up to meet him and there he was fast asleep in the cart, with the donkey bringing him home as usual. They followed him down and took the donkey from under the cart. They took the wheels off the cart and lifted him in through the door in the car with no wheels. They then put back the wheels on the cart in the kitchen and put the donkey under the cart again. So they hid to see what Connors would say when he woke up. He looked around him and he said 'I often heard that the Devil dipped his tail in drink but he must be here when I brought the donkey and

  19. (no title)

    The following story was told to me a few years ago by my aunt...

    Language
    English
    Collector
    Mrs Clare Aherne
    Occupation
    teacher
    Informant
    Mrs Mary Meade
    Age
    circa 82

    The following story was told to me a few years ago by my aunt - Mrs.Mary Meade, aged about 82, Crooke, Passage East and told me since by John Colfer (85) Passage East.
    At the time of the '98 rebellion my great-great-grandfather named Robin Pottle lived in the farm next to Geneva Barracks, now occupied by Thomas Ivory. One day Robin Pottle was making stooks in the cornfield close to the barracks. He noticed a 'Croppy' running towards him in a distracted manner. The Croppy reached him and told him he had just escaped from the barracks. Just then they heard the uproar from the barracks as the escape was discovered. "I'm lost" the poor prisoner groaned. "No" said Pottle, "lie in here". He put the Croppy kneeling and built the stook over him. Then calmly proceeded to erect another, moving away

  20. The Ancient Ferry

    Language
    English

    the public were entitled to a free and unrestrained access across the river. Lord Waterford produced in parchment several charters and royal grants in support of his claims. The first of these was one of Kings John's by which that monarch granted for ever the ferry between Ballyhack and Passage with all its apurtenances, together with the town of Passage and its revenues and the townslands of Crooke and Knockroe with their castles, etc to the Abbey of Dunbrody.

    The last Royal Charter was one of King William's by which he assigned all the ferries of the Suir and Barrow and other rivers in Ireland to James Roche in recognition of the services he rendered to that monarch by swimming the river at Derry and bringing a message of hope